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2017 Agenda – BioInformatics: Track 6: BioIT World Conference & Expo ’17, May 23-35, 2017, Seaport World Trade Center, Boston, MA

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

2017bioit-bit-mini-logo

 

 bioinformatics

http://www.bio-itworldexpo.com/Bio-It_Expo_Content.aspx?id=140955

TUESDAY, MAY 23

7:00 am Workshop Registration and Morning Coffee

8:0011:30 Recommended Morning Pre-Conference Workshops*

(W4) Data Visualization to Accelerate Biological Discovery

12:304:00 pm Recommended Afternoon Pre-Conference Workshops*

(W13) Proteogenomics: Integration of Genomics and Proteomics Data

* Separate registration required.

2:006:00 Main Conference Registration Open

4:00 PLENARY KEYNOTE SESSION

Click here for detailed information

5:007:00 Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24

7:00 am Registration Open and Morning Coffee

8:00 PLENARY KEYNOTE SESSION

Click here for detailed information

9:50 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

APPLICATIONS & SOLUTIONS FOR DATA SHARING AND DECISION MAKING

10:50 Chairperson’s Remarks

Kevin Merlo, BioSafety Development Engineer, Dassault Systemes

11:00 Innovative Data Integration Applicable for Therapeutic Protein Development 2.0

Wolfgang Paul, Group Leader and Senior Scientist, Large Molecule Research, Roche

Therapeutic proteins are registered including sequence, structural and functional data and information. Millions of data points are captured during the development of Roche’s innovative therapeutic proteins in data warehouse used by DAMAS (data acquisition, management and analyses system). Fast access and visualization of relevant process and analytical data drive scientific discussion and decision making. Analyzing the stored big data is key towards process development of therapeutic proteins 2.0.

11:30 Informatics – A Silver Bullet for Pharmaceutical Sciences?

William Loging, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Genomics & Head, Production Bioinformatics, Genetics and Genomics Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

The Pharmaceutical Sciences field is in constant search for the next big innovative push that will increase the success rate of drug programs. The fields of computational chemistry, structural bioinformatics – just to name a few – have changed the way drug researchers look for and identify novel drug candidates. Utilizing more than 15 years of Pharmaceutical experience, and using real world examples of high provide drug projects, this talk will provide practical steps for the merger of informatics and the strategic approaches needed for drug discovery success.

12:00 pm Big Data-Driven Bioinformatics

Frank Lee, Ph.D., Healthcare Life Sciences Industry Leader, Software Defined Infrastructure, IBM Systems, IBM

IBM will discuss the IBM Reference Architecture for Genomics, its new features, and case studies: hybrid cloud with integrated workload and data management for high performance genomics analytics; container technologies for migrating and sharing application and data; and application portal and metadata engine for global access to and searching of distributed resources. A demo of a hybrid cloud-based bioinformatics solution will follow.

12:30 Session Break

12:40 Luncheon Presentation I to be Announced

1:10 Luncheon Presentation II to be Announced

1:40 Session Break

STANDARDS FOR CHEMICAL STRUCTURES

1:50 Chairperson’s Remarks

1:55 PANEL DISCUSSION: Linking and Finding Information Using the IUPAC InChI Standard for Chemical Structures

Steve Heller, Ph.D., Project Director, InChI Trust; Scientific Information Consultant (Moderator)

Evan Bolton, Ph.D., Lead Scientist, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), National Library of Medicine (NLM), and National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Keith T. Taylor, BSc, Ph.D., MRSC, Principal, Ladera Consultancy

Tyler Peryea, Informatics Scientist, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

Lawrence Callahan, Ph.D., Chemist, Substance Registration System, Office of Critical Path Programs, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

This session will highlight on-going efforts to strengthen and expand the non-proprietary IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) standard for chemical structures and its hashed-form, the InChIKey. Information standards are critical to enable effective communication of scientific content. Funding to maintain InChI comes from most major publishers and database providers as well as governmental agencies (NIH, FDA and NIST). The InChI is an open-source, widely adopted standard found in most chemical information containing databases, including those from Chemical Abstracts, Reaxys, ChEMBL, OpenPHACTS, PubChem, DrugBank, PDB, Sigma-Aldrich, and many others, such as internal Pharma corporate databases. InChI is an addition to a database, not a replacement. With the implementation of the ISO identification of medicinal products (IDMP) and the related ISO 11238 standards, adding and having an InChI will allow for an easier, effective, and more complete search for information on a particular drug.

2:55 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

3:10 Integrated Informatics for Biologics Discovery

Robert Brown, Ph.D., Vice President, Product Marketing, Dotmatics

3:25 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES AND APPLICATIONS TO PERFORM BIG DATA ANALYTICS ON –OMICS DATA

4:00 Building Disease Networks Using Text Mining and Machine Learning Techniques

Kamal Rawal, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Biotech and Bioinformatics, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology

Obesity is a global epidemic affecting over 1.5 billion people and is one of the risk factors for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. We have constructed a comprehensive map of the molecules reported to be implicated in obesity. Using text mining & deep curation strategies combined with omics data, we have explained the therapeutics and side effects of several drugs (i.e., orlistat) at network level.

4:20 Big Data and Systems Biology: From Genome to Phenome (and Everything in Between)

Dan Jacobson, Ph.D., Computational Biologist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4:40 Novel Feature Selection Strategies for Enhanced Predictive Modeling and Deep Learning in the Biosciences

Tom Chittenden, Ph.D., D.Phil., Lecturer and Senior Biostatistics and Mathematical Biology Consultant, Harvard Medical School

We have built a robust AI approach that precisely assesses pathogenicity for all genomic missense variants. Coupled with our advanced deepCODE mathematical statistics feature selection strategy for constructing deep learning models, we are able to quantitatively integrate a priori pathway-based biological knowledge with multiple types of high-throughput omics data.

5:00 Network Analysis for Drug Discovery: Benchmarking Results and Best Practices Reported by CBDD Consortium

Marina Bessarabova, Ph.D., Senior Director, Discovery and Translational Science, Life Sciences Professional Services, Clarivate Analytics (Formerly the IP & Science Business of Thomson Reuters)

A large number of advanced approaches to network analysis of -omics data were developed by academia groups in the past 15 years. Adoption of these approaches in drug development requires thorough review of the published approaches, implementation of methods identified as potentially applicable to drug development and benchmarking of the methods with an aim to establish best practices for application of the methods to diseases and mechanism of action understanding, target identification, drug repositioning, patient stratification, biomarker discovery, and drug combination effect prediction. CBDD (Computational Biology Methods for Drug Discovery) is a precompetitive consortium between Novartis, Pfizer, Sanofi, Janssen, Regeneron, UCB, Roche, Takeda, Biogen, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck and Clarivate Analytics (formally Thomson Reuters) focused on adoption of network analysis approaches in drug development: literature review, method implementation and benchmarking. Benchmarking results and best practices for application of network analysis in drug development established by members of the program will be shared during the presentation.

5:30 15th Anniversary Celebration in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing and Best of Show Awards

THURSDAY, MAY 25

7:00 am Registration Open and Morning Coffee

8:00 PLENARY KEYNOTE SESSION & AWARDS PROGRAM

8:05 Benjamin Franklin Awards and Laureate Presentation

8:35 Best Practices Awards Program

8:50 Plenary Keynote

Click here for detailed information

9:45 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall and Poster Competition Winners Announced

DATA COMPUTING AND BIOINFORMATICS IN AGRO CHEMICALS AND BIOTECHNOLOGY: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

10:30 Chairperson’s Remarks

Bino John, Ph.D., Computational Biology Group Leader, Dow AgroSciences LLC

10:40 How Biotech and Big Data Are Changing Agro Industry

Bino John, Ph.D., Computational Biology Group Leader, Dow AgroSciences LLC

More than 70% of the increase in food production in the next 50 years is expected to come from technological advances. Indeed, recent advances in genomics and phenomics are beginning to transform the Agro-industry, whereby creating new opportunities for informatics disciplines. While informatics needs in managing, analyzing, and visualizing big data share commonalties between Agro and the biomedical communities, Agro companies face unprecedented challenges in big biological data, generally larger than their peers in the biomedical community.

11:00 Offering Outcomes: How Digital Farming Data Is Enabling New Business Models

Tobias Menne, Global Head of Digital Farming, Bayer

11:20 Building the Next-Generation R&D IT Infrastructure for Small Molecule Discovery

Paimun Amini, Chemistry IT Lead, R&D IT, Monsanto Company

Barrett Foat, Ph.D., Data Science Team Lead, Agricultural Productivity Innovations, Monsanto

The Pharma boom in the 90s & 2000s led to the emergence of a rich ecosystem of software companies focused on delivering the IT needs for small molecule discovery. Today, cloud data storage, IoT, and the growth of predictive analytics present new opportunities for the evolution of the R&D pipeline. New technologies allow for integrated software and hardware solutions that optimize productivity while removing the risk of technical debt.

11:40 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

12:10 pm Session Break

12:20 Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Enjoy Lunch on Your Own

1:20 Dessert Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

LOOKING BEYOND THE GENOME OF THE PATIENT: DATA, ANALYSIS AND TOOLS TO IMPROVE BETTER DISEASE UNDERSTANDING FOR CURRENT TREATMENTS AND DRUG DEVELOPMENT

1:55 Chairperson’s Remarks

Michael N. Liebman, Ph.D., Managing Director, IPQ Analytics, LLC and Strategic Medicine, Inc.

2:00 Distinguishing between Precision Medicine and Accurate Medicine: Application to Heart Failure Patients and Clinical Practice

Michael N. Liebman, Ph.D., IPQ Analytics, LLC and Strategic Medicine, Inc.

Increasingly, patient stratification based on genomic analysis is being considered in disease management. Critically, the need to understand real world medical practice and real world patient complexities extends far beyond the genome of the patient. We have shown examples of this complexity in heart disease and how this impacts development of clinical guidelines, trial design, and development of new patient management approaches.

2:30 CARPEDIEM – Comorbidity and Risk Profiles Evaluation in Diabetes and Heart Morbidities

Sabrina Molinaro, Psy.D., Ph.D., Head, Department of Epidemiology and Health Services, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council of Italy

Our project uniquely develops a patient record that includes clinical and individual factors (EHR-driven phenotyping) that will be validated through the comparison of existing standards for building new risk algorithms. An understanding of the current limitations and biases of risk profiling in heart disease and diabetes and how an extended, integrated database and automatic rule-based classification system can be used to improve patient management.

3:00 PANEL DISCUSSION: Precision Medicine vs. Accurate Medicine: The Need to Understand Real World Medicine and Real World Patients

Michael N. Liebman, Ph.D., IPQ Analytics, LLC and Strategic Medicine, Inc. (Moderator)

Charles Barr, M.D., MPH, Group Medical Director and Head, Evidence Science and Innovation, Genentech

Hal Wolf, Director, National Leader of Information and Digital Health Strategy, The Chartis Group

4:00 Conference Adjourns

SOURCE

http://www.bio-itworldexpo.com/bioinformatics/


Expedite Use of Agents in Clinical Trials: New Drug Formulary Created – The NCI Formulary is a public-private partnership between NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

New Drug Formulary Will Help Expedite Use of Agents in Clinical Trials

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) today launched a new drug formulary (the “NCI Formulary”) that will enable investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers to have quicker access to approved and investigational agents for use in preclinical studies and cancer clinical trials. The NCI Formulary could ultimately translate into speeding the availability of more-effective treatment options to patients with cancer.

The NCI Formulary is a public-private partnership between NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. It is also one of NCI’s efforts in support of the Cancer Moonshot, answering Vice President Biden’s call for greater collaboration and faster development of new therapies for patients. The availability of agents through the NCI Formulary will expedite the start of clinical trials by alleviating the lengthy negotiation process — sometimes up to 18 months — that has been required for investigators to access such agents on their own.

“The NCI Formulary will help researchers begin testing promising drug combinations more quickly, potentially helping patients much sooner,” said NCI Acting Director Douglas Lowy, M.D. “Rather than spending time negotiating agreements, investigators will be able to focus on the important research that can ultimately lead to improved cancer care.”

The NCI Formulary launched today with fifteen targeted agents from six pharmaceutical companies:

  • Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • Eli Lilly and Company
  • Genentech
  • Kyowa Hakko Kirin
  • Loxo Oncology
  • Xcovery Holding Company LLC

“The agreements with these companies demonstrate our shared commitment to expedite cancer clinical trials and improve outcomes for patients,” said James Doroshow, M.D., NCI Deputy Director for Clinical and Translational Research. “It represents a new drug development paradigm that will enhance the efficiency with which new treatments are discovered.”

The establishment of the NCI Formulary will enable NCI to act as an intermediary between investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers and participating pharmaceutical companies, facilitating and streamlining the arrangements for access to and use of pharmaceutical agents. Following company approval, investigators will be able to obtain agents from the available formulary list and test them in new preclinical or clinical studies, including combination studies of formulary agents from different companies.

The NCI Formulary leverages lessons learned through NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-MATCH trial, a study in which targeted agents from different companies are being tested alone or in combination in patients with genetic mutations that are targeted by these drugs. As the use of genomic sequencing data becomes more common in selecting cancer therapies, requests for access to multiple targeted agents for the conduct of clinical trials are becoming more common.

“We are very pleased that several additional pharmaceutical companies have already pledged a willingness to participate and are in various stages of negotiation with NCI,” said Dr. Doroshow, who is also director of NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis. “By the end of 2017, we expect to have doubled the number of partnerships and drugs available in the NCI Formulary.”

CTEP staff continue to discuss the NCI Formulary with pharmaceutical companies to make additional proprietary agents available for studies initiated by investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers.

The Formulary will complement NIH’s plans for another new public-private partnership in oncology, the Partnership to Accelerate Cancer Therapies (PACT). Through PACT, the NIH, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, biopharmaceutical groups in the private sector, foundations, and cancer advocacy organizations will come together to support new research projects to accelerate progress in cancer research as part of the Cancer Moonshot. PACT research will center on the identification and validation of biomarkers of response and resistance to cancer therapies, with special emphasis on immunotherapies. PACT will also establish a platform for selecting and testing combination therapies. PACT is expected to launch in 2017.

About the National Cancer Institute (NCI): NCI leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH’s efforts to dramatically reduce the prevalence of cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at cancer.gov or call NCI’s Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

SOURCE

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-drug-formulary-will-help-expedite-use-agents-clinical-trials


Top 32 Pharma companies: Perception of Pharma Companies Pairing of the Most Admired Pharma Companies – A Survey by eyeforpharma, its mission is to make Pharma companies more open and valued

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Perception of Pharma Companies Pairing

Pfizer or Otsuka?

Pfizer
Otsuka

*2Eli Lilly or Celgene?

Eli Lilly
Celgene

*3Sanofi or Merck KGaA (EMD)?

Sanofi
Merck KGaA (EMD)

*4Amgen or Bristol-Myers Squibb?

Amgen
Bristol-Myers Squibb

*5Janssen (J&J) or Valeant?

Johnson & Johnson (Janssen)
Valeant

*6AstraZeneca or UCB?

AstraZeneca
UCB

*7Roche (Genentech) or Biogen?

Roche (Genentech)
Biogen

*8Teva or Servier?

Teva
Servier

*9Novartis or Astellas?

Novartis
Astellas

*10Bayer or Boehringer Ingelheim?

Bayer
Boehringer Ingelheim

*11Gilead or Eisai?

Gilead
Eisai

*12Allergan or Daiichi Sankyo?

Allergan
Daiichi Sankyo

*13GlaxoSmithKline or Mylan?

GlaxoSmithKline
Mylan

*14Abbvie or Shire?

Abbvie
Shire

*15Merck & Co (MSD) or Takeda?

Merck & Co (MSD)
Takeda

*16Novo Nordisk or CSL?

Novo Nordisk
CSL
SOURCES

From: Andy Robertson <arobertson@eyeforpharma.com>

Reply-To: Andy Robertson <arobertson@eyeforpharma.com>

Date: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 at 8:33 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Novartis vs Astellas – who wins?


Finding the Actions That Alter Evolution

The biologist Marcus Feldman creates mathematical models that reveal how cultural traditions can affect the evolution of a species.

By Elizabeth Svoboda

January 5, 2017

In a commentary in Nature, you and your co-authors wrote, “We hold that organisms are constructed in development, not simply ‘programmed’ to develop by genes.” What does “constructed in development” mean?

It means there’s an interaction between the subject and the environment. The idea of a genetic blueprint is not tenable in light of all that is now known about how all sorts of environmental contingencies affect traits. For many animals it’s like that. Even plants — the same plant that is genetically identical, if you put it in this environment, it’s going to look totally different from if you put it in that environment.

We now have a better picture of the regulatory process on genes. Epigenetics changes the landscape in genetics because it’s not only the pure DNA sequence which influences what’s going on at the level of proteins and enzymes. There’s this whole other stuff, the other 95 percent of the genome, that acts like rheostats — you slide this thing up and down, you get more or less of this protein. It’s a critical thing in how much of this protein is going to be made. It’s interesting to think about the way in which cultural phenomena, which we used to think were things by themselves, can have this effect on how much messenger RNA is made, and therefore on many aspects of gene regulation.

Article to review and VIEW VIDEO

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20170105-marcus-feldman-interview-culture-and-evolution/

 

ABOUT QUANTA

Quanta Magazine’s mission is to enhance public understanding of research developments in mathematics and the physical and life sciences. Quanta articles do not necessarily represent the views of the Simons Foundation. Learn more


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

Researchers have classified a brand-new organ inside human body. Known as the mesentery, the new organ is found in our digestive systems, and was long thought to be made up of fragmented, separate structures. But recent research has shown that it’s actually one, continuous organ. The evidence for the organ’s reclassification is now published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology. Although we now know about the structure of this new organ, its function is still poorly understood, and studying it could be the key to better understanding and treatment of abdominal and digestive disease.

mesentery

J Calvin Coffey, a researcher from the University Hospital Limerick in Ireland, who first discovered that the mesentery was an organ. In 2012, Coffey and his colleagues showed through detailed microscopic examinations that the mesentery is actually a continuous structure. Over the past four years, they’ve gathered further evidence that the mesentery should actually be classified as its own distinct organ, and the latest paper makes it official. Mesentery is a double fold of peritoneum – the lining of the abdominal cavity – that holds our intestine to the wall of our abdomen. It was described by the Italian polymath Leanardo da Vinci in 1508, but it has been ignored throughout the centuries, until now. Although there are generally considered to be five organs in the human body, there are in fact now 79, including the mesentery. The heart, brain, liver, lungs and kidneys are the vital organs, but there are another 74 that play a role in keeping us healthy. The distinctive anatomical and functional features of mesentery have been revealed that justify designation of the mesentery as an organ. Accordingly, the mesentery should be subjected to the same investigatory focus that is applied to other organs and systems. This provides a platform from which to direct future scientific investigation of the human mesentery in health and disease.

References:

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/langas/article/PIIS2468-1253(16)30026-7/abstract

http://www.sciencealert.com/it-s-official-a-brand-new-human-organ-has-been-classified

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-38506708

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/new-organ-mesentery-found-human-body-digestive-system-classified-abdominal-grays-anatomy-a7507396.html

https://in.news.yahoo.com/scientists-discover-human-organ-064207997.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesentery


One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers: R&D at WPI

Author: Marzan Khan, B.Sc

 

A team of mechanical engineers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) have developed a fascinating technology – a liquid biopsy chip that captures and detects metastatic cancer cells, just from a small blood sample of cancer patients(1). This device is a recent development in the scientific field and holds tremendous potential that will allow doctors to spot signs of metastasis for a variety of cancers at an early stage and initiate an appropriate course of treatment(1).

Metastasis occurs when cancer cells break away from their site of origin and spread to other parts of the body via the lymph or the bloodstream, where they give rise to secondary tumors(2). By this time, the cancer is at an advanced stage and it becomes increasingly difficult to fight the disease. The cells that are shed by primary and metastatic cancers are called circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their numbers lie in the range of 1–77,200/m(3). The basis of the liquid biopsy chip test is to capture these circulating tumor cells in the patient’s blood and identify the cell type through specific interaction with antibodies(4).

The chip is comprised of individual test units or small elements, about 3 millimeters wide(4). Each small element contains a network of carbon nanotube sensors in a well which are functionalized with antibodies(4). These antibodies will bind cell-surface antigens or protein markers unique for each type of cancer cell. Specific interaction between a cell surface protein and its corresponding antibody is a thermodynamic event that causes a change in free energy which is transduced into electricity(3). This electrical signature is picked up by the semi-conducting carbon nanotubes and can be seen as electrical spikes(4). Specific interactions create an increase in electrical signal, whereas non-specific interactions cause a decrease in signal or no change at all(4). Capture efficiency of cancer cells with the chip has been reported to range between 62-100%(4).

The liquid biopsy chip is also more advanced than microfluidics for several reasons. Firstly, the nanotube-chip arrays can capture as well as detect cancer cells, while microfluidics can only capture(4). Samples do not need to be processed for labeling or fixation, so the cell structures are preserved(4). Unlike microfluidics, these nanotubes will also capture tiny structures called exosomes spanning the nanometer range that are produced from cancer cells and carry the same biomarkers(4).

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-associated deaths in the United states, with a survival window of 5 years in only 6% of the cases with treatment(5). In most patients, the disease has already metastasized at the time of diagnosis due to the lack of early-diagnostic markers, affecting some of the major organs such as liver, lungs and the peritoneum(5,6). Despite surgical resection of the primary tumor, the recurrence of local and metastatic tumors is rampant(5). Metastasis is the major cause of mortality in cancers(5). The liquid biopsy chip, that identifies CTCs can thus become an effective diagnostic tool in early detection of cancer as well as provide information into the efficacy of treatment(3). At present, ongoing experiments with this device involve testing for breast cancers but Dr. Balaji Panchapakesan and his team of engineers at WPI are optimistic about incorporating pancreatic and lung cancers into their research.

REFERENCES

1.Nanophenotype. Researchers build liquid biopsy chip that detects metastatic cancer cells in blood: One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers. 27 Dec 2016. Genesis Nanotechnology,Inc

https://genesisnanotech.wordpress.com/2016/12/27/researchers-build-liquid-biopsy-chip-that-detects-metastatic-cancer-cells-in-blood-one-blood-sample-can-be-tested-for-a-comprehensive-array-of-cancer-cell-markers/

2.Martin TA, Ye L, Sanders AJ, et al. Cancer Invasion and Metastasis: Molecular and Cellular Perspective. In: Madame Curie Bioscience Database [Internet]. Austin (TX): Landes Bioscience; 2000-2013.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK164700/

3.F Khosravi, B King, S Rai, G Kloecker, E Wickstrom, B Panchapakesan. Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells. 23 Dec 2013. IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine 7 (4), 20-26

Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells

4.Farhad Khosravi, Patrick J Trainor, Christopher Lambert, Goetz Kloecker, Eric Wickstrom, Shesh N Rai and Balaji Panchapakesan. Static micro-array isolation, dynamic time series classification, capture and enumeration of spiked breast cancer cells in blood: the nanotube–CTC chip. 29 Sept 2016. Nanotechnology. Vol 27, No.44. IOP Publishing Ltd

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0957-4484/27/44/44LT03/meta

5.Seyfried, T. N., & Huysentruyt, L. C. (2013). On the Origin of Cancer Metastasis. Critical Reviews in Oncogenesis18(1-2), 43–73.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3597235/

6.Deeb, A., Haque, S.-U., & Olowoure, O. (2015). Pulmonary metastases in pancreatic cancer, is there a survival influence? Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology6(3), E48–E51. http://doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2078-6891.2014.114

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397254/

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Liquid Biopsy Chip detects an array of metastatic cancer cell markers in blood – R&D @Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Reporters: Tilda Barliya, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/28/liquid-biopsy-chip-detects-an-array-of-metastatic-cancer-cell-markers-in-blood-rd-worcester-polytechnic-institute-micro-and-nanotechnology-lab/

 

Trovagene’s ctDNA Liquid Biopsy urine and blood tests to be used in Monitoring and Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer

Reporters: David Orchard-Webb, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/06/trovagenes-ctdna-liquide-biopsy-urine-and-blood-tests-to-be-used-in-monitoring-and-early-detection-of-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/06/liquid-biopsy-assay-may-predict-drug-resistance/


New insights in cancer, cancer immunogenesis and circulating cancer cells

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/15/new-insights-in-cancer-cancer-immunogenesis-and-circulating-cancer-cells/

 

Prognostic biomarker for NSCLC and Cancer Metastasis

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curato

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/24/prognostic-biomarker-for-nsclc-and-cancer-metastasis/

 

Monitoring AML with “cell specific” blood test

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/23/monitoring-aml-with-cell-specific-blood-test/

 

Diagnostic Revelations

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/02/diagnostic-revelations/

 

Circulating Biomarkers World Congress, March 23-24, 2015, Boston: Exosomes, Microvesicles, Circulating DNA, Circulating RNA, Circulating Tumor Cells, Sample Preparation

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/03/circulating-biomarkers-world-congress-march-23-24-2015-boston-exosomes-microvesicles-circulating-dna-circulating-rna-circulating-tumor-cells-sample-preparation/

 

 

 


Four patents and one patent application on Nanopore Sequencing and methods of trapping a molecule in a nanopore assigned to Genia, is been claimed in a Law Suit by The Regents of the University of California, should be assigned to UCSC

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

The university claims that while at UCSC Roger Chen’s research focused on nanopore sequencing, and that he along with others developed technology that became the basis of patent applications filed by the university. However, when Chen left the university in 2008 and cofounded Genia, he was awarded patents for technology developed while he was at UCSC, but those patents were assigned to Genia and not the university, according to the suit.

In the suit, the university notes four patents and one patent application assigned to Genia that it claims should be assigned to UCSC: US Patent Nos., 8,324,914; 8,461,854; 9,041,420; and 9,377,437; and US Patent Application 15/079,322. The patents and patent applications all relate to nanopore sequencing and specifically to methods of trapping a molecule in a nanopore and characterizing it based on the electrical stimulus required to move the molecule through the pore.

Genia was founded in 2009, and in 2014, Roche acquired the startup for $125 million in cash and up to $225 million in milestone payments. Earlier this year, the company published a proof-of-principle study of its technology in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Roche’s head of sequencing solutions, Neil Gunn, said that Roche would announce a commercialization timeline in 2017.

It’s unclear how the lawsuit will impact that commercialization, but Mick Watson, director of ARK-Genomics at the Roslin Institute in the UK, speculated in a blog post that if the suit is decided in favor of UCSC, it could result in a very large settlement and potentially even the end of Genia.

 

SOURCE

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/university-california-files-suit-against-genia-cofounder

http://www.opiniomics.org/university-of-california-makes-legal-move-against-roger-chen-and-genia/