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Posts Tagged ‘Proteomics’


5:00 – 5:45 PM Early Diagnosis Through Predictive Biomarkers, NonInvasive Testing

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

Diagnosing cancer early is often the difference between survival and death. Hear from experts regarding the new and emerging technologies that form the next generation of cancer diagnostics.

Moderator: Heather Rose, Director of Licensing, Thomas Jefferson University
Speakers:
Bonnie Anderson, Chairman and CEO, Veracyte @BonnieAndDx
Kevin Hrusovsky, Founder and Chairman, Powering Precision Health @KevinHrusovsky

Bonnie Anderson and Veracyte produces genomic tests for thyroid and other cancer diagnosis.  Kevin Hrusovksy and Precision Health uses peer reviewed evidence based medicine to affect precision medicine decision.

Bonnie: aim to get a truth of diagnosis.  Getting tumor tissue is paramount as well as properly preserved tissue.  They use deep RNA sequencing  and machine learning  in their clinically approved tests.

Kevin: Serial biospace entrepreneur.  Two diseases, cancer and neurologic, have been diseases which have been hardest to get reproducible and validated biomarkers of early disease.  He concentrates on protein biomarkers.

Heather:  FDA has recently approved drugs for early disease intervention.  However the use of biomarkers can go beyond patient stratification in clinical trials.

Kevin: 15 approved drugs for MS but the markers are scans looking for brain atrophy which is too late of an endpoint.  So we need biomarkers of early disease progression.  We can use those early biomarkers of disease progression so pharma can target those early biomarkers and or use those early biomarkers of disease progression  for endpoint

Bonnie: exciting time in the early diagnostics field. She prefers transcriptomics to DNA based methods such as WES or WGS (whole exome or whole genome sequencing).  It was critical to show data on the cost savings imparted by their transcriptomic based thryoid cancer diagnostic test for payers to consider this test eligible for reimbursement.

Kevin: There has been 20 million  CAT scans for  cancer but it is estimated 90% of these scans led to misdiagnosis. Biomarker  development  has revolutionized diagnostics in this disease area.  They have developed a breakthrough panel of ten protein biomarkers in serum which he estimates may replace 5 million mammograms.

All panelists agreed on the importance of regulatory compliance and the focus of new research should be on early detection.  In addition they believe that Dr. Gotlieb’s appointment to the FDA is a positive for the biomarker development field, as Dr. Gotlieb understands the potential and importance of early detection and prevention of disease.  Kevin also felt Dr. Gotlieb understands the importance of incorporating biomarkers as endpoints in clinical trials.  Over 750 phase 1,2, and 3 clinical trials use biomarker endpoints but the pharma companies still need to prove the biomarkers clinical relevance to the FDA.They also agreed it would be helpful to involve advocacy groups in putting more pressure on the healthcare providers and policy makers on this importance of diagnostics as a preventative measure.

In addition, the discovery and use of biomarkers as disease endpoints has led to a resurgence of Alzheimer’s disease drug development by companies which have previously given up on these type of neurodegenerative diseases.

Kevin feels proteomics offers great advantages over DNA-based diagnostics, especially in cancer such as ovarian cancer, where a high degree of specificity for a diagnostic test is required to ascertain if a woman should undergo prophylactic oophorectomy.  He suggests that a new blood-based protein biomarker panel is being developed for early detection of some forms of ovarian cancer.

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Please see related articles on Live Coverage of Previous Meetings on this Open Access Journal

LIVE – Real Time – 16th Annual Cancer Research Symposium, Koch Institute, Friday, June 16, 9AM – 5PM, Kresge Auditorium, MIT

Real Time Coverage and eProceedings of Presentations on 11/16 – 11/17, 2016, The 12th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Tweets Impression Analytics, Re-Tweets, Tweets and Likes by @AVIVA1950 and @pharma_BI for 2018 BioIT, Boston, 5/15 – 5/17, 2018

BIO 2018! June 4-7, 2018 at Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/press-coverage/

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Protein profiling in cancer and metabolic diseases

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

Deep Protein Profiling Key

Company has encouraged by two recent reports that emphasise the importance of protein profiling to improve outcomes in cancer treatment.

http://www.technologynetworks.com/Proteomics/news.aspx?ID=190145

Proteome Sciences plc has strongly encouraged by two recent reports that emphasise the importance of protein profiling to improve outcomes in cancer treatment. These highlight the growing need for more detailed, personal assessment of protein profiles to improve the management of cancer treatment.

In the first study two groups from University College London and Cancer Research UK demonstrated that genetic mutations in cancer can lead to changes in the proteins on the cell surface1. These are new sequences which are seen as foreign by the body’s immune system and, with appropriate immunotherapy, the level of response in lung cancer was greatly enhanced.

However many of the patients with these types of mutations unfortunately still did not respond which highlighted the need for deeper analysis of the protein expression in tumours in order to better appreciate the mechanisms that contribute to treatment failure.

The second study, led by Professor Nigel Bundred of Manchester University, reported that use of two drugs that act on the same breast cancer target, an over-expressing protein called Her-2, were able to eradicate detectable tumours in around 10% of those treated in just 11 days, with 87% of those treated having a proteomic change indicating cells had stopped growing and/or cell death had increased2.

Whilst these results appear very promising it is worth noting that the over-expressing Her-2 target is only present in about 20% of breast tumours meaning this combination therapy was successful in clearing tumours in just 2% of the total breast cancer population.

Dr. Ian Pike, Chief Operating Officer of Proteome Sciences commented, “Both these recent studies should rightly be recognised as important steps forward towards better cancer treatment. However, in order to overcome the limitations of current drug therapy programs, a much deeper and more comprehensive analysis of the complex protein networks that regulate tumour growth and survival is required and will be essential to achieve a major advance in the battle to treat cancer.

“Our SysQuant® workflows provide that solution. As an example, in pancreatic cancer3 we have successfully mapped the complex network of regulatory processes and demonstrate the ability to devise personalised treatment combinations on an individual basis for each patient. A retrospective study with SysQuant® to predict response to the targeted drug Sorafenib in liver cancer is in process and we are planning further prospective trials to guide personalised treatment selection in liver cancer.

“We are already delivering systems-wide biology solutions through SysQuant® and TMTcalibrator™ programs to our clients that are generating novel biological data and results using more sensitive profiling that are helping them to better understand their drug development programs and to provide new biomarkers for tracking patient response in clinical trials.

“We are strongly positioned to deliver more comprehensive analysis of proteins and cellular pathways across other areas of disease and in particular to extend the use of SysQuant® with other leading cancer research groups in liver and other cancers.”

Proteome Sciences has also expanded its offering in personalised medicine through the use of its TMTcalibrator™ technology to uniquely identify protein biomarkers that reveal active cancer and other disease processes in body fluid samples. The importance of these ‘mechanistic’ biomarkers is that they are essential to monitor that drugs are being effective and that they can be used as early biomarkers of disease recurrence.

Using SysQuant® and TMTcalibrator™, Proteome Sciences can deliver more comprehensive analysis and provide unparalleled levels of sensitivity and breadth of coverage of the proteome, enabling faster, more efficient drug development and more accurate disease diagnosis.

 

Discovering ‘Outlier’ Enzymes

Researchers at TSRI and Salk Institute have discovered ‘Outlier’ enzymes that could offer new targets to treat type 2 diabetes and inflammatory disorders.

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have discovered two enzymes that appear to play a role in metabolism and inflammation—and might someday be targeted with drugs to treat type 2 diabetes and inflammatory disorders. The discovery is unusual because the enzymes do not bear a resemblance—in their structures or amino-acid sequences—to any known class of enzymes.

The team of scientists nevertheless identified them as “outlier” members of the serine/threonine hydrolase class, using newer techniques that detect biochemical activity. “A huge fraction of the human ‘proteome’ remains uncharacterized, and this paper shows how chemical approaches can be used to uncover proteins of a given functionality that have eluded classification based on sequence or predicted structure,” said co-senior author Benjamin F. Cravatt, chair of TSRI’s Department of Chemical Physiology.

“In this study, we found two genes that control levels of lipids with anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory activity, suggesting exciting targets for diabetes and inflammatory diseases,” said co-senior author Alan Saghatelian, who holds the Dr. Frederik Paulsen Chair at the Salk Institute. The study, which appeared as a Nature Chemical Biology Advance Online Publication on March 28, 2016, began as an effort in the Cravatt laboratory to discover and characterize new serine/threonine hydrolases using fluorophosphonate (FP) probes—molecules that selectively bind and, in effect, label the active sites of these enzymes.

Pulling FP-binding proteins out of the entire proteome of test cells and identifying them using mass spectrometry techniques, the team matched nearly all to known hydrolases. The major outlier was a protein called androgen-induced gene 1 protein (AIG1). The only other one was a distant cousin in terms of sequence, a protein called ADTRP. “Neither of these proteins had been characterized as an enzyme; in fact, there had been little functional characterization of them at all,” said William H. Parsons, a research associate in the Cravatt laboratory who was co-first author of the study.

Experiments on AIG1 and ADTRP revealed that they do their enzymatic work in a unique way. “It looks like they have an active site that is novel—it had never been described in the literature,” said Parsons. Initial tests with panels of different enzyme inhibitors showed that AIG1 and ADTRP are moderately inhibited by inhibitors of lipases—enzymes that break down fats and other lipids. But on what specific lipids do these newly discovered outlier enzymes normally work?

At the Salk Institute, the Saghatelian laboratory was investigating a class of lipids it had discovered in 2014. Known as fatty acid esters of hydroxy fatty acids (FAHFAs), these molecules showed strong therapeutic potential. Saghatelian and his colleagues had found that boosting the levels of one key FAHFA lipid normalizes glucose levels in diabetic mice and also reduces inflammation.

“[Ben Cravatt’s] lab was screening panels of lipids to find the ones that their new enzymes work on,” said Saghatelian, who is a former research associate in the Cravatt laboratory. “We suggested they throw FAHFAs in there—and these turned out to be very good substrates.” The Cravatt laboratory soon developed powerful inhibitors of the newly discovered enzymes, and the two labs began working together, using the inhibitors and genetic techniques to explore the enzymes’ functions in vitro and in cultured cells.

Co-first author Matthew J. Kolar, an MD-PhD student, performed most of the experiments in the Saghatelian lab. The team concluded that AIG1 and ADTRP, at least in the cell types tested, appear to work mainly to break down FAHFAs and not any other major class of lipid. In principle, inhibitors of AIG1 and ADTRP could be developed into FAHFA-boosting therapies.

“Our prediction,” said Saghatelian, “is that if FAHFAs do what we think they’re doing, then using an enzyme inhibitor to block their degradation would make FAHFA levels go up and should thus reduce inflammation as well as improve glucose levels and insulin sensitivity.” The two labs are now collaborating on further studies of the new enzymes—and the potential benefits of inhibiting them—in mouse models of diabetes, inflammation and autoimmune disease.

“One of the neat things this study shows,” said Cravatt, “is that even for enzyme classes as well studied as the hydrolases, there may still be hidden members that, presumably by convergent evolution, arrived at that basic enzyme mechanism despite sharing no sequence or structural homology.”

Other co-authors of the study, “AIG1 and ADTRP are atypical integral membrane hydrolases that degrade bioactive FAHFAs,” were Siddhesh S. Kamat, Armand B. Cognetta III, Jonathan J. Hulce and Enrique Saez, of TSRI; and co-senior author Barbara B. Kahn of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School

 

New Weapon Against Breast Cancer

Molecular marker in healthy tissue can predict a woman’s risk of getting the disease, research says.

Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and collaborators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have identified a molecular marker in normal breast tissue that can predict a woman’s risk for developing breast cancer, the leading cause of death in women with cancer worldwide.

The work, led by HSCI principal faculty member Kornelia Polyak and Rulla Tamimi of BWH, was published in an early online release and in the April 1 issue of Cancer Research.

The study builds on Polyak’s earlier research finding that women already identified as having a high risk of developing cancer — namely those with a mutation called BRCA1 or BRCA2 — or women who did not give birth before their 30s had a higher number of mammary gland progenitor cells.

In the latest study, Polyak, Tamimi, and their colleagues examined biopsies, some taken as many as four decades ago, from 302 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Nurses’ Health Study II who had been diagnosed with benign breast disease. The researchers compared tissue from the 69 women who later developed cancer to the tissue from the 233 women who did not. They found that women were five times as likely to develop cancer if they had a higher percentage of Ki67, a molecular marker that identifies proliferating cells, in the cells that line the mammary ducts and milk-producing lobules. These cells, called the mammary epithelium, undergo drastic changes throughout a woman’s life, and the majority of breast cancers originate in these tissues.

Doctors already test breast tumors for Ki67 levels, which can inform decisions about treatment, but this is the first time scientists have been able to link Ki67 to precancerous tissue and use it as a predictive tool.

“Instead of only telling women that they don’t have cancer, we could test the biopsies and tell women if they were at high risk or low risk for developing breast cancer in the future,” said Polyak, a breast cancer researcher at Dana-Farber and co-senior author of the paper.

“Currently, we are not able to do a very good job at distinguishing women at high and low risk of breast cancer,” added co-senior author Tamimi, an associate professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. “By identifying women at high risk of breast cancer, we can better develop individualized screening and also target risk reducing strategies.”

To date, mammograms are the best tool for the early detection, but there are risks associated with screening. False positive and negative results and over-diagnosis could cause psychological distress, delay treatment, or lead to overtreatment, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Mammography machines also use low doses of radiation. While a single mammogram is unlikely to cause harm, repeated screening can potentially cause cancer, though the NCI writes that the benefits “nearly always outweigh the risks.”

“If we can minimize unnecessary radiation for women at low risk, that would be good,” said Tamimi.

Screening for Ki67 levels would “be easy to apply in the current setting,” said Polyak, though the researchers first want to reproduce the results in an independent cohort of women.

 

AIG1 and ADTRP are atypical integral membrane hydrolases that degrade bioactive FAHFAs

William H ParsonsMatthew J Kolar, …., Barbara B KahnAlan Saghatelian & Benjamin F Cravatt

Nature Chemical Biology 28 March 2016                    http://dx.doi.org:/10.1038/nchembio.2051

Enzyme classes may contain outlier members that share mechanistic, but not sequence or structural, relatedness with more common representatives. The functional annotation of such exceptional proteins can be challenging. Here, we use activity-based profiling to discover that the poorly characterized multipass transmembrane proteins AIG1 and ADTRP are atypical hydrolytic enzymes that depend on conserved threonine and histidine residues for catalysis. Both AIG1 and ADTRP hydrolyze bioactive fatty acid esters of hydroxy fatty acids (FAHFAs) but not other major classes of lipids. We identify multiple cell-active, covalent inhibitors of AIG1 and show that these agents block FAHFA hydrolysis in mammalian cells. These results indicate that AIG1 and ADTRP are founding members of an evolutionarily conserved class of transmembrane threonine hydrolases involved in bioactive lipid metabolism. More generally, our findings demonstrate how chemical proteomics can excavate potential cases of convergent or parallel protein evolution that defy conventional sequence- and structure-based predictions.

Figure 1: Discovery and characterization of AIG1 and ADTRP as FP-reactive proteins in the human proteome.

 

http://www.nature.com/nchembio/journal/vaop/ncurrent/carousel/nchembio.2051-F1.jpg

(a) Competitive ABPP-SILAC analysis to identify FP-alkyne-inhibited proteins, in which protein enrichment and inhibition were measured in proteomic lysates from SKOV3 cells treated with FP-alkyne (20 μM, 1 h) or DMSO using the FP-biotin…

 

  1. Willems, L.I., Overkleeft, H.S. & van Kasteren, S.I. Current developments in activity-based protein profiling. Bioconjug. Chem. 25, 11811191 (2014).
  2. Niphakis, M.J. & Cravatt, B.F. Enzyme inhibitor discovery by activity-based protein profiling.Annu. Rev. Biochem. 83, 341377 (2014).
  3. Berger, A.B., Vitorino, P.M. & Bogyo, M. Activity-based protein profiling: applications to biomarker discovery, in vivo imaging and drug discovery. Am. J. Pharmacogenomics 4,371381 (2004).
  4. Liu, Y., Patricelli, M.P. & Cravatt, B.F. Activity-based protein profiling: the serine hydrolases.Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 1469414699 (1999).
  5. Simon, G.M. & Cravatt, B.F. Activity-based proteomics of enzyme superfamilies: serine hydrolases as a case study. J. Biol. Chem. 285, 1105111055 (2010).
  6. Bachovchin, D.A. et al. Superfamily-wide portrait of serine hydrolase inhibition achieved by library-versus-library screening. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 2094120946 (2010).
  7. Jessani, N. et al. A streamlined platform for high-content functional proteomics of primary human specimens. Nat. Methods 2, 691697 (2005).
  8. Higa, H.H., Diaz, S. & Varki, A. Biochemical and genetic evidence for distinct membrane-bound and cytosolic sialic acid O-acetyl-esterases: serine-active-site enzymes. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 144, 10991108 (1987).

Academic cross-fertilization by public screening yields a remarkable class of protein phosphatase methylesteras-1 inhibitors

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Apr 26; 108(17): 6811–6816.    doi:  10.1073/pnas.1015248108
National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored screening centers provide academic researchers with a special opportunity to pursue small-molecule probes for protein targets that are outside the current interest of, or beyond the standard technologies employed by, the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we describe the outcome of an inhibitor screen for one such target, the enzyme protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1), which regulates the methylesterification state of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and is implicated in cancer and neurodegeneration. Inhibitors of PME-1 have not yet been described, which we attribute, at least in part, to a dearth of substrate assays compatible with high-throughput screening. We show that PME-1 is assayable by fluorescence polarization-activity-based protein profiling (fluopol-ABPP) and use this platform to screen the 300,000+ member NIH small-molecule library. This screen identified an unusual class of compounds, the aza-β-lactams (ABLs), as potent (IC50 values of approximately 10 nM), covalent PME-1 inhibitors. Interestingly, ABLs did not derive from a commercial vendor but rather an academic contribution to the public library. We show using competitive-ABPP that ABLs are exquisitely selective for PME-1 in living cells and mice, where enzyme inactivation leads to substantial reductions in demethylated PP2A. In summary, we have combined advanced synthetic and chemoproteomic methods to discover a class of ABL inhibitors that can be used to selectively perturb PME-1 activity in diverse biological systems. More generally, these results illustrate how public screening centers can serve as hubs to create spontaneous collaborative opportunities between synthetic chemistry and chemical biology labs interested in creating first-in-class pharmacological probes for challenging protein targets.

Protein phosphorylation is a pervasive and dynamic posttranslational protein modification in eukaryotic cells. In mammals, more than 500 protein kinases catalyze the phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues on proteins (1). A much more limited number of phosphatases are responsible for reversing these phosphorylation events (2). For instance, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and PP1 are thought to be responsible together for > 90% of the total serine/threonine phosphatase activity in mammalian cells (3). Specificity is imparted on PP2A activity by multiple mechanisms, including dynamic interactions between the catalytic subunit (C) and different protein-binding partners (B subunits), as well as a variety of posttranslational chemical modifications (2, 4). Within the latter category is an unusual methylesterification event found at the C terminus of the catalytic subunit of PP2A that is introduced and removed by a specific methyltransferase (leucine carbxoylmethyltransferase-1 or LCMT1) (5, 6) and methylesterase (protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 or PME-1) (7), respectively (Fig. 1A). PP2A carboxymethylation (hereafter referred to as “methylation”) has been proposed to regulate PP2A activity, at least in part, by modulating the binding interaction of the C subunit with various regulatory B subunits (810). A predicted outcome of these shifts in subunit association is the targeting of PP2A to different protein substrates in cells. PME-1 has also been hypothesized to stabilize inactive forms of nuclear PP2A (11), and recent structural studies have shed light on the physical interactions between PME-1 and the PP2A holoenzyme (12).

There were several keys to the success of our probe development effort. First, screening for inhibitors of PME-1 benefited from the fluopol-ABPP technology, which circumvented the limited throughput of previously described substrate assays for this enzyme. Second, we were fortunate that the NIH compound library contained several members of the ABL class of small molecules. These chiral compounds, which represent an academic contribution to the NIH library, occupy an unusual portion of structural space that is poorly accessed by commercial compound collections. Although at the time of their original synthesis (23) it may not have been possible to predict whether these ABLs would show specific biological activity, their incorporation into the NIH library provided a forum for screening against many proteins and cellular targets, culminating in their identification as PME-1 inhibitors. We then used advanced chemoproteomic assays to confirm the remarkable selectivity displayed by ABLs for PME-1 across (and beyond) the serine hydrolase superfamily. That the mechanism for PME-1 inhibition involves acylation of the enzyme’s conserved serine nucleophile (Fig. 3) suggests that exploration of a more structurally diverse set of ABLs might uncover inhibitors for other serine hydrolases. In this way, the chemical information gained from a single high-throughput screen may be leveraged to initiate probe development programs for additional enzyme targets.

Projecting forward, this research provides an example of how public small-molecule screening centers can serve as a portal for spawning academic collaborations between chemical biology and synthetic chemistry labs. By continuing to develop versatile high-throughput screens and combining them with a small-molecule library of expanding structural diversity conferred by advanced synthetic methodologies, academic biologists and chemists are well-positioned to collaboratively deliver pharmacological probes for a wide range of proteins and pathways in cell biology.

 

New weapon against breast cancer

Molecular marker in healthy tissue can predict a woman’s risk of getting the disease, research says

April 6, 2016 | Popular
BRC_Cancer605

 

New Group of Aging-Related Proteins Discovered

http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/new-group-of-aging-related-proteins-discovered/81252599/

Scientists have discovered a group of six proteins that may help to divulge secrets of how we age, potentially unlocking new insights into diabetes, Alzheimer’s, cancer, and other aging-related diseases.

The proteins appear to play several roles in our bodies’ cells, from decreasing the amount of damaging free radicals and controlling the rate at which cells die to boosting metabolism and helping tissues throughout the body respond better to insulin. The naturally occurring amounts of each protein decrease with age, leading investigators to believe that they play an important role in the aging process and the onset of diseases linked to older age.

The research team led by Pinchas Cohen, M.D., dean and professor of the University of Southern California Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, identified the proteins and observed their origin from mitochondria and their game-changing roles in metabolism and cell survival. This latest finding builds upon prior research by Dr. Cohen and his team that uncovered two significant proteins, humanin and MOTS-c, hormones that appear to have significant roles in metabolism and diseases of aging.

Unlike most other proteins, humanin and MOTS-c are encoded in mitochondria. Dr. Cohen’s team used computer analysis to see if the part of the mitochondrial genome that provides the code for humanin was coding for other proteins as well. The analysis uncovered the genes for six new proteins, which were dubbed small humanin-like peptides, or SHLPs, 1 through 6 (pronounced “schlep”).

After identifying the six SHLPs and successfully developing antibodies to test for several of them, the team examined both mouse tissues and human cells to determine their abundance in different organs as well as their functions. The proteins were distributed quite differently among organs, which suggests that the proteins have varying functions based on where they are in the body. Of particular interest is SHLP 2, according to Dr. Cohen.  The protein appears to have insulin-sensitizing, antidiabetic effects as well as neuroprotective activity that may emerge as a strategy to combat Alzheimer’s disease. He added that SHLP 6 is also intriguing, with a unique ability to promote cancer cell death and thus potentially target malignant diseases.

Proteins That May Protect Against Age Related Illnesses Discovered

 

The cell proliferation antigen Ki-67 organises heterochromatin

 Michal Sobecki, 

Antigen Ki-67 is a nuclear protein expressed in proliferating mammalian cells. It is widely used in cancer histopathology but its functions remain unclear. Here, we show that Ki-67 controls heterochromatin organisation. Altering Ki-67 expression levels did not significantly affect cell proliferation in vivo. Ki-67 mutant mice developed normally and cells lacking Ki-67 proliferated efficiently. Conversely, upregulation of Ki-67 expression in differentiated tissues did not prevent cell cycle arrest. Ki-67 interactors included proteins involved in nucleolar processes and chromatin regulators. Ki-67 depletion disrupted nucleologenesis but did not inhibit pre-rRNA processing. In contrast, it altered gene expression. Ki-67 silencing also had wide-ranging effects on chromatin organisation, disrupting heterochromatin compaction and long-range genomic interactions. Trimethylation of histone H3K9 and H4K20 was relocalised within the nucleus. Finally, overexpression of human or Xenopus Ki-67 induced ectopic heterochromatin formation. Altogether, our results suggest that Ki-67 expression in proliferating cells spatially organises heterochromatin, thereby controlling gene expression.

 

A protein called Ki-67 is only produced in actively dividing cells, where it is located in the nucleus – the structure that contains most of the cell’s DNA. Researchers often use Ki-67 as a marker to identify which cells are actively dividing in tissue samples from cancer patients, and previous studies indicated that Ki-67 is needed for cells to divide. However, the exact role of this protein was not clear. Before cells can divide they need to make large amounts of new proteins using molecular machines called ribosomes and it has been suggested that Ki-67 helps to produce ribosomes.

Now, Sobecki et al. used genetic techniques to study the role of Ki-67 in mice. The experiments show that Ki-67 is not required for cells to divide in the laboratory or to make ribosomes. Instead, Ki-67 alters the way that DNA is packaged in the nucleus. Loss of Ki-67 from mice cells resulted in DNA becoming less compact, which in turn altered the activity of genes in those cells.

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BioMEMS The Market aspects of Oligonucleotide-Chips, Products and Applications, Competition, January 21, 2016

Curator: Gérard LOISEAU, ESQ

 

BioMEMS

The Market aspects of Oligonucleotide-Chips, Products, Applications, Competition 

January 21, 2016

2015-2020

The oligonucleotide synthesis market is expected to reach USD 1.918.6Billion at a CAGR of 10.1% by 2020 from USD 1.078.1Billion in 2015.

SOURCE

MARKETSANDMARKETS marketsandmarkets.com/

 

PLAYERS

  • Agilent Technologies Inc.
  • BioAutomation Corp.
  • Biosearch Technologies
  • Gen9 Inc.
  • GenScript Inc.
  • Illumina Inc.
  • Integrated DNA Technologies
  • New England Biolabs Inc.
  • Nitto Denko Avecia Inc.
  • OriGene Technologies Inc.
  • Sigma-Aldrich Corporation
  • Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.
  • TriLink Biotechnologies

 

Agilent Technologies
 CA NYSE :A


http://www.agilent.com/

  • Agilent was created as a spin off from Hewlett-Packard Company in 1999.
  • Agilent Technologies Inc. is engaged in the life sciences, diagnostics and applied chemical markets. The Company provides application focused solutions that include instruments, software, services and consumables for the entire laboratory workflow. The Company has three business segments:

the life sciences and applied markets business,

the diagnostics and genomics business, and

the Agilent Cross Lab business

  • The Company’s life sciences and applied markets business segment brings together the Company’s analytical laboratory instrumentation and informatics.
  • The Company’s diagnostics and genomics business segment consists of three businesses: the Dako business, the genomics business and the nucleic acid solutions business.
  • The Company’s Agilent Cross Lab business segment combines its analytical laboratory services and consumables business

SOURCE

http://reuters.com/

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

https://www.agilent.com/en-us/default#collapse-0

  • October 09, 2015 03:21 PM Eastern Daylight Time
  • CARPINTERIA, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Dako, an Agilent Technologies company and a worldwide provider of cancer diagnostics, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new test that can identify PD-L1 expression levels on the surface of non-small cell lung cancer tumor cells and provide information on the survival benefit with OPDIVO® (nivolumab) for patients with non-squamous NSCLC.

SOURCE

BUSINESS WIRE busibesswire.com/

 

BioAutomation Corp.

 TX


 

http://bioautomation.com/

          PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

  • DNA and RNA synthesis reagents for the MerMades

 

Note: The MerMade 192E Oligonucleotide synthesizer is designed to synthesize DNA, RNA & LNA oligonucleotides in a column format

          PARTNERSHIPS

  • HONGENE BIOTECH : BIOAUTOMATION is the exclusive distributor for the Americas
  • EMD MILLIPORE
  • BIOSEARCH TECHNOLOGIES

 

DISTRIBUTORS

  • LINK TECHNOLOGIES : UK
  • AME BIOSCIENCE : UK
  • BOSUNG SCIENCE : KOREA
  • DNA CHEM : CHINA
  • WAKO : JAPAN
  • ACE PROBE : INDIA

SOURCE

bioautomation.com/

 

Biosearch Technologies
 CA


http://biosearchtech.com/

          PRODUCTS

  • qPCR & SNP Genotyping
  • Custom Oligonucleotides
  • – highly sophisticated oligonucleotides
  • – simple PCR primers
  • Oligos in Plates
  • RNA FISH
  • Synthesis Reagents
  • Immunochemicals
  • Primers
  • Probes
  • Large-Scale Synthesis Oligos
  • Intermediate-Scale Synthesis Oligos

          SERVICES

  • GMP & Commercial Services
  • OEM & Kit Manufacturing
  • qPCR Design Collaborations

          DISTRIBUTORS

Argentina | Australia | Austria | Brazil | Canada |Chile | China | Colombia | Czech Republic | Denmark | Ecuador | Finland | Germany |Hong Kong | Israel | Italy | Japan | Korea | Malaysia | Mexico | New Zealand | Norway | Paraguay | Peru| Philippines | Poland | Romania | Singapore | South Africa | Spain | Sweden |Switzerland | Taiwan ROC | Thailand | Turkey | United Kingdom | Uruguay | Vietnam

SOURCE

biosearchtech.com/

 

Gen9 Inc.
 MA 


http://www.gen9bio.com/

          PRODUCTS

Gen9 is building on advances in synthetic biology to power a scalable fabrication capability that will significantly increase the world’s capacity to produce DNA content. The privately held company’s next-generation gene synthesis technology allows for the high-throughput, automated production of DNA constructs at lower cost and higher accuracy than previous methods on the market. Founded by world leaders in synthetic biology, Gen9 aims to ensure the constructive application of synthetic biology in industries ranging from enzyme and chemical production to pharmaceuticals and biofuels.

          SERVICES

  • Synthetic Biology
  • Gene Synthesis Services
  • Variant Libraries
  • Gene Sequence Design Services

         INVESTORS

  • Agilent Technologies : Private Equity
  • CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and SANTA CLARA, Calif. — April 24, 2013 —Gen9 Receives $21 Million Strategic Investment from Agilent Technologies

SOURCE

gen9bio.com/

 

GenScript Inc.
 NJ 


http://www.genscript.com/

  • GenScript is the largest gene synthesis provider in the USA
  • GenScript Corporation, a biology contract research organization, provides biological research and drug discovery services to pharmaceutical companies, biotech firms, and research institutions in the United States, Europe, and Japan. It offers bio-reagent, custom molecular biology, custom peptide, protein production, custom antibody production, drug candidates testing, assay development and screening, lead optimization, antibody drug development, gene synthesis, and assay-ready cell line production services.
  • The company also offers molecular biology, peptide, protein, immunoassay, chemicals, and cell biology products. It offers its products through distributors in Tokyo, Japan; and Seoul, Korea. GenScript Corporation has a strategic partnership with Immunologix, Inc. The company was founded in 2002 and is based in Piscataway, New Jersey. It has subsidiaries in France, Japan, and China.

 

Note: As of October 24, 2011, Immunologix, Inc. was acquired by Intrexon Corporation. Immunologix, Inc. develops and produces antibody-based therapeutics for various biological targets. It produces human monoclonal antibodies against viral, bacterial, and tumor antigens, as well as human auto antigens.

Intrexon Corporation, founded in 1998, is a leader in synthetic biology focused on collaborating with companies in Health, Food, Energy, Environment and Consumer sectors to create biologically based products that improve quality of life and the health of the planet.

 

 

             PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

  • Gene synthesis
  • Antibody services
  • Protein Services
  • Peptide services

 

               INVESTORS


Note: The Balloch Group (‘TBG’) was established in 2001 by Howard Balloch (Canada‘s ambassador to China from 1996 to 2001). TBG has since grown from a market-entry consultancy working with North American clients in China to a leading advisory and merchant banking firm serving both domestic Chinese companies and multinational corporations. TBG was ranked as the number one boutique investment bank in China by ChinaVenture in 2008.

Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield and Byers

 

Illumina
Inc. CA


http://illumina.com/

 

Monica Heger : SAN FRANCISCO (GenomeWeb) – Illumina today announced two new next-generation sequencing platforms, a targeted sequencing system called MiniSeq and a semiconductor sequencer that is still under development.

Illumina disclosed the initiatives during a presentation at the JP Morgan Healthcare conference held here today. During the presentation, Illumina CEO Jay Flatley also announced a new genotyping array called Infinium XT; a partnership with Bio-Rad to develop a single-cell sequencing workflow; preliminary estimates of its fourth-quarter 2015 revenues; and an update on existing products. The presentation followed the company’s announcement on Sunday that it has launched a new company called Grail to develop a next-generation sequencing test for early cancer detection from patient blood samples.

The MiniSeq system, which is based on Illumina’s current sequencing technology, will begin shipping early this quarter and has a list price of $49,500. It can perform a variety of targeted DNA and RNA applications, from single-gene to pathway sequencing, and promises “all-in” prices, including library prep and sequencing, of $200 to $300 per sample, Flatley said during the JP Morgan presentation.

SOURCES

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing-technology/illumina-unveils-mini-targeted-sequencer-semiconductor-sequencing-project-jp

http://investor.biospace.com/biospace/quote?Symbol=ILMN

 

              PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

  •               Mid to large scale manufacturing assets
  •               Analytical Labs
  •               Pre-clinical
  •               Clinical
  •               Launched products

 

              COMPETITORS

https://finance.yahoo.com/q/co?s=ILMN+Competitors Tue, Feb 2, 2016, 2:16pm EST – US Markets

ILMN PVT1 AFFX LMNX Industry
Market Cap: 22.75B N/A 1.13B 835.66M 134.14M
Employees: 3,700 10,000 1,200 745 45.00
Qtrly Rev Growth (yoy): 0.14 N/A -0.01 0.07 0.18
Revenue (ttm): 2.14B 3.80B1 357.74M 235.37M 8.47M
Gross Margin (ttm): 0.73 N/A 0.63 0.71 0.58
EBITDA (ttm): 770.84M N/A 46.64M 52.99M -12.31M
Operating Margin (ttm): 0.30 N/A 0.08 0.17 -1.62
Net Income (ttm): 510.36M 430.90M1 11.22M 39.29M N/A
EPS (ttm): 3.42 N/A 0.13 0.93 -0.34
P/E (ttm): 45.43 N/A 104.40 20.91 25.33
PEG (5 yr expected): 2.68 N/A 4.66 0.55 N/A
P/S (ttm): 10.87 N/A 3.13 3.45 13.65

 

Pvt1 = Life Technologies Corporation (privately held)

AFFX = Affymetrix Inc.

LMNX = Luminex Corporation

 

 

Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT)
IOWA + CA

http://www.com/

 

Integrated DNA Technologies, Inc. (IDT), the global leader in nucleic acid synthesis, serving all areas of life sciences research and development, offers products for a broad range of genomics applications. IDT’s primary business is the production of custom, synthetic nucleic acids for molecular biology applications, including qPCR, sequencing, synthetic biology, and functional genomics. The company manufactures and ships an average of 44,000 custom nucleic acids per day to more than 82,000 customers worldwide. For more information, visit idtdna.com.

 

               PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

               https://eu.idtdna.com/site

  • DNA & RNA Synthesis
  • Custom DNA Oligos 96- & 384-Well Plates Ultramer Oligos Custom RNA Oligos SameDay Oligos HotPlates ReadyMade Primers Oligo Modifications Freedom
  • Dyes GMP for Molecular Diagnostics Large Scale Oligo Synthesis

 

Note : Skokie, IL – December 1, 2015. Integrated DNA Technologies Inc. (“IDT”), the global leader in custom nucleic acid synthesis, has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire the oligonucleotide synthesis business of AITbiotech Pte. Ltd. in Singapore (“AITbiotech”). With this acquisition, IDT expands its customer base across Southeast Asia making it possible for these additional customers to now have access to its broad range of products for genomic applications. AITbiotech will continue operations in its other core business areas.

 

New England Biolabs Inc.
 MA 


http://www.neb.com/

 

                PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

  •                 Restriction Endonucleases
  •                 PCR, Polymerases & Amplification Technologies
  •                 DNA Modifying Enzymes
  •                 Library Preparation for Next Generation Sequencing
  •                 Nucleic Acid Purification
  •                 Markers & Ladders
  •                 RNA Reagents
  •                 Gene Expression
  •                 Cellular Analysis

SOURCE

neb.com/

 

Nitto Denko Avecia Inc.
 MA


http://avecia.com/

 

With over 20 years of experience in oligonucleotide development and production, and over 1000 sequences manufactured, Avecia has played an integral role in the advancing oligo therapeutic market. Our mission is to continue to build value for our customers, as they progress through drug development into commercialization. And as a member of the Nitto Denko Corporation (nitto.com), Avecia is committed to the future of the oligonucleotide market. We are driven by innovative ideas and flexible solutions, designed to provide our customers with the best in service, quality, and technology.

 

SOURCE

http://avecia.com/

 

Note : 1918 Nitto Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. forms in Ohsaki, Tokyo, to produce electrical insulating materials in Japan.

2011 Acquires Avecia Biotechnology Inc. in the U.S.A.

 

 

OriGene Technologies Inc.
 CA

http://www.com/

 

OriGene Technologies, Inc. develops, manufactures, and sells genome wide research and diagnostic products for pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and academic research applications. The company offers cDNA clones, including TrueORF cDNA, viral ORF, destination vectors, TrueClones (human), TrueClones (mouse), organelle marker plasmids, MicroRNA tools, mutant and variant clones, plasmid purification kits, transfection reagents, and gene synthesis service; and HuSH shRNA, siRNA, miRNA, qPCR reagents, plasmid purification products, transfection reagents, PolyA+ and total RNA products, first-strand cDNA synthesis, and CRISPR/Cas9 genome products. It also provides proteins and lysates, such as purified human proteins, over-expression cell lysates, mass spectrometry standard proteins, and protein purification reagents; UltraMAB IHC antibodies, TrueMAB primary antibodies, anti-tag and fluorescent proteins, ELISA antibodies, luminex antibodies, secondary antibodies, and controls and others; and anatomic pathology products, including IHC antibodies, detection systems, and IHC accessories

The company offers luminex and ELISA antibody pairs, autoantibody profiling arrays, ELISA kits, cell assay kits, assay reagents, custom development, and fluorogenic cell assays; TissueFocus search tools; tissue sections; tissue microarrays, cancer protein lysate arrays, TissueScan cDNA arrays, tissue blocks, and quality control products, as well as tissue RNA, DNA, and protein lysates; and lab essentials. Its research areas include cancer biomarker research, RNAi, pathology IHC, stem cell research, ion channels, and protein kinase products. The company provides gene synthesis and molecular biology services, genome editing, custom cloning, custom shRNA, purified protein, monoclonal antibody development, and assay development. It sells its products through distributors worldwide, as well as online. OriGene Technologies, Inc. was incorporated in 1995 and is based in Rockville, Maryland.

SOURCE

http://BLOOMBERG.com

               PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

  •                cDNA Clones
Human, mouse, rat
Expression validated
  •                RNAi
shRNA, siRNA
microRNA & 3’UTR clones
  •                Gene Synthesis
Codon optimization
Variant libraries
  •                Real-time PCR
Primer pairs, panels
SYBR green reagents
  •                Lab Essentials
DNA/RNA purification kits
Transfection reagents
  •                Anatomic Pathology
UltraMAB antibodies
Specificity validated
  •                Recombinant Proteins
10,000 human proteins
from mammalian system
  •                Antibodies
TrueMAB primary antibodies
Anti-tag antibodies
  •                Assays and Kits
ELISA & Luminex antibodies
Autoantibody Profiling Array
  •                Cancer & Normal Tissues
Pathologist verified
gDNA, RNA, sections, arrays

SOURCE

origene.com/

 

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation 
MI 


http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/

Louis, MO – November 18, 2015 Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Completes Sigma-Aldrich Acquisition

Merck KGaA today announced the completion of its $17 billion acquisition of Sigma-Aldrich, creating one of the leaders in the $130 billion global industry to help solve the toughest problems in life science.

Press Release: 18-Nov-2015

Letter to our Life Science Customers from Dr. Udit Batra

The life science business of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany brings together the world-class products and services, innovative capabilities and exceptional talent of EMD Millipore and Sigma-Aldrich to create a global leader in the life science industry.

Everything we do starts with our shared purpose – to solve the toughest problems in life science by collaborating with the global scientific community. 

This combination is built on complementary strengths, which will enable us to serve you even better as one organization than either company could alone.

This means providing a broader portfolio with a catalog of more than 300,000 products, including many of the most respected brands in the industry, greater geographic reach, and an unmatched combination of industry-leading capabilities.

                PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

                http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/configurator/servlet/DesignCenter?btnOpen_0.x=1

                http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/content/dam/sigma-aldrich/common/quality-products.jpg

 

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc.
 MA 
NYSE :TMO


http://thermofisher.com/

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. is a provider of analytical instruments, equipment, reagents and consumables, software and services for research, manufacturing, analysis, discovery and diagnostics. The company operates through four segments: Life Sciences Solutions, provides reagents, instruments and consumables used in biological and medical research, discovery and production of new drugs and vaccines as well as diagnosis of disease; Analytical Instruments, provides instruments, consumables, software and services that are used in the laboratory; Specialty Diagnostics, offers diagnostic test kits, reagents, culture media, instruments and associated products, and Laboratory Products and Services, offers self-manufactured and sourced products for the laboratory.

SOURCE

http://REUTERS.com

 

                PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

  •                 Oligos Value – Standard – Plate
  •                 Primers
  •                 Probes
  •                 Nucleotides

 

                BRANDS

  1.                THERMO SCIENTIFIC
  2.                 APPLIED BIOSYSTEMS
  3.                 INVITROGEN
  4.                 FISHER SCIENTIFIC
  5.                 UNITY LAB SERVICES

 

                 PARTNERSHIPS

AFFYMETRIX : NASDAQ : AFFX : affymetrix.com/

WALTHAM, Mass. & SANTA CLARA, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jan. 8, 2016– Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. (NYSE:TMO), the world leader in serving science, and Affymetrix Inc. (NASDAQ:AFFX), a leading provider of cellular and genetic analysis products, today announced that their boards of directors have unanimously approved Thermo Fisher’s acquisition of Affymetrix for $14.00 per share in cash. The transaction represents a purchase price of approximately $1.3 billion.

SOURCE

http://BUSINESSWIRE.com

 

TriLink Biotechnologies
 CA 


http://www.com/

 

              PRODUCTS

              Oligonucleotides

  •               DNA Oligos
  •               RNA Oligos
  •               Modified Oligos
  •               Specialty Oligos

              Nucleotides

  •               NTPs (Nucleoside Triphosphates)
  •               Biphosphates
  •               Monophosphates

 

              SERVICES

  •              Custom Chemistry
  •              Reagents
  •              Aptamers

 

             PARTNERSHIPS

  • LIFE TECHNOLOGIES,
  • TERMO FISHER SCIENTIFIC since July 2015 thermofisher.com/
  • GENMARK genmarkdx.com/

SOURCE

http://trilinkbiotech.com/

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

Gene Editing: The Role of Oligonucleotide Chips

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/07/gene-editing-the-role-of-oligonucleotide-chips/

Gene Editing for Exon 51: Why CRISPR Snipping might be better than Exon Skipping for DMD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/23/gene-editing-for-exon-51-why-crispr-snipping-might-be-better-than-exon-skipping-for-dmd/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »


Antibody alternatives in specific aptamer 3-D scaffold binding

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

New Proteomics Tools to Open Up Drug Discovery

Dr. Paul Ko Ferrigno, Chief Scientific Officer, and Dr. Jane McLeod, of Avacta Life Sciences

http://www.dddmag.com/articles/2016/01/new-proteomics-tools-open-drug-discovery

 

Size matters: Smaller molecules allow a tighter packing density on solid surfaces for improved signal-to-noise in assays, such as SPR or ELISA.

http://www.dddmag.com/sites/dddmag.com/files/AvactaAffimer%20stills_00006.jpg

Size matters: Smaller molecules allow a tighter packing density on solid surfaces for improved signal-to-noise in assays, such as SPR or ELISA.

 

In the current genomic era of very accurate DNA analyses by in situ hybridization, DNA chip analyses, and deep sequencing, it is often assumed that antibodies have an analogous ability to identify molecular targets accurately. Nothing could be further from the truth. Proteomics as a field is still lagging behind its genomic counterpart in the level of detail we can achieve, the level of data we can collect and the overall levels of accuracy and reliability that the collected data represent.

From the estimated 20,000 human genes 100,000 different possible proteins have been predicted. What is more, the variation achieved via the post-translational modification of these proteins brings another layer of complexity to cellular signalling. All this means that while studying the genetic blueprint can offer insights into the cell, it is only through examining the functional protein units that we can comprehensively map the dynamic interactions that occur within the cell to drive an organism or disease process.

 

Why not use antibodies?

Antibodies form the basis of molecular recognition in proteomics, whether this is to identify a protein within a complex mixture or label a specific protein within a cell. Both their target specificity and high binding capacity have made these molecules fantastically useful tools within diagnostics. However, the large majority of commercially available antibodies are for use as reagents in research and development, where they are simply not as well validated and issues with their manufacture have created problems that have hindered drug development.

It has proven next to impossible to develop antibodies to certain targets. This may be because of their high homology to the host protein, so the immune system fails to recognise them as different, or due to antigen processing resulting in the loss of post-translational modifications or discontinuous epitopes. However, without the necessary antibodies to investigate these targets the corresponding research avenues have remained closed and key drug targets may have been missed.

Almost worse than lacking the necessary research tools is the problem of antibody reproducibility. Matthias Uhlen revealed that of the 5,436 antibodies tested as part of the Protein Atlas project over 50 percent failed to recognize their target in at least one of two commonly used assays. Antibodies that are not specific to their target or do not recognize their target at all are responsible for increasing the cost of biological research, with an estimated $800 million spent globally every year on bad antibodies. Many published studies have had to be retracted due to antibody-derived error and those that remain unidentified in the literature will continue to lead researchers down blind alleys. This level of misinformation in the published literature is not just hindering the progression of the field, but possibly even sending it backwards and costing more than is needed — an issue not to be taken lightly when so many research budgets are coming under the knife.

More recently there has been a call from a number of leading scientists for the use of polyclonal antibodies, considered to be the worst offenders in terms of batch-to-batch irreproducibility, to be abandoned. They suggest a move towards recombinant systems of production, which would remove the restrictions of the immune system on antibody production. Yet, they state that $1 billion dollars investment would be required to re-route antibody production down this path and suggest that a period of five to ten years may be required to bring about these changes.

Simply producing recombinant antibodies rather than animal-derived affinity reagents will still leave us with a number of problems regarding their use. Antibodies are simply too large to target many smaller, hidden epitopes and the presence of key disulphide bonds within their structure makes them all too susceptible to reduction within the cell, rendering them useless for applications such as live cell imaging of molecules within the cytoplasm. Moreover, can we afford to wait another decade for a solution to this problem before we pursue protein targets for basic understanding and drug development?

 

 

 

 

Antibody alternatives for new targets and techniques

Antibody alternatives are already available to researchers in the life sciences field. They are produced either from nucleic acid or protein molecules. Aptamers are short, single-stranded RNA or DNA molecules that fold to form 3D scaffolds, which can present a specific interaction surface to allow specific binding to its target molecule. Protein scaffolds are formed from parts of or whole proteins modified to present a peptide sequence. This peptide sequence works in a similar manner to present a specific interaction surface for specific binding to a desired target.

These antibody alternatives are produced in recombinant systems, minimizing batch-to-batch variation and allowing them to be produced to theoretically any target. Additionally, as they do not use animals in their production they are generally less expensive to produce than traditional antibodies.

 

 

 

 

While companies such as Affibody and Avacta Life Sciences are aiming to open up the drug pipeline, by offering these alternative affinity reagents to previously inaccessible targets for use in research and development, many have moved into exploiting their therapeutic potential. Noxxon produce an RNA-based scaffold, Spiegelmers, which are currently in phase 2 clinical trials for diabetic nephropathy, and Molecular Partners have reached phase 3 clinical trials with their protein scaffold DARPins, for wet age-related macular degeneration.

These new antibody alternatives are smaller than traditional antibodies. This opens up the use of new technologies, such as super resolution microscopy. While the diffraction limit remained at about 250 nmm the length of the antibody at 15 nm was of little importance, tagging your molecule as accurately as necessary. Removing this limit in super resolution microscopy has meant that antibodies are now too large to provide the required level of accuracy. Instead, using an antibody alternative of only 2nm to tag your protein of interest opens up this new technique offering greater precision to intracellular localization.

 

 

 

As these scaffolds have been engineered to be fit-for-purpose many contain no intramolecular disulphide bonds and so are not sensitive to the reducing environment of the cell. This function enables their use as intracellular reporters of molecular conformation, as well as in standard assays like IHC or western blotting, so allowing scientists to use the same reagent across both intracellular and biochemical assays, thus bridging the gap between cell biology and biochemical studies.

Offering increased reproducibility, access to an increased range of applications, and the opportunity to hit previously inaccessible targets, antibody alternatives are opening up potential new avenues of drug discovery.

 

 

About the Authors

Dr. Paul Ko Ferrigno is Chief Scientific Officer at Avacta Life Sciences and a Visiting Professor at the University of Leeds. He has been working on peptide aptamers since 2001 in Leeds and at the MRC Cancer Cell Unit in Cambridge, UK where his team developed the Affimer scaffold technology.

Dr. Jane McLeod is a Scientific Writer at Avacta Life Sciences.

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »


Development of Chemoresistance to Targeted Therapies: Alterations of Cell Signaling, & the Kinome [11.4.1.2]

 

Curator, Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

The advent of molecular targeted therapies like Imatinib (Gleevec), and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) has been transformative to cancer therapy. However, as with all chemotherapeutics, including radiation therapy, the development of chemo-resistance toward personalized, molecular therapies has been disastrous to the successful treatment of cancer. The fact that chemo-resistance develops to personalized therapies was a serious disappointment to clinicians (although most expected this to be the case) but more surprisingly it was the rapidity of onset and speed of early reported cases which may have been the biggest shocker.

A post on resistance to other TKIs (to EGFR and ALK) can be seen here: https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/01/resistance-to-receptor-of-tyrosine-kinase/

History of Development of Resistance to Imatinib (Gleevec)

The Melo group published a paper in Blood showing that short exposure to STI571 (imatinib; trade name Gleevec®) could result in drug resistant clones

Selection and characterization of BCR-ABL positive cell lines with differential sensitivity to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571: diverse mechanisms of resistance. Blood. 2000 Aug 1;96(3):1070-9.

Mahon FX1, Deininger MW, Schultheis B, Chabrol J, Reiffers J, Goldman JM, Melo JV.

Abstract

Targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl with STI571 is an attractive therapeutic strategy in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). A few CML cell lines and primary progenitors are, however, resistant to this compound. We investigated the mechanism of this resistance in clones of the murine BaF/3 cells transfected with BCR-ABL and in 4 human cell lines from which sensitive (s) and resistant (r) clones were generated by various methods. Although the resistant cells were able to survive in the presence of STI571, their proliferation was approximately 30% lower than that of their sensitive counterparts in the absence of the compound. The concentration of STI571 needed for a 50% reduction in viable cells after a 3-day exposure was on average 10 times higher in the resistant (2-3 micromol/L) than in the sensitive (0.2-0.25 micromol/L) clones. The mechanism of resistance to STI571 varied among the cell lines. Thus, in Baf/BCR-ABL-r, LAMA84-r, and AR230-r, there was up-regulation of the Bcr-Abl protein associated with amplification of the BCR-ABL gene. In K562-r, there was no Bcr-Abl overexpression, but the IC(50) for the inhibition of Bcr-Abl autophosphorylation was increased in the resistant clones. Sequencing of the Abl kinase domain revealed no mutations. The multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was overexpressed in LAMA84-r, indicating that at least 2 mechanisms of resistance operate in this cell line. KCL22-r showed neither Bcr-Abl up-regulation nor a higher threshold for tyrosine kinase inhibition by STI571. We conclude that BCR-ABL-positive cells can evade the inhibitory effect of STI571 by different mechanisms, such as Bcr-Abl overexpression, reduced intake mediated by Pgp, and, possibly, acquisition of compensatory mutations in genes other than BCR-ABL.

mellobcrablresistamplification

FISH analysis of AR230 and LAMA84 sensitive and resistant clones, with probes for the ABL (red signal) and theBCR (green signal) genes. BCR-ABL is identified as a red–green or yellow fused signal. Adapted from Mahon et al., Blood 2000; 96(3):1070-9.

This rapid onset of imatinib resistance also see in the clinic and more prominent in advance disease

From NCCN 2nd Annual Congress: Hematologic Malignancies – Update on Primary Therapy, Second-Line Therapy, and New Agents for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (Slides with Transcript)

http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/564097

There is some evidence that even looking earlier makes some sense in determining what the prognosis is. This is from Timothy Hughes’ group in Adelaide, and he is looking at an earlier molecular time point, 3 months after initiation of therapy. And what you have done here is you have taken the 3-month mark and you have said, “Well, based on your response at 3 months, what is your likelihood that in the future you will either get a major molecular response or become resistant?”

3monthimitanibresist

If you look at the accumulation of imatinib resistance to find if it is either initially not responding or becoming resistant after a good response, it goes up with type of disease and phase of disease. So if you look at patients who have early chronic phase disease — that is, they start getting imatinib less than a year from the diagnosis — their chance of failure is pretty low. With later disease — they are in a chronic phase but they have had disease more than a year before they get imatinib — it is higher. If you see patients with accelerated phase or blast crisis, the chances are that they will fail sometime in the future.

speed of imitinib resistance

Therefore, because not all resistant samples show gene amplification of Bcr/Abl and the rapidity of onset of resistance, many feel that there are other mechanisms of resistance at play, like kinome plasticity.

Kinome Plasticity Contributes to TKI resistance

Beyond gene amplification, other mechanisms of imitanib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) include alterations in compensatory signaling pathways. This can be referred to as kinome plasticity and is explained in the following abstracts from the AACR 2015 meeting.

Systems-pharmacology dissection of a drug synergy in imatinib-resistant CML

Georg E Winter, Uwe Rix, Scott M Carlson, Karoline V Gleixner, Florian Grebien, Manuela Gridling, André C Müller, Florian P Breitwieser, Martin Bilban, Jacques Colinge, Peter Valent, Keiryn L Bennett, Forest M White & Giulio Superti-Furga. Nature Chemical Biology 8,905–912(2012)

Occurrence of the BCR-ABLT315I gatekeeper mutation is among the most pressing challenges in the therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Several BCR-ABL inhibitors have multiple targets and pleiotropic effects that could be exploited for their synergistic potential. Testing combinations of such kinase inhibitors identified a strong synergy between danusertib and bosutinib that exclusively affected CML cells harboring BCR-ABLT315I. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we applied a systems-level approach comprising phosphoproteomics, transcriptomics and chemical proteomics. Data integration revealed that both compounds targeted Mapk pathways downstream of BCR-ABL, resulting in impaired activity of c-Myc. Using pharmacological validation, we assessed that the relative contributions of danusertib and bosutinib could be mimicked individually by Mapk inhibitors and collectively by downregulation of c-Myc through Brd4 inhibition. Thus, integration of genome- and proteome-wide technologies enabled the elucidation of the mechanism by which a new drug synergy targets the dependency of BCR-ABLT315I CML cells on c-Myc through nonobvious off targets.

nchembio.1085-F2kinomegleevecresistance

Please see VIDEO and SLIDESHARE of a roundtable Expert Discussion on CML

Curated Content From the 2015 AACR National Meeting on Drug Resistance Mechanisms and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

Session Title: Mechanisms of Resistance: From Signaling Pathways to Stem Cells
Session Type: Major Symposium
Session Start/End Time: Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 10:30 AM -12:30 PM
Location: Terrace Ballroom II-III (400 Level), Pennsylvania Convention Center
CME: CME-Designated
CME/CE Hours: 2
Session Description: Even the most effective cancer therapies are limited due to the development of one or more resistance mechanisms. Acquired resistance to targeted therapies can, in some cases, be attributed to the selective propagation of a small population of intrinsically resistant cells. However, there is also evidence that cancer drugs themselves can drive resistance by triggering the biochemical- or genetic-reprogramming of cells within the tumor or its microenvironment. Therefore, understanding drug resistance at the molecular and biological levels may enable the selection of specific drug combinations to counteract these adaptive responses. This symposium will explore some of the recent advances addressing the molecular basis of cancer cell drug resistance. We will address how tumor cell signaling pathways become rewired to facilitate tumor cell survival in the face of some of our most promising cancer drugs. Another topic to be discussed involves how drugs select for or induce the reprogramming of tumor cells toward a stem-like, drug resistant fate. By targeting the molecular driver(s) of rewired signaling pathways and/or cancer stemness it may be possible to select drug combinations that prevent the reprogramming of tumors and thereby delay or eliminate the onset of drug resistance.
Presentations:
Chairperson
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 10:30 AM -12:30 PM
David A. Cheresh. UCSD Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA
Introduction
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 10:30 AM -10:40 AM
Resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors: Heterogeneity and therapeutic strategies.
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 10:40 AM -10:55 AM
Jeffrey A. Engelman. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Discussion
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 10:55 AM -11:00 AM
NG04: Clinical acquired resistance to RAF inhibitor combinations in BRAF mutant colorectal cancer through MAPK pathway alterations
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 11:00 AM -11:15 AM
Ryan B. Corcoran, Leanne G. Ahronian, Eliezer Van Allen, Erin M. Coffee, Nikhil Wagle, Eunice L. Kwak, Jason E. Faris, A. John Iafrate, Levi A. Garraway, Jeffrey A. Engelman. Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
Discussion
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 11:15 AM -11:20 AM
SY27-02: Tumour heterogeneity and therapy resistance in melanoma
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 11:20 AM -11:35 AM
Claudia Wellbrock. Univ. of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
Discussion
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 11:35 AM -11:40 AM
SY27-03: Breast cancer stem cell state transitions mediate therapeutic resistance
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 11:40 AM -11:55 AM
Max S. Wicha. University of Michigan, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI
Discussion
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 11:55 AM -12:00 PM
SY27-04: Induction of cancer stemness and drug resistance by EGFR blockade
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 12:00 PM -12:15 PM
David A. Cheresh. UCSD Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA
Discussion
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 12:15 PM -12:20 PM
General Discussion
Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015, 12:20 PM -12:30 PM

Targeting Macromolecular Signaling Complexes 
Room 115, Pennsylvania Convention Center

Drug Resistance 
Hall A (200 Level), Pennsylvania Convention Center
Resistance to Pathway-Targeted Therapeutics 1 
Section 33

Molecular Mechanisms of Sensitivity or Resistance to Pathway-Targeted Agents 
Room 118, Pennsylvania Convention Center

Targeting Signaling Pathways in Cancer 
Room 204, Pennsylvania Convention Center
Exploiting the MAPK Pathway in Cancer 
Room 115, Pennsylvania Convention Center

PLEASE see the attached WORD file which includes ALL abstracts, posters, and talks on this subject from the AACR 2015 national meeting BELOW

 AACR2015resistancekinome

Other posts related to, Cancer, Chemotherapy, Gleevec and Resistance on this Open Access Journal Include

Imatinib (Gleevec) May Help Treat Aggressive Lymphoma: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Treatments for Acute Leukemias [2.4.4A]

Therapeutic Implications for Targeted Therapy from the Resurgence of Warburg ‘Hypothesis’

Hematologic Malignancies [6.2]

Overview of Posttranslational Modification (PTM)

Novel Modeling Methods for Genomic Data Analysis & Evolutionary Systems Biology to Design Dosing Regimens to Minimize Resistance

Mechanisms of Drug Resistance

Using RNA-seq and targeted nucleases to identify mechanisms of drug resistance in acute myeloid leukemia

An alternative approach to overcoming the apoptotic resistance of pancreatic cancer

Resistance to Receptor of Tyrosine Kinase

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Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Leroy Hood

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Intelligence

Series E. 2; 4.5

Leroy Hood, MD, PhD

Dr. Hood created the technological foundation for the sciences of genomics (study of genes) and proteomics (study of proteins) through the invention of five groundbreaking instruments and by explicating the potentialities of genome and proteome research into the future through his pioneering of the fields of systems biology and systems medicine. Hood’s instruments not only pioneered the deciphering of biological information, but also introduced the concept of high throughput data accumulation through automation and parallelization of the protein and DNA chemistries.

The first four instruments were commercialized by Applied Biosystems, Inc., a company founded by Dr. Hood in 1981, and the ink-jet technology was commercialized by Agilent Technologies, thus making these instruments immediately available to the world-community of scientists.

The first two instruments transformed the field of proteomics. The protein sequencer allowed scientists to read and analyze proteins that had not previously been accessible, resulting in the characterization of a series of new proteins whose genes could then be cloned and analyzed. These discoveries led to significant ramifications for biology, medicine, and pharmacology. The second instrument, the protein synthesizer, synthesized proteins and peptides in sufficient quantities to begin characterizing their functions. The DNA synthesizer, the first of three instruments for genomic analyses, was used to synthesize DNA fragments for DNA mapping and gene cloning. The most notable of Hood’s inventions, the automated DNA sequencer developed in 1986, made possible high-speed sequencing of human genomes and was the key technology enabling the Human Genome Project.

In the early 1990s Hood and his colleagues developed the ink-jet DNA synthesis technology for creating DNA arrays with tens of thousands of gene fragments, one of the first of the so-called DNA chips, which enabled measuring the levels of 10,000s of expressed genes. This instrument has also transformed genomics, biology, and medicine.

In 1992, Hood created the first cross-disciplinary biology department, Molecular Biotechnology, at the University of Washington. In 2000, he left the UW to co-found Institute for Systems Biology, the first of its kind. He has pioneered systems medicine the years since ISB’s founding.

In 2000, Hood and two colleagues founded the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB), a nonprofit research institute integrating biology, technology, computation and medicine to take a systems (holistic) approach to studying the complexity of biology and medicine by analyzing all elements in a biological system rather than studying them one gene or protein at a time (an atomistic approach).

Hood has made many seminal discoveries in the fields of immunology, neurobiology and biotechnology and, most recently, has been a leader in the development of systems biology, its applications to cancer, neurodegenerative disease, and the linkage of systems biology to personalized medicine.

Hood’s efforts in a systems approach to disease have led him to pioneer a new approach to medicine that he coined P4 Medicine in 2003. His view is that P4 medicine will transform the practice of medicine over the next decade, moving it from a largely reactive discipline to a proactive one.

Dr. Hood’s outstanding contributions have had a resounding effect on the advancement of science since the 1960s. Throughout his career, he has adhered to the advice of his mentor, Dr. William J. Dreyer: “If you want to practice biology, do it on the leading edge, and if you want to be on the leading edge, invent new tools for deciphering biological information.”

 

Hood is now pioneering new approaches to P4 medicine

Co-founder and Chairman P4 Medicine institute

—predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory, and most recently, has embarked on creating a P4 pilot project on 100,000 well individuals, that is transforming healthcare.

In addition to his ground-breaking research, Hood has published 750 papers, received 36 patents, 17 honorary degrees and more than 100 awards and honors. He is one of only 15 individuals elected to all three National Academies—the National Academy of Science, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. Hood has founded or co-founded 15 different biotechnology companies.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3D5aE8tgbsl9U Feb 18, 2015 Dr. Leroy Hood, President and Co-founder, Institute for Systems Biology, gives a talk entitled “Systems Medicine and a Longitudinal, …

http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DaYGTLj02sx0  Nov 19, 2014 … of Healthcare? A Personal View of Biological Complexity, Paradigm Changes, Systems Biology and Systems Medicine .Speaker: Leroy Hood.

http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DnT1MvnH6j8Q Sep 26, 2014 Dr. Leroy Hood discusses how P4 (Predictive, Preventive, … EMBC 2014 Theme Keynote Lecture with Dr. Emery Brown – Duration: 58:49. by …

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Metabolic Genomics and Pharmaceutics, Vol. 1 of BioMed Series D available on Amazon Kindle


Metabolic Genomics and Pharmaceutics, Vol. 1 of BioMed Series D available on Amazon Kindle

Reporter: Stephen S Williams, PhD

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence would like to announce the First volume of their BioMedical E-Book Series D:

Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics, Vol. I

SACHS FLYER 2014 Metabolomics SeriesDindividualred-page2

which is now available on Amazon Kindle at

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B012BB0ZF0.

This e-Book is a comprehensive review of recent Original Research on  METABOLOMICS and related opportunities for Targeted Therapy written by Experts, Authors, Writers. This is the first volume of the Series D: e-Books on BioMedicine – Metabolomics, Immunology, Infectious Diseases.  It is written for comprehension at the third year medical student level, or as a reference for licensing board exams, but it is also written for the education of a first time baccalaureate degree reader in the biological sciences.  Hopefully, it can be read with great interest by the undergraduate student who is undecided in the choice of a career. The results of Original Research are gaining value added for the e-Reader by the Methodology of Curation. The e-Book’s articles have been published on the Open Access Online Scientific Journal, since April 2012.  All new articles on this subject, will continue to be incorporated, as published with periodical updates.

We invite e-Readers to write an Article Reviews on Amazon for this e-Book on Amazon.

All forthcoming BioMed e-Book Titles can be viewed at:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, launched in April 2012 an Open Access Online Scientific Journal is a scientific, medical and business multi expert authoring environment in several domains of  life sciences, pharmaceutical, healthcare & medicine industries. The venture operates as an online scientific intellectual exchange at their website http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com and for curation and reporting on frontiers in biomedical, biological sciences, healthcare economics, pharmacology, pharmaceuticals & medicine. In addition the venture publishes a Medical E-book Series available on Amazon’s Kindle platform.

Analyzing and sharing the vast and rapidly expanding volume of scientific knowledge has never been so crucial to innovation in the medical field. WE are addressing need of overcoming this scientific information overload by:

  • delivering curation and summary interpretations of latest findings and innovations on an open-access, Web 2.0 platform with future goals of providing primarily concept-driven search in the near future
  • providing a social platform for scientists and clinicians to enter into discussion using social media
  • compiling recent discoveries and issues in yearly-updated Medical E-book Series on Amazon’s mobile Kindle platform

This curation offers better organization and visibility to the critical information useful for the next innovations in academic, clinical, and industrial research by providing these hybrid networks.

Table of Contents for Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics, Vol. I

Chapter 1: Metabolic Pathways

Chapter 2: Lipid Metabolism

Chapter 3: Cell Signaling

Chapter 4: Protein Synthesis and Degradation

Chapter 5: Sub-cellular Structure

Chapter 6: Proteomics

Chapter 7: Metabolomics

Chapter 8:  Impairments in Pathological States: Endocrine Disorders; Stress

                   Hypermetabolism and Cancer

Chapter 9: Genomic Expression in Health and Disease 

 

Summary 

Epilogue

 

 

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