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Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group is pleased to announce its sponsorship and invite you to attend the Dedicated Lifesciences/Healthcare Track at New York Venture Summit presented by youngStartup Ventures.

 

 

 

Official Logo of Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

 

 

Special discount.  Use discount code LPBIVIP and receive 10% off the “early bird” rates. Early bird rates expire at the end of May.

 

>> Call for Top Lifesciences/Healthcare Innovators to present to leading Investors (details below).

 

New York

Venture Summit

July 9th & 10th 2019 | Convene | New York City

 

Where Innovation Meets Capital

 

 

Friends,

 

Come meet, interact and network with hundreds of VCs, Corporate VCs, angel investors, investment bankers and founders of venture backed, emerging and early stage companies on the Dedicated Lifesciences/Healthcare Track at the prestigious New York Venture Summit being held on July 9th & 10th 2019 at Convene, New York City.

 

Whether you’re a Lifesciences/Healthcare  startup seeking capital and exposure, or an investor seeking new deals, The New York Venture Summit presented by youngStartup Ventures – is the event of the year you won’t want to miss.

 

A highly productive venture conference, The New York Venture Summit is dedicated to showcasing VCs, Corporate VCs and angel investors committed to funding venture backed, emerging and early stage Lifesciences/Healthcare companies.

 

Partial list of VCs and Angels confirmed to speak and judge includes:

Jenny Abramson, Founder & Managing Partner, Rethink Impact | Nick Adams, Managing Partner & Co-Founder, Differential Ventures | Karine Agajanian, Senior Analyst, Anzu Partners | John Albright, Managing Partner, Relay Ventures | Andrew Aldrich, Principal, American Family Ventures | Liza Benson, Partner, Moderne Ventures | Lily Bernicker, Associate, Collaborative Fund | Laura Bock, Investor, QED Investors | Matt Brennan, Partner, General Catalyst Partners | Joel Brightfield, Principal, SixThirty | Ciara Burnham, Partner, QED Investors | Daniel Burstein, Managing Partner, Millennium Technology Value Partners | Don Burton, Founding & Managing Partner, LearnStart | Jason Cahill, Founder & Managing Director, McCune Capital | Alex Carusillo, Venture Associate, OCA Ventures | Benjamin Cukier, Founder, Centana Growth Partners | Ned Daoro, Senior Associate, Clocktower Technology Ventures | Soraya Darabi, General Partner, Trail Mix Ventures | Tyler Dean, Investor, Point72 Ventures | Parth Desai, Investor, Flare Capital Partners | Alan Du, Investor, Millennium Technology Value Partners | Tyler Durham, Principal, Schlumberger Ventures | Miriam Eaves, Venture Partner, BP Ventures | Kenny Estes, Co-Founder & Partner, West Loop Ventures | Dave Fan, Principal, Alumni Ventures Group | Michael Fanfant, Senior Associate, Runa Capital | Matt Fates, Founder & General Partner, Pulse Ventures | Sana Fathima, Investment Manager, Lockheed Martin Ventures | Lindsay Fitzgerald, Managing Director, American Express Ventures | Haley Fradkin, Investment Associate, Plum Alley Investments | Ben Freeberg, Senior Associate, Alpha Venture Partners | Kyle Fugere, Head of Ventures, dunnhumby Ventures | Anna Garcia, General Partner, Runway Venture Partners | Stephen Gilfus, Founder, Blackboard Inc. | Karim Gillani, General Partner, Luge Capital | Edward Greer, Corporate Technology Scout, Dow Ventures | John Gu, Investor, Spring Mountain Capital | Whitney Haring-Smith, Managing Partner, Anzu Partners | Will Hawkins, Senior Associate, Founder Collective | Martin Heidecker, Director, Investment Manager, Boehringer Ingelheim Venture Fund | Ann Hickey, Vice President, Town Hall Ventures | Kyle Howard-Johnson, Investor, Catalyst Investors | Vinay Iyengar, Investor, Bessemer Venture Partners | Deborah Jackson, Founder, Plum Alley Investments | Dhruv Jain, Investor, Bessemer Venture Partners | Del Johnson, Principal, Backstage Capital | Jay Karandikar, Venture Partner, New Crop Capital | Hana Khosla, Investor, Activant Capital | Avery Klemmer, Investor, FirstMark Capital | Jak Knowles, Vice President Venture Investments, Leaps by Bayer | Steve Konsek, Program Director, National Science Foundation | George Krautzel, Managing Partner, MissionOG | Ricky Lai, Senior Associate, Portag3 Ventures | Eddie Lee, Senior Associate, White Star Capital | Bion Ludwig, Partner, Savano Capital Partners | Coppelia Marincovic, Investment Manager, Solvay Ventures | Elizabeth McCluskey, Principal, Impact Engine | Shripal Meghani, Partner, Cleveland Clinic Ventures | Arpesh Mehta, Investment Director, DSM Venturing | Andrée-Lise Méthot, Founder & Managing Partner, Cycle Capital Management | Ed Michael, Co-founder and Managing Partner, LionBird Ventures | Sarah Millar, Associate, City Light Capital | Bá Minuzzi, General Partner, BABEL Ventures | Greg Neufeld, Partner, ValueStream Ventures | Jason Palmer, General Partner, New Markets Venture Partners | Matt Perlman, Principal, IA Capital Group | Victoria Pettibone, Managing Director, Astia Angels | Daniel Pianko, Partner, University Ventures | Adam Plotkin, Partner, ff Venture Capital | Jean-Noel Poirier, Managing Partner, Clean Energy Venture Group | Greg Pope, Principal, Anzu Partners | Alison Andrews Reyes, General Partner, 1843 Capital | Lisa Rhoads, Managing Director, Easton Capital | Douglas Roth, Managing Director, Connecticut Innovations | Boris Ryabov, Managing Partner, Bright Capital | Ernst Sack, Partner, Blue Bear Capital | Zak Schwarzman, Partner, MetaProp | Thomas Seo, Vice President, Citi Ventures | Connie Sheng, Founding Managing Partner, Nautilus Venture Partners | Jaidev Shergill, Managing Partner, Capital One Growth Partners | Zacary Sherman, Associate, Pereg Ventures | Nicole Shimer, Investment Associate, Insight Venture Partners | Raj Singh, Managing Partner, JetBlue Technology Ventures | Jean Sini, Angel Investor | Neil Swami, Principal, Catalyst Health Ventures | Erica Van, Associate, Charles River Ventures | Jamie M. Weston, Managing Director, Spring Mountain Capital | Anthony Xu, Partner, New Ground Ventures | Lisa Xu, Investor, FirstMark Capital | Wesley Yiu, Senior Associate, Triphammer Ventures | Chris Young, Partner, Revel Partners | Katherine Zamsky, Managing Partner, Carbon Ventures | Lu Zhang, Founder & Managing Partner, Fusion Fund | Greg Ziac, General Partner, NMT Capital | Chris Zock, Managing Director , Sandbox Insurtech Ventures and many more.

 

Special Offer:

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence Group has made special arrangement for our network to receive a special discount, currently 10% off the existing “early bird” savings. Early bird rates expire at the end of May.

This conference will be attended by the best people in the industry. Please register early to avoid disappointment. 

 

Register Today & Save Click here.   

(Use promo code “LPBIVIP”)

 

In addition to providing access to leading Investors, the conference will feature more than 100 pre-screened venture backed, emerging and early stage companies seeking capital, and hardcore networking. 

 

 

Call for TOP INNOVATORS!

Get Noticed > Get Funded > Grow Faster

 

A select group of more than 100 Top Innovators from the Technology, Life Sciences/Healthcare, CleanTech and Fintech sectors will be chosen to present their breakthrough investment opportunities to an exclusive audience of Venture Capitalists, Corporate Investors, Private Investors, Investment Bankers, and Strategic Partners.

 

Apply to Present / Nominate a company:

For more information or to be considered for one of the Top Innovator slots click here.

 

Seed Pitchfest:

If you are a seed stage company seeking angel funding of less than $1M (and have raised less than $300,000) click here to apply for our Seed stage track.

 

We look forward to seeing you there. 

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

&

youngStartup Ventures

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Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

The importance of B cells to human health is more than what is already known. Vaccines capable of eradicating disease activate B cells, cancer checkpoint blockade therapies are produced using B cells, and B cell deficiencies have devastating impacts. B cells have been a subject of fascination since at least the 1800s. The notion of a humoral branch to immunity emerged from the work of and contemporaries studying B cells in the early 1900s.

 

Efforts to understand how we could make antibodies from B cells against almost any foreign surface while usually avoiding making them against self, led to Burnet’s clonal selection theory. This was followed by the molecular definition of how a diversity of immunoglobulins can arise by gene rearrangement in developing B cells. Recombination activating gene (RAG)-dependent processes of V-(D)-J rearrangement of immunoglobulin (Ig) gene segments in developing B cells are now known to be able to generate an enormous amount of antibody diversity (theoretically at least 1016 possible variants).

 

With so much already known, B cell biology might be considered ‘‘done’’ with only incremental advances still to be made, but instead, there is great activity in the field today with numerous major challenges that remain. For example, efforts are underway to develop vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibody responses, to understand how autoantigen- and allergen-reactive antibodies arise, and to harness B cell-depletion therapies to correct non-autoantibody-mediated diseases, making it evident that there is still an enormous amount we do not know about B cells and much work to be done.

 

Multiple self-tolerance checkpoints exist to remove autoreactive specificities from the B cell repertoire or to limit the ability of such cells to secrete autoantigen-binding antibody. These include receptor editing and deletion in immature B cells, competitive elimination of chronically autoantigen binding B cells in the periphery, and a state of anergy that disfavors PC (plasma cell) differentiation. Autoantibody production can occur due to failures in these checkpoints or in T cell self-tolerance mechanisms. Variants in multiple genes are implicated in increasing the likelihood of checkpoint failure and of autoantibody production occurring.

 

Autoantibodies are pathogenic in a number of human diseases including SLE (Systemic lupus erythematosus), pemphigus vulgaris, Grave’s disease, and myasthenia gravis. B cell depletion therapy using anti-CD20 antibody has been protective in some of these diseases such as pemphigus vulgaris, but not others such as SLE and this appears to reflect the contribution of SLPC (Short lived plasma cells) versus LLPC (Long lived plasma cells) to autoantibody production and the inability of even prolonged anti-CD20 treatment to eliminate the latter. These clinical findings have added to the importance of understanding what factors drive SLPC versus LLPC development and what the requirements are to support LLPCs.

 

B cell depletion therapy has also been efficacious in several other autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While the potential contributions of autoantibodies to the pathology of these diseases are still being explored, autoantigen presentation has been posited as another mechanism for B cell disease-promoting activity.

 

In addition to autoimmunity, B cells play an important role in allergic diseases. IgE antibodies specific for allergen components sensitize mast cells and basophils for rapid degranulation in response to allergen exposures at various sites, such as in the intestine (food allergy), nose (allergic rhinitis), and lung (allergic asthma). IgE production may thus be favored under conditions that induce weak B cell responses and minimal GC (Germinal center) activity, thereby enabling IgE+ B cells and/or PCs to avoid being outcompeted by IgG+ cells. Aside from IgE antibodies, B cells may also contribute to allergic inflammation through their interactions with T cells.

 

B cells have also emerged as an important source of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Mouse studies revealed that B cell-derived IL-10 can promote recovery from EAE (Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis) and can be protective in models of RA and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, IL-10 production from B cells restrains T cell responses during some viral and bacterial infections. These findings indicate that the influence of B cells on the cytokine milieu will be context dependent.

 

The presence of B cells in a variety of solid tumor types, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and melanoma, has been associated in some studies with a positive prognosis. The mechanism involved is unclear but could include antigen presentation to CD4 and CD8 T cells, antibody production and subsequent enhancement of presentation, or by promoting tertiary lymphoid tissue formation and local T cell accumulation. It is also noteworthy that B cells frequently make antibody responses to cancer antigens and this has led to efforts to use antibodies from cancer patients as biomarkers of disease and to identify immunotherapy targets.

 

Malignancies of B cells themselves are a common form of hematopoietic cancer. This predilection arises because the gene modifications that B cells undergo during development and in immune responses are not perfect in their fidelity, and antibody responses require extensive B cell proliferation. The study of B cell lymphomas and their associated genetic derangements continues to be illuminating about requirements for normal B cell differentiation and signaling while also leading to the development of targeted therapies.

 

Overall this study attempted to capture some of the advances in the understanding of B cell biology that have occurred since the turn of the century. These include important steps forward in understanding how B cells encounter antigens, the co-stimulatory and cytokine requirements for their proliferation and differentiation, and how properties of the B cell receptor, the antigen, and helper T cells influence B cell responses. Many advances continue to transform the field including the impact of deep sequencing technologies on understanding B cell repertoires, the IgA-inducing microbiome, and the genetic defects in humans that compromise or exaggerate B cell responses or give rise to B cell malignancies.

 

Other advances that are providing insight include single-cell approaches to define B cell heterogeneity, glycomic approaches to study effector sugars on antibodies, new methods to study human B cell responses including CRISPR-based manipulation, and the use of systems biology to study changes at the whole organism level. With the recognition that B cells and antibodies are involved in most types of immune response and the realization that inflammatory processes contribute to a wider range of diseases than previously believed, including, for example, metabolic syndrome and neurodegeneration, it is expected that further basic research-driven discovery about B cell biology will lead to more and improved approaches to maintain health and fight disease in the future.

 

References:

 

https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(19)30278-8

 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/hon.2405

 

https://www.pnas.org/content/115/18/4743

 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/all.12911

 

https://cshperspectives.cshlp.org/content/10/5/a028795

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0049017218304955

 


The role of PET/CT in diagnosing giant cell arteritis (GCA) and assessing the risk of ischemic events

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

May 20, 2019 — PET/CT images are offering evidence of a link between vascular patterns at the time of diagnosis for giant cell arteritis (GCA) and a patient’s risk of an ischemic event, Spanish researchers explained in a study published online on 12 May in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

The group found that patients with inflammation in vertebral arteries, which causes blood vessels to narrow, were five times more likely to develop ischemic symptoms. The information may be particularly helpful because GCA is difficult to diagnose in its early stages.

“Bearing in mind these results and our findings, we consider that the vertebral arteries should be carefully studied in patients with suspected GCA, not only to support the diagnosis but also to assess the risk of development of ischemic events,” wrote lead author Dr. Jaume Mestre-Torres and colleagues from Hospital Vall d’Hebron in Barcelona.

GCA’s challenges

Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory disease that causes the large blood vessels to narrow and restrict blood flow. The affliction is typically seen in the temporal arteries and the aorta in adults older than 50. Currently, there is little information on how the disease develops, although there are indications that it may be linked to genetics.

The challenge for clinicians is that there are “no specific clinical symptoms that lead to the diagnosis of GCA, but headache and ischemic symptoms such as jaw claudication and transient visual loss or permanent visual loss may raise suspicion [of the disease],” the authors noted.

Results

In assessing visual loss, the team found no significant differences between patients with vertebral artery involvement and permanent visual loss (61.5%) and patients with vertebral artery issues and no permanent visual loss (58.8%) (p = 0.88). Interestingly, the presence of intrathoracic large-vessel vasculitis tended to protect against a patient’s likelihood of permanent visual loss.

In addition, “all patients with vertebral involvement but no aortic involvement showed ischemic manifestations at disease onset,” the researchers noted. “In contrast, none of the patients with aortic involvement but no vertebral hypermetabolism showed ischemic symptoms.”

SOURCE

https://www.auntminnieeurope.com/index.aspx?sec=sup&sub=mol&pag=dis&ItemID=617395


Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) Released Classification Stages of Cardiogenic Shock

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
NEWS | CARDIOGENIC SHOCK | MAY 20, 2019

SCAI Releases New Consensus Document on Classification Stages of Cardiogenic Shock

New classification system endorsed by multiple societies was developed to describe five stages of shock

SCAI Releases New Consensus Document on Classification Stages of Cardiogenic Shock

Image courtesy of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI).

May 20, 2019 – A newly released expert consensus statement proposes a classification schema for cardiogenic shock (CS) that will facilitate communication in both the clinical and research settings. The document was published online in the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI)’s Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions journal,1 and is endorsed by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

Cardiogenic shock is a condition in which the heart, often abruptly, cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs, according to the Mayo Clinic, most often accompanying larger heart attacks such as myocardial infarction (MI). Outcomes for patients with cardiogenic shock complicating MI have not significantly improved over the last 30 years despite the development of various percutaneous mechanical circulatory support technologies and the national standard of emergent angioplasty and stenting.

SCAI convened a multidisciplinary writing group comprised of leading experts in interventionaland advanced heart failure, non-invasive cardiology, emergency medicine, critical care and cardiac nursing to represent the team-based care of these patients. The writing group developed a new five-stage system that is defined by narrative patient descriptions, physical findings, and biochemical/hemodynamic markers, creating a new language that will facilitate rapid assessment, reassessment over time and communication between providers including hospital systems.

The new CS definition is intended to provide clinicians and researchers with a unified and standardized vocabulary that will translate across all settings. Additionally, the definition aims to facilitate recognition of risk for adverse outcomes and the potential benefit from various interventions and prognosis. The goal is to reduce mortality on both an individual and national scale.

“The main areas we may have failed in the fight to improve mortality in cardiogenic shock is, quite simply, not speaking the same language when describing these patients,” said Srihari S. Naidu, M.D., FSCAI, former SCAI Trustee and chair of the writing group. “Without that, we can’t even begin to understand these patients, how sick they are, what might work and what does not work. This is the most important first step, and it is important to use this classification system to reset our understanding of cardiogenic shock and restart the trials very much needed in this space.”

For more information: http://www.scai.org

Related Cardiogenic Shock Content

VIDEO: Cardiogenic Shock Case with Impella CP Support

VIDEO: Analysis of Outcomes for 15,259 U.S. Patients with AMICS Supported with the Impella Device

VIDEO: How to Reduce Cardiogenic Shock Mortality by 50 Percent

Reference

1. Baran D.A., Grines C.L., Bailey S., et al. SCAI clinical expert consensus statement on the classification of cardiogenic shock. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, May 19, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1002/ccd.28329

SOURCE

https://www.dicardiology.com/content/scai-releases-new-consensus-document-classification-stages-cardiogenic-shock?eid=333021707&bid=2450760


2020 Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal for Outstanding Research in the Medical Sciences – Call for Nominations

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

SOURCE

Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal

Scheduled for presentation in 2020.  Nominations accepted online through Monday, October 7, 2019.

About the Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal

The Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal is awarded every two years for outstanding research in the medical sciences. The medal carries with it a $25,000 award, and an additional $50,000 for research. The Kovalenko Fund, gifted by Michael S. Kovalenko in 1949 to the National Academy of Science in memory of his wife, Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko, was specifically designed to recognize the achievements made to the medical sciences and, over the past 67 years, has honored many outstanding contributors.

Most Recent Recipient

James P. Allison, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, received the 2018 Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal.

Allison’s pioneering research has had a vast impact on cancer therapy and the evolution of the entire field of cancer immunology. His work has advanced science while improving the health and wellbeing of cancer patients worldwide, a process that continues to this day. Read more about Allison’s work»

Award History

The first Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal was awarded to Alfred N. Richards in 1952 for his outstanding contributions to medical science over a period of a half-century, both as an investigator and as a research executive and administrator. Richards received his first honor in 1897, when he became the first graduate student at Columbia to earn his PhD in physiological chemistry. Richards’ early research focused on the liver and chronic indole poisoning as a possible cause for cyclic vomiting in children although later, he notably sought to study the physiological and ecological effects of the atomic bomb. Richards served as Chairman of the Committee on Medical Research for President Roosevelt and, from 1947-1950, he served as the National Academy of Sciences’ own President, overseeing the establishment of the National Science Foundation.

Recipients:

James P. Allison (2018)
For the discovery that antibody blockade of the T cell molecule CTLA-4 unleashes the body’s immune response against malignant tumors and develops immune checkpoint blockade as a successful cancer therapy.
Read more about Allison’s work»
Watch Allison’s acceptance speech»

Huda Y. Zoghbi (2016)
For her pioneering contributions to the fields of neurodegenerative proteinopathies, autism spectrum disorders, epigenetics, and developmental biology by coupling clinical observation and gene discovery with focused, in-depth mechanistic study.
Read more about Zoghbi’s work»

Stuart H. Orkin (2013)
For his pioneering achievements in defining the molecular basis of blood disorders and the mechanisms governing the development of blood stem cells and individual blood lineages. His work has significantly advanced our understanding of human hematologic diseases and revealed new strategies to prevent and manage these disorders.
 
For her discovery of recurring chromosome translocations that characterize specific hematological malignancies, a landmark event that caused a major shift in the paradigms relating to cancer biology in the 1970s and paved the way for development of specific treatment for two leukemias.
 
Jeffrey M. Friedman (2007)
For the discovery of leptin and its role in the regulation of appetite, energy expenditure, and the molecular mechanisms underlying obesity.
 
Irving L. Weissman (2004)
For his seminal studies that defined the physical properties, purification, and growth regulation of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells.
 
For his elucidation of the structure, function, and mechanism of regulation of heptahelical receptors, nature’s detectors of signals from many hormones, neurotransmitters, and drugs.
 
For his landmark discovery and identification of genes that control immune responsiveness, and for his subsequent elucidation of mechanisms of antigen recognition and induction of the immune response.
 
For his discovery and purification of the hemotopoietic growth factors and for their introduction into clinical medicine for the control of blood cell formation and resistance to infection.
 
For revolutionary accomplishments in human sphingolipid storage disorders, including the discovery of enzymatic defects, the development of genetic counseling procedures, and successful enzyme-replacement therapy.
 
For the discovery and characterization, with Avery and McLeod, that deoxyribonucleic acid is the chemical substance of heredity, and for his subsequent contributions to our understanding of the biology of streptococci and their role in disease.
 
Oscar D. Ratnoff (1985)
For his studies of the Hageman trait, an experiment of nature that improved understanding of such bodily defenses as the formation and dissolution of blood clots, inflammation, and immunity.
 
Henry G. Kunkel (1979)
For his pioneering and influential studies in basic immunology, immune complex disease, immune deficiency disorders, and lymphocytic membrane markers.
 
Julius H. Comroe, Jr. (1976)
For his immeasurable contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease during his career, which was devoted to the physiology and chemistry of respiration and the mechanical and chemical properties of the human lung.
 
Seymour S. Kety (1973)
For furthering the essential understanding of balance between hereditary and other biological factors, on the one hand, and psychosocial experimental ones, on the other, in the pathogenesis and manifestations of schizophrenia.
 
For his laboratory and epidemiological researches on virus diseases, including his major role in the program for the evaluation of the polio vaccine and for his imaginative design for long-term studies of the atomic bomb survivors in Japan.
 
Karl P. Link (1967)
For his discovery and application of coumarin anticoagulants.
 
Rufus Cole (1966)
For his notable role in advancing our knowledge of lobar pneumonia and in establishing clinical investigation as a science.
 
George H. Whipple (1962)
For his contributions of many biological discoveries basic for advances in clinical and experimental medicine.
 
Karl F. Meyer (1961)
For his outstanding contributions to medical sciences as an investigator, teacher, and administrator over a period of half a century.
 
Eugene L. Opie (1959)
For his outstanding contributions to medical science and for a life of exemplary devotion to medical education and inquiry into the origins of disease.
 
Ernest W. Goodpasture (1958)
For his outstanding contributions to medical science and for long and continued devotion to the study of his chosen field of pathology.
 
Peyton Rous (1955)
 
Alfred N. Richards (1952)
For his outstanding contributions to medical science over a period of a half-century, both as an investigator and as a research executive and administrator.

Verily kicked off Project Baseline in April 2017, with a health study geared to gather health data from 10,000 people over four years – Partnership with Big Pharma on CLinical Trials announced on 5/21/2019

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 5/22/2019

On Tuesday morning, Verily, Alphabet’s unit focused on life sciences, announced that it had formed alliances with Novartis, Sanofi, Otsuka, and Pfizer to work on clinical trials. What are those drug giants getting out of the deal? STAT sat down with Scarlet Shore, who leads Verily’s project Baseline, to learn about the company’s vision for the clinical trial of the future. The conversation took place at CNBC’s “Healthy Returns” conference, where the partnerships were unveiled.

SOURCE

https://www.statnews.com/2019/05/21/four-of-the-worlds-largest-drug-companies-are-teaming-with-verily-here-is-what-they-get/?utm_source=STAT+Newsletters&utm_campaign=1630aad75d-Readout_COPY_03&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8cab1d7961-1630aad75d-150237109

Novartis, Otsuka, Pfizer, Sanofi join Verily’s Project Baseline

“Evidence generation through research is the backbone of improving health outcomes. We need to be inclusive and encourage diversity in research to truly understand health and disease, and to provide meaningful insights about new medicines, medical devices and digital health solutions,” said Jessica Mega, M.D., Verily’s chief medical and scientific officer, in the statement. “Novartis, Otsuka, Pfizer and Sanofi have been early adopters of advanced technology and digital tools to improve clinical research operations, and together we’re taking another step towards making research accessible and generating evidence to inform better treatments and care.”
Jessica Mega, M.D., Verily’s chief medical and scientific officer, in the statement. “Novartis, Otsuka, Pfizer and Sanofi have been early adopters of advanced technology and digital tools to improve clinical research operations, and together we’re taking another step towards making research accessible and generating evidence to inform better treatments and care.”

 


CytoReason is re-defining the Context of the Immune System for Drug Discovery

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

CytoReason is re-defining the context of the immune system at a cellular level in order to better understand disease and support more effective drug discovery and development.

Our leading-edge machine-learning driven approach identifies “cause and effect” of the gene/cell/cytokine relationships that lie at the heart of treating disease.

Faster and more accurately than ever before.

CytoReason’s mission is to simulate the cells that can stimulate discovery of:​

  • New targets for treating disease
  • New insights to mechanism of actions (both of disease and drugs)
  • Differences in responses to both disease and treatment
  • Which diseases a drug can impact

We have developed a unique machine-learning driven approach to “seeing” the cells that can make the difference in patients seeing a better life.

The insights our approach generates, enable pharmaceutical and biotech companies to make the right decisions, at the right time, in the drug discovery and development programs that bring better therapies.

Based on cutting edge technologies, trained on data that would normally be impossible to access, and steered by leading biological and data science researchers, our approach is underpinned by three core principles:​

SOURCE

https://www.cytoreason.com/

Press Release

https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/216dd2_b715f2c29a8c496eb65315d332a7077e.pdf

Case Studies

Click one of the buttons below to view a short case study presention:

Collaboration & Results

Working with leading global pharma and biotech companies and key research institutions, our results help guide R&D decision making.

Results

Our platform is tried and tested, producing real results with validation

•    Discovered: New cellular players in melanoma microenvironment

•    Discovered: New IL4 mechanism of action in atopic dermatitis

•    Discovered: Novel pre-treatment biomarkers in IBD anti-TNFα therapy

•    Discovered: 355 previously unreported cell/cytokine interactions (view infographic)

Publications

Science is the backbone of our methodologies and applications, and must stand the test of scientific scrutiny.  To date we have 16 research papers published in top quality peer-reviewed scientific journals, including four in 2018 alone – 3 of which were published in journals from the Nature group

SOURCE

 

Shen-Orr told Forbes in an article published late last month that CytoReason’s tech is able to calculate immune age in one of two ways: “Via cell-subset composition nearest neighbor approach or based on a gene expression signature where the genes are predictive of the cell-subsets composition, and they test for their enrichment in the gene expression pattern of the sample. The immune profiles of individuals are used to predict immune changes based on a machine learning methodology deployed on data on a range of cell-subsets. ”

“The immune age is a biological clock that will help to identify, the decline and progress in immunity that occurs in old age, to determine preventive measures and develop new treatment modalities to minimize chronic disease and death,” he added.

CytoReason’s tech has so far yielded two pending patents, 10 commercial and scientific collaborations, and 16 peer-reviewed publications.

Harel says it was a combination of forces that made CytoReason’s immune-focused methodology work: Big Data, machine learning, and biology. He describes it as “the intersection of computer science and biology.”

SEE ALSO: The Future Of Medicine: Israeli Scientists Unveil New Tech To 3D-Print Personalized Drugs

 

Professor Magdassi tells NoCamels that with 3D printing of hydrogels, molecules that are soluble in water, scientists can improve the performance of the drug through its delivery. For example, “the hydrogel once ingested can be designed to swell, releasing two, or three, or four drugs at a time [or with a delay] or it can be designed not to swell, depending on what we are trying to achieve.”

“The drug can be tailored to the patient because of the unique shape or structure of the hydrogel and/or its release behavior,” Professor Magdassi explains.

Currently, there is one 3D-printed drug on the market. In 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Spritam, a 3D-printed powdered drug in pill form for the treatment of epileptic seizures, designed to dissolve faster than other pills.

SOURCE

http://nocamels.com/2018/11/future-medicine-israel-3d-print-personalized-drugs/

 

Quantifying The Age Of Our Immune System Could Bring Us Some Steps Closer To Precision Medicine

Last January, CytoReason announced an agreement with Pfizer, in which the latter will leverage the former’s technology to create cell-based models of the immune system. According to the agreement, CytoReason will receive an undisclosed amount in the low double-digit millions of U.S. dollars from Pfizer in access fees, research support and success-based payments. Prof. Shen-Orr concluded, “The immune age is a biological clock that will help to identify, the decline and progress in immunity that occurs in old age, to determine preventive measures and develop new treatment modalities to minimize chronic disease and death.”
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