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Archive for the ‘CRISPR/Cas9 & Gene Editing’ Category


Gene-editing Second International Summit in Hong Kong: George Church, “Let’s be quantitative before we start being accusatory”

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

UPDATED on 11/30/2018

Gene editing takes a foreboding leap forward

He Jiankui. Photo: Zhang Wei/Chinese News Service/VCG via Getty Images

 

China is temporarily suspending the work of scientists who claimed twins were born after being genetically edited as embryos.

Why it matters: The scientific consensus is that gene editing embryos at this stage of science is “irresponsible.” But, while this particular experiment has not been verified, the fact is the technology is available to researchers, so there’s a growing call for international limitations on its use.

ICYMI: Chinese scientist He Jiankui announced earlier this week that twins were born after he used the gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 to cut the CCR5 gene that’s known to play a role in HIV infection.

  • He stirred even more dismay when he mentioned the possibility of a second pregnancy.
  • China currently bans human implantation of gene-edited embryos. Its Ministry of Science and Technology is investigating the claims, per Xinhua.

There are concerns about the safety, efficacy and possible mosaicism, where a person can contain genes in both its edited and unedited forms, from cutting genes.

  • Editing embryos raises an even bigger concern: The genetic changes and all the unknowns around them can be passed down to future generations.

Between the lines: Not everyone viewed it as a complete disaster. For instance, Harvard Medical School’s George Daley suggested that it may be time to reconsider the massive amounts of research done over the past several years and look for plausible methods of moving forward.

What to watch: Scientists are cautious about predicting what the impact will be, in part because the details of this claim are thin. However, the debate is heating up and one concern is it will dampen important research.

  • Medical ethicist Jonathan Moreno from the University of Pennsylvania says the situation reminds him of other times in history where there were tremors in the science world, like the death of 18-year-old Jesse Gelsinger in 1999 from a gene therapy trial that led to years of diminished research.

The bottom line: The alarm over what could be next is real. But scientists hope the current debate will promote consensus on firm limits and promote transparency.

Go deeper:

SOURCE

From: Andrew Freedman <andrew.freedman@axios.com>

Date: Thursday, November 29, 2018 at 5:33 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Axios Science: About that climate report — Gene editing takes a foreboding step — Building in harms’ way

 

 

He Jiankui spoke at the second international summit on human genome editing in Hong Kong. (Alex Hofford/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

CRISPR-baby scientist faces the music

The scientist who claims to have helped produce the first people born with edited genomes faced a tough crowd yesterday at a gene-editing summit in Hong Kong. He Jiankui gave a 20-minute talk about his unpublished work in animals and humans before opening a 40-minute Q&A session (watch it here). He faced difficult questions about the ethics of his work and his choice to keep it mostly under wraps until after the babies were born, and left many unanswered.

Meanwhile, prominent geneticist George Church is one of the few scientists who seem to be looking on the bright side of He’s controversial claim. “Let’s be quantitative before we start being accusatory,” Church told Science. “As long as these are normal, healthy kids it’s going to be fine for the field and the family.”

Nature | 9 min read & Science | 6 min read

Read more: Genome-edited baby claim provokes international outcry

 

SOURCE

From: Nature Briefing <briefing@nature.com>

Reply-To: Nature Briefing <briefing@nature.com>

Date: Thursday, November 29, 2018 at 12:18 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: CRISPR-baby scientist faces the music at gene-editing summit

 

See

SAVE

The ethical red flags of genetically edited babies

Driving the news: Chinese scientist He Jiankui announced Sunday night that a pair of twin girls had been born from embryos he modified using the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR.

  • He hasn’t provided solid proof, but if it‘s true, it would be the first time the technology has been used to engineer a human.

What they’re saying: The inventors of CRISPR technology did not seem pleased with the development — one called for a moratorium on implantation edited embryos into potential mothers.

  • “I hope we will be more cautious in the next thing we try to do, and think more carefully about when you should use technology versus when you could use technology,” said Jessica Berg, a bioethicist at Case Western Reserve University.

Between the lines: Several specific factors in He’s work sent up ethical red flags.

  • Many scientists had assumed that, when this technology was first used in humans, it would edit out mutations tied to a single gene that were certain to cause a child pain and suffering once it was born — essentially, as a last resort.
  • But He used CRISPR to, as he put it, “close a door” that HIV could have one day traveled through. That has prompted some speculation that this project was more about testing the technology than serving an acute medical need.
  • “That should make us very uneasy about the whole situation,” Berg said. “Of all the things to have started with, it does make you a little suspicious about this particular choice.”

The intrigue: There’s a lot we still don’t know about He’s work, and that’s also contributing to an attitude of skepticism.

  • How many embryos did he edit and implant before these live births?
  • How will he know it worked? As the children age, they’ll likely have their blood drawn and those samples will be exposed to HIV in a lab, but researchers aren’t going to tell them to go out and have unprotected sex or use intravenous drugs — another reason HIV seems like an odd starting place for human gene editing.
  • How did this even happen? The university where He worked said he was on leave, and Chinese officials have said he’s under investigation. But gene editing is a pretty hard thing to freelance.

The other side: He defended his work in a video message, saying, “I understand my work will be controversial but I believe families need this technology and I’m willing to take the criticism for them.”

  • “Their parents don’t want a designer baby, just a child who won’t suffer from a disease which medicine can now prevent,” He said.

Yes, but: Now that this threshold may have been crossed, attempts to create “designer babies” — within the limitations of what CRISPR can do — probably aren’t far off, some experts fear.

  • There are “likely to be places that are less regulated than others, where people are going to attempt to see what they can do,” Berg said. “I wouldn’t say everything in the world has changed now, but it’s certainly the next step.”
SOURCE

https://www.axios.com/genetic-editing-baby-china-ethics-controversy-b33f8414-8b83-445c-bad5-d8407f8841f4.html

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/11/26/jennifer-doudna-and-npr-science-correspondent-joe-palca-several-interviews/

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Jennifer Doudna and NPR science correspondent Joe Palca, several interviews

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

UPDATED on 11/27/2018

SAVE

The ethical red flags of genetically edited babies

Driving the news: Chinese scientist He Jiankui announced Sunday night that a pair of twin girls had been born from embryos he modified using the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR.

  • He hasn’t provided solid proof, but if it‘s true, it would be the first time the technology has been used to engineer a human.

What they’re saying: The inventors of CRISPR technology did not seem pleased with the development — one called for a moratorium on implantation edited embryos into potential mothers.

  • “I hope we will be more cautious in the next thing we try to do, and think more carefully about when you should use technology versus when you could use technology,” said Jessica Berg, a bioethicist at Case Western Reserve University.

Between the lines: Several specific factors in He’s work sent up ethical red flags.

  • Many scientists had assumed that, when this technology was first used in humans, it would edit out mutations tied to a single gene that were certain to cause a child pain and suffering once it was born — essentially, as a last resort.
  • But He used CRISPR to, as he put it, “close a door” that HIV could have one day traveled through. That has prompted some speculation that this project was more about testing the technology than serving an acute medical need.
  • “That should make us very uneasy about the whole situation,” Berg said. “Of all the things to have started with, it does make you a little suspicious about this particular choice.”

The intrigue: There’s a lot we still don’t know about He’s work, and that’s also contributing to an attitude of skepticism.

  • How many embryos did he edit and implant before these live births?
  • How will he know it worked? As the children age, they’ll likely have their blood drawn and those samples will be exposed to HIV in a lab, but researchers aren’t going to tell them to go out and have unprotected sex or use intravenous drugs — another reason HIV seems like an odd starting place for human gene editing.
  • How did this even happen? The university where He worked said he was on leave, and Chinese officials have said he’s under investigation. But gene editing is a pretty hard thing to freelance.

The other side: He defended his work in a video message, saying, “I understand my work will be controversial but I believe families need this technology and I’m willing to take the criticism for them.”

  • “Their parents don’t want a designer baby, just a child who won’t suffer from a disease which medicine can now prevent,” He said.

Yes, but: Now that this threshold may have been crossed, attempts to create “designer babies” — within the limitations of what CRISPR can do — probably aren’t far off, some experts fear.

  • There are “likely to be places that are less regulated than others, where people are going to attempt to see what they can do,” Berg said. “I wouldn’t say everything in the world has changed now, but it’s certainly the next step.”
SOURCE

https://www.axios.com/genetic-editing-baby-china-ethics-controversy-b33f8414-8b83-445c-bad5-d8407f8841f4.html

 

 

UPDATED on 11/26/2018

  1. CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna explains gene-editing …

    news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2018/05/crispr…

    Doudna, who spoke at Harvard’s Science Center, explained the work that led to the development of CRISPR/Cas9 geneediting technology, which was described in a paper in the journal Science in 2012. A sign of how quickly the techniques would be adopted by her scientific colleagues came within months.

  2. Eventbrite – Science History Institute presents Jennifer A. Doudna, “CRISPR Biology and Biotechnology: the Future of Genome Editing” – Friday, November 16, 2018 at Science History Institute, Philadelphia, PA.

  3. A pioneer of the Crispr geneediting technology that’s taken Wall Street by storm says the field is probably five to 10 years away from having an approved therapy for patients.

  4. A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power …

    thehumanist.com/magazine/november-december-2017/…

    BOOK BY JENNIFER DOUDNA AND SAMUEL STERNBERG HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT, 2017 304 PP.; $28.00 (HARDCOVER) $14.99 (KINDLE) CRISPR is the basis of a genome editingtechnology—the latest breakthrough in the grand tradition that began over 400 generations ago when we started to grow wheat and rice instead of just picking its wild cousins.

  5. The CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology was discovered in 2012 by campus professor of chemistry, molecular biology and biochemistry Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier, director at the Max …

  6. 2 hours ago · The International Summit on Human Genome Editing begins here on Tuesday and many researchers, ethicists, and policymakers attending the meeting first learned of He’s claim through media reports.

 

 

Video of Conversation With Jennifer Doudna and NPR’s Joe Palca

WATCH VIDEO

https://today.lbl.gov/2018/01/26/video-of-conversation-with-jennifer-doudna-and-nprs-joe-palca/

Published on Jan 24, 2018

SUBSCRIBE 13K
This conversation between Berkeley Lab researcher Jennifer Doudna and NPR science correspondent Joe Palca took place on on Monday, Nov. 20, 2017. The event was the first in the Director’s Distinguished Women in Science speaker series, a venue for women scientists to share their work and perspectives with the Lab community. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/berkeleylab/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/berkeleylab Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BerkeleyLab/ More Berkeley Lab news: http://bit.ly/BerkeleyLabNews Subscribe: https://youtube.com/berkeleylab
SOURCE

Jennifer Doudna Talks CRISPR Origins, Implications with NPR’s Joe Palca

SOURCE

http://biosciences.lbl.gov/2017/12/01/jennifer-doudna-talks-crispr-origins-implications-nprs-joe-palca/

 

Jennifer Doudna featured on NPR’s Morning Edition for her work on CRISPR/Cas9 — a tool for editing genes

October 13, 2014
Jennifer Doudna. Jennifer Doudna. Photo: Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab Public Affairs

UC Berkeley’s Jennifer Doudna was featured on NPR’s Morning Edition for her work on CRISPR/Cas9 — a tool for editing genes. Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues showed that CRISPR/Cas9, can be used with great precision to selectively disable or add several genes at once in human cells, offering a potent new tool to understand and treat complex genetic diseases.

Read more and listen to the full story, “In Hopes Of Fixing Faulty Genes, One Scientist Starts With the Basics.”

SOURCE

https://vcresearch.berkeley.edu/news/jennifer-doudna-featured-nprs-morning-edition-her-work-crisprcas9-tool-editing-genes

 

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Patent on Methods and compositions for RNA-directed target DNA modification and for RNA-directed modulation of transcription was awarded to UC, Berkeley on October 30, 2018

  •  site-specific modification of a target DNA and/or a polypeptide associated with the target DNA, a DNA-targeting RNA
  •  genetically modified cells that produce Cas9; and Cas9 transgenic non-human multicellular organisms.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

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United States Patent 10,113,167
Doudna ,   et al. October 30, 2018

Methods and compositions for RNA-directed target DNA modification and for RNA-directed modulation of transcription 

AbstractThe present disclosure provides a DNA-targeting RNA that comprises a targeting sequence and, together with a modifying polypeptide, provides for site-specific modification of a target DNA and/or a polypeptide associated with the target DNA. The present disclosure further provides site-specific modifying polypeptides. The present disclosure further provides methods of site-specific modification of a target DNA and/or a polypeptide associated with the target DNA The present disclosure provides methods of modulating transcription of a target nucleic acid in a target cell, generally involving contacting the target nucleic acid with an enzymatically inactive Cas9 polypeptide and a DNA-targeting RNA. Kits and compositions for carrying out the methods are also provided. The present disclosure provides genetically modified cells that produce Cas9; and Cas9 transgenic non-human multicellular organisms.


Inventors: Doudna; Jennifer A. (Berkeley, CA), Jinek; Martin (Berkeley, CA), Chylinski; Krzysztof (Vienna, AT), Charpentier; Emmanuelle (Braunschweig, DE)
Applicant:
Name City State Country Type

The Regents of the University of California
University of Vienna
Charpentier; Emmanuelle
Oakland
Vienna
Braunschweig
CA
N/A
N/A
US
AT
DE
Assignee: The Regents of the University of California (Oakland, CA)
University of Vienna (Vienna, AT)
Charpentier; Emmanuelle (Braunschweig, DE)
Family ID: 1000003617643
Appl. No.: 15/138,604
Filed: April 26, 2016

SOURCE

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=10113167.PN.&OS=PN/10113167&RS=PN/10113167

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UC Berkeley team awarded second CRISPR-Cas9 patent

 

“Today’s news … represents yet another validation of the historic and field-changing breakthrough invented by scientists Jennifer Doudna, Emmanuelle Charpentier, and their team… The patent announced today specifically highlights the CRISPR-Cas9 invention’s ability to edit DNA in any setting, including within animal and human cells. It also highlights its utility in several formats across both dual-RNA and single-RNA configurations, useful for therapy for genetic diseases and for improving food security.”
— Edward Penhoet, special adviser to the UC Berkeley chancellor, tells Axios

The details: According to the patent, the compositions can be used in animal or human cells, and can work as either 2 separate pieces of RNA or a single piece of RNA.

  • Penhoet says the new patent covers 2 RNA components that together form the “DNA-targeting-RNA,” with one that targets the particular sequence of DNA needed to be edited and the other that binds with the Cas9 protein.
  • This follows another patent given to UC Berkeley in June on methods to use CRISPR-cas9.
  • The patents cover the composites used by CRISPR-Cas9 within human, plant, animal and bacteria cells.
  • Both allow the use of strands of RNA “that can be shorter than naturally-occurring RNA components. This allows them to be more easily used and, therefore, is a form often preferred,” Penhoet says.

Go deeper:

SOURCE

https://www.axios.com/uc-berkeley-awarded-crispr-cas9-gene-edit-patent-5a533f22-929d-4e7d-83fe-0a73ebeb4538.html

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Will the Supreme Court accept a UC Berkeley Appeal of the Sep. 10th, US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit decision to uphold the patent filed by the Broad Institute on CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

On 2018, Sep. 10th, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit agreed to uphold the patent filed by the Broad Institute on CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing in organisms with complex cells – UC Berkeley team can appeal this decision to the US Supreme Court, it is unclear whether the Supreme Court will accept this case.

According to Appeal and Interference Statistics 11/30/2016

https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Appeal%20and%20Interference%20Statistics%20November%202016.pdf

In recent years, more than half of PTAB’s decisions have been upheld. “The Federal Circuit heard three appeals of interferences in 2016,” said intellectual property expert Jacob Sherkow of New York Law School. “All three were at least affirmed in part. It’s completely unclear whether that’s meaningful — it’s an N of 3–but there you go.” Overall, on 155 appeals since PTAB was created in 2012, the Federal Circuit affirmed 120 on every issue, dismissed or reversed 21 on every issue, and issued partial decisions (that is, upholding parts of a PTAB decision and reversing others) in the other 14.

SOURCE

Disputed CRISPR Patents Stay with Broad Institute, U.S. Panel Rules

Three judges have released their decision

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/disputed-crispr-patents-stay-with-broad-institute-u-s-panel-rules/

 

Based on

Appeal and Interference Statistics 11/30/2016

https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Appeal%20and%20Interference%20Statistics%20November%202016.pdf

I recommend UC, Berkeley to Appeal to the Supreme Court the Sept 10th Decision.

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Sickle Cell and Beta Thalassemia chosen for first human trial of the gene editing technology, CRISPR by sponsoring companies CRISPR Therapeutics and Vertex Pharmaceuticals, trial at a single site in Germany,

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

UPDATED on 9/13/2018

 

September 13, 2018

NIH launches initiative to accelerate genetic therapies to cure sickle cell disease

“Our scientific investments have brought us to a point where we have many tools available to correct or compensate for the defective gene that causes sickle cell disease. We are now ready to use these tools to speed up our quest for a cure,” said Gary H. Gibbons, M.D., director of NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), which is leading the effort.

SOURCE

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-launches-initiative-accelerate-genetic-therapies-cure-sickle-cell-disease

 

 

Vertex licensed CTX001, an autologous gene-edited hematopoietic stem cell therapy, from CRISPR in December. It was the first CRISPR-based treatment to come out of a four-year, $105 million deal the pair struck in 2015. At the time, Vertex paid up $75 million in cash and took a $30 million stake in CRISPR Therapeutics in exchange for the right to license up to six gene-editing programs. CTX001 is being developed for the blood disorders sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia.

Both disorders are caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene, which codes for a part of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of red blood cells. This results in missing or defective hemoglobin. CTX001 was developed on the knowledge that fetal hemoglobin—found in newborn babies but later replaced by adult hemoglobin—can be protective in adults who have blood disorders.

CTX001 uses CRISPR gene-editing ex vivo—that is, outside the body. A patient’s cells are harvested and edited to increase fetal hemoglobin levels in the patient’s blood cells. The edited cells are then infused back into the patient where they are expected to produce blood cells with fetal hemoglobin and compensate for defective adult hemoglobin.

SOURCE

https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/crispr-therapeutics-vertex-start-first-company-backed-human-crispr-trial?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTm1FMllXTmtOMlkwWkRNdyIsInQiOiJLMUEyeGtsT0ZMTVBuM1RtbVFjRFdMQUdRcDZkXC9yVHlXTWxIQmlvc3M0XC9LVFArdlFuaVVYY0lQXC81ak9cL3h1VjFHYnprZ3dqVlNlaWFldWxcLzA3QUphdExpc0w0Vk1TSGR3WVl0YXNqQlFRVHdvZmNycVNEWE9qdWQ2QmdacklSIn0%3D&mrkid=993697

Other 339 articles on GENE EDITING were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, including the following articles:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Gene+Editing

On CRISPR/Cas9, there are 141 articles in the Journal:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=CRISPR%2FCas9

Gene Therapy, there are 11 articles in the Journal:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/category/genome-biology/gene-therapy-gene-editing-development/

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On June 12, 2018 – Berkeley was granted a patent on using CRISPR/Cas9 to edit single-stranded RNA. On June 19, 2018 – Berkeley was granted a second patent, covering the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing with formats that will be particularly useful in developing human therapeutics and improvements in food security.

Reporter and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

The patent covers methods of using optimized guide RNA formats (including single guide and dual guide formats) in certain environments, including eukaryotic cells (such as human, animal and plant cells). The optimized formats modify the part of a guide RNA that interacts with the CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease.

 

Who is it that deserves credit for turning a bacterial immune system into a revolutionary gene editing tool?

We suggest that it is as follows: Two owners of IP in Red

Gene Editing Consortium of Biotech Companies: CRISPR Therapeutics $CRSP, Intellia Therapeutics $NTLA, Caribou Biosciences, ERS Genomics, UC, Berkeley (Doudna’s IP) and University of Vienna (Charpentier’s IP), is appealing the decision ruled that there was no interference between the two sides, to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, targeting patents from The Broad Institute.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/04/13/gene-editing-consortium-of-biotech-companies-crispr-therapeutics-crsp-intellia-therapeutics-ntla-caribou-biosciences-and-ers-genomics-uc-berkeley-doudnas-ip-and-university-of-vienna-charpe/

Patents for the wide use of CRISPR-Cas9 for gene editing all types of cells have already been issued to the Doudna-Charpentier team by the European Patent Office (representing more than 30 countries), the United Kingdom, China, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico and other countries. The scope of the United States patent issued today broadly includes the use of a CRISPR-Cas9 compound that is specially engineered to be more easily employed inside any type of plant or animal cell, or outside a cell, in order to modify a gene or the expression of a gene.

CRISPR Therapeutics, Intellia Therapeutics and Caribou Biosciences issued the following joint statement on the grant of the ‘772 patent:

“We believe that the U.S. patent ‘772 granted today covers the use of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing with the RNA guide formats that are widely used throughout the industry. We anticipate this is the first of many patents that will be granted to UC on this foundational CRISPR/Cas9 intellectual property.”

In addition to this granted U.S. patent, applications from this patent estate have been found allowable in the United States and also have issued in Europe, the United Kingdom, China, Japan and various other countries worldwide. These patents cover the dual- and single-guide RNA compositions of the widely adopted CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology and their uses in all environments, including plant, animal and human cells as well as for use in human therapeutics.

SOURCE

http://ir.intelliatx.com/news-releases/news-release-details/crispr-therapeutics-intellia-therapeutics-and-caribou

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/04/28/doudna-and-charpentier-and-their-teams-to-receive-wide-ranging-patents-in-many-countries-european-patent-office-epo-and-uk-intellectual-property-office-broad-patent-for-crispr-cas9-gene-editing/

Schematic representation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. The Cas9 enzyme (orange) cuts the DNA (blue) in the location selected by the RNA (red). Image courtesy of Carlos Clarivan/Science Photo Library/NTB Scanpix

 

“Today’s patent is one of many we anticipate will be awarded to these inventors for their CRISPR-Cas9 invention,” said Edward Penhoet, special advisor to the UC Berkeley chancellor and special assistant to the University of California president. “Six years ago, the Doudna-Charpentier team was the first to file a patent application and publish on the necessary and sufficient components that enable CRISPR-Cas9 to be employed in all environments, including plant and animal cells. Their remarkable research has only accelerated since then, creating new jobs and opening up new possibilities to improve life.”

The U.S. patent granted today (10,000,772) is not involved in any interference proceeding before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, or any appeal before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The ‘772 patent is not impacted by the USPTO’s decision to terminate an interference between a separate UC patent application and a patent application owned by the Broad Institute, Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology without reaching a decision on which inventors were the first to invent the use of CRISPR/Cas9 technology for genome editing. UC’s appeal of that decision was heard on April 30, 2018 by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which will issue a decision in the future.

RELATED INFORMATION

SOURCE

http://news.berkeley.edu/2018/06/19/doudna-charpentier-team-awarded-u-s-patent-for-crispr-cas9/

Comments made on On June 12, 2018 – Berkeley was granted a patent on using CRISPR/Cas9 to edit single-stranded RNA. On June 19, 2018 – Berkeley was granted a second patent, covering the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing with formats

There have also been others commenting on the decision, including Jacob Sherkow, who’s an associate professor from the New York Law School. He said that he expected the second patent, in particular, to have “pretty minimal commercial value”. While former molecular biologist and biotech patent lawyer, Dr. Kevin Noonan have reportedly said he thinks UC Berkeley “is just happy to get a patent”.

SOURCE

http://www.frontlinegenomics.com/news/23997/finally-a-win-for-uc-berkeley-two-crispr-patents-awarded/

 

The University of California will finally be granted a key CRISPR patent

Other related 140 articles on CRISPR and on the Legal dispute, published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, include the following:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=CRISPR

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Original Tweets Re-Tweets and Likes by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 at #kisymposium for 17th annual Summer Symposium: Breakthrough Cancer Nanotechnologies: Koch Institute, MIT Kresge Auditorium, June 15, 2018, 9AM-4PM

 

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