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Archive for the ‘Glycobiology: Biopharmaceutical Production’ Category


Glycobiology vs Proteomics: Glycobiologists Prespective in the effort to explain the origin, etiology and potential therapeutics for the Coronavirus Pandemic (COVID-19)

 Curator: Ofer Markman, PhD

 The sugars involved in a viral disease are unique in many ways when compared with the DNA/RNA or the proteins involved: they are almost totally dependent on the infected cells and thus are not affected by the viral mutation rate or by the virus at all. Nevertheless they are affected by the cells, their type and their sugar production mechanisms and in some respect to the production rate by which the virus is replicated in the infected cells. Mutations may have nevertheless major effect not on the structures of the glycans but rather on the existence of the glycosylation site, and thus the glycan at all, but not on its structures.

This may make the gycomolecule a good target for diagnostics as stability in the molecule may mean longer life shelve of diagnostics kits.

Unique sugars are already predicted/found in the virus from certain Chinese origin, in this case an o-linked glycan/s not previously detected.

  • The proximal origin of SARS-CoV-2

Kristian G. AndersenAndrew RambautW. Ian Lipkin, Edward C. Holmes & Robert F. Garry

Nature Medicine (2020)Cite this article

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-020-0820-9

  • The covid-19 coronavirus epidemic has a natural origin, scientists say

https://globalhealthnewswire.com/2020/03/17/the-covid-19-coronavirus-epidemic-has-a-natural-origin-scientists-say/

  • Emerging WuHan (COVID-19) coronavirus: glycan shield and structure prediction of spike glycoprotein and its interaction with human CD26

Naveen Vankadari & Jacqueline A. Wilce

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/22221751.2020.1739565

Nevertheless, if the virus can infect multiple cells once current cells are not going to be available for any reason those viruses may present other glycans.

Once one starts to treat the infected person via modulation of protein production or by other means the change in the dynamic of protein production vs. protein glycosylation may cause changes in protein glycosyation, including their structures, this is well known to biotechnologists producing glycoproteins in labs and production.

This may either be a problem in understanding the state of disease or an advantage as it may help following response to the treatment and help as a co-treatment diagnostics.

Early Studies include the following:

  • Carbohydrate-based Diagnostics: A New Approach to COVID-19 Testing?

Mar 19, 2020 | Original story from Iceni Diagnostics

https://www.technologynetworks.com/diagnostics/news/carbohydrate-based-diagnostics-a-new-approach-to-covid-19-testing-332313

Glycans may play a role in treatment as well. TAMIFLU a case in point. Tamiflu is directed to the flu enzyme Neuraminidaze that is part of the viral structures. This approach was also explored to develop treatments.

  • Pneumagen Ltd Leverages its Novel Glycan Approach to Target Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infections

March 17, 2020 PR-M03-20-NI-024

https://www.pharmasalmanac.com/articles/pneumagen-ltd-leverages-its-novel-glycan-approach-to-target-coronavirus-covid-19-infections

Glycans do not only effect their own involvement in treatment/diagnostics they also are effecting protein based diagnostics for this see statement by Dr. Michael Mercier of UAH

  • We’re dealing with COVID-19, but what’s a virus in the first place?

23-Mar-2020 8:45 AM EDT, by University of Alabama Huntsville

https://www.newswise.com/articles/we-re-dealing-with-covid-19-but-what-s-a-virus-in-the-first-place

 

Other related articles on this topic published on this topic in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

 

The Relevance of Glycans in the Viral Pathology of COVID-19

Reporter: Ofer Markman, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/03/23/glycans-in-the-viral-pathology-of-covid-19/

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The Relevance of Glycans in the Viral Pathology of COVID-19

 

Reporter: Ofer Markman, PhD

 

While we are constantly cautioning people from putting too high validity to the results seen in the bellow mentioned Study, 

The ABO blood groups are a result of various and different glycans on the surfaces of red blood cells and their definition is related to Blood Immunology and Blood Typing classification used for Blood Donations. It was the hallmark of the 1930 Nobel prize of medicine.

In the article, ABO blood group glycans modulate sialic acid recognition on erythrocytes the authors claim that the ABH(O) glycan can modulate the surface of cells and their interactions to pathogens, in this case the Malaria pathogen.

Glycans are involved in the interaction of the flu virus to the host cell and the antiviral drug Tamiflu (Oseltamivir ) is based on the inhibition of that sort of interaction/modulation.

The Relevance of Glycans in the Viral Pathology of COVID-19

Even if true, the numbers in this paper show statistical significant difference but mildly significant difference in the risk profile suggesting we are to pay too much attention to the phenomena or worry, regardless of the fact these result have no significance on behavioral instructions nor would call for testing one’s blood type in regards to a viral infection. I would neither totally ignore the finding as it may shed light on viral pathology and infection mechanisms and understanding of the later may lead us to treatment or effective vaccines. But we are still early on this path.

SOURCE

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.03.11.20031096v1

Original Reference

Jiao Zhao, Yan Yang, Han-Ping Huang, Dong Li, Dong-Feng Gu, Xiang-Feng Lu, Zheng Zhang, Lei Liu, Ting Liu, Yu-Kun Liu, Yun-Jiao He, Bin Sun, Mei-Lan Wei, Guang-Yu Yang,  View ORCID Profile Xinghuan Wang, Li Zhang, Xiao-Yang Zhou, Ming-Zhao Xing,  View ORCID Profile Peng George Wang

doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.03.11.20031096

yet a more relevant understanding of glycans in the biology of the virus:-

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Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Obesity is a global concern that is associated with many chronic complications such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance (IR), cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Growing evidence has implicated the digestive system, including its microbiota, gut-derived incretin hormones, and gut-associated lymphoid tissue in obesity and IR. During high fat diet (HFD) feeding and obesity, a significant shift occurs in the microbial populations within the gut, known as dysbiosis, which interacts with the intestinal immune system. Similar to other metabolic organs, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver, altered immune homeostasis has also been observed in the small and large intestines during obesity.

 

A link between the gut microbiota and the intestinal immune system is the immune-derived molecule immunoglobulin A (IgA). IgA is a B cell antibody primarily produced in dimeric form by plasma cells residing in the gut lamina propria (LP). Given the importance of IgA on intestinal–gut microbe immunoregulation, which is directly influenced by dietary changes, scientists hypothesized that IgA may be a key player in the pathogenesis of obesity and IR. Here, in this study it was demonstrate that IgA levels are reduced during obesity and the loss of IgA in mice worsens IR and increases intestinal permeability, microbiota encroachment, and downstream inflammation in metabolic tissues, including inside the VAT.

 

IgA deficiency alters the obese gut microbiota and its metabolic phenotype can be recapitulated into microbiota-depleted mice upon fecal matter transplantation. In addition, the researchers also demonstrated that commonly used therapies for diabetes such as metformin and bariatric surgery can alter cellular and stool IgA levels, respectively. These findings suggested a critical function for IgA in regulating metabolic disease and support the emerging role for intestinal immunity as an important modulator of systemic glucose metabolism.

 

Overall, the researchers demonstrated a critical role for IgA in regulating intestinal homeostasis, metabolic inflammation, and obesity-related IR. These findings identify intestinal IgA+ immune cells as mucosal mediators of whole-body glucose regulation in diet-induced metabolic disease. This research further emphasized the importance of the intestinal adaptive immune system and its interactions with the gut microbiota and innate immune system within the larger network of organs involved in the manifestation of metabolic disease.

 

Future investigation is required to determine the impact of IgA deficiency during obesity in humans and the role of metabolic disease in human populations with selective IgA deficiency, especially since human IgA deficiency is associated with an altered gut microbiota that cannot be fully compensated with IgM. However, the research identified IgA as a critical immunological molecule in the intestine that impacts systemic glucose homeostasis, and treatments targeting IgA-producing immune populations and SIgA may have therapeutic potential for metabolic disease.

 

References:

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11370-y?elqTrackId=dc86e0c60f574542b033227afd0fdc8e

 

https://www.jci.org/articles/view/88879

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.2353

 

https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/57/6/1470

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413115001047?via%3Dihub

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413115002326?via%3Dihub

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1931312814004636?via%3Dihub

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature15766

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413116000371?via%3Dihub

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.2001

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1550413118305047?via%3Dihub

 

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Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide and the most common cause of long-term disability amongst adults, more particularly in patients with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that disordered physiological variables following acute ischaemic stroke, especially hyperglycaemia, adversely affect outcomes.

 

Post-stroke hyperglycaemia is common (up to 50% of patients) and may be rather prolonged, regardless of diabetes status. A substantial body of evidence has demonstrated that hyperglycaemia has a deleterious effect upon clinical and morphological stroke outcomes. Therefore, hyperglycaemia represents an attractive physiological target for acute stroke therapies.

 

However, whether intensive glycaemic manipulation positively influences the fate of ischaemic tissue remains unknown. One major adverse event of management of hyperglycaemia with insulin (either glucose-potassium-insulin infusions or intensive insulin therapy) is the occurrence of hypoglycaemia, which can also induce cerebral damage.

 

Doctors all over the world have debated whether intensive glucose management, which requires the use of IV insulin to bring blood sugar levels down to 80-130 mg/dL, or standard glucose control using insulin shots, which aims to get glucose below 180 mg/dL, lead to better outcomes after stroke.

 

A period of hyperglycemia is common, with elevated blood glucose in the periinfarct period consistently linked with poor outcome in patients with and without diabetes. The mechanisms that underlie this deleterious effect of dysglycemia on ischemic neuronal tissue remain to be established, although in vitro research, functional imaging, and animal work have provided clues.

 

While prompt correction of hyperglycemia can be achieved, trials of acute insulin administration in stroke and other critical care populations have been equivocal. Diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia per se are associated with poor cerebrovascular health, both in terms of stroke risk and outcome thereafter.

 

Interventions to control blood sugar are available but evidence of cerebrovascular efficacy are lacking. In diabetes, glycemic control should be part of a global approach to vascular risk while in acute stroke, theoretical data suggest intervention to lower markedly elevated blood glucose may be of benefit, especially if thrombolysis is administered.

 

Both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia may lead to further brain injury and clinical deterioration; that is the reason these conditions should be avoided after stroke. Yet, when correcting hyperglycaemia, great care should be taken not to switch the patient into hypoglycaemia, and subsequently aggressive insulin administration treatment should be avoided.

 

Early identification and prompt management of hyperglycaemia, especially in acute ischaemic stroke, is recommended. Although the appropriate level of blood glucose during acute stroke is still debated, a reasonable approach is to keep the patient in a mildly hyperglycaemic state, rather than risking hypoglycaemia, using continuous glucose monitoring.

 

The primary results from the Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) study, a large, multisite clinical study showed that intensive glucose management did not improve functional outcomes at 90 days after stroke compared to standard glucose therapy. In addition, intense glucose therapy increased the risk of very low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) and required a higher level of care such as increased supervision from nursing staff, compared to standard treatment.

 

References:

 

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-provides-answer-long-held-debate-blood-sugar-control-after-stroke

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27873213

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19342845

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20491782

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21211743

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18690907

 

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Glycobiology advances

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

The Evolution of the Glycobiology Space

The Nascent Stage of another Omics Field with Biomarker and Therapeutic Potential

Enal Razvi, Ph.D. , Gary Oosta, Ph.D

http://www.genengnews.com/insight-and-intelligence/the-evolution-of-the-glycobiology-space/77900638/

 

The Evolution of the Glycobiology Space

 

Glycobiology is an important field of study with medical applications because it is known that tumor cells alter their glycosylation pattern, which may contribute to their metastatic potential as well as potential immune evasion. [iStock/© vjanez]    http://www.genengnews.com/media/images/AnalysisAndInsight/Apr12_2016_iStock_41612310_PlasmaMembraneOfACell1211657142.jpg

There is growing interest in the field of glycobiology given the fact that epitopes with physiological and pathological relevance have glyco moieties.  We believe that another “omics” revolution is on the horizon—the study of the glyco modifications on the surface of cells and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in many disease classes. Not much industry tracking of this field has taken place. Thus, we sought to map this landscape by examining the entire ensemble of academic publications in this space and teasing apart the trends operative in this field from a qualitative and quantitative perspective. We believe that this methodology of en masse capture and publication and annotation provides an effective approach to evaluate this early-stage field.

Identifiation and Growth of Glycobiology Publications

http://www.genengnews.com/Media/images/AnalysisAndInsight/thumb_April12_2016_SelectBiosciences_Figure11935315421.jpg

For this article, we identified 7000 publications in the broader glycobiology space and analyzed them in detail.  It is important to frame glycobiology in the context of genomics and proteomics as a means to assess the scale of the field. Figure 1 presents the relative sizes of these fields as assessed by publications in from 1975 to 2015.

Note that the relative scale of genomics versus proteomics and glycobiology/glycomics in this graph strongly suggests that glycobiology is a nascent space, and thus a driver for us to map its landscape today and as it evolves over the coming years.

Figure 2. (A) Segmentation of the glycobiology landscape. (B) Glycobiology versus glycomics publication growth.

 

http://www.genengnews.com/Media/images/AnalysisAndInsight/thumb_April12_2016_SelectBiosciences_Figure2ab1917013624.jpg

To examine closely the various components of the glycobiology space, we segmented the publications database, presented in Figure 2A. Note the relative sizes and growth rates (slopes) of the various segments.

Clearly, glycoconjugates currently are the majority of this space and account for the bulk of the publications.  Glycobiology and glycomics are small but expanding and therefore can be characterized as “nascent market segments.”  These two spaces are characterized in more detail in Figure 2B, which presents their publication growth rates.

Note the very recent increased attention directed at these spaces and hence our drive to initiate industry coverage of these spaces. Figure 2B presents the overall growth and timeline of expansion of these fields—especially glycobiology—but it provides no information about the qualitative nature of these fields.

Focus of Glycobiology Publications

http://www.genengnews.com/Media/images/AnalysisAndInsight/April12_2016_SelectBiosciences_Figure2c1827601892.jpg

Figure 2C. Word cloud based on titles of publications in the glycobiology and glycomics spaces.

To understand the focus of publications in this field, and indeed the nature of this field, we constructed a word cloud based on titles of the publications that comprise this space presented in Figure 2C.

There is a marked emphasis on terms such as oligosaccharides and an emphasis on cells (this is after all glycosylation on the surface of cells). Overall, a pictorial representation of the types and classes of modifications that comprise this field emerge in this word cloud, demonstrating the expansion of the glycobiology and to a lesser extent the glycomics spaces as well as the character of these nascent but expanding spaces.

Characterization of the Glycobiology Space in Journals

Figure 3A. Breakout of publications in the glycobiology/glycomics fields.   http://www.genengnews.com/Media/images/AnalysisAndInsight/April12_2016_SelectBiosciences_Figure3a_5002432117316.jpg
Having framed the overall growth of the glycobiology field, we wanted to understand its structure and the classes of researchers as well as publications that comprise this field. To do this, we segmented the publications that constitute this field into the various journals in which glycobiology research is published. Figure 3A presents the breakout of publications by journal to illustrate the “scope” of this field.

The distribution of glycobiology publications across the various journals suggests a very concentrated marketplace that is very technically focused. The majority of the publications segregate into specialized journals on this topic, a pattern very indicative of a field in the very early stages of development—a truly nascent marketplace.

http://www.genengnews.com/Media/images/AnalysisAndInsight/thumb_April12_2016_SelectBiosciences_Figure3b1012091061.jpg

Figure 3B. Origin of publications in the glycobiology/glycomics fields.
We also sought to understand the “origin” of these publications—the breakout between academic- versus industry-derived journals. Figure 3B presents this breakout and shows that these publications are overwhelmingly (92.3%) derived from the academic sector. This is again a testimonial to the early nascent nature of this marketplace without significant engagement by the commercial sector and therefore is an important field to characterize and track from the ground up.

Select Biosciences, Inc. further analyzed the growth trajectory of the glycobiology papers in Figure 3C as a means to examine closely the publications trajectory. Although there appears to be some wobble along the way, overall the trajectory is upward, and of late it is expanding significantly.

In Summary

Figure 3C. Trajectory of the glycobiology space.   http://www.genengnews.com/Media/images/AnalysisAndInsight/April12_2016_SelectBiosciences_Figure3c1236921793.jpg
Glycobiology is the study of what coats living cells—glycans, or carbohydrates, and glycoconjugates. This is an important field of study with medical applications because it is known that tumor cells alter their glycosylation pattern, which may contribute to their metastatic potential as well as potential immune evasion.

At this point, glycobiology is largely basic research and thus it pales in comparison with the field of genomics. But in 10 years, we predict the study of glycobiology and glycomics will be ubiquitous and in the mainstream.

We started our analysis of this space because we’ve been focusing on many other classes of analytes, such as microRNAs, long-coding RNAs, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, etc., whose potential as biomarkers is becoming established. Glycobiology, on the other hand, represents an entire new space—a whole new category of modifications that could be analyzed for diagnostic potential and perhaps also for therapeutic targeting.

Today, glycobiology and glycomics are where genomics was at the start of the Human Genome Project. They respresent a nascent space and with full headroom for growth. Select Biosciences will continue to track this exciting field for research developments as well as development of biomarkers based on glyco-epitopes.

Enal Razvi, Ph.D., conducted his doctoral work on viral immunology and subsequent to receiving his Ph.D. went on to the Rockefeller University in New York to serve as Aaron Diamond Post-doctoral fellow under Professor Ralph Steinman [Nobel Prize Winner in 2011 for his discovery of dendritic cells in the early-70s with Zanvil Cohn]. Subsequently, Dr. Razvi completed his research fellowship at Harvard Medical School. For the last two decades Dr. Razvi has worked with small and large companies and consulted for more than 100 clients worldwide. He currently serves as Biotechnology Analyst and Managing Director of SelectBio U.S. He can be reached at enal@selectbio.us. Gary M. Oosta holds a Ph.D. in Biophysics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in Chemistry from E. Mich. Univ. He has 25 years of industrial research experience in various technology areas including medical diagnostics, thin-layer coating, bio-effects of electromagnetic radiation, and blood coagulation. Dr. Oosta has authored 20 technical publications and is an inventor on 77 patents worldwide. In addition, he has managed research groups that were responsible for many other patented innovations. Dr. Oosta has a long-standing interest in using patents and publications as strategic technology indicators for future technology selection and new product development. To enjoy more articles like this from GEN, click here to subscribe now!

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Triglycerides: Is it a Risk Factor or a Risk Marker for Atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular Disease ? The Impact of Genetic Mutations on (ANGPTL4) Gene, encoder of (angiopoietin-like 4) Protein, inhibitor of Lipoprotein Lipase

 

Reporters, Curators and Authors: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN and Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Introduction

The role for triglycerides as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease is not new, going back to Donald Frederickson’s classification of hyperlipidemias, at least with respect to Type I and Type IIb. Whether there was a mechanism beyond the observations was yet an open question.  The paper that follows addresses such a question.

 

Large Genetic Studies Support Role For Triglycerides In Cardiovascular Disease

SOURCE

http://cardiobrief.org/2016/03/03/large-genetic-studies-support-role-for-triglycerides-in-cardiovascular-disease/#comments

 

Two  papers published in the New England Journal of Medicine offer new genetic evidence to support the increasingly accepted though still controversial view that triglycerides play an important causal role in cardiovascular disease. If fully validated the new findings could lead to new drugs to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease, though others caution that there is still a long way to go before this could happen.

Both studies describe the impact of genetic mutations on a gene (ANGPTL4) which encodes for a protein (angiopoietin-like 4) that inhibits lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme that plays a key role in breaking down and removing triglycerides from the blood. The large studies found that people with  mutations that inactivate ANGPTL4 have lower levels of triglycerides, higher levels of HDL cholesterol, and decreased risk for cardiovascular disease.

The findings, writes Sander Kersten (Wageningen University, the Netherlands) in an accompanying editorial, “suggest that lowering plasma triglyceride levels is a viable approach to reducing the risk of coronary artery disease.”

The Genetics of Dyslipidemia — When Less Is More

Sander Kersten, Ph.D.   Mar 2, 2016;   http://dx.doi.org:/10.1056/NEJMe1601117

Two groups of investigators now describe in the Journal important genetic evidence showing a causal role of plasma triglycerides in coronary heart disease. Stitziel and colleagues2 tested 54,003 coding-sequence variants covering 13,715 human genes in more than 72,000 patients with coronary artery disease and 120,000 controls. Dewey and colleagues3 sequenced the exons of the gene encoding angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) in samples obtained from nearly 43,000 participants in the DiscovEHR human genetics study. The two groups found a significant association between an inactivating mutation (E40K) in ANGPTL4 and both low plasma triglyceride levels and high levels of HDL cholesterol. ANGPTL4 is an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase, the enzyme that breaks down plasma triglycerides along the capillaries in heart, muscle, and fat.4 Extensive research has shown that ANGPTL4 orchestrates the processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins during physiologic conditions such as fasting, exercise, and cold exposure.4 The E40K mutation in ANGPTL4 was previously shown to nearly eliminate the ability of ANGPTL4 to inhibit lipoprotein lipase, a mechanism that may result in part from the destabilization of ANGPTL4.5

The key finding in each study was that carriers of the E40K mutation and other rare mutations in ANGPTL4 had a lower risk of coronary artery disease than did noncarriers, a result that is consistent with the lower triglyceride levels and higher HDL cholesterol levels among mutation carriers. These findings confirm previous data6 and provide convincing genetic evidence that an elevated plasma triglyceride level increases the risk of coronary heart disease. In combination with extensive recent data on other genetic variants that modulate plasma triglyceride levels, the studies suggest that lowering plasma triglyceride levels is a viable approach to reducing the risk of coronary artery disease.

However, as a cautionary note, Talmud and colleagues7 previously found that the presence of the E40K variant was associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease after adjustment for the altered plasma lipids. Consistent with this hypothesis, the overexpression of Angptl4 in mice was found to protect against atherosclerosis independent of plasma lipids.8

The studies also “implicate targeted inactivation of ANGPTL4 as a potential weapon in the war on heart disease,” though he also points to a previous study that did not support this hypothesis. Sekar Kathiresan (Broad Institute), senior author of one of the NEJM studies, told me that the previous study was small and “basically got the result wrong. Between, the two papers in this NEJM issue, we are looking at 10X more data.”

Recent large genetic studies have resulted in an important change in the field. Many researchers now believe that HDL, which was once thought to play an important protective role in atherosclerosis, is only a marker of disease. In contrast, triglycerides are now thought by many to play an important functional role.

One of the NEJM papers showed that a human monoclonal antibody to ANGPTL4 lowered triglyceride levels in animals. The study was funded by Regeneron and was performed by researchers at Regeneron and Geisinger, as part of an ongoing collaboration using deidentified genetic data from Geisinger patients. In their NEJM paper the researchers reported inflammation and other side effects in the animals treated with the antibody, but they said that no such problem has been observed in humans who have mutations that have the same functional effect as the antibody.

Coding Variation in ANGPTL4, LPL, and SVEP1and the Risk of Coronary Disease Myocardial Infarction Genetics and CARDIoGRAM Exome Consortia Investigators

March 2, 2016     http://dx.doi.org:/10.1056/NEJMoa1507652

Although genomewide association studies have identified more than 56 loci associated with the risk of coronary artery disease,1-3 the disease-associated variants are typically common (minor-allele frequency >5%) and located in noncoding sequences; this has made it difficult to pinpoint causal genes and affected pathways. This lack of a causal mechanism has in part hindered the immediate translation of the findings of genomewide association studies into new therapeutic targets. However, the discovery of rare or low-frequency coding-sequence variants that affect the risk of coronary artery disease has facilitated advances in the prevention and treatment of disease. The most recent example of such advances is the development of a new class of therapeutic agents that is based on the discovery of the gene encoding proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a regulator of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol4 and the discovery that low-frequency and loss-of-function variants in this gene protect against coronary artery disease.5,6

Recently, low-frequency coding variation across the genome was systematically tabulated with the use of next-generation exome and whole-genome sequencing data from more than 12,000 persons of various ancestries (including a major contribution from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project). Protein-altering variants (i.e., nonsynonymous, splice-site, and nonsense single-nucleotide substitutions) that were observed at least twice among these 12,000 persons were included in a genotyping array (hereafter referred to as the exome array). In addition, the exome array contains previously described variants from genomewide association studies, a sparse genomewide grid of common markers, markers that are informative with regard to ancestry (i.e., African American, Native American, and European), and some additional content. Additional information on the design of the exome array is provided at http://genome.sph.umich.edu/wiki/Exome_Chip_Design. In this study, we focused on the 220,231 autosomal variants that were present on the array and were expected to alter protein sequence (i.e., missense, nonsense, splice-site, and frameshift variants) and used these to test the contribution of low-frequency coding variation to the risk of coronary artery disease.

Low-Frequency Coding Variants Associated with Coronary Artery Disease

The discovery cohort comprised 120,575 persons (42,335 patients and 78,240 controls) (Table S1 in the Supplementary Appendix). In the discovery cohort, we found significant associations between low-frequency coding variants in theLPA and PCSK9 genes and coronary artery disease (Table 1

TABLE 1

Low-Frequency Coding Variations Previously Associated with Coronary Artery Disease.). Both gene loci also harbor common noncoding variants associated with coronary artery disease that had previously been discovered through genomewide association studies. These variants were also present on the exome array and had significant associations with coronary artery disease in our study (Table 1). In a conditional analysis, the associations between coronary artery disease and the low-frequency coding variants in both LPA and PCSK9 were found to be independent of the associations between coronary artery disease and the more common variants (Table 1). ….

We found a significant association between SVEP1 p.D2702G and blood pressure (Table 3TABLE 3   Association between Low-Frequency Variants and Traditional Risk Factors., and Table S7 in the Supplementary Appendix). The allele associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease was also associated with higher systolic blood pressure (0.94 mm Hg higher for each copy of the allele among allele carriers, P=3.0×10−7) and higher diastolic blood pressure (0.57 mm Hg higher for each copy of the allele among allele carriers, P=4.4×10−7). We did not find an association between SVEP1 p.D2702G and any plasma lipid trait. In contrast, ANGPTL4 p.E40K was not associated with blood pressure but instead was found to be associated with significantly lower levels of triglycerides (approximately 0.3 standard deviation units lower for each copy of the allele among allele carriers, P=1.6×10−13) (Table 3) and with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (approximately 0.3 standard deviation units higher for each copy of the allele among allele carriers, P=8.2×10−11) (Table 3). In a conditional analysis, these effects appeared to be at least partially independent of each other (Table S8 in the Supplementary Appendix). We did not observe any significant association between ANGPTL4 p.E40K and LDL cholesterol level (Table 3). Both SVEP1 p.D2702G and ANGPTL4 p.E40K were nominally associated with type 2 diabetes in a direction concordant with the associated risk of coronary artery disease.

ANGPTL4 Loss-of-Function Mutations, Plasma Lipid Levels, and Coronary Artery Disease

The finding that a missense allele in ANGPTL4 reduced the risk of coronary artery disease, potentially by reducing triglyceride levels, raised the possibility that complete loss-of-function variants in ANGPTL4 may have an even more dramatic effect on triglyceride concentrations and the risk of coronary artery disease. We therefore examined sequence data for the seven protein-coding exons of ANGPTL4 in 6924 patients with early-onset myocardial infarction and 6834 controls free from coronary artery disease (details of the patients and controls are provided in Table S3 in the Supplementary Appendix). We discovered a total of 10 variants that were predicted to lead to loss of gene function (Figure 1A FIGURE 1    

Loss-of-Function Alleles in ANGPTL4 and Plasma Lipid Levels., and Table S9 in the Supplementary Appendix), carried by 28 heterozygous persons; no homozygous or compound heterozygous persons were discovered. Carriers of loss-of-function alleles had significantly lower levels of triglycerides than did noncarriers (a mean of 35% lower among carriers, P=0.003) (Figure 1B, and Table S10 in the Supplementary Appendix), with no significant difference in LDL or HDL cholesterol levels. Moreover, we found a lower risk of coronary artery disease among carriers of loss-of-function alleles (9 carriers among 6924 patients vs. 19 carriers among 6834 controls; odds ratio for disease, 0.47; P=0.04) (Table S11 in the Supplementary Appendix). A similar investigation was performed for the 48 protein-coding exons of SVEP1; however, only 3 loss-of-function allele carriers were discovered (2 carriers among 6924 patients vs. 1 carrier among 6834 controls).

Coding Variation in LPL and the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

On the basis of the fact that a loss of ANGPTL4 function was associated with reduced risk of coronary artery disease and that ANGPTL4 inhibits lipoprotein lipase (LPL), one would expect a gain of LPL function to also be associated with a lower risk of coronary artery disease, whereas a loss of LPL function would be expected to be associated with a higher risk. In observations consistent with these expectations, we found a low-frequency missense variant in LPL on the exome array that was associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (p.D36N; minor-allele frequency, 1.9%; odds ratio for disease, 1.13; P=2.0×10−4) (Table S12 in the Supplementary Appendix); previous studies have shown that this allele (also known as p.D9N) is associated with LPL activity that is 20% lower in allele carriers than in noncarriers.8 We also identified a nonsense mutation in LPL on the exome array that was significantly associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease (p.S447*; minor-allele frequency, 9.9%; odds ratio, 0.94; P=2.5×10−7) (Table S12 in the Supplementary Appendix). Contrary to most instances in which the premature introduction of a stop codon leads to loss of gene function, this nonsense mutation, which occurs in the penultimate codon of the gene, paradoxically induces a gain of LPL function.9 …..

Through large-scale exomewide screening, we identified a low-frequency coding variant in ANGPTL4 that was associated with protection against coronary artery disease and a low-frequency coding variant in SVEP1 that was associated with an increased risk of the disease. Moreover, our results highlight LPL as a significant contributor to the risk of coronary artery disease and support the hypothesis that a gain of LPL function or loss of ANGPTL4 inhibition protects against the disease.

ANGPTL4 has previously been found to be involved in cancer pathogenesis and wound healing.10 Previous functional studies also revealed that ANGPTL4 regulates plasma triglyceride concentration by inhibiting LPL.11 The minor allele at p.E40K has previously been associated with lower levels of triglycerides and higher levels of HDL cholesterol.12 We now provide independent confirmation of these lipid effects. In vitro and in vivo experimental evidence suggests that the lysine allele at p.E40K results in destabilization of ANGPTL4 after its secretion from the cell in which it was synthesized. It may be that the p.E40K variant leads to increases in the enzymatic activity of LPL because of this destabilization.13 Previous, smaller studies produced conflicting results regarding p.E40K and the risk of coronary artery disease14,15; we now provide robust support for an association between p.E40K and a reduced risk of coronary artery disease.

An important caveat  to this research is that it is still very early. Most promising therapeutic targets do not work out. James Stein (University of Wisconsin) praised the papers but also offered a word of caution. “This is great science and important research that sheds light on the genetic regulation of TG-rich lipoproteins, serum TG levels, and CVD risk,” he said. “Since it is hard, if not impossible, to disconnect TG-rich lipoproteins from LDL, we should be humble in extrapolating these findings to clinical medicine in an era of low LDL due to statins and PCSK9 inhibitors. I hope this research identifies new targets for drug therapy and better understanding of CVD risk prediction– only time will tell.”

Previous studies with fibrates and other drugs have failed to convincingly show that lowering triglycerides is beneficial. Kathiresan said that what really seems to matter is “how you alter the plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs).” Some genes that alter TRLs have other metabolic effects. As an example he cited a gene that lowers TRLs but increases the risk for type 2 diabetes. The NEJM papers, by observing the effect of specific mutations, therefore point the way to targets that may be clinically significant.

Conclusions:  The work that has been presented puts a new light on the possible role of triglycerides in the development of congenitally predetermined cardiovascular disease. It does not necessarily establish a general link to mechanism of cardiovascular disease, but it opens up new pathways to our understanding.

SOURCE

http://cardiobrief.org/2016/03/03/large-genetic-studies-support-role-for-triglycerides-in-cardiovascular-disease/#comments

John Contois commented on your update
“Are triglycerides a CHD risk factor? The answer is still maybe. Triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are inextricably linked to LDL metabolism and LDL particle number (and apo B). Still these are important new data and targets for novel therapeutics.”

 

Risk of Dis-lipids Syndromes in Modern Society

 

Risk of Dis-lipids Syndrome in Modern Society

Aurelian Udristioiuᶪ, Manole Cojocaru²
¹Department of Biochemistry, Clinical Laboratory, Emergency County Hospital Targu Jiu & Titu Maiorescu University, Bucharest, Romania,
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Titu Maiorescu University, Bucharest, Romania

Abstract
Aim of this work was to emphasis the preclinical evaluation of dis-lipids syndromes types at the patients which were presented to a routine control for checking health status, in the hospital ambulatory.
Material and Method:
Were analyzed 60 patients, registered in Clinical Laboratory, assessing by running on the Hitachi 912 Analyzer, the principal biochemical parameters of lipid metabolism: Cholesterol, Triglycerides and fractions of Cholesterol, HDL and LDL. From the total of 60 patients 35 were females and 25 males.
Results
The persons with an alarm signal of atherosclerotic process were in 28 % and persons with low HDL was in 17%. The cases with atherosclerotic index, report-LDL/HDL>3.5 for men and 2.5 for women were in 14 % , the cases with predictive value with coronary risk, report-CO/HDL>5 were presented in 5 % and the cases with dis-lipid syndrome type 2- 4, with high Cholesterol and Triglycerides, were presented in 30% percent.
Conclusions
Lipids controls, and its fractions, are necessary to be prevented atherosclerotic process in the incipient status of ill.

 

http://video.epccs.eu/video_1466.html

 

 

REFERENCES

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe1601117

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1507652

March 2, 2016 Regeneron Genetics Center Publication in New England Journal of Medicine Links ANGPTL4 Inhibition and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease Demonstrates power of large-scale Precision Medicine initiatives

http://files.shareholder.com/downloads/REGN/1634352863x0x879015/042D3D02-04CB-4DD1-89FE-53927F422025/REGN_News_2016_3_2_General_Releases.pdf

e-Books by Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

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Other related articles on this topic published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

Editorial & Publication of Articles in e-Books by  Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence:  Contributions of Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/16/editorial-publication-of-articles-in-e-books-by-leaders-in-pharmaceutical-business-intelligence-contributions-of-larry-h-bernstein-md-fcap/

Editorial & Publication of Articles in e-Books by Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence: Contributions of Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/16/editorial-publication-of-articles-in-e-books-by-leaders-in-pharmaceutical-business-intelligence-contributions-of-aviva-lev-ari-phd-rn/

TRIGLYCERIDES

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Triglycerides

HDL

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=HDL

PCSK9

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=PCSK9

STATINS

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Statins

STATIN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=STATIN

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newly developed oxazolidinone antibiotics

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

 

New Antibacterial oxazolidinones in pipeline by Wockhardt

by DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

 

WCK ?

(5S)-N-{3-[3,5-difluoro-4-(4-hydroxy-4-methoxymethyl-piperidin-1-yl)-phenyl]-2-oxo-oxazolidin-5-ylmethyl}-acetamide

MF C19 H25 F2 N3 O5, MW 413.42

Acetamide, N-​[[(5S)​-​3-​[3,​5-​difluoro-​4-​[4-​hydroxy-​4-​(methoxymethyl)​-​1-​piperidinyl]​phenyl]​-​2-​oxo-​5-​oxazolidinyl]​methyl]​-

CAS 957796-51-9

Antibacterial oxazolidinones

THIS MAY BE WCK 4086?????

PATENT

WO 2015173664, US8217058, WO 2012059823, 

 

Oxazolidinone represent a novel chemical class of synthetic antimicrobial agents.Linezolid represents the first member of this class to be used clinically. Oxazolidinones display activity against important Gram-positive human and veterinary pathogens including Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) and β-lactam Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP). The oxazolidinones also show activity against Gram-negative aerobic bacteria, Gram-positive and Gram-negative anaerobes. (Diekema D J et al., Lancet 2001 ; 358: 1975-82).

Various oxazolidinones and their methods of preparation are disclosed in the literature. International Publication No. WO 1995/25106 discloses substituted piperidino phenyloxazolidinones and International Publication No. WO 1996/13502 discloses phenyloxazolidinones having a multisubstituted azetidinyl or pyrrolidinyl moiety. US Patent Publication No. 2004/0063954, International Publication Nos. WO 2004/007489 and WO 2004/007488 disclose piperidinyl phenyl oxazolidinones for antimicrobial use.

Pyrrolidinyl/piperidinyl phenyl oxazohdinone antibacterial agents are also described in Kim H Y et al., Bioorg. & Med. Chem. Lett., (2003), 13:2227-2230. International Publication No. WO 1996/35691 discloses spirocyclic and bicyclic diazinyl and carbazinyl oxazolidinone derivatives. Diazepeno phenyloxazolidinone derivatives are disclosed in the International Publication No. WO 1999/24428. International Publication No. WO 2002/06278 discloses substituted aminopiperidino phenyloxazolidinone derivatives.

Various other methods of preparation of oxazolidinones are reported in US Patent No. 7087784, US Patent No. 6740754, US Patent No. 4948801 , US Patent No. 3654298, US Patent No. 5837870, Canadian Patent No. 681830, J. Med. Chem., 32, 1673 (1989), Tetrahedron, 45, 1323 (1989), J. Med. Chem., 33, 2569 (1990), Tetrahedron Letters, 37, 7937-40 (1996) and Organic Process Research and Development, 11 , 739-741(2007).

Indian Patent Application No. 2534/MUM/2007 discloses a process for the preparation of substituted piperidino phenyloxazolidinones. International Publication No. WO2012/059823 further discloses the process for the preparation of phosphoric acid mono-(L-{4-[(5)-5-(acetylaminomethyl)-2-oxo-oxazolidin-3-yl]-2,6-difluorophenyl}4-methoxymethyl piperidine-4-yl)ester.

US Patent No. 8217058 discloses (5S)-N-{3-[3,5-difluoro-4-(4-hydroxy-4-methoxymethyl-piperidin-l-yl)-phenyl]-2-oxo-oxazolidin-5-ylmethyl}-acetamide as an antibacterial agent and its process for preparation.

PATENT

WO2015173664

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2015173664&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

 

 

PATENT

http://www.google.st/patents/WO2007132314A2?cl=en

 

Figure imgf000004_0001

Wockhardt Ltd,

Figure imgf000006_0001
Figure imgf000006_0002

(3) (4)

 

PATENT

WO 2012059823

http://www.google.co.in/patents/WO2012059823A1?cl=en

Phosphoric acid mono-(l-{4-[(S)-5-(acetylamino- methyl)-2-oxo-oxazolidin-3-yl]-2,6-difluorophenyl}-4-methoxymethyl-piperidin-4-yl) ester of Formula (A),
Figure imgf000022_0001
the process comprising the steps of:
a) Converting intermediate of Formula (1) into intermediate of Formula (3)
Figure imgf000022_0002
b) Converting intermediate of Formula (3) into intermediate of Formula (5)
Figure imgf000022_0003

c) Converting intermediate of Formula (5) into intermediate of structure (6)

Figure imgf000022_0004
(5) <6> d) Converting intermediate of Formula (6) into intermediate of Formula (10)
Figure imgf000023_0001
e) Converting intermediate of Formula (10) into intermediate of Formula (11),
Figure imgf000023_0002

f) Converting intermediate of Formula (11) into compound of Formula (A) or Pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof

Figure imgf000023_0003

 

 

Figure imgf000006_0001
Figure imgf000006_0002
Figure imgf000006_0003

 

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