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BioMed e-Series: 16 Volumes – electronic Table of Contents (eTOCs) of each Volume

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

CLICK on the RED Link to review eTOCs of each Volume

 

Series A: e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases

Series Content Consultant: Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

Volume 1,2,3,4

Volume 1

Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/perspectives-nitric-oxide-disease-mechanisms-table-aviva/

 

Volume 2

Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q5MCN8

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cardiovascular-original-research-cases-methodology-aviva/

 

Volume 3

Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/etiologies-cardiovascular-diseases-epigenetics-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

Volume 4

Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutics Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases – eTOCs http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/regenerative-translational-medicine-therapeutics-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

Volumes 5 and 6 – will be published in 2018

 

Series B: Frontiers in Genomics Research

Series Content Consultant: Prof. Marcus Feldman, Stanford University

Volume 1

Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018DHBUO6 | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/genomics-orientations-personalized-medicine-table-lev-ari-phd-rn/?published=t

 

Volume 2 – will be published in 2018

 

Series C: e-Books on Cancer & Oncology

Series Content Consultant: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Volume 1 – HOW This BOOK HELPS in Education of the Medicine as a Profession

Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis – Electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cancer-biology-genomics-disease-diagnosis-table-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

Volume 2 – HOW This BOOK HELPS in Education of the Medicine as a Profession

Cancer Therapies: Metabolic, Genomics, Interventional, Immunotherapy and Nanotechnology in Therapy Delivery http://www.amazon.com/dp/B071VQ6YYK | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cancer-therapies-metabolic-genomics-interventional-lev-ari-phd-rn/?published=t

 

Series D: e-Books on BioMedicine – Metabolomics, Immunology, Infectious Diseases

Series Content Consultant: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Volume 1

Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B012BB0ZF0 | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/metabolic-genomics-pharmaceutics-electronic-table-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

Volume 2

Infectious Diseases and Therapeutics e-Table of Contents, Volume 2 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075CXHY1B | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/infectious-diseases-therapeutics-e-table-contents-2-lev-ari-phd-rn/

Volume 3

The Immune System and Therapeutics e-Table of Contents https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075CXHY1B | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/immune-system-therapeutics-e-table-contents-aviva-lev-ari-phd-rn/?published=t

Series E: Patient-Centered Medicine

Series Content Consultant: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Volume 1

The VOICES of Patients, Hospitals CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families – e-Table of Contents https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076HGB6MZ | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/voices-patients-hospitals-ceos-health-care-providers-aviva/

 

Volume 2

Medical Scientific Discoveries for the 21st Century & Interviews with Scientific Leaders, e-Table of Contents https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078313281 | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/medical-scientific-discoveries-21st-century-leaders-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

Volume 3

Milestones in Physiology – Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics Patient-centric Perspective, eTOCs http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019VH97LU | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/milestones-physiology-discoveries-medicine-genomics-aviva/

 

Volume 4

Medical 3D BioPrinting – The Revolution in Medicine -Technologies for Patient-centered Medicine: From R&D in Biologics to New Medical Devices, eTOCs | LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/medical-3d-bioprinting-revolution-medicine-from-rd-lev-ari-phd-rn/?published=t

 

BioMed e-Series

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

BioMed e-Series

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Medical Scientific Discoveries for the 21st Century & Interviews with Scientific Leaders at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078313281 – electronic Table of Contents 

Author, Curator and Editor: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Available on Kindle Store @ Amazon.com since 12/9/2017

List of Contributors & Contributors’ Biographies

Volume Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Preface, all Introductions, all Summaries and Epilogue

Part One:

1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3, 2.3, 2.4, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 2.5, 2.6.1, 2.6.2, 2.6.3, 2.6.4, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Part Two:

5.2, 5.3, 5.6, 6.1.2, 6.1.4, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.3.2, 6.3.4, 6.3.5, 6.3.6, 6.3.8, 6.3.10, 6.4.1, 6.4.2, 6.5.1.2, 6.5.1.3, 6.5.2.2, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 8.7, 8.8, 8.9, 8.9.1, 8.9.3, 8.9.4, 8.9.5, 8.9.6, 8.10.1, 8.10.2, 8.10.3, 8.10.4, 9.2, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.9, 9.10, 9.11, 9.12, 9.13, 9.14, 9.15, 9.16, 10.2, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 10.10, 10.11, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.5, 11.6, 11.7, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 12.7, 12.8, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11, 12.12, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.6, 13.12, 13.13, 14.1, 14.2

Guest Authors:

Pnina Abir-Am, PhD Part Two: 6.1.1

Stephen J Williams, PhDPart Two: 6.2.6, 6.5.2.2, 10.4, 10.9, 13.4

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN:

Part One:

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.7, 2.2.1, 2.3

Part Two:

5.1, 5.4, 5.5, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11, 6.1.3, 6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.5, 6.3.1, 6.3.3, 6.3.7, 6.3.9, 6.4.3, 6.5.1.1, 6.5.2.1, 6.5.2.2, 6.5.3.1, 6.5.4, 6.5.5, 6,5,6, 8.9.2, 8.10.2, 9.1, 9.4, 10.1, 10.3, 11.4, 12.6, 13.5, 13.7, 13.8, 13.9, 13.10, 13.11

Adam Sonnenberg, BSC, MSc(c)Part Two: 13.9

 

electronic Table of Contents

PART ONE:

Physician as Authors, Writers in Medicine and Educator in Public Health

 

Chapter 1: Physicians as Authors

Introduction

1.1  The Young Surgeon and The Retired Pathologist: On Science, Medicine and HealthCare Policy – Best writers Among the WRITERS

1.2 Atul Gawande: Physician and Writer

1.3 Editorial & Publication of Articles in e-Books by  Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence:  Contributions of Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

1.4 Abraham Verghese, MD, Physician and Notable Author

1.5 Eric Topol, M.D.

1.6 Gregory House, MD

1.7 Peter Mueller, MD  Professor of Radiology @MGH & HMS – 2015 Synergy’s Honorary Award Recipient

Summary

Chapter 2: Professional Recognition

Introduction

2.1 Proceedings

2.1.1 Research Presentations

2.1.2 Proceedings of the NYAS

2.1.3 Cold Spring Harbor Conference Meetings

2.1.4 Young Scientist Seminars

2.2 Meet Great Minds

2.2.1 Meet the Laureates

2.2.2 Richard Feynman, Genius and Laureate

2.2.3 Fractals and Heat Energy

2.3 MacArthur Foundation Awards

2.4 Women’s Contributions went beyond Rosie the Riveter

2.4.1 Secret Maoist Chinese Operation Conquered Malaria

2.4.2 Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel

2.5 Impact Factors and Achievement

2.6   RAPsodisiac Medicine

2.6.1 Outstanding-achievements-in-radiology-or-radiotherapy

2.6.2 Outstanding-achievement-in-anesthesiology

2.6.3 Outstanding-achievement-in-pathology

2.6.4 Topics in Pathology – Special Issues from Medscape Pathology

2.7 How to win the Nobel Prize

2.8 Conversations about Medicine

2.9 Current Advances in Medical Technology

2.10 Atul Butte, MD, PhD

Summary

Chapter 3:  Medical and Allied Health Sciences Education

Introduction

3.1 National Outstanding Medical Student Award Winners

3.2 Outstanding Awards in Medical Education

3.3 Promoting Excellence in Physicians and Nurses

3.4 Excellence in mentoring

Summary

Chapter 4: Science Teaching in Math and Technology (STEM)

Introduction

4.1 Science Teaching in Math and Technology

4.2 Television as a Medium for Science Education

4.2.1 Science Discovery TV

4.3 From Turing to Watson

Summary

PART TWO:

Medical Scientific Discoveries Interviews with Scientific Leaders

Chapter 5: Cardiovascular System

Introduction

5.1 Physiologist, Professor Lichtstein, Chair in Heart Studies at The Hebrew University elected Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

5.2 Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cardiac Disorders

5.3 Notable Contributions to Regenerative Cardiology

5.4 For Accomplishments in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Diseases: The Arrigo Recordati International Prize for Scientific Research

5.5 Becoming a Cardiothoracic Surgeon: An Emerging Profile in the Surgery Theater and through Scientific Publications

5.6 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

5.7 CVD Prevention and Evaluation of Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities: Coronary Calcium Score by CT Scan Screening to justify or not the Use of Statin

5.8 2013 as A Year of Revolutionizing Medicine and Top 11 Cardiology Stories

5.9 Bridging the Gap in Medical Innovations – Elazer Edelman @ TEDMED 2013

5.10 Development of a Pancreatobiliary Chemotherapy Eluting Stent for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma PIs: Jeffrey Clark (MGH), Robert Langer (Koch), Elazer Edelman (Harvard:MIT HST Program)

5.11 Publications on Heart Failure by Prof. William Gregory Stevenson, M.D., BWH

Summary

Chapter 6: Genomics

Introduction
6.1 Genetics before the Human Genome Project

6.1.1 Why did Pauling Lose the “Race” to James Watson and Francis Crick? How Crick Describes his Discovery in a Letter to his Son

6.1.2 John Randall’s MRC Research Unit and Rosalind Franklin’s role at Kings College

6.1.3 Interview with the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA: Watson on The Double Helix and his changing view of Rosalind Franklin

6.1.4 The Initiation and Growth of Molecular Biology and Genomics, Part I

6.2 The Human Genome Project: Articles of Note  @ pharmaceuticalintelligence.com by multiple authors

6.2.1 CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: The Birth of BioInformatics & Computational Genomics

6.2.2 What comes after finishing the Euchromatic Sequence of the Human Genome?

6.2.3 Human Genome Project – 10th Anniversary: Interview with Kevin Davies, PhD – The $1000 Genome

6.2.4 University of California Santa Cruz’s Genomics Institute will create a Map of Human Genetic Variations

6.2.5 Exceptional Genomes: The Process to find them

6.2.6 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

6.3 The Impact of Genome Sequencing on Biology and Medicine

6.3.1 Genomics in Medicine – Establishing a Patient-Centric View of Genomic Data

6.3.2 Modification of genes by homologous recombination – Mario Capecchi, Martin Evans, Oliver Smithies

6.3.3 AAAS February 14-18, 2013, Boston: Symposia – The Science of Uncertainty in Genomic Medicine

6.3.4 The Metabolic View of Epigenetic Expression

6.3.5  Pharmacogenomics

6.3.6 Neonatal Pathophysiology

6.3.7 Genetics of Conduction Disease: Atrioventricular (AV) Conduction Disease (block): Gene Mutations – Transcription, Excitability, and Energy Homeostasis

6.3.8 3D mapping of genome in combine FISH and RNAi

6.3.9 Human Variome Project: encyclopedic catalog of sequence variants indexed to the human genome sequence

6.3.10 DNA mutagenesis and DNA repair

6.4 Scientific Leadership Recognition for Contributions to Genomics

6.4.1 Interview with Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak (44 minutes)

6.4.2 DNA Repair Pioneers Win Nobel – Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich, and Aziz Sancar 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the mechanisms of DNA repair

6.4.3  Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

6.5 Contemporary Field Leaders in Genomics

6.5.1 ROBERT LANGER

6.5.1.1 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Fundamental Physics and Life Sciences for a Total of $21 Million – MIT’s Robert Langer gets $3 Million

6.5.1.2 National Medal of Science – 2006 Robert S. Langer

6.5.1.3  Confluence of Chemistry, Physics, and Biology

6.5.2 JENNIFER DOUDNA

6.5.2.1 Jennifer Doudna, cosmology teams named 2015 Breakthrough Prize winners

6.5.2.2 UPDATED – Medical Interpretation of the Genomics Frontier – CRISPR – Cas9: Gene Editing Technology for New Therapeutics

6.5.3 ERIC LANDER

6.5.3.1  2012 Harvey Prize in April 30: at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology to Eric S. Lander @MIT & Eli Yablonovitch @UC, Berkeley

6.5.4 2013 Genomics: The Era Beyond the Sequencing of the Human Genome: Francis Collins, Craig Venter, Eric Lander, et al.

6.5.5 Recognitions for Contributions in Genomics by Dan David Prize Awards

6.5.6   65 Nobel Laureates meet 650 young scientists covering the fields of physiology and medicine, physics, and chemistry, 28 June – 3 July, 2015, Lindau & Mainau Island, Germany

Summary

Chapter 7: The RNAs

Introduction

7.1 RNA polymerase – molecular basis for DNA transcription – Roger Kornberg, MD

7.2  One gene, one protein – Charles Yanofsky

7.3 Turning genetic information into working proteins – James E. Darnell Jr.

7.4 Small but mighty RNAs – Victor Ambros, David Baulcombe, and Gary Ruvkun, Phillip A. Sharp

7.5 Stress-response gene networks – Nina V. Fedoroff

Summary

Chapter 8: Proteomics, Protein-folding, and Cell Regulation
Introduction.

8.1 The Life and Work of Allan Wilson

8.2 Proteomics

8.3 More Complexity in Protein Evolution

8.4 Proteins: An evolutionary record of diversity and adaptation

8.5 Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Leroy Hood

8.6 Ubiquitin researchers win Nobel – Ciechanover, Hershko, and Rose awarded for discovery of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis

8.7 Buffering of genetic modules involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism provides homeostatic regulation

8.8 Dynamic Protein Profiling

8.9 Protein folding

8.9.1 Protein misfolding and prions – Susan L. Lindquist, Stanley B. Prusiner

8.9.2 A Curated Census of Autophagy-Modulating Proteins and Small Molecules Candidate Targets for Cancer Therapy

8.9.3 Voluntary and Involuntary S-Insufficiency

8.9.4 Transthyretin and Lean Body Mass in Stable and Stressed State

8.9.5 The matter of stunting in the Ganges Plains

8.9.6 Proteins, Imaging and Therapeutics

8.10 Protein Folding and Vesicle Cargo

8.10.1 Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) and Molecular Chaperones

8.10.2 Collagen-binding Molecular Chaperone HSP47: Role in Intestinal Fibrosis – colonic epithelial cells and sub epithelial myofibroblasts

8.10.3 Biology, Physiology and Pathophysiology of Heat Shock Proteins

8.10.4 The Role of Exosomes in Metabolic Regulation 


Summary

Chapter 9:  Neuroscience

Introduction

9.1 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 for Cell Transport: James E. Rothman of Yale University; Randy W. Schekman of the University of California, Berkeley; and Dr. Thomas C. Südhof of Stanford University

9.2 Proteins that control neurotransmitter release – Richard H. Scheller

9.3 Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Robert J. Lefkowitz

9.4 MIND AND MEMORY: BIOLOGICAL AND DIGITAL – 2014 Dan David Prize Symposium

9.5 A new way of moving – Michael Sheetz, James Spudich, Ronald Vale

9.6 Role the basal ganglia

9.7 The Neurogenetics of Language – Patricia Kuhl – 2015 George A. Miller Award

9.8 The structure of our visual system

9.9 Outstanding Achievement in Schizophrenia Research

9.10 George A. Miller, a Pioneer in Cognitive Psychology, Is Dead at 92

9.11 – To understand what happens in the brain to cause mental illness

9.12 Brain and Cognition

9.13 – To reduce symptoms of mental illness and retrain the brain

9.14 Behavior

9.15 Notable Papers in Neurosciences

9.16 Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) – an unproved supplement

Summary

Chapter 10: Microbiology & Immunology

Introduction

10.1 Reference Genes in the Human Gut Microbiome: The BGI Catalogue

10.2 Malnutrition in India, high newborn death rate and stunting of children age under five years

10.3 In His Own Words: Leonard Herzenberg, The Immunologist Who Revolutionized Research, Dies at 81

10.4 Heroes in Medical Research: Dr. Robert Ting, Ph.D. and Retrovirus in AIDS and Cancer

10.5 Tang Prize for 2014: Immunity and Cancer

10.6 Halstedian model of cancer progression

10.7 The History of Hematology and Related Sciences

10.8 Pathology Emergence in the 21st Century

10.9 Heroes in Medical Research: Barnett Rosenberg and the Discovery of Cisplatin

10.10  T cell-mediated immune responses & signaling pathways activated by TLRs – Bruce A. Beutler, Jules A. Hoffmann, Ralph M. Steinman

10.11 Roeder – the coactivator OCA-B, the first cell-specific coactivator, discovered by Roeder in 1992, is unique to immune system B cells

Summary

Chapter 11: Endocrine Hormones

Introduction

11.1 Obesity – 2010 Douglas L. ColemanJeffrey M. Friedman

11.2 Lonely Receptors: RXR – Jensen, Chambon, and Evans – Nuclear receptors provoke RNA production in response to steroid hormones

11.3 The Fred Conrad Koch Lifetime Achievement Award—the Society’s highest honor—recognizes the lifetime achievements and exceptional contributions of an individual to the field of endocrinology

11.4 Gerald D Aurbach Award for Outstanding Translational Research

11.5 Roy O. Greep Award for Outstanding Research in Endocrinology – Martin M. Matzuk

11.6 American Physiology Society Awards

11.7 Solomon Berson and Rosalyn Yalow

Summary

Chapter 12. Stem Cells

Introduction

12.1 Mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent – John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka

12.2 Observing the spleen colonies in mice and proving the existence of stem cells – Till and McCulloch

12.3 McEwen Award for Innovation: Irving Weissman, M.D., Stanford School of Medicine, and Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D., Hubrecht Institute

12.4 Developmental biology

12.5  CRISPR/Cas-mediated genome engineering – Rudolf Jaenisch

12.6 Ribozymes and RNA Machines –  Work of Jennifer A. Doudna

12.7 Ralph Brinster, ‘Father of Transgenesis’

12.8 Targeted gene modification

12.9 Stem Cells and Cancer

12.10 ALPSP Awards

12.11 Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators

12.12 Breaking news about genomic engineering, T2DM and cancer treatments

Summary
Chapter 13: 3D Printing and Medical Application

Introduction

13.1 3D Printing

13.2 What is 3D printing?

13.3 The Scientist Who Is Making 3D Printing More Human

13.4 Join These Medical 3D Printing Groups on Twitter and LinkedIn for great up to date news

13.5 Neri Oxman and her Mediated Matter group @MIT Media Lab have developed a technique for 3D-printing Molten Glass

13.6 The ‘chemputer’ that could print out any drug

13.7 3-D-Bioprinting in use to Create Cardiac Living Tissue: Print your Heart out

13.8 LPBI’s Perspective on Medical and Life Sciences Applications – 3D Printing: BioInks, BioMaterials-BioPolymer

13.9 Medical MEMS, Sensors and 3D Printing: Frontier in Process Control of BioMaterials

13.10 NIH and FDA on 3D Printing in Medical Applications: Views for On-demand Drug Printing, in-Situ direct Tissue Repair and Printed Organs for Live Implants

13.11 ‘Pop-up’ fabrication technique trumps 3D printing

13.12 Augmentation of the ONTOLOGY of the 3D Printing Research

13.13 Superresolution Microscopy

Summary

Chapter 14: Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

Introduction

14.1 Insights in Biological and Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

14.2 Breakthrough work in cancer

Summary to Part Two

Volume Summary and Conclusions

EPILOGUE

 

 


Series A: e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases – electronic Table of Contents per Volume 1,2,3,4

 

Editor-in-Chief, BioMed e-Series, LPBI Group: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

Volume 1

Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

Click here

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/perspectives-nitric-oxide-disease-mechanisms-table-aviva/

 

Volume 2

Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q5MCN8

Click here

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cardiovascular-original-research-cases-methodology-aviva/

 

Volume 3

Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

Click here

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/etiologies-cardiovascular-diseases-epigenetics-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

Volume 4

Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutics Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases – eTOCs http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A

Click here

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/regenerative-translational-medicine-therapeutics-lev-ari-phd-rn/


Mitral Valve Repair Global Leader: Edwards LifeSciences acquired Harpoon Medical for $250 in 12/2017 followed by $690 million buyout of Valtech Cardio 1/2017 and $400 million acquisition of CardiAQ Valve Technologies in 8/2016

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD

 

Acquisitions of small players marks the ENTRY of Edwards LifeSciences into the Mitral Valve Repair Market, following MAJOR success in TAVR.

  • Harpoon Medical (trans apical approach) in 12/2017 and 
  • CardiAQ Valve Technologies in 8/2016
  • $690 million buyout of Valtech Cardio, 1/2017 –  It does not include Valtech Cardio’s trans-septal mitral valve replacement program; that business is slated to be spun out on its own before the buyout’s closing, expected in early 2017, but Edwards said last year that it’s due to keep an option to buy.

 

 

Edwards buys mitral valve repair player in $250M deal – Harpoon Medical

“The unique beating-heart repair procedure for mitral valve patients complements Edwards’ comprehensive portfolio of treatments for structural heart disease, and reinforces our commitment to innovation in cardiac surgery.”

The HARPOON system is designed to facilitate echo-guided repair of mitral valve regurgitation, by stabilizing the prolapsed mitral valve leaflet to restore proper coaptation and valve function.  The HARPOON device is currently investigational and not available for commercial use. It is expected to receive CE Mark approval soon.

“There are a significant number of patients currently undergoing mitral valve surgery that we believe can benefit from Harpoon’s therapy during a minimally invasive, beating-heart procedure,” said device inventor James S. Gammie, M.D., chairman of the company’s scientific advisory board and professor and chief of cardiac surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “This therapy offers the potential for earlier treatment of degenerative mitral valve disease with faster recovery and less morbidity, while also providing the opportunity for more consistent procedures and outcomes for patients.”

Edwards will discuss the HARPOON technology further at its annual Investor Conference on Dec. 7.

Edwards Lifesciences closes $690m Valtech Cardio buy

Edwards Lifesciences, Valtech CardioEdwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) said yesterday that it closed the $690 million buyout of Valtech Cardio and most of the heart valve repair technologies it’s developing.

Valtech makes the Cardioband device, which is designed to reshape the mitral valve using specially designed anchors.

The deal, announced in November 2016, calls for $340 million in up-front cash and another $350 million in milestones over 10 years. It does not include Valtech Cardio’s trans-septal mitral valve replacement program; that business is slated to be spun out on its own before the buyout’s closing, expected in early 2017, but Edwards said last year that it’s due to keep an option to buy.

Or Yehuda, Israel-based Valtech was the target of a previous takeover attempt by HeartWare International that was spiked early this year after a proxy war. (HeartWare itself was acquired by Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) for $1.1 billion in August.) Valtech won CE Mark approval in the European Union for Cardioband in September 2015 but the device is not approved for the U.S. market.

“We look forward to the Valtech team joining Edwards. We believe their knowledge, experience and the Cardioband technology are valuable additions to Edwards,” Edwards chairman & CEO Michael Mussallem said in prepared remarks.

Edwards Lifesciences bought CardiAQ Valve Technologies and its mitral valve device for $400 million last August.

Shares in Edwards have plummeted today in mid-day trading, down 9.1% at $89.06 as of 12:45 p.m. EST.

Last month, Edwards said it closed the $690 million buyout of Valtech Cardio and most of the heart valve repair technologies it’s developing.

Valtech makes the Cardioband device, which is designed to reshape the mitral valve using specially designed anchors.

The deal, announced in November 2016, calls for $340 million in up-front cash and another $350 million in milestones over 10 years. It does not include Valtech Cardio’s trans-septal mitral valve replacement program; that business is slated to be spun out on its own before the buyout’s closing, expected in early 2017, but Edwards said last year that it’s due to keep an option to buy.

SOURCE

http://www.massdevice.com/edwards-pauses-cardiaq-valve-clinical-trial-enrollment/


FDA approval on 12/1/2017 of Amgen’s evolocumb (Repatha) a PCSK9 inhibitor for the prevention of heart attacks, strokes, and coronary revascularizations in patients with established cardiovascular disease

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Evolocumab was first FDA approved in 2015 for patients with

  • familial hypercholesterolemia and
  • others who fail to achieve LDL cholesterol lowering through diet and maximally-tolerated statin therapy.

In the Repatha cardiovascular outcomes study (FOURIER), Repatha reduced the risk of

  • heart attack by 27 percent, the risk of
  • stroke by 21 percent and the risk of
  • coronary revascularization by 22 percent.2

 

U.S. Repatha Indication

Repatha is a PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9) inhibitor antibody indicated:

  • to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and coronary revascularization in adults with established cardiovascular disease.
  • as an adjunct to diet, alone or in combination with other lipid-lowering therapies (e.g., statins, ezetimibe), for treatment of adults with primary hyperlipidemia (including heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia [HeFH]) to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).
  • as an adjunct to diet and other LDL‑lowering therapies (e.g., statins, ezetimibe, LDL apheresis) in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) who require additional lowering of LDL‑C.

The safety and effectiveness of Repatha have not been established in pediatric patients with HoFH who are younger than 13 years old.

The safety and effectiveness of Repatha have not been established in pediatric patients with primary hyperlipidemia or HeFH.

Eligible patients with high cholesterol (LDL-C ≥70 mg/dL or non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [non-HDL-C] ≥100 mg/dL) and established cardiovascular disease at more than 1,300 study locations around the world were randomized to receive Repatha subcutaneous 140 mg every two weeks or 420 mg monthly plus high- or moderate-intensity effective statin dose; or placebo subcutaneous every two weeks or monthly plus high- to moderate-intensity statin dose. Statin therapy was defined in the protocol as at least atorvastatin 20 mg or equivalent daily with a recommendation for at least atorvastatin 40 mg or equivalent daily where approved. The study was event driven and continued until at least 1,630 patients experienced a key secondary endpoint.

About Repatha® (evolocumab)
Repatha® (evolocumab) is a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Repatha binds to PCSK9 and inhibits circulating PCSK9 from binding to the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR), preventing PCSK9-mediated LDLR degradation and permitting LDLR to recycle back to the liver cell surface. By inhibiting the binding of PCSK9 to LDLR, Repatha increases the number of LDLRs available to clear LDL from the blood, thereby lowering LDL-C levels.1

About Amgen in the Cardiovascular Therapeutic Area
Building on more than three decades of experience in developing biotechnology medicines for patients with serious illnesses, Amgen is dedicated to addressing important scientific questions to advance care and improve the lives of patients with cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.8 Amgen’s research into cardiovascular disease, and potential treatment options, is part of a growing competency at Amgen that utilizes human genetics to identify and validate certain drug targets. Through its own research and development efforts, as well as partnerships, Amgen is building a robust cardiovascular portfolio consisting of several approved and investigational molecules in an effort to address a number of today’s important unmet patient needs, such as high cholesterol and heart failure.

Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (HoFH): In 49 patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia studied in a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 33 patients received 420 mg of Repatha subcutaneously once monthly. The adverse reactions that occurred in at least 2 (6.1 percent) Repatha-treated patients and more frequently than in placebo-treated patients, included upper respiratory tract infection (9.1 percent versus 6.3 percent), influenza (9.1 percent versus 0 percent), gastroenteritis (6.1 percent versus 0 percent), and nasopharyngitis (6.1 percent versus 0 percent).

Immunogenicity: Repatha is a human monoclonal antibody. As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity with Repatha.

Please contact Amgen Medinfo at 800-77-AMGEN (800-772-6436) or 844-REPATHA (844-737-2842) regarding Repatha® availability or find more information, including full Prescribing Information, at www.amgen.com and www.Repatha.com.

References

  1. Repatha® U.S. Prescribing Information. Amgen.
  2. Sabatine MS, Giugliano RP, Keech AC, et al, for the FOURIER Steering Committee and Investigators. N Engl J Med. Evolocumab and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease. 2017;376:1713-22.
  3. Cannon CP, et al. N Engl J Med. 2004;350:1495-1504.
  4. LaRosa JC, et al. N Engl J Med. 2005;352:1425-1435.
  5. Pederson TR, et al. JAMA. 2005;294:2437-2445.
  6. Search Collaborative Group Lancet 2010;376:1658–69.
  7. Cannon CP, et al. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:2387-2397.
  8. World Health Organization. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) fact sheet. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs317/en/. Accessed October 30, 2017.

 

SOURCE: Amgen


PMC Comment Letter on Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: Innovation Center New Direction

Guest Author: Cynthia A. Bens, Vice President, Public Policy, PMC

cbens@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org

NOVEMBER 27, 2017

In response to a Wall Street Journal op-ed and request for information about innovative ways to pay for and deliver health care in the U.S., the Personalized Medicine Coalition has encouraged the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to spearhead models that empower physicians to move away from the current standard of care when patient outcomes can be improved by tailoring care to a patient’s genetics and other factors:

In keeping with PMC’s mission to underline the significance of personalized medicine to patients and the health system, the Coalition’s comment letter contends that personalized medicine products and services can increase the overall value of dollars spent by improving health outcomes.

CMS’ previous efforts to advance new payment models, the letter notes, were met with resistance largely because they focused on reducing overall health care costs without adequately considering whether those reductions would result in a disproportionate decrease in the outcomes that matter to patients.

PMC indicates in the letter that the guiding principles put forth in CMS’ request for information provide “reasonable assurance” that the agency plans to proceed at “a more measured pace” going forward.

“We believe that personalized medicine has the potential to help CMS deliver on its goal of [affordable, accessible health care] if [the agency] focuses on maximizing individual patient outcomes, if new models are fully evaluated before large-scale implementation, if payment is not rooted in current standard of care, and if physicians have the flexibility to tailor care based on a patient’s genetics and other factors,” the letter reads.

Please contact Cynthia A. Bens, Vice President, Public Policy, at cbens@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org with questions about PMC’s comment letter.

###

Personalized Medicine Coalition
1710 Rhode Island Ave. NW; Suite 700
Washington, D.C. 20036
Blog: Education & Advocacy
Twitter: @PerMedCoalition
www.PersonalizedMedicineCoalition.org

SOURCE

From: Personalized Medicine Coalition <messages@app.production.membersuite.com>
Reply-To: “Christopher Wells (PMC)” <cwells@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org>
Date: Monday, November 27, 2017 at 2:58 PM
To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>
Subject: PMC to CMS: To Increase Value, Empower Physicians to Tailor Care, Optimize Outcomes

 and

From: “Christopher Wells (PMC)” <cwells@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org>

Date: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at 7:34 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Re: PMC to CMS: To Increase Value, Empower Physicians to Tailor Care, Optimize Outcomes


The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures,”

Debut of our new book on Patient-Centered Medicine – Patient Case Studies of Serious Medical Conditions. We hope you will enjoy reading this unique volume on AmazonPrime.com and Kindle Unlimited

 

Editor-in-Chief: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN and Gail Thornton, PhD(c), Co-Editor

 

The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures,” uniquely written, explores the concept of “patient-centered medicine,” which puts the patient as the central focus in medicine and health care.

Real-life examples of survival stories from patients who have endured major or critical illnesses, such as cancer, heart disease or liver failure, have one common thread – the patients have an unwavering strength, determination and hope for survival. They deserve the best care possible for the best possible outcome in medical treatment.

The link to the book is below:

The VOICES of Patients, Hospitals CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures … E: Patient-Centered Medicine Book 1)

  • Divided into three parts – Perspectives of Care, Voices of Cancer Survivors and the Voices of Open Heart-Surgery Survivors, the book documents primary research conducted by a team of writers through personal interviews conducted with patients facing major health diagnoses with the support of their families.
  • The book also features interviews conducted on the importance of increasing the effort in global health and wellness and developing new medicines and technologies with hospitals CEOs, leading academic research center leaders and pharmaceutical research and development scientists in the U.S. and other countries, including Singapore and Switzerland.
  • And lastly, the book provides personal accounts and testimonies of patients written from their perspective; some of those patients are medical doctors diagnosed with cancer, who underwent invasive surgeries.

The book is the brainchild of Aviva Lev-Ari, Ph.D., R.N., Director and Founder of Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, and Editor-in Chief of www. pharmaceuticalintelligence.com . The book’s co-editors are Larry H. Bernstein, M.D., F.A.C.P., and Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Specifically, you can read about articles that:

  • Explore the personal account and medical journey of patients of all ages with serious health conditions, such as cancer, heart disease, liver failure, who underwent treatment for multiple diagnoses and subsequent surgeries. They never lost hope, perspective or sense of self as they are the true survivors, along with their families and caregivers.
  • Look at hospital CEOs from Singapore to Switzerland to New York who believe an essential component to quality health care is a highly qualified staff and facilities that deliver superb technology.
  • Emphasize the methods of scientific discovery and development in academic research institutions and pharmaceutical research and development companies, whose goal is to constantly discover and develop new and better medicines.
  • Discuss unique ways of the university research community to address the global health challenge by helping under-developed and under-served populations around the world by improving health and wellness.

Perception of care is determined by a number of important factors that are dependent on the individual, physician, and treatment conditions,” said Drs. Larry Bernstein and Aviva Lev-Ari. “The individual factors include patient social status, linguistic factors, cognitive skills and level of education, and communication skills of the health care providers. The facilities can be a factor not easily ranked, although that is always a matter for debate.

 

HERE ARE SPECIFIC PROFILES THAT ARE INCLUDED IN THE BOOK:

 

HOSPITAL CEOs

2.2 Hospital CEO: A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

2.4 Hospital CEO: A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care — Richmond University Medical Center, New York’s Leader in Health Care and Medical Education

2.5 Hospital CEO: University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland – A Prominent Center of Pediatric Research and Medicine

2.6 Hospital CEO: Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries

 

PHARMACEUTICAL R&D

2.3 Drug Discovery for Cancer Cure: Value for Patients – Turning Advances in Science: A Case Study of a Leading Global Pharmaceutical Company – Astellas Pharma Inc.

 

ACADEMIC RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS

2.7 Institute Director: The Rutgers Global Health Institute, part of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey – A New Venture Designed to Improve Health and Wellness Globally

2.8 City of Hope, Duarte, California – Combining Science with Soul to Create Miracles at a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer Institute – An Interview with the Provost and Chief Scientific Officer of City of Hope, Steven T. Rosen, M.D.

2.9 The Future of Hospitals – How Medical Care and Technology Work Together to Advance Patient Care

 

PATIENT STORIES

5.4.3 Almudena’s Story: A Life of Hope, Rejuvenation and Strength

Patient had ovarian clear cell adenocarcinomas (OCCAs) and underwent a complete hysterectomy at age 52. Interview was conducted 15 months’ post-surgery. Earlier in life, patient had thyroid cancer and removal of her thyroid gland and all the lymph nodes in her neck.

5.6.6 Adenocarcinoma of the Duodenum

Nathalie’s Story: A Health Journey With A Happy Ending

Patient was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the duodenum over two years ago and had tumor removed at age 35. Interview was conducted 2+ years post-surgery.

5.7.1 Marcela’s Story: A Liver Transplant Gives the Gift of Life

Patient is HCV Positive, liver transplanted from a 22-year-old donor performed at age 70. Interview conducted 14 years post-liver transplant.

8.2 Triple-bypass operation at age 69 – Ralph’s Story: An Entertainer at Heart

Patient was diagnosed with heart disease and pulmonary hypertension in January 2016 and had a triple-bypass operation at age 69. Interview was conducted six months post-surgery.

 

Please see our other 11 e-books in our 16-volume e-book BioMed series written on various medical topics:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=Aviva+Lev-Ari%2C+PhD%2C+RN

https://www.amazon. com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_ebooks_ 9?ie=UTF8&text=Aviva+Lev-Ari& search-alias=digital-text& field-author=Aviva+Lev-Ari& sort=relevancerank.