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Reporter: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

UPDATED on 1/11/2020

In May 2019, Aviva Lev-Ari, Ph.D., R.N., Stephen Williams, Ph.D., and Irina Robu, Ph.D., spoke with Partners in Health and Biz, an half-hour audio podcast that reaches 40,000 listeners, about the topic of 3D Medical BioPrinting Technology: A Revolution in Medicine. The topic is also the title of a recently offered e-book by the LPBI Group on 3D BioPrinting, available on Amazon/Kindle Direct [https://www.amazon.com/Medical-BioPrinting-Technologies-Patient-centered-Patient-Centered-ebook/dp/B078QVDV2W]. https://www.spreaker.com/user/pihandbiz/bioprinting-2019-final

The 3D BioPrinting technology is being used to develop advanced medical practices that will help with previously difficult processes, such as delivering drugs via micro-robots, targeting specific cancer cells and even assisting in difficult eye operations. 

The table of contents in this book includes: Chapter 1: 3D Bioprinting: Latest Innovations in a Forty year-old Technology. Chapter 2: LPBI Initiative on 3D BioPrinting, Chapter 3: Cardiovascular BioPrinting, Chapter 4: Medical and Surgical Repairs – Advances in R&D Research, Chapter 5: Organ on a Chip, Chapter 6: FDA Regulatory Technology Issues, Chapter 7: DNA Origami, Chapter 8: Aptamers and 3D Scaffold Binding, Chapter 9: Advances and Future Prospects, Chapter 10: BioInks and MEMS, Chapter 11: BioMedical MEMS, Chapter 12: 3D Solid Organ Printing and Chapter 13: Medical 3D Printing: Sources and Trade Groups – List of Secondary Material. 


Old Industrial Revolution Paradigm of Education Needs to End: How Scientific Curation Can Transform Education

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, PhD.

Dr. Cathy N. Davidson from Duke University gives a talk entitled: Now You See It.  Why the Future of Learning Demands a Paradigm Shift

In this talk, shown below, Dr. Davidson shows how our current education system has been designed for educating students for the industrial age type careers and skills needed for success in the Industrial Age and how this educational paradigm is failing to prepare students for the challenges they will face in their future careers.

Or as Dr. Davidson summarizes

Designing education not for your past but for their future

As the video is almost an hour I will summarize some of the main points below

PLEASE WATCH VIDEO

Summary of talk

Dr. Davidson starts the talk with a thesis: that Institutions tend to preserve the problems they were created to solve.

All the current work, teaching paradigms that we use today were created for the last information age (19th century)

Our job to to remake the institutions of education work for the future not the one we inherited

Four information ages or technologies that radically changed communication

  1. advent of writing: B.C. in ancient Mesopotamia allowed us to record and transfer knowledge and ideas
  2. movable type – first seen in 10th century China
  3. steam powered press – allowed books to be mass produced and available to the middle class.  First time middle class was able to have unlimited access to literature
  4. internet- ability to publish and share ideas worldwide

Interestingly, in the early phases of each of these information ages, the same four complaints about the new technology/methodology of disseminating information was heard

  • ruins memory
  • creates a distraction
  • ruins interpersonal dialogue and authority
  • reduces complexity of thought

She gives an example of Socrates who hated writing and frequently stated that writing ruins memory, creates a distraction, and worst commits ideas to what one writes down which could not be changed or altered and so destroys ‘free thinking’.

She discusses how our educational institutions are designed for the industrial age.

The need for collaborative (group) learning AND teaching

Designing education not for your past but for the future

In other words preparing students for THEIR future not your past and the future careers that do not exist today.

In the West we were all taught to answer silently and alone.  However in Japan, education is arranged in the han or group think utilizing the best talents of each member in the group.  In Japan you are arranged in such groups at an early age.  The concept is that each member of the group contributes their unique talent and skill for the betterment of the whole group.  The goal is to demonstrate that the group worked well together.

see https://educationinjapan.wordpress.com/education-system-in-japan-general/the-han-at-work-community-spirit-begins-in-elementary-school/ for a description of “in the han”

In the 19th century in institutions had to solve a problem: how to get people out of the farm and into the factory and/or out of the shop and into the firm

Takes a lot of regulation and institutionalization to convince people that independent thought is not the best way in the corporation

keywords for an industrial age

  • timeliness
  • attention to task
  • standards, standardization
  • hierarchy
  • specialization, expertise
  • metrics (measures, management)
  • two cultures: separating curriculum into STEM versus artistic tracts or dividing the world of science and world of art

This effort led to a concept used in scientific labor management derived from this old paradigm in education, an educational system controlled and success measured using

  • grades (A,B,C,D)
  • multiple choice tests

keywords for our age

  • workflow
  • multitasking attention
  • interactive process (Prototype, Feedback)
  • data mining
  • collaboration by difference

Can using a methodology such as scientific curation affect higher education to achieve this goal of teaching students to collaborate in an interactive process using data mining to create a new workflow for any given problem?  Can a methodology of scientific curation be able to affect such changes needed in academic departments to achieve the above goal?

This will be the subject of future curations tested using real-world in class examples.

However, it is important to first discern that scientific content curation takes material from Peer reviewed sources and other expert-vetted sources.  This is unique from other types of content curation in which take from varied sources, some of which are not expert-reviewed, vetted, or possibly ‘fake news’ or highly edited materials such as altered video and audio.  In this respect, the expert acts not only as curator but as referee.  In addition, collaboration is necessary and even compulsory for the methodology of scientific content curation, portending the curator not as the sole expert but revealing the CONTENT from experts as the main focus for learning and edification.

Other article of note on this subject in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include:

The above articles will give a good background on this NEW Conceived Methodology of Scientific Curation and its Applicability in various areas such as Medical Publishing, and as discussed below Medical Education.

To understand the new paradigm in medical communication and the impact curative networks have or will play in this arena please read the following:

Scientific Curation Fostering Expert Networks and Open Innovation: Lessons from Clive Thompson and others

This article discusses a history of medical communication and how science and medical communication initially moved from discussions from select individuals to the current open accessible and cooperative structure using Web 2.0 as a platform.

 



Google AI improves accuracy of reading mammograms, study finds

Google AI improves accuracy of reading mammograms, study finds

Google CFO Ruth Porat has blogged about twice battling breast cancer.

Artificial intelligence was often more accurate than radiologists in detecting breast cancer from mammograms in a study conducted by researchers using Google AI technology.

The study, published in the journal Nature, used mammograms from approximately 90,000 women in which the outcomes were known to train technology from Alphabet Inc’s DeepMind AI unit, now part of Google Health, Yahoo news reported.

The AI system was then used to analyze images from 28,000 other women and often diagnosed early cancers more accurately than the radiologists who originally interpreted the mammograms.

In another test, AI outperformed six radiologists in reading 500 mammograms. However, while the AI system found cancers the humans missed, it also failed to find cancers flagged by all six radiologists, reports The New York Times.

The researchers said the study “paves the way” for further clinical trials.

Writing in NatureEtta D. Pisano, chief research officer at the American College of Radiology and professor in residence at Harvard Medical School, noted, “The real world is more complicated and potentially more diverse than the type of controlled research environment reported in this study.”

Ruth Porat, senior vice president and chief financial officer Alphabet, Inc., wrote in a company blog titled “Breast cancer and tech…a reason for optimism” in October about twice battling the disease herself, and the importance of her company’s application of AI to healthcare innovations.

She said that focus had already led to the development of a deep learning algorithm to help pathologists assess tissue associated with metastatic breast cancer.

“By pinpointing the location of the cancer more accurately, quickly and at a lower cost, care providers might be able to deliver better treatment for more patients,” she wrote.

Google also has created algorithms that help medical professionals diagnose lung cancer, and eye disease in people with diabetes, per the Times.

Porat acknowledged that Google’s research showed the best results occur when medical professionals and technology work together.

Any insights provided by AI must be “paired with human intelligence and placed in the hands of skilled researchers, surgeons, oncologists, radiologists and others,” she said.

Anne Stych is a staff writer for Bizwomen.
Industries:

The Future of Synthetic Biology

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

With an estimated global evaluation of around $14 billion US, synthetic biology is a rapidly accelerating market. Nonetheless while the growth of the market has been remarkable, the ttrue impact has not yet been seen. The era of AI will quickly increase the pace of discovery, and produce materials not seen in nature, through extrapolation and generative design. The extraordinary is now possible: producing spider silk without spiders, egg proteins without chickens and fragrances without flowers.

Synthetic biology companies are associating with fashion designers as well as forming ‘organism foundries. Rapidly, AI will utilize its learning of the natural world to make guided inferences which produce entirely new materials. From a technology perspective, we’re experiencing an explosion of capability that will be invasive in the next 3-5 years. Language models have come a long way, to the point where full models are being kept private so as not to endanger the public.

Already today, the average person has the ability to start their own commercial space venture for less than the cost of a juice franchise. PwC Australia’s Charmaine Green believes secret trends can hide among obvious ones. She outlines three trends leading to her hypothesis that Australia is well placed to become the global creative hub for video game development.

Economies like Australia are situated to capitalize on this trend, and video game development can become a permanent and substantial part of the economy. In Australia, Green argues, we have all the basic elements needed: high ingenuity, creative risk taking, and the freedom and flexibility that comes with the country’s small-to-mid studios.

SOURCE

Tech trends that will change the world by 2025


Self-propelled Liposomes as a Drug Delivery System

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Liposomes are small artificial vesicles of spherical shape that can be created from cholesterol and natural non-toxic phospholipids. As a result of their size and hydrophobic and hydrophilic character, liposomes are promising systems for drug delivery. Liposome properties diverge considerably with lipid composition, surface charge, size, and the method of preparation. Scientists at Penn State developed self-propelled liposomes that migrate away and/or towards chemical signals, making it possible for self-directed drug delivery vehicles that can actively target a specific area of the body. Besides, the choice of bilayer components controls the ‘rigidity’ or ‘fluidity’ and the charge of the bilayer. Countless liposomes proposed for drug delivery are tissue-specific, since of antibodies on their surface bind to the target tissue when they encounter it. The technology may help to enhance efficacy and reduce side-effects of drugs in a variation of applications.

Yet, the key to drug delivery is enhancing the specificity and affinity of a drug delivery vehicle for its target tissue. As the drawbacks of conventional drug therapies, scientists are developing an extensive variability of drug delivery vehicles including nanoparticles, biomaterials, and implantable devices, to increase drug accumulation at a target site in the body and reduce side-effects elsewhere. To address the drawbacks, these researchers developed a type of liposome that can actively propel itself near a chemical signal in the body, such as a chemical attractant released by a target tissue.

The liposomes proposed by Penn researchers are covered in enzymes that react with specific substrates to produce energy, which can help to push the liposomes along, through a phenomenon called chemotaxis. By changing the enzymes coating the liposomes, the investigators can tune this chemotaxis and permit the particles to either move towards or away the chemical signal. This could aid the particles to gravitate near certain tissues, and possibly avoid others in the body.
Currently, the are still developing the liposomes, and hope that they will be able to use them for drug delivery soon
SOURCE
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191118110928.htm


3D Printing Used as New Tool for Radiologists

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

3D printing is a technique that has gained immense popularity for its ability to create 3D structures in art, jewelry, engineering, medicine. In this case, radiologists use 3D printing to transform a 2D scan into 3D visualization of a patient’s anatomy. Radiologists use their unique skills to visualize the anatomy of the organs of interest which give them a large advantage in communicating with patients as well as surgical teams.
The 3D printed anatomical models have proved valuable in providing a better understanding of complex anatomies and being used as a tangible aid for pre-surgical planning. It gives the patient a clear understanding of what is happening and it provides a great value when it comes to patient specific care. However, 3D modelling is essential at the beginning but it can also be a useful tool for surgeons. The list of medical 3D printing benefits is infinite. Just recently, a scientific team at University of Minnesota constructed their own patient specific 3D organ model based on MRI scans and prostate tissue samples of patients. The organs allow surgeons to plan and rehearse surgery.
In addition to researchers at University of Minnesota, Siemens Health engineers also created a platform to make medical apps that can be accessible throughout hospitals. In addition, Siemens Health partnered up with Materialise to make 3D printing software an integral part of the radiology workflow.
Hence, using 3D bioprinting is a desirable path to follow for radiologist. Not only they get to interpret anatomy, but now they can use 3D bioprinting as a state of the art tool that empower them to provide immense value to an audience that stretches from patient to practitioner.

SOURCE

https://www.bioportfolio.com/news/article/4177601/3D-Printing-Used-as-New-Tool-for-Radiologists.html


The Problem and Challenges of Commercialization

Curator and Reporter: Joel Shertok, PhD

 

As the old saying goes,

Anybody can do something once; the problem is: can you do it twice, or for that matter, over and over again?

This is the essential issue faced by those personnel in the throes of the commercialization process.

Any successful commercial process has to meet a number of criteria:

  1. The process must be reproducible — it must yield the same product/results given the same inputs.
  2. The process must be economically viable: given the constraints of raw material, energy, and labor costs, depreciation schedules for equipment, expected process failures, R/D, Marketing, and Sales support costs, the process needs to yield both a profit and positive cash flow
  3. The process should be implemented using readily available commercial components and control instrumentation. On occasion, successful implementation of a project will require specialized components; however these components themselves must meet the criteria for successful commercialization
  4. The process must be “simple” enough so that suitably trained operators can manage the process. A unit that requires Ph.D.’s to maintain operations is doomed to failure

History is replete with novel processes that worked on the lab scale, but were failures when a commercial operation was attempted. The issues that are most responsible for lab-to-production failure are listed under the general classification of “scale-up”. Scale-up principles are covered in my monograph, “The Art of Scale-up” (www.artofscaleup.com), but in general follow these rules:

  • Identification of those process parameters that will have major impact on commercial viability: reaction kinetics, mass transfer vs. temperature/kinetic control; if multi-phase systems are involved, the type and energy of required stirring; heat transfer considerations; side reactions; etc.

  • Materials of construction; raw material and product hazards; etc.

  • Regulatory considerations: FDA, OSHA, EPA.

Failure to address any of these issues prior to commercialization will lead to surprises during commercialization.

In addition to the engineering/scale-up aspects of commercialization, there are several other criteria that may need attention:

  1. When to launch a product – where will the new product fit into the overall corporate product portfolio?
  2. Where is the proper location to launch?  A product aimed at flu symptom suppression in cold-weather conditions may not do well in Florida; ….. super-sweet tea does well in the South, and not so well in New England, so that a product to replace sugar might do well in the South.
  3. Who is going to use the product?  Are you targeting doctor’s offices, hospitals, or direct to consumer routes?
  4. How to launch – social media and “influencers” have given rise to new avenues of product introductions.

The old aphorism of “measure twice, cut once” has a special resonance when doing commercialization of a new process or product. The more the process is thought out ahead of time, the less issues there will be down the road. In the commercial world, there is constant pressure to rush things to meet management deadlines, which always leads to problems and extra expense. A crusty of R/D chemist once remarked, “There is never time to do it right, but always time to do it twice.” Everyone needs to keep this in the back of their mind