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Archive for the ‘Technology Transfer: Biotech and Pharmaceutical’ Category

Milestones in Physiology & Discoveries in Medicine and Genomics: Request for Book Review Writing on Amazon.com


physiology-cover-seriese-vol-3individualsaddlebrown-page2

Milestones in Physiology

Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics

Patient-centric Perspective 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019VH97LU 

2015

 

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

Preface

Introduction 

Chapter 1: Evolution of the Foundation for Diagnostics and Pharmaceuticals Industries

1.1  Outline of Medical Discoveries between 1880 and 1980

1.2 The History of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology in the late 19th and 20th Century

1.3 The Classification of Microbiota

1.4 Selected Contributions to Chemistry from 1880 to 1980

1.5 The Evolution of Clinical Chemistry in the 20th Century

1.6 Milestones in the Evolution of Diagnostics in the US HealthCare System: 1920s to Pre-Genomics

 

Chapter 2. The search for the evolution of function of proteins, enzymes and metal catalysts in life processes

2.1 The life and work of Allan Wilson
2.2  The  evolution of myoglobin and hemoglobin
2.3  More complexity in proteins evolution
2.4  Life on earth is traced to oxygen binding
2.5  The colors of life function
2.6  The colors of respiration and electron transport
2.7  Highlights of a green evolution

 

Chapter 3. Evolution of New Relationships in Neuroendocrine States
3.1 Pituitary endocrine axis
3.2 Thyroid function
3.3 Sex hormones
3.4 Adrenal Cortex
3.5 Pancreatic Islets
3.6 Parathyroids
3.7 Gastointestinal hormones
3.8 Endocrine action on midbrain
3.9 Neural activity regulating endocrine response

3.10 Genomic Promise for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Dementias, Autism Spectrum, Schizophrenia, and Serious Depression

 

Chapter 4.  Problems of the Circulation, Altitude, and Immunity

4.1 Innervation of Heart and Heart Rate
4.2 Action of hormones on the circulation
4.3 Allogeneic Transfusion Reactions
4.4 Graft-versus Host reaction
4.5 Unique problems of perinatal period
4.6. High altitude sickness
4.7 Deep water adaptation
4.8 Heart-Lung-and Kidney
4.9 Acute Lung Injury

4.10 Reconstruction of Life Processes requires both Genomics and Metabolomics to explain Phenotypes and Phylogenetics

 

Chapter 5. Problems of Diets and Lifestyle Changes

5.1 Anorexia nervosa
5.2 Voluntary and Involuntary S-insufficiency
5.3 Diarrheas – bacterial and nonbacterial
5.4 Gluten-free diets
5.5 Diet and cholesterol
5.6 Diet and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
5.7 Diet and exercise
5.8 Anxiety and quality of Life
5.9 Nutritional Supplements

 

Chapter 6. Advances in Genomics, Therapeutics and Pharmacogenomics

6.1 Natural Products Chemistry

6.2 The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance

6.3 Viruses, Vaccines and immunotherapy

6.4 Genomics and Metabolomics Advances in Cancer

6.5 Proteomics – Protein Interaction

6.6 Pharmacogenomics

6.7 Biomarker Guided Therapy

6.8 The Emergence of a Pharmaceutical Industry in the 20th Century: Diagnostics Industry and Drug Development in the Genomics Era: Mid 80s to Present

6.09 The Union of Biomarkers and Drug Development

6.10 Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

6.11 Epigenomics and Companion Diagnostics

 

Chapter  7

Integration of Physiology, Genomics and Pharmacotherapy

7.1 Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

7.2 Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD

7.3 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

7.4 Synthetic Biology: On Advanced Genome Interpretation for Gene Variants and Pathways: What is the Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

7.5 Diagnosing Diseases & Gene Therapy: Precision Genome Editing and Cost-effective microRNA Profiling

7.6 Imaging Biomarker for Arterial Stiffness: Pathways in Pharmacotherapy for Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia Management

7.7 Neuroprotective Therapies: Pharmacogenomics vs Psychotropic drugs and Cholinesterase Inhibitors

7.8 Metabolite Identification Combining Genetic and Metabolic Information: Genetic association links unknown metabolites to functionally related genes

7.9 Preserved vs Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available and Needed Therapies

7.10 Biosimilars: Intellectual Property Creation and Protection by Pioneer and by

7.11 Demonstrate Biosimilarity: New FDA Biosimilar Guidelines

 

Chapter 7.  Biopharma Today

8.1 A Great University engaged in Drug Discovery: University of Pittsburgh

8.2 Introduction – The Evolution of Cancer Therapy and Cancer Research: How We Got Here?

8.3 Predicting Tumor Response, Progression, and Time to Recurrence

8.4 Targeting Untargetable Proto-Oncogenes

8.5 Innovation: Drug Discovery, Medical Devices and Digital Health

8.6 Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse Effects

8.7 Nanotechnology and Ocular Drug Delivery: Part I

8.8 Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) system and nanotechnology: Part II

8.9 The Delicate Connection: IDO (Indolamine 2, 3 dehydrogenase) and Cancer Immunology

8.10 Natural Drug Target Discovery and Translational Medicine in Human Microbiome

8.11 From Genomics of Microorganisms to Translational Medicine

8.12 Confined Indolamine 2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) Controls the Homeostasis of Immune Responses for Good and Bad

 

Chapter 9. BioPharma – Future Trends

9.1 Artificial Intelligence Versus the Scientist: Who Will Win?

9.2 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on KannaLife Sciences and the Discipline and Potential of Pharmacognosy

9.3 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on Computer-Aided Drug Design and Gfree Bio, LLC

9.4 Heroes in Medical Research: The Postdoctoral Fellow

9.5 NIH Considers Guidelines for CAR-T therapy: Report from Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee

9.6 1st Pitch Life Science- Philadelphia- What VCs Really Think of your Pitch

9.7 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

9.8 Heroes in Medical Research: Green Fluorescent Protein and the Rough Road in Science

9.9 Issues in Personalized Medicine in Cancer: Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

9.10 The SCID Pig II: Researchers Develop Another SCID Pig, And Another Great Model For Cancer Research

Epilogue

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cvd-series-a-volume-iv-cover

Series A: e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases

Series A Content Consultant: Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

VOLUME FOUR

Regenerative and Translational Medicine

The Therapeutic Promise for

Cardiovascular Diseases

  • on Amazon since 12/26/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A

 

by  

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Senior Editor, Author and Curator

and

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor and Curator

 

Part One:

Cardiovascular Diseases,Translational Medicine (TM) and Post TM

Introduction to Part 1: Cardiovascular Diseases,Translational Medicine (TM) and Post TM

Chapter 1: Translational Medicine Concepts

1.0 Post-Translational Modification of Proteins

1.1 Identifying Translational Science within the Triangle of Biomedicine

1.2 State of Cardiology on Wall Stress, Ventricular Workload and Myocardial Contractile Reserve: Aspects of Translational Medicine (TM)

1.3 Risk of Bias in Translational Science

1.4 Biosimilars: Intellectual Property Creation and Protection by Pioneer and by Biosimilar Manufacturers

Chapter 2: Causes and the Etiology of Cardiovascular Diseases: Translational Approaches for Cardiothoracic Medicine

2.1 Genomics

2.1.1 Genomics-Based Classification

2.1.2  Targeting Untargetable Proto-Oncogenes

2.1.3  Searchable Genome for Drug Development

2.1.4 Zebrafish Study Tool

2.1.5  International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (2004) Finishing the euchromatic sequence of the human genome.

2.2  Proteomics

2.2.1 The Role of Tight Junction Proteins in Water and Electrolyte Transport

2.2.2 Selective Ion Conduction

2.2.3 Translational Research on the Mechanism of Water and Electrolyte Movements into the Cell

2.2.4 Inhibition of the Cardiomyocyte-Specific Kinase TNNI3K ­ Oxidative Stress

2.2.5 Oxidized Calcium Calmodulin Kinase and Atrial Fibrillation

2.2.6 S-Nitrosylation in Cardiac Ischemia and Acute Coronary Syndrome

2.2.7 Acetylation and Deacetylation

2.2.8 Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors (NOS-I) 

2.3 Cardiac and Vascular Signaling

2.3.1 The Centrality of Ca(2+) Signaling and Cytoskeleton Involving Calmodulin Kinases and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Failure, Arterial Smooth Muscle, Post-ischemic Arrhythmia, Similarities and Differences, and Pharmaceutical Targets

2.3.2 Leptin Signaling in Mediating the Cardiac Hypertrophy associated with Obesity

2.3.3 Triggering of Plaque Disruption and Arterial Thrombosis

2.3.4 Sensors and Signaling in Oxidative Stress

2.3.5 Resistance to Receptor of Tyrosine Kinase

2.3.6  S-nitrosylation signaling in cell biology.

2.4  Platelet Endothelial Interaction

2.4.1 Platelets in Translational Research ­ 1

2.4.2 Platelets in Translational Research ­ 2: Discovery of Potential Anti-platelet Targets

2.4.3 The Final Considerations of the Role of Platelets and Platelet Endothelial Reactions in Atherosclerosis and Novel Treatments

2.4.4 Endothelial Function and Cardiovascular Disease
Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.5 Post-translational modifications (PTMs)

2.5.1 Post-Translational Modifications

2.5.2.  Analysis of S-nitrosylated Proteins

2.5.3  Mechanisms of Disease: Signal Transduction: Akt Phosphorylates HK-II at Thr-473 and Increases Mitochondrial HK-II Association to Protect Cardiomyocytes

2.5.4  Acetylation and Deacetylation of non-Histone Proteins

2.5.5  Study Finds Low Methylation Regions Prone to Structural Mutation

2.6 Epigenetics and lncRNAs

2.6.1 The Magic of the Pandora’s Box : Epigenetics and Stemness with Long non-coding RNAs (lincRNA)

2.6.2 The SILENCE of the Lambs” Introducing The Power of Uncoded RNA

2.6.3 Long Noncoding RNA Network regulates PTEN Transcription

2.6.4 How mobile elements in “Junk” DNA promote cancer. Part 1: Transposon-mediated tumorigenesis.

2.6.5 Transposon-mediated Gene Therapy improves Pulmonary Hemodynamics and attenuates Right Ventricular Hypertrophy: eNOS gene therapy reduces Pulmonary vascular remodeling and Arterial wall hyperplasia

2.6.6 Junk DNA codes for valuable miRNAs: non-coding DNA controls Diabetes

2.6.7 Targeted Nucleases

2.6.8 Late Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease and One-carbon Metabolism
Dr. Sudipta Saha

2.6.9 Amyloidosis with Cardiomyopathy

2.6.10 Long non-coding RNAs: Molecular Regulators of Cell Fate

2.7 Metabolomics

2.7.1 Expanding the Genetic Alphabet and Linking the Genome to the Metabolome

2.7.2 How Methionine Imbalance with Sulfur-Insufficiency Leads to Hyperhomocysteinemia

2.7.3 A Second Look at the Transthyretin Nutrition Inflammatory Conundrum

2.7.4 Transthyretin and Lean Body Mass in Stable and Stressed State

2.7.5 Hyperhomocysteinemia interaction with Protein C and Increased Thrombotic Risk

2.7.6 Telling NO to Cardiac Risk

2.8 Mitochondria and Oxidative Stress

2.8.1 Reversal of Cardiac Mitochondrial Dysfunction

2.8.2 Calcium Signaling, Cardiac Mitochondria and Metabolic Syndrome

2.8.3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cardiac Disorders

2.8.4 Mitochondrial Metabolism and Cardiac Function

2.8.5 Mitochondria and Cardiovascular Disease: A Tribute to Richard Bing

2.8.6 MIT Scientists on Proteomics: All the Proteins in the Mitochondrial Matrix Identified

2.8.7 Mitochondrial Dynamics and Cardiovascular Diseases

2.8.8 Mitochondrial Damage and Repair under Oxidative Stress

2.8.9 Nitric Oxide has a Ubiquitous Role in the Regulation of Glycolysis -with a Concomitant Influence on Mitochondrial Function

2.8.10 Mitochondrial Mechanisms of Disease in Diabetes Mellitus

2.8.11 Mitochondria Dysfunction and Cardiovascular Disease – Mitochondria: More than just the “Powerhouse of the Cell”

Chapter 3: Risks and Biomarkers for Diagnosis and Prognosis in Translational Cardiothoracic Medicine

3.1 Biomarkers. Diagnosis and Management: Biomarkers. Present and Future.

3.2 Landscape of Cardiac Biomarkers for Improved Clinical Utilization

3.3 Achieving Automation in Serology: A New Frontier in Best

3.4 Accurate Identification and Treatment of Emergent Cardiac Events

3.5 Prognostic Marker Importance of Troponin I in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (ADHF)

3.6 High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays Preparing the United States for High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays

3.7 Voices from the Cleveland Clinic On Circulating apoA1: A Biomarker for a Proatherogenic Process in the Artery Wall

3.8 Triggering of Plaque Disruption and Arterial Thrombosis

3.9 Relationship between Adiposity and High Fructose Intake Revealed

3.10 The Cardio-Renal Syndrome (CRS) in Heart Failure (HF)

3.11 Aneuploidy and Carcinogenesis

3.12 “Sudden Cardiac Death,” SudD is in Ferrer inCode’s Suite of Cardiovascular Genetic Tests to be Commercialized in the US

Chapter 4: Therapeutic Aspects in Translational Cardiothoracic Medicine

4.1 Molecular and Cellular Cardiology

4.1.1 αllbβ3 Antagonists As An Example of Translational Medicine Therapeutics

4.1.2 Three-Dimensional Fibroblast Matrix Improves Left Ventricular Function post MI

4.1.3 Biomaterials Technology: Models of Tissue Engineering for Reperfusion and Implantable Devices for Revascularization

4.1.4 CELLWAVE Randomized Clinical Trial: Modest improvement in LVEF at 4 months ­ “Shock wave­facilitated intracoronary administration of BMCs” vs “Shock wave treatment alone”

4.1.5 Prostacyclin and Nitric Oxide: Adventures in vascular biology –  a tale of two mediators

4.1.6 Cardiac Contractility & Myocardium Performance: Ventricular Arrhythmiasand Non-ischemic Heart Failure – Therapeutic Implications for Cardiomyocyte Ryanopathy

4.1.7 Publications on Heart Failure by Prof. William Gregory Stevenson, M.D., BWH

4.2 Interventional Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery – Mechanical Circulatory Support and Vascular Repair

4.2.1 Mechanical Circulatory Support System, LVAD, RVAD, Biventricular as a Bridge to Heart Transplantation or as “Destination Therapy”: Options for Patients in Advanced Heart Failure

4.2.2 Heart Transplantation: NHLBI’s Ten Year Strategic Research Plan to Achieving Evidence-based Outcomes

4.2.3 Improved Results for Treatment of Persistent type 2 Endoleak after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Onyx Glue Embolization

4.2.4 Carotid Endarterectomy (CEA) vs. Carotid Artery Stenting (CAS): Comparison of CMMS high-risk criteria on the Outcomes after Surgery: Analysis of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Vascular Registry Data

4.2.5 Effect of Hospital Characteristics on Outcomes of Endovascular Repair of Descending Aortic Aneurysms in US Medicare Population

4.2.6 Hypertension and Vascular Compliance: 2013 Thought Frontier – An Arterial Elasticity Focus

4.2.7 Preventive Medicine Philosophy: Excercise vs. Drug, IF More of the First THEN Less of the Second

4.2.8 Cardio-oncology and Onco-Cardiology Programs: Treatments for Cancer Patients with a History of Cardiovascular Disease

Summary to Part One

 

Part Two:

Cardiovascular Diseases and Regenerative Medicine

Introduction to Part Two

Chapter 1: Stem Cells in Cardiovascular Diseases

1.1 Regeneration: Cardiac System (cardiomyogenesis) and Vasculature (angiogenesis)

1.2 Notable Contributions to Regenerative Cardiology by Richard T. Lee (Lee’s Lab, Part I)

1.3 Contributions to Cardiomyocyte Interactions and Signaling (Lee’s Lab, Part II)

1.4 Jmjd3 and Cardiovascular Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells

1.5 Stem Cell Therapy for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)

1.6 Intracoronary Transplantation of Progenitor Cells after Acute MI

1.7 Progenitor Cell Transplant for MI and Cardiogenesis (Part 1)

1.8 Source of Stem Cells to Ameliorate Damage Myocardium (Part 2)

1.9 Neoangiogenic Effect of Grafting an Acellular 3-Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Onto Myocardium (Part 3)

1.10 Transplantation of Modified Human Adipose Derived Stromal Cells Expressing VEGF165

1.11 Three-Dimensional Fibroblast Matrix Improves Left Ventricular Function Post MI

Chapter 2: Regenerative Cell and Molecular Biology

2.1 Circulating Endothelial Progenitors Cells (cEPCs) as Biomarkers

2.2 Stem Cell Research — The Frontier at the Technion in Israel

2.3 Blood vessel-generating stem cells discovered

2.4 Heart Renewal by pre-existing Cardiomyocytes: Source of New Heart Cell Growth Discovered

2.5 The Heart: Vasculature Protection – A Concept-based Pharmacological Therapy including THYMOSIN

2.6 Innovations in Bio instrumentation for Measurement of Circulating Progenetor Endothelial Cells in Human Blood.

2.7 Endothelial Differentiation and Morphogenesis of Cardiac Precursor

Chapter 3: Therapeutics Levels In Molecular Cardiology

3.1 Secrets of Your Cells: Discovering Your Body’s Inner Intelligence (Sounds True, on sale May 1, 2013) by Sondra Barrett

3.2 Human Embryonic-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells for Myocardial Repair

3.3 Repair using iPPCs or Stem Cells

3.3.1 Reprogramming cell in Tissue Repair

3.3.2 Heart patients’ skin cells turned into healthy heart muscle cells

3.4 Arteriogenesis and Cardiac Repair: Two Biomaterials – Injectable Thymosin beta4 and Myocardial Matrix Hydrogel 

3.5 Cardiovascular Outcomes: Function of circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells (cEPCs): Exploring Pharmaco-therapy targeted at Endogenous Augmentation of cEPCs

3.6 Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD

Chapter 4: Research Proposals for Endogenous Augmentation of circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells (cEPCs)

4.1 Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-gamma) Receptors Activation: PPARγ transrepression for Angiogenesis in Cardiovascular Disease and PPARγ transactivation for Treatment of Diabetes

4.2 Clinical Trials Results for Endothelin System: Pathophysiological role in Chronic Heart Failure, Acute Coronary Syndromes and MI – Marker of Disease Severity or Genetic Determination?

4.3 Endothelin Receptors in Cardiovascular Diseases: The Role of eNOS Stimulation

4.4 Inhibition of ET-1, ETA and ETA-ETB, Induction of NO production, stimulation of eNOS and Treatment Regime with PPAR-gamma agonists (TZD): cEPCs Endogenous Augmentation for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction – A Bibliography

4.5 Positioning a Therapeutic Concept for Endogenous Augmentation of cEPCs — Therapeutic Indications for Macrovascular Disease: Coronary, Cerebrovascular and Peripheral

4.6 Endothelial Dysfunction, Diminished Availability of cEPCs, Increasing CVD Risk for Macrovascular Disease – Therapeutic Potential of cEPCs

4.7 Vascular Medicine and Biology: CLASSIFICATION OF FAST ACTING THERAPY FOR PATIENTS AT HIGH RISK FOR MACROVASCULAR EVENTS Macrovascular Disease – Therapeutic Potential of cEPCs

4.8 Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and the Role of agent alternatives in endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) Activation and Nitric Oxide Production

4.9 Resident-cell-based Therapy in Human Ischaemic Heart Disease: Evolution in the PROMISE of Thymosin beta4 for Cardiac Repair

4.10 Macrovascular Disease – Therapeutic Potential of cEPCs: Reduction Methods for CV Risk

4.11 Bystolic’s generic Nebivolol – positive effect on circulating Endothelial Proginetor Cells endogenous augmentation

4.12 Heart Vasculature – Regeneration and Protection of Coronary Artery Endothelium and Smooth Muscle: A Concept-based Pharmacological Therapy of a Combination Three Drug Regimen including THYMOSIN

Summary to Part Two

Epilogue to Volume Four

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https://www.youtube.com/v/fyYT8wozccw?fs=1&hl=fr_FR

Nursing School Doesn’t Have to be so DAMN Hard! CPP=MAP-ICP Normal range should be greater than 70 mmHg How to calculate, regulate, and manage CPP or cerebra…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.youtube.com

See on Scoop.itCardiovascular and vascular imaging

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Ubiquitin researchers win Nobel

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

 

Ciechanover, Hershko, and Rose awarded for discovery of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/23111/title/Ubiquitin-researchers-win-Nobel/

Nature Cell Biology 2, E171 (2000) http://dx.doi.org:/10.1038/35036412

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2004 “for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation” jointly to

Aaron Ciechanover
Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel,

Avram Hershko
Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel and

Irwin Rose
University of California, Irvine, USA

 

Proteins labelled for destruction

Proteins build up all living things: plants, animals and therefore us humans. In the past few decades biochemistry has come a long way towards explaining how the cell produces all its various proteins. But as to thebreaking down of proteins, not so many researchers were interested. Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko and Irwin Rose went against the stream and at the beginning of the 1980s discovered one of the cell’s most important cyclical processes, regulated protein degradation. For this, they are being rewarded with this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko and Irwin Rose have brought us to realise that the cell functions as a highly-efficient checking station where proteins are built up and broken down at a furious rate. The degradation is not indiscriminate but takes place through a process that is controlled in detail so that the proteins to be broken down at any given moment are given a molecular label, a ‘kiss of death’, to be dramatic. The labelled proteins are then fed into the cells’ “waste disposers”, the so called proteasomes, where they are chopped into small pieces and destroyed.

 

Avram Hershko is an Israeli biochemist and winner of the 2004 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

Hershko (born December 31, 1937) was born as Hersko Ferenc in Karcag, Hungary. In 1950, Hershko and his family emigrated from Hungary to Israel, where he adopted the name Avram. Hershko received his M.D. and Ph.D. from the Hadassah Medical School of the Hebrew University. In 1965-67, Hershko worked as a physician in the Israel Defense Forces.

In 1969-72, Hershko was a postdoctoral fellow with the late Dr. Gordon Tomkins at the University of California, San Francisco.

In 1987, Hershko was awarded the Weizmann Prize for Sciences, an honor given to top Israeli scientists. In 1994, he won the Israeli Prize for his contributions to Israeli society through biochemistry and medicine.

In 2004, Hershko was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation.”

Ciechanover was born in Haifa, a year before the establishment of Israel. He is the son of Bluma (Lubashevsky), a teacher of English, and Yitzhak Ciechanover, an office worker.[1] His family were Jewish immigrants from Poland before World War II.

He earned a master’s degree in science in 1971 and graduated from Hadassah Medical School in Jerusalem in 1974. He received his doctorate in biochemistry in 1981 from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa before conducting postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Harvey Lodish at the Whitehead Instituteat MIT from 1981-1984. He is currently a Technion Distinguished Research Professor in the Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute at the Technion.

Ciechanover is a member of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and is a foreign associate of the United States National Academy of Sciences.

As one of Israel’s first Nobel Laureates in Science, he is honored in playing a central role in the history of Israel and in the history of the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology

 

  • Ciechanover, A., Hod, Y. and Hershko, A. (1978). A Heat-stable Polypeptide Component of an ATP-dependent Proteolytic System from Reticulocytes. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 81, 1100–1105.
  • Ciechanover, A., Heller, H., Elias, S., Haas, A.L. and Hershko, A. (1980). ATP-dependent Conjugation of Reticulocyte Proteins with the Polypeptide Required for Protein Degradation. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 1365–1368.
  • Hershko, A. and Ciechanover, A. (1982). Mechanisms of intracellular protein breakdown. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 51, 335–364.

Interview Transcript

Transcript from an interview with the 2004 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko and Irwin Rose, on 9 December 2004. Interviewer is Joanna Rose, science writer.

Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko and Irwin Rose during the interview

Dr Ciechanover, Dr Hershko and Dr Rose, my congratulations to the Nobel Prize and welcome to this interview. I know that you two started as medical doctors but you are in science now, and you get the prize for scientific research. How come you left medicine?

Avram Hershko: Well, I started out as a medical student, I wanted to be a doctor. And during my medical studies I studied biochemistry. That was one of the subjects that every medical student studies, so I liked it very much. I liked, you know, the whole concept of biochemistry, of looking for chemical processes in cells, so we had, we could take off one year from the studies to spend in research in the lab. I also found a very good teacher, Jacob Mager, and I wanted to spend it with him, so I did. That’s how I got involved in biochemistry. Afterwards, I finished my medical studies but already, I, after that one year, I knew that I will go to biochemistry and not to practical medicine. That’s how I started. So, it’s, it’s, like all things in life, it starts by some kind of accident or so, that was the accident, I met a subject during my studies that I liked.

And a good teacher.

Avram Hershko: And a very good teacher.

Was it also a topic, an issue that you were interested in?

Avram Hershko: No, no, not yet, not yet. Mager was interested in many subjects so that was … Actually, I continued with him after my army service as a doctor, and during the course of a couple of years I evolved in four completely different subjects, protein, synthesis, purine metabolism, and a certain disease called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, because he was interested in many things, so that gave me a very good background, a very, very, you know, very good basic background.

What about you, Dr Ciechanover?

I fell in love with biochemistry …

Aaron Ciechanover: Surely you can repeat the story verbatim. The same very story, I started in the same medical school, and after four years I decided to try and taste, I fell in love with biochemistry, too.

Like ten years later.

Aaron Ciechanover: Exactly ten years later, and I also decided to taste it, and at that time at medical school they let students take one year off for medical studies, try some research, so I went into biochemistry, same very story, different mentor. And, a wonderful mentor, and I studied lipids.

Also.

Aaron Ciechanover: Not proteins at all, and then exactly, made a decision, that that’s it. But I had, because of obligations to serve in Israel in the military as a physician. I completed my medical studies, went to serve in the army, but meanwhile, in between, I was looking already for a future mentor, in biochemistry, and Avram was at the time abroad, in the University of California in San Francisco, and I got rave recommendation, that he is a great teacher and a great biochemist, and I wrote him, and he was ready to accept me, and there started this story. More or less.

So did you go to the States?

Aaron Ciechanover: No, no, he came here. He returned to /- – -/ fellow, he started a new department in Haifa, which was a new medical school, I joined him, not initially on this project, on a different one because I still had to serve in the army. It’s a little bit complicated date-wise, but basically it’s the same very story, mentorship, the same footstep, without knowing where I am going.

You will never know.

Aaron Ciechanover: I never know, but it’s basically, ten years later the same very footsteps.

Oh, that’s funny. What about you, Dr Rose? How did you get …

Irwin Rose: I have an anomalist’s story. It doesn’t, there is no precedent for this. We moved from the east coast to the town of Spokane, Washington, when I was about 13 years old, and I did not adapt very well to the, to the style of the place, and I spent most of my time in the public library. And I enjoyed the company of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, because it was the book shaped thing, in those days, you know, it was the small journal …

Avram Hershko: At the age of 13?

Irwin Rose: No, you know, like a couple of years, you know, I was very unpopular with the other students, and so I read the Journal of Biological … the small, the small Journal of Biological Chemistry, and I found an article I thought I understood. And I read it and I thought I understood it to the point where I could make some suggestions as to how it would be, the experiment might work, and then I was very satisfied with that, and then I … I didn’t spend much time in science at that point. Went into the navy, got out of the navy, tried to go to the University of California at Berkeley, but due to the failure to find the bulletin board announcing the laboratory time of organic chemistry, I couldn’t do my organic chemistry there.

So I said OK, I’ll be a biochemist …

So I went back to the State College of Washington and there I was influenced, I would say, by the embryology teacher, who was a very strong personality in terms of academic research, he tried to encourage his students. Then I went to the University of Chicago and there was a big shock to learn all the new kinds of things that they were teaching there, in organic chemistry and that sort of stuff, and very attractive concepts, and things began to come together in my mind as to how chemistry worked and how I might be able to exploit some of the early kinds of techniques that were being used in organic chemistry into biochemistry, which was something I was attracted to, due to my reading of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. So at that point I signed up, there was a big gymnasium, and people were signing people up for which major you were going to go into. So I said OK, I’ll be a biochemist.

So I entered into the department of biochemistry, never saw the chairman of biochemistry because he was the appointed ambassador to Britain for the United States. So I floated around in the department of biochemistry and learned some interesting things, and then I began to … I never wanted to work with a mentor, because I always wanted to have my own reputation and be free to do what I wanted to do. So I worked with the weakest people in the department. Don’t make that public. No, I don’t mention the names, but … so I did that sort of thing and that way I came to learn some more independence, and once in a while I did a good experiment, and so I had more confidence that I could do research, and so that’s how it got started.

Avram Hershko: Can I mention the story that you did your PhD or eight counts per minute or …

Irwin Rose: Oh yes, well, in those days people weren’t counting, people counted on planchettes. And you …

Avram Hershko: Puckered.

Irwin Rose: Well, it could be, depends on they were flat.

Avram Hershko: You dried them, didn’t you?

Irwin Rose: Yes, you dried them out, depending … yes, that’s right. You had to dry them out, it depends on what the compound was, but if it was trillium you had to get an infinitely thin layer so that you wouldn’t get self-absorption.

Avram Hershko: It’s common, self-absorption on a planchette.

Irwin Rose: Did you guys do that, too?

Aaron Ciechanover: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Avram Hershko: We had a counter with only three /- – -/ so we moved it like that …

Irwin Rose: Oh yeah, yeah.

Avram Hershko: … it was a big excitement.

Irwin Rose: So I wasn’t that primitive. You were doing these things in Israel, an advanced state.

Aaron Ciechanover: You came to our country.

Irwin Rose: I did. I came to Israel. But anyway, yes, so we did those things. And even if you had eight counts above background, if there were eight, there were eight. That’s right. So you could do some experiments. That’s how it worked out.

So how did you meet together?

Avram Hershko: Well, that’s another story. I got interested in protein degradation during my post-doc fellowship in San Francisco, and when I came back to Israel I continued with that, and at that time it was a very obscure field, you know. People, there were all kinds of, not too many people were interested in it. Those that were interested were not very good. So I looked for somebody, and so my first time I think I came up and I looked for somebody to spend a sabbatical with. I couldn’t find anybody that attracted me. So then I met Ernie at a meeting in 1976, one year before, before my sabbatical was due. And do you remember, we met in the breakfast, so I said can I, just began to talk …

Irwin Rose: It’s alright, I forgot.

… it turned out that he was interested in protein degradation. And that was a secret …

Avram Hershko: … breakfast table, so I knew who he was, he was very well known for his work on enzyme mechanism. That I knew, but then I asked him what are you interested in, in other things? So it turned out that he was interested in protein degradation. And that was a secret, it was a secret because he never published anything on it, and I asked him how come you never published anything, and so he said there is nothing worth publishing on protein degradation. So that’s what he said.

Irwin Rose: Yeah, that was my opinion. Well, because I hadn’t done anything, you don’t say it right.

Avram Hershko: OK. Well, that’s how I remember it. And anyhow, I liked that attitude very much, and asked, I asked him can I spend my sabbatical with you? And he said yes, so that’s how it started, and then Aaron, the same year he started his PhD with me, and after my sabbatical the following, the summer after my sabbatical, Aaron joined us, and then he joined us for a couple of summers afterwards, so that’s how, that’s how the whole connection started.

But how come you pick up an obscure field in science, to work on?

Irwin Rose: Well, I’ll tell you, because when I first worked at Yale, the guy who had a lab next to me had made the original observation that there was a protein, there was an energy dependent on protein breakdown. Now, nobody believed him, but he had made some pretty strong observations that if you …

Avram Hershko: Here, we could mention names.

Irwin Rose: Yes, Melvin Simpson. He made these important observations.

Aaron Ciechanover: He hardly believed himself, because when you go into discussion on the paper, you kind of come to a convoluted argument whether it’s a direct requirement or indirect. We can do the conclusion that it’s indirect.

When was it?

Avram Hershko: 1953, so …

Irwin Rose: So I didn’t read the paper, but I had this man in the laboratory next to me and he said, he made this observation and I got very interested in it. And worked on it for, on sabbatical, and when I went to England and when I went to Israel I got mice from Mager, it turned out the same guy, but he wasn’t there at the time, and … but I never found an energy dependence on the protein breakdown. And it turns out later on that a fellow named Art Haas who had been a post doc with me, made the observation that if you’re not careful when you break cells, there’s a lysosomal enzyme that degrades the ubiquitin. So I never would have found it, you know. Somebody else had to make the observation that you could make a self-resistent that … that would show an ATP dependence on protein breakdown. It was not for me, but I did work on it earlier, and that’s the, that’s why I told you that I’d never made any important observations.

But you three work together. How does it work, to do things together?

Irwin Rose: I don’t do anything.

You do nothing? Who is the worker?

Avram Hershko: Well, that’s, first of all, that’s not true. I remember that you made some ubiquitin preparation …

Irwin Rose: I did.

Avram Hershko: Yes, and it fell on the floor, and then you collected it up from the floor … yeah, yeah. That first step is to boil the extra, because ubiquitin is heat stable, so you boiled it but then it fell on the floor, but you picked it up and it was good, yeah.

Irwin Rose: It was good, nothing could destroy it.

Irwin Rose: It was a licence only enzyme.

Aaron Ciechanover: The /- – -/ can take it, but not the floor.

Avram Hershko: But, yeah, but when I came to his lab we already had his first step, which was the fractionation, well, the reticulocyte cell-free system system was actually established in the laboratory of somebody else, Alfred Goldberg in Harvard, but they didn’t …

Aaron Ciechanover: /Inaudible./

Avram Hershko: No, no, but, yeah, but he made it first, he made it first.

Aaron Ciechanover: The first publication was from Harvard, no doubt.

Avram Hershko: But then he didn’t progress, but then he didn’t do what he should have done, which is fractionation. It’s hard to purify right away, but ATP dependent enzyme, he never found it. And what we did was fractionation and constitution, so we already had this first step of separating it into two, two fractions, fraction one and fraction two.

… we didn’t really understand that it’s binding …

So during these two years between the beginning of ’77 when I write to your lab and December of ’79, when we made the breakthrough in your lab, we purified the component from fraction one, we found it a heat stable protein, and then you had a part in that, you also boiled ubiquitin, and then in Haifa we found that it gets … when we labelled it with iodine and we found it gets bound to proteins and ATP dependent reaction, but we didn’t really understand that it’s binding, its co-herent binding the substate until that summer in 1971 in the laboratory of Rose where you invited me, together with Aaron who was then my graduate student in /- – -/ who was there. 1979, 1979. So that is when, when the discovery that ubiquitin …

Irwin Rose: Shall I tell the story about the ubiquitin?

Avram Hershko: Yes. I think I have finished. So then, that’s how I remember it, and how …

Irwin Rose: OK, well, here they had a heat stable factor that was required, and they made the observation that the ubiquitin went on to proteins. And so one of my post docs went to a post doc of another student, of another faculty member at the Fox Chase Cancer Centre, and said, there was a conversation, and do you know of any examples of a protein covalently linked to a protein? And this post doctoral fellow said yes, there is in the nucleus, a protein called ubiquitin that’s covalently linked to histone. And so they rushed to look at the amino acid composition of that so-called ubiquitin, and they compared it to the amino acid composition which you had published, I guess …

Aaron Ciechanover: No, not yet.

Irwin Rose: Not yet published.

Aaron Ciechanover: But in the end it was published back to back with JBC.

Irwin Rose: No, no, no. But how did they know the conversation …

Aaron Ciechanover: No, because they knew, the end story is that the Wilkinson paper came back to back with ours on the /- – -/.

Avram Hershko: OK. Let’s not go into the detail.

Irwin Rose: Well, for some reason or other, they found confidence…

Avram Hershko: They knew that I published that.

Irwin Rose: Really, and I was not a leak.

Avram Hershko: No, no, you were not.

Aaron Ciechanover: No, he was in the lab, he was free and did this. We didn’t hide anything.

Irwin Rose: OK, you’re getting the inside story here. Now, wait a second.

I have a statement from your colleague. “At first nobody cared about your work, and those that knew something about it, they didn’t believe it.” Was it so …?

Irwin Rose: Who said that?

Avram Hershko: That was, that was Fred Goldberg, yeah.

Aaron Ciechanover: Let’s not mention names.

Avram Hershko: Oh! No, we didn’t mention names.

That citation is right.

Aaron Ciechanover: I’ll tell you, I’ll tell you a funny story. I left the lab in ’81, basically after my PhD was completed I submitted it and I went to Harvard, I went to MIT to do a post doc fellow, and Harvard carried out weekly seminars. And in this weekly seminar, one of the founders in the field of proteolysis, one of the originally, not the founder, but it doesn’t matter. A famous scientist in the field presented the weekly seminar at Harvard. I knew of him because he was our competitor for many years, and I went to hear the seminar, so I crossed the river by the bus, I took the shuttle bus that goes /- – -/ and I was sitting in the very back bench. And this was probably about two weeks before you came to visit, it was the very beginning of my, do you remember when I met you, I came to the airport to pick you up.

Avram Hershko: Yeah, yeah.

Aaron Ciechanover: And then, near me, was sitting a very famous scientist that I only later realised that his name is Arthur Dee, a very famous scientist, and after this presentation of the professor, this was only ’81 when we had like eight or nine papers already in the literature with a huge amount of information there. And he was a protein researcher and he raised his hand, I remember very well, and the other guy, when we were both  /- – -/ he said, you know, I have a question to ask you. There is a fellow in Haifa by the name of Hershko, and another one with a very complicated Polish name that I cannot even pronounce, that published a series of papers on a small protein that is attached to other proteins and marks them for degradation, can you comment on it? And he basically dismissed it as an artefact.

… it adds to our benefit, because they left us alone for seven successive years …

And I don’t, I don’t criticise him, all I’m telling you it was symbolic for me enough for after eight papers in the literature, this was the spirit in the field from people who worked in the field, and there were very few. As a matter of fact, it adds to our benefit, because they left us alone for seven successive years, even after I left the lab to work out basically the entire system. The next scientist to join the field was a scientist at MIT, Alex Varshavsky, who joined in ’84, ’83, but published in ’84, and given I was there and collaborated, so for seven successive years they let us lay the entire stone down in the literature so I don’t criticise him, actually I appreciate him tremendously for letting us do it. You know, in retrospect.

But I wonder, how do you survive as a scientist when nobody believes you somehow? Nobody’s interested. You become kind of non-visible.

Irwin Rose: You’re making observations, and the observations get published, so the observations are true. Whether anybody will say that belongs to a big story like it turns out to be is not predictable, but so you don’t make claims like that. You say that this is very interesting and so on and so on and so on, and you keep following it up, and it doesn’t necessarily become the centre of attention yet, until you build a big enough story. I think that’s the way it works.

We all survive because funding for research was generous in those days, you know. It’s been less generous now, and we have a peer review system which is more critical and so I think you have to, you have to add successively to the picture you’re trying to portray. It’s not sufficient to just provide data. So I think that’s part of it. But I agree that it’s important to be left alone for a sufficient amount of time in order to be able to do it, and not feel that you’re in the middle of a big activity already, so you know, you need to do that sort of thing.

So do you think you would get support today for such work, which was kind of apart?

Avram Hershko: Well, I hope the fund /- – -/ look up your website and will hear these things. Because it’s … yeah, Joe Goldstein, you know, a Nobel Laureate and a good one, wrote a nice article about this year’s Lasker Award, in which he compared science to a sculpture by this British sculptor who had his stone, it was a huge stone of two and a half ton, on which another stone, and another stone, and another stone, and at the end is a little stone, so he said that in science there are big stones and small stones. The important science is the opposite. When you have a little stone, and on top of it you put a bigger stone and then a bigger stone. If you throw out a big stone at the beginning so there’s a lot of publicity sometimes nothing comes out of it, and the scientist, to find his little stone, on which the other stones can be built. So I recommend to read his article.

Now you find the small stones, Dr Rose, in your kitchen, as I understand it. You have a small laboratory there?

Irwin Rose: You want to talk about my kitchen?

Yeah. Your laboratory, I would say.

Irwin Rose: Well, when I retired from Fox Chase I took my spectrophotometer and a lot of my chemicals, based on a sort of suggestion of Dr … his recommendation. So I took all my chemicals and my spectrophotometer and my constant temperature bath and so forth with me to Irvine, and when the person whose laboratory I was sitting decided to retire, I had to do something with the spectrophotometer and so I found a place in my kitchen for it. And this was very convenient because it saved me a lot of time. I didn’t have to go to work every day and if I had a little experiment to do I could do it in my kitchen. So that was very good, although I’ve got a lot of chemicals that I have no use for and I’d like to take them back.

Aaron Ciechanover: Send them over, send them over.

Irwin Rose: I’ll send them over. I’ll get a box.

Avram Hershko: But I worry that you don’t have an ice machine. You need an ice machine.

Irwin Rose: No, I don’t have an ice machine. But I have a freezer and I can make ice cubes and I can break them up.

It’s kind of worrying, in science. So you can work when everything’s /- – -/ ?

Irwin Rose: Yeah, that’s right, exactly.

So are you the kind of scientists that work all day and all night long, kind of nerd scientists?

So that’s my recommendation, do not retire. Do not retire fellas. …

Irwin Rose: I think we all work all day and all night long. I do. I don’t have any hobbies, you know, I’m very embarrassed when people ask me what are my hobbies, I don’t have any hobbies. I mean, it’s just enough to keep up with the things I’m trying to solve. You know, I used to work on little puzzles and so on and so forth. Each puzzle requires attention and, so you get an idea. You get your ideas at different times. Sometimes your wife makes a statement and you say: aha, maybe you’re right. And so you go off to your kitchen, and do a little experiment, so you try to, that’s the way you make progress, if you continue these things. So that’s my recommendation, do not retire. Do not retire fellas.

Avram Hershko: I won’t.

Aaron Ciechanover: I’m never going to.

You worked together in the beginning, you were the graduate student of Dr Hershko, how was it to separate from each other?

Aaron Ciechanover: Well, it’s the nature of science, I think, because you know, you graduate, you go your post doctorate fellowship, and Avram was gracious enough to bring me back, but now is independent and that’s the entire idea, if you bring a young scientist back, you give him a bench, start up funds, and then you tell him now in five years, come back in five years, and show the committees that you worked for something. So actually, you know, it would be unnatural if we would have continued to work together. So, each of us is independent. Now we’re in the same institute and that’s the whole idea of children that grow up, students that become their own, scientists on their own, I think that’s the way.

Do you compete with each other?

Avram Hershko: No, there is enough to do in the ubiquitin field, we don’t feel that we had to compete. There are different aspects of the ubiquitin field. I am working on cell cycle and he works on …

Aaron Ciechanover: /- – -/. Completely different.

How is it to live in a small country with big problems and to get funds for science?

Avram Hershko: It is not easy, it is not easy. You have to know the daily tension which is of course distractive. The funds are small, some funds for science are small. Graduate students have to go to serve in the army and things like that, so it’s more difficult than elsewhere, but it’s possible, it’s possible.

And now everybody’s happy. About the Nobel Prize. So thank you very much for sharing your thoughts with us, and being with us.

 

See a Video of the Interview
26 min.

 

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To cite this page
MLA style: “Transcript from an interview with the 2004 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko and Irwin Rose, on 9 December 2004”. Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 5 Sep 2015. <http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/chemistry/laureates/2004/ciechanover-hershko-rose-interview-transcript.html>

 

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TEL AVIV, Israel, March 24, 2015 /PRNewswire/ —

 

The Tel Aviv Stock Exchange (TASE) continues to implement the recommendations of the

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(Logo:

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Photo:

http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130117/588933

 

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130117/588933

http://photoarchive.ap.org/

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Henan Provincial Government of China and APCEO, we are honored to invite you as VIP guest to attend The 3rd World Emerging Industries Summit.
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Dates:   Apr. 20 -22, 2015
Venue:   JW Marriott Hotel Zhengzhou (5-star), Henan province, China
Theme:  Emerging Industries, the new power to world economic growth
VIP Treatment for you (ZHENGZHOU,HENAN,CHNIA, Apr. 20-22, 2015):
Free participation, Free hotel and accommodation.
Basic Agenda & Main Activities:
1. Opening Ceremony
2. Keynote Session
3. Meeting High-Rank Government Officials
4. High-level Forum on Specialized International Cooperation
5. The 9th China Henan International Investment & Trade Fair
(More than 100,000 audiences and more than 5,000 exhibitors)
6. Key Cooperation Projects Signing Ceremony
7. A trip to Airport Economic Comprehensive Experimentation Zone
We are looking forward to meeting you at this important event!
Yours sincerely
Xie Fuzhan
Governor
Henan Provincial Government of China
Zheng Xiongwei
Global Executive Chairman of APCEO

 

 


Shenyang as the Financial Gateway to Northeast China

Co-hosted with the Province of Liaoning and the Municipal Government of Shenyang, this event will provide attendees with high-level networking opportunities together with insight into the region’s economic roadmap.

Known as the ‘Gateway to Northeast China’, Shenyang has witnessed remarkable growth over the last decade. Some of its major sources of investments have come from Hong Kong, Korea, Japan, US, Taiwan, Singapore and Germany. With the development of a Far East Free Trade Zone in Shenyang, the region is well positioned to further benefit from China’s increasing economic ties with Russia, Korea and Mongolia.

Join over 500 international and local business executives, industrialists, investors, bankers, economists and policymakers to make new connections in this region and to discover the opportunities and incentives for doing business in Shenyang.

View the latest agenda: (English) l (Chinese)

Topics and themes:
– Gateway to Northeast China: Economic and Investment Opportunities
– Financing Chinese Enterprise Growth
– Shenyang Far East Free Trade Zone
– The Urban Development of Shenyang
– Private Banking and Wealth Management for Northeast China
– The Development of the Digital Economy in China

Speakers include:
– CHEN Zhenggao, Governor, The People’s Government of Liaoning Province
– PAN Liguo, Mayor, Shenyang Municipal People’s Government

– Martin Lee-Warner, Senior Adviser, Raiffeisen Bank International
– Florian Schmied, Chairman, European Union Chamber of Commerce in China, Shenyang
Chapter
– Karen Chen
, President, Head of China Wealth Management, UBS (China)
– HUANG Fan, Director, Head of Private Wealth Management, Deutsche Bank (China)
– Timothy Lo
, Managing Director, CIC Banque Privée
– Angel Wu, Regional Head of Products & Solutions Asia & Middle East, ABN Amro Bank
– Gina Rivera, China – Business Development Manager, Koehler Group
– Edward Tse, Chief Executive Officer, Gao Feng Advisory Company
– Senior representative, Standard Chartered
– Senior representative, MasterCard

Attendance to the summit is free and by-invitation-only. As an attendee, you will be further invited to one-on-one meetings and site visits, including a tour to the state-of-the-art BMW Brilliance auto assembly plant.

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