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Archive for the ‘CRISPR/Cas9 & Gene Editing’ Category


Will the Supreme Court accept a UC Berkeley Appeal of the Sep. 10th, US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit decision to uphold the patent filed by the Broad Institute on CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

On 2018, Sep. 10th, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit agreed to uphold the patent filed by the Broad Institute on CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing in organisms with complex cells – UC Berkeley team can appeal this decision to the US Supreme Court, it is unclear whether the Supreme Court will accept this case.

According to Appeal and Interference Statistics 11/30/2016

https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Appeal%20and%20Interference%20Statistics%20November%202016.pdf

In recent years, more than half of PTAB’s decisions have been upheld. “The Federal Circuit heard three appeals of interferences in 2016,” said intellectual property expert Jacob Sherkow of New York Law School. “All three were at least affirmed in part. It’s completely unclear whether that’s meaningful — it’s an N of 3–but there you go.” Overall, on 155 appeals since PTAB was created in 2012, the Federal Circuit affirmed 120 on every issue, dismissed or reversed 21 on every issue, and issued partial decisions (that is, upholding parts of a PTAB decision and reversing others) in the other 14.

SOURCE

Disputed CRISPR Patents Stay with Broad Institute, U.S. Panel Rules

Three judges have released their decision

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/disputed-crispr-patents-stay-with-broad-institute-u-s-panel-rules/

 

Based on

Appeal and Interference Statistics 11/30/2016

https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/documents/Appeal%20and%20Interference%20Statistics%20November%202016.pdf

I recommend UC, Berkeley to Appeal to the Supreme Court the Sept 10th Decision.

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Sickle Cell and Beta Thalassemia chosen for first human trial of the gene editing technology, CRISPR by sponsoring companies CRISPR Therapeutics and Vertex Pharmaceuticals, trial at a single site in Germany,

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

UPDATED on 9/13/2018

 

September 13, 2018

NIH launches initiative to accelerate genetic therapies to cure sickle cell disease

“Our scientific investments have brought us to a point where we have many tools available to correct or compensate for the defective gene that causes sickle cell disease. We are now ready to use these tools to speed up our quest for a cure,” said Gary H. Gibbons, M.D., director of NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), which is leading the effort.

SOURCE

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-launches-initiative-accelerate-genetic-therapies-cure-sickle-cell-disease

 

 

Vertex licensed CTX001, an autologous gene-edited hematopoietic stem cell therapy, from CRISPR in December. It was the first CRISPR-based treatment to come out of a four-year, $105 million deal the pair struck in 2015. At the time, Vertex paid up $75 million in cash and took a $30 million stake in CRISPR Therapeutics in exchange for the right to license up to six gene-editing programs. CTX001 is being developed for the blood disorders sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia.

Both disorders are caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene, which codes for a part of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of red blood cells. This results in missing or defective hemoglobin. CTX001 was developed on the knowledge that fetal hemoglobin—found in newborn babies but later replaced by adult hemoglobin—can be protective in adults who have blood disorders.

CTX001 uses CRISPR gene-editing ex vivo—that is, outside the body. A patient’s cells are harvested and edited to increase fetal hemoglobin levels in the patient’s blood cells. The edited cells are then infused back into the patient where they are expected to produce blood cells with fetal hemoglobin and compensate for defective adult hemoglobin.

SOURCE

https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/crispr-therapeutics-vertex-start-first-company-backed-human-crispr-trial?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTm1FMllXTmtOMlkwWkRNdyIsInQiOiJLMUEyeGtsT0ZMTVBuM1RtbVFjRFdMQUdRcDZkXC9yVHlXTWxIQmlvc3M0XC9LVFArdlFuaVVYY0lQXC81ak9cL3h1VjFHYnprZ3dqVlNlaWFldWxcLzA3QUphdExpc0w0Vk1TSGR3WVl0YXNqQlFRVHdvZmNycVNEWE9qdWQ2QmdacklSIn0%3D&mrkid=993697

Other 339 articles on GENE EDITING were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, including the following articles:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Gene+Editing

On CRISPR/Cas9, there are 141 articles in the Journal:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=CRISPR%2FCas9

Gene Therapy, there are 11 articles in the Journal:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/category/genome-biology/gene-therapy-gene-editing-development/

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On June 12, 2018 – Berkeley was granted a patent on using CRISPR/Cas9 to edit single-stranded RNA. On June 19, 2018 – Berkeley was granted a second patent, covering the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing with formats that will be particularly useful in developing human therapeutics and improvements in food security.

Reporter and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

The patent covers methods of using optimized guide RNA formats (including single guide and dual guide formats) in certain environments, including eukaryotic cells (such as human, animal and plant cells). The optimized formats modify the part of a guide RNA that interacts with the CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease.

 

Who is it that deserves credit for turning a bacterial immune system into a revolutionary gene editing tool?

We suggest that it is as follows: Two owners of IP in Red

Gene Editing Consortium of Biotech Companies: CRISPR Therapeutics $CRSP, Intellia Therapeutics $NTLA, Caribou Biosciences, ERS Genomics, UC, Berkeley (Doudna’s IP) and University of Vienna (Charpentier’s IP), is appealing the decision ruled that there was no interference between the two sides, to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, targeting patents from The Broad Institute.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/04/13/gene-editing-consortium-of-biotech-companies-crispr-therapeutics-crsp-intellia-therapeutics-ntla-caribou-biosciences-and-ers-genomics-uc-berkeley-doudnas-ip-and-university-of-vienna-charpe/

Patents for the wide use of CRISPR-Cas9 for gene editing all types of cells have already been issued to the Doudna-Charpentier team by the European Patent Office (representing more than 30 countries), the United Kingdom, China, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico and other countries. The scope of the United States patent issued today broadly includes the use of a CRISPR-Cas9 compound that is specially engineered to be more easily employed inside any type of plant or animal cell, or outside a cell, in order to modify a gene or the expression of a gene.

CRISPR Therapeutics, Intellia Therapeutics and Caribou Biosciences issued the following joint statement on the grant of the ‘772 patent:

“We believe that the U.S. patent ‘772 granted today covers the use of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing with the RNA guide formats that are widely used throughout the industry. We anticipate this is the first of many patents that will be granted to UC on this foundational CRISPR/Cas9 intellectual property.”

In addition to this granted U.S. patent, applications from this patent estate have been found allowable in the United States and also have issued in Europe, the United Kingdom, China, Japan and various other countries worldwide. These patents cover the dual- and single-guide RNA compositions of the widely adopted CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology and their uses in all environments, including plant, animal and human cells as well as for use in human therapeutics.

SOURCE

http://ir.intelliatx.com/news-releases/news-release-details/crispr-therapeutics-intellia-therapeutics-and-caribou

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/04/28/doudna-and-charpentier-and-their-teams-to-receive-wide-ranging-patents-in-many-countries-european-patent-office-epo-and-uk-intellectual-property-office-broad-patent-for-crispr-cas9-gene-editing/

Schematic representation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. The Cas9 enzyme (orange) cuts the DNA (blue) in the location selected by the RNA (red). Image courtesy of Carlos Clarivan/Science Photo Library/NTB Scanpix

 

“Today’s patent is one of many we anticipate will be awarded to these inventors for their CRISPR-Cas9 invention,” said Edward Penhoet, special advisor to the UC Berkeley chancellor and special assistant to the University of California president. “Six years ago, the Doudna-Charpentier team was the first to file a patent application and publish on the necessary and sufficient components that enable CRISPR-Cas9 to be employed in all environments, including plant and animal cells. Their remarkable research has only accelerated since then, creating new jobs and opening up new possibilities to improve life.”

The U.S. patent granted today (10,000,772) is not involved in any interference proceeding before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, or any appeal before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The ‘772 patent is not impacted by the USPTO’s decision to terminate an interference between a separate UC patent application and a patent application owned by the Broad Institute, Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology without reaching a decision on which inventors were the first to invent the use of CRISPR/Cas9 technology for genome editing. UC’s appeal of that decision was heard on April 30, 2018 by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which will issue a decision in the future.

RELATED INFORMATION

SOURCE

http://news.berkeley.edu/2018/06/19/doudna-charpentier-team-awarded-u-s-patent-for-crispr-cas9/

Comments made on On June 12, 2018 – Berkeley was granted a patent on using CRISPR/Cas9 to edit single-stranded RNA. On June 19, 2018 – Berkeley was granted a second patent, covering the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing with formats

There have also been others commenting on the decision, including Jacob Sherkow, who’s an associate professor from the New York Law School. He said that he expected the second patent, in particular, to have “pretty minimal commercial value”. While former molecular biologist and biotech patent lawyer, Dr. Kevin Noonan have reportedly said he thinks UC Berkeley “is just happy to get a patent”.

SOURCE

http://www.frontlinegenomics.com/news/23997/finally-a-win-for-uc-berkeley-two-crispr-patents-awarded/

 

The University of California will finally be granted a key CRISPR patent

Other related 140 articles on CRISPR and on the Legal dispute, published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, include the following:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=CRISPR

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Original Tweets Re-Tweets and Likes by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 at #kisymposium for 17th annual Summer Symposium: Breakthrough Cancer Nanotechnologies: Koch Institute, MIT Kresge Auditorium, June 15, 2018, 9AM-4PM

 

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National Academy of Sciences for work in chemical sciences: Jennifer Doudna, University of California, Berkeley

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

National Academy of Sciences awards for Raghavendra, Doudna

Prasad Raghavendra and Jennifer Doudna received awards this week from the National Academy of Sciences for work in computer science and chemical sciences, respectively.

Prasad Raghavendra, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and Jennifer Doudna, a professor of molecular and cell biology and of chemistry, were honored this week by the National Academy of Sciences for their innovative body of research.

Raghavendra shared the inaugural Michael and Sheila Held Prize with David Steurer, a professor of theoretical computer science at ETH Zurich, for “revolutionary contributions to the understanding of optimization and complexity in computer science, work that has relevance for solving the most difficult and intractable of computing problems.” The winners will share the $100,000 prize.

Doudna, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, received the 2018 NAS Award in Chemical Sciences for “pioneering discoveries on how RNA can fold to function in complex ways” and the invention, with Emmanuelle Charpentier, of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology.

The winners will be honored in a ceremony on Sunday, April 29, during the National Academy of Sciences’ 155th annual meeting.

Raghavendra’s prize, awarded this year for the first time, was made possible through a bequest from the estate of Michael and Sheila Held. Doudna’s award, established in 1978 and currently supported by the Merck Company Foundation, is accompanied by a medal and a $15,000 prize.

Previous winners of the NAS Award in Chemical Sciences include Paul Alivisatos, a professor of chemistry and UC Berkeley’s executive vice chancellor and provost, chemistry professors emeritus Gabor Somorjai and Robert Bergman, and former chemistry professor Carolyn Bertozzi, who is now at Stanford University.

Another former UC Berkeley faculty member, James Allison, received the NAS’s 2018 Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal “for important medical discoveries related to the body’s immune response to tumors.” He is now at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. All are among 18 awards to 21 scientists announced this week.

National Academy of Sciences announcement
SOURCE

 

SOURCE 

TED.com

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CRISPR on TED Ideas worth spreading – Ellen Jorgensen

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

On same webpage see other CRISPR Talk on TED on the right hand side of the webpage

 

SOURCE

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CRISPR snips a strand of DNA – Visualization of the Process

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Watch what it actually looks like when CRISPR snips a strand of DNA

WATCH VIDEO

Molecular animations are an essential way to demystify and explain complex biological systems. Through the use of stunning imagery and attention to detail, Visual Science and Skoltech have captured the dynamic mechanisms of CRISPR-Cas proteins and their use as research tools.

 Jennifer Doudna, Professor of the Depts. of Molecular and Cell Biology and Chemistry at the UC Berkeley, Executive Director of the Innovative Genomics Institute

You can watch the animation, created by biologists at Russia’s Skoltech Institute and the Visual Science organization, below or at the latter’s website:
SOURCE

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