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Danny Bar-Zohar, MD –  New R&D Leader for new pipelines at Merck KGaA as Luciano Rossetti steps out

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Danny Bar-Zohar, MD – A Pharmaceutical Executive Profile in R&D: Ex-Novastis, Ex-Teva

Experience

Education

SOURCE

https://www.linkedin.com/in/danny-bar-zohar-513904a/

 

Novartis vet Danny Bar-Zohar leaps back into R&D, taking over the development team at Merck KGaA as Luciano Rossetti steps out

John Carroll
Editor & Founder

After a brief stint as a biotech investor at Syncona, Novartis vet Danny Bar-Zohar is back in R&D, and he’s taking the lead position at Merck KGaA’s drug division.

Bar-Zohar had led late-stage clinical development across a variety of areas — neuroscience, immunology, oncology and ophthalmology, among others — before joining the migration of talent out of the Basel-based multinational. He had been at Novartis for 7 years, which followed an earlier chapter in research at Teva.

Luciano Rossetti
The scientist is taking the lead on development at Merck KGaA, in place of Luciano Rossetti, who had a mixed record in R&D that nevertheless marked a big improvement over the dismal run the company had endured earlier. Joern-Peter Halle will continue on as global head of research. Rossetti is retiring after 6 years of running the research group, which has extensive operations in Germany as well as Massachusetts.

Their PD-L1 Bavencio — allied with Pfizer — has had a few successes, and a whole slate of failures. Sprifermin was touted as a big potential advance in osteoarthritis, but Merck KGaA is now auctioning off that part of the portfolio. One of the few late-stage bright spots has been their MET inhibitor tepotinib, which won breakthrough status and now is under priority review. That drug faces a rival at Novartis — capmatinib — that won an accelerated OK at the FDA in May.

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There’s also a BTK inhibitor, evobrutinib, that’s being developed for MS. But that’s a very crowded field, and Sanofi has been bullish about its prospects in the same research niche after buying out Principia.

Moving back into mid-stage development, there’s a major program underway for bintrafusp alfa, a bifunctional fusion protein targeting TGF-β and PD-L1, which Merck KGaA has high hopes for.

That all marks some bright, though limited, prospects for Merck KGaA, highlighting the need to find something new to beef up the pipeline. Bar-Zohar will get a say in that.

AUTHOR
John Carroll

SOURCE

https://endpts.com/novartis-vet-danny-bar-zohar-leaps-back-into-rd-taking-over-the-team-at-merck-kgaa-as-luciano-rossetti-steps-out/

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CAR T-CELL THERAPY MARKET: 2020 – 2027

G L O B A L  M A R K E T  A N A L Y S I S  A N D

I N D U S T R Y  F O R E C A S T

 

DISCLAIMER

LPBI Group’s decision to publish the Table of Contents of this Report does not imply endorsement of the Report

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Founder 1.0 & 2.0 LPBI Group

Guest Reporter: MIKE WOOD

Marketing Executive
BIOTECH FORECASTS

 

ABOUT BIOTECH FORECASTS

BIOTECH FORECASTS is a full-service market research and business- consulting firm primarily focusing on healthcare, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology industries. BIOTECH FORECASTS provides global as well as medium and small Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology businesses with unmatched quality of “Market Research Reports” and “Business Intelligence Solutions”. BIOTECH FORECASTS has a targeted view to provide business insights and consulting to assist its clients to make strategic business decisions, and achieve sustainable growth in their respective market domain.

UPDATED on 10/13/2020

CAR T-CELL THERAPY MARKET

Mike Wood

Mike Wood

Marketing Executive at Biotech Forecasts

CAR T-cell therapy as a part of adoptive cell therapy (ACT), has become one of the most rapidly growing and promising fields in the Immuno-oncology. As compared to the conventional cancer therapies, CAR T-cell therapy is the single-dose solution for the treatment of various cancers, significantly for some lethal forms of hematological malignancies.

CAR T-cell therapy mainly involves the use of engineered T-cells, the process starts with the extraction of T-cells through leukapheresis, either from the patient (autologous) or a healthy donor (allogeneic). After the expression of a synthetic receptor (Chimeric Antigen Receptor) in the lab, the altered T-cells are expanded to the right dose and administered into the patient’s body. where they target and attach to a specific antigen on the tumor surface, to kill the cancerous cells by igniting the apoptosis.

The global CAR T-cell therapy market was valued at $734 million in 2019 and is estimated to reach $4,078 million by 2027, registering a CAGR of 23.91% from 2020 to 2027.

Factors that drive the market growth involve, (1) Increased in funding for R&D activities pertaining to cell and gene therapy. By H1 2020 cell and gene therapy companies set new records in the fundraising despite the pandemic crisis. For Instance, by June 2020 totaled $1,452 Million raised in Five IPOs including, Legend Biotech ($487M), Passage Bio ($284M), Akouos ($244M), Generation Bio ($230M), and Beam Therapeutics ($207M), which is 2.5 times the total IPO of 2019.

Moreover, in 2019 cell therapy companies specifically have raised $560 million of venture capital, including Century Therapeutics ($250M), Achilles Therapeutics Ltd. ($121M in series B), NKarta Therapeutics Inc. ($114M), and Tmunity Therapeutics ($75M in Series B).

(2) Increased in No. of Approved Products, By July 2020, there are a total of 03 approved CAR T-cell therapy products, including KYMRIAH®, YESCARTA®, and the most recently approved TECARTUS™ (formerly KTE-X19). Furthermore, two CAR T-cell therapies BB2121, and JCAR017 are expected to get the market approval by the end of 2020 or in early 2021.

Other factors that boost the market growth involves; (3) increase in government support, (4) ethical acceptance of Cell and Gene therapy for cancer treatment, (5) rise in the prevalence of cancer, and (6) an increase in awareness regarding the CAR T-cell therapy.

However, high costs associated with the treatment (KYMRIAH® cost around $475,000, and YESCARTA® costs $373,000 per infusion), long production hours, obstacles in treating solid tumors, and unwanted immune responses & potential side effects might hamper the market growth.

The report also presents a detailed quantitative analysis of the current market trends and future estimations from 2020 to 2027.

The forecasts cover 2 Approach Types, 5 Antigen Types, 5 Application Types, Regions, and 14 Countries.

The report comes with an associated file covering quantitative data from all numeric forecasts presented in the report, as well as with a Clinical Trials Data File.

KEY FINDINGS

The report has the following key findings:

  • The global CAR T-cell therapy market accounted for $734 million in 2019 and is estimated to reach $4,078 million by 2027, registering a CAGR of 23.91% from 2020 to 2027.
  • By approach type the autologous segment was valued at $655.26 million in 2019 and is estimated to reach $ 3,324.52 million by 2027, registering a CAGR of 22.51% from 2020 to 2027.
  • By approach type, the allogeneic segment exhibits the highest CAGR of 32.63%.
  • Based on the Antigen segment CD19 was the largest contributor among the other segments in 2019.
  • The Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) segment generated the highest revenue and is expected to continue its dominance in the future, followed by the Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) segment.
  • North America dominated the global CAR T-cell therapy market in 2019 and is projected to continue its dominance in the future.
  • China is expected to grow the highest in the Asia-Pacific region during the forecast period.

TOPICS COVERED

The report covers the following topics:

  • Market Drivers, Restraints, and Opportunities
  • Porters Five Forces Analysis
  • CAR T-Cell Structure, Generations, Manufacturing, and Pricing Models
  • Top Winning Strategies, Top Investment Pockets
  • Analysis of by Approach Type, Antigen Type, Application, and Region
  • 51 Company Profiles, Product Portfolio, and Key Strategies
  • Approved Products Profiles, and list of Expected Approvals
  • COVID-19 Impact on the Cell and Gene Therapy Industry
  • CAR T-cell therapy clinical trials analysis from 1997 to 2019
  • Market analysis and forecasts from 2020 to 2027

FORECAST SEGMENTATION

By Approach Type

  • Autologous
  • Allogeneic

By Antigen Type

  • CD19
  • CD20
  • BCMA
  • MSLN
  • Others

By Application

  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)
  • Diffuse large B-Cell lymphoma (DLBCL)
  • Multiple Myeloma (MM)
  • Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)
  • Other Cancer Indications

By Region

  • North America: USA, Canada, Mexico
  • Europe: UK, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Rest of Europe
  • Asia-Pacific: China, Japan, India, South Korea, Rest of Asia-Pacific
  • LAMEA: Brazil, South Africa, Rest of LAMEA

Contact at info@biotechforecasts.com for any Queries or Free Report Sample

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Published by

Mike Wood
Marketing Executive at Biotech Forecasts
1 article
The global CAR T-cell therapy market was valued at $734 million in 2019 and is estimated to reach $4,078 million by 2027, registering a CAGR of 23.91% from 2020 to 2027. hashtagcelltherapy hashtaggenetherapy hashtagimmunotherapy hashtagcancertreatment hashtagcartcell hashtagregenerativemedicine hashtagbiotech hashtagcancer

 

Table of Contents

 

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

1.1 REPORT DESCRIPTION 17
1.2 TOPICS COVERED 19
1.3 KEY MARKET SEGMENTS 20
1.4 KEY BENEFITS 21
1.5 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 21
1.6 TARGET AUDIENCE 22
1.7 COMPANIES MENTIONED 23

CHAPTER 2: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2.1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 26
2.2 CXO PROSPECTIVE 29

CHAPTER 3: MARKET OVERVIEW

3.1 MARKET DEFINITION AND SCOPE 30
3.2 KEY FINDINGS 31
3.3 TOP INVESTMENT POCKETS 32
3.4 TOP WINNING STRATEGIES 33
3.4.1.Top winning strategies, by year, 2017-2019* 34
3.4.2.Top winning strategies, by development, 2017-2019*(%) 34
3.4.3.Top winning strategies, by company, 2017-2019* 35
3.5 TOP PLAYER POSITIONING, BY PIPELINE VOLUME, 2019 38
3.6 PORTERS FIVE FORCES ANALYSIS 39
3.7 COVID19 IMPACT ON CELL AND GENE THERAPY (CGT) INDUSTRY 41
3.8 MARKET DYNAMICS 46
3.8.1    Drivers 46
3.8.1.1   Increase in funding for R&D activities of CAR T-cell therapy 46
3.8.1.2   The rise in the prevalence of cancer 47
3.8.1.3   Increase in awareness regarding CAR T-cell therapy 47

 

3.8.2    Restrains 48
3.8.2.1   The high cost of CAR T-cell therapy treatment 48
3.8.2.2   Unwanted immune responses and side effects 48
3.8.2.3   Long production time 48
3.8.2.4   Obstacles in treating solid tumors 49
3.8.3    Opportunities 49
3.8.3.1   Untapped potential for emerging markets 49

CHAPTER 4: CAR T-CELL THERAPY, A BRIEF INTRODUCTION

4.1 OVERVIEW 50
4.2 SIXTY YEARS HISTORY OF CAR T-CELL THERAPY 51
4.3 CAR T-CELL STRUCTURE AND GENERATIONS 53
4.4 CAR T-CELL MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 56
4.5 PRICING AND PAYMENT MODELS FOR CAR T-CELL THERAPIES 59

CHAPTER 5: CAR T-CELL THERAPY MARKET, BY APPROACH TYPE

5.1 OVERVIEW 61
5.1.1    Market size and forecast 62
5.2 AUTOLOGOUS 63
5.2.1    Key market trends 63
5.2.2    Key growth factors and opportunities 64
5.2.3    Market size and forecast 64
5.2.4    Market size and forecast by country 65
5.3 ALLOGENEIC 66
5.3.1    Key market trends 67
5.3.2    Key growth factors and opportunities 68
5.3.3    Market size and forecast 68
5.3.4    Market size and forecast by country 69

CHAPTER 6: CAR T-CELL THERAPY MARKET, BY ANTIGEN TYPE

6.1 OVERVIEW 70
6.1.1         Market size and forecast 71
6.2 CD19 72
6.2.1         Market size and forecast 73
6.2.2         Market size and forecast by country 74

 

6.3 CD20 75
6.3.1 Market size and forecast 76
6.3.2 Market size and forecast by country 77
6.4 BCMA 78
6.4.1 Market size and forecast 79
6.4.2 Market size and forecast by country 80
6.5 MSLN 81
6.5.1 Market size and forecast 82
6.5.2 Market size and forecast by country 83
6.6 OTHERS 84
6.6.1 Market size and forecast 85
6.6.2 Market size and forecast by country 86

CHAPTER 7: CAR T-CELL THERAPY MARKET, BY APPLICATION

7.1 OVERVIEW 87
7.1.1       Market size and forecast 88
7.2 ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA (ALL) 89
7.2.1       Market size and forecast 90
7.2.2       Market size and forecast by country 91
7.3 DIFFUSE LARGE B-CELL LYMPHOMA (DLBCL) 92
7.3.1       Market size and forecast 93
7.3.2       Market size and forecast by country 94
7.4 MULTIPLE MYELOMA (MM) 95
7.4.1       Market size and forecast 96
7.4.2       Market size and forecast by country 97
7.5 ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA (AML) 98
7.5.1       Market size and forecast 99
7.5.2       Market size and forecast by country 100
7.6 OTHERS 101
7.6.1       Market size and forecast 102
7.6.2       Market size and forecast by country 103

CHAPTER 8: CAR T-CELL THERAPY MARKET, BY REGION

8.1 OVERVIEW 104
8.1.1       Market size and forecast 104
8.2 NORTH AMERICA 105
8.2.1       Key market trends 105
8.2.2       Key growth factors and opportunities 105

 

8.2.3       Market size and forecast, by country 106
8.2.4       Market size and forecast, by approach type 106
8.2.5       Market size and forecast, by antigen type 107
8.2.6 Market size and forecast, by application 107
8.2.6.1 U.S. market size and forecast, by approach type 108
8.2.6.2 U.S. market size and forecast, by antigen type 108
8.2.6.3 U.S. market size and forecast, by application 109
8.2.6.4 Canada market size and forecast, by approach type 110
8.2.6.5 Canada market size and forecast, by antigen type 110
8.2.6.6 Canada market size and forecast, by application 111
8.2.6.7 Mexico market size and forecast, by approach type 112
8.2.6.8 Mexico market size and forecast, by antigen type 112
8.2.6.9 Mexico market size and forecast, by application 113
8.3 EUROPE 114
8.4.1 Key market trends 114
8.4.2 Key growth factors and opportunities 114
8.4.3 Market size and forecast, by country 115
8.4.4 Market size and forecast, by approach type 115
8.4.5 Market size and forecast, by antigen type 116
8.4.6 Market size and forecast, by application 116
8.3.6.1 UK market size and forecast, by approach type 117
8.3.6.2 UK market size and forecast, by antigen type 117
8.3.6.3 UK market size and forecast, by application 118
8.3.6.4 Germany market size and forecast, by approach type 119
8.3.6.5 Germany market size and forecast, by antigen type 119
8.3.6.6 Germany market size and forecast, by application 120
8.3.6.7 France market size and forecast, by approach type 121
8.3.6.8 France market size and forecast, by antigen type 121
8.3.6.9 France market size and forecast, by application 122
8.3.6.10 Spain market size and forecast, by approach type 123
8.3.6.11 Spain market size and forecast, by antigen type 123
8.3.6.12 Spain market size and forecast, by application 124
8.3.6.13 Italy market size and forecast, by approach type 125
8.3.6.14 Italy market size and forecast, by antigen type 125
8.3.6.15 Italy market size and forecast, by application 126
8.3.6.16 Rest of Europe market size and forecast, by approach type 127
8.3.6.17 Rest of Europe market size and forecast, by antigen type 127
8.3.6.18 Rest of Europe market size and forecast, by application 128
8.4 ASIA-PACIFIC 129
8.4.1 Key market trends 129
8.4.2 Key growth factors and opportunities 129
8.4.3 Market size and forecast, by country 130
8.4.4 Market size and forecast, by approach type 130

 

8.4.5       Market size and forecast, by antigen type 131
8.4.6 Market size and forecast, by application 131
8.4.6.1 China market size and forecast, by approach type 132
8.4.6.2 China market size and forecast, by antigen type 132
8.4.6.3 China market size and forecast, by application 133
8.4.6.4 Japan market size and forecast, by approach type 134
8.4.6.5 Japan market size and forecast by antigen type 134
8.4.6.6 Japan market size and forecast, by application 135
8.4.6.7 India market size and forecast, by approach type 136
8.4.6.8 India market size and forecast, by antigen type 136
8.4.6.9 India market size and forecast, by application 137
8.4.6.10 South Korea market size and forecast, by approach type 138
8.4.6.11 South Korea market size and forecast, by antigen type 138
8.4.6.12 South Korea market size and forecast, by application 139
8.4.6.13 Rest of Asia-Pacific market size and forecast, by approach type 140
8.4.6.14 Rest of Asia-Pacific market size and forecast, by antigen type 140
8.4.6.15 Rest of Asia-Pacific market size and forecast, by application 141
8.5 LAMEA 142
8.5.1 Key market trends 142
8.5.2 Key growth factors and opportunities 142
8.5.3 Market size and forecast, by country 143
8.5.4 Market size and forecast, by approach type 143
8.5.5 Market size and forecast, by antigen type 144
8.5.6 Market size and forecast, by application 144
8.5.6.1 Brazil market size and forecast by approach type 145
8.5.6.2 Brazil market size and forecast, by antigen type 145
8.5.6.3 Brazil market size and forecast, by application 146
8.5.6.4 South Africa market size and forecast, by approach type 147
8.5.6.5 South Africa market size and forecast, by antigen type 147
8.5.6.6 South Africa market size and forecast, by application 148
8.5.6.7 Rest of LAMEA market size and forecast by approach type 149
8.5.6.8 Rest of LAMEA market size and forecast, by antigen type 149
8.5.6.9 Rest of LAMEA market size and forecast, by application 150

CHAPTER 9: CLINICAL TRIALS ANALYSIS & PRODUCT PROFILES

9.1 OVERVIEW 151
9.1.1      No. of Clinical Trials from 1997 to 2019 151
9.1.2      Clinical Trials from 1997 to 2019: Based on Approach Type 152
9.1.3      Clinical Trials from 1997 to 2019: Based on Antigen Type 153
9.1.4      Clinical Trials from 1997 to 2019: Based on Application 154
9.1.5      Clinical Trials from 1997 to 2019: Based on Region 155

 

9.2 EXPECTED APPROVALS 156
9.3 APPROVED PRODUCTS PROFILES 157
9.3.1      KYMRIAH® 157
9.3.2      YESCARTA® 159
9.3.3      TECARTUS™ 161

CHAPTER 10: COMPANY PROFILES

10.1       Abbvie Inc. 162
10.2       Adaptimmune Therapeutics Plc 164
10.3 Allogene Therapeutics, Inc. 166
10.4 Amgen, Inc 168
10.5 Anixa Biosciences, Inc. 170
10.6 Arcellx, Inc. 172
10.7 Atara Biotherapeutics, Inc. 173
10.8 Autolus Therapeutics Plc. 175
10.9 Beam Therapeutics, Inc. 177
10.10 Bellicum Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 179
10.11 BioNtech SE 181
10.12 Bluebird Bio, Inc. 183
10.13 Carsgen Therapeutics, Ltd 185
10.14 Cartesian Therapeutics, Inc. 187
10.15 Cartherics Pty Ltd. 188
10.16 Celgene Corporation 189
10.17 Cellectis SA 191
10.18 Cellular Biomedicine Group, Inc. 193
10.19 Celularity, Inc. 195
10.20 Celyad SA 196
10.21 CRISPR Therapeutics AG 198
10.22 Eureka Therapeutics, Inc. 200
10.23 Fate Therapeutics, Inc. 201
10.24 Fortress Biotech, Inc 203
10.25 Gilead Sciences, Inc. 205
10.26 Gracell Biotechnology Ltd 207
10.27 icell Gene Therapeutics 208
10.28 Johnson & Johnson 209
10.29 Juventas Cell Therapy Ltd. 211
10.30 Kuur Therapeutics 212
10.31 Legend Biotech Corp. 213
10.32 Leucid Bio Ltd. 214
10.33 Minerva Biotechnologies Corp. 215

 

10.34     Molecular Medicine SPA (Molmed) 216
10.35     Nanjing Bioheng Biotech Co., Ltd. 218
10.36     Noile-Immune Biotech Inc. 219
10.37     Novartis AG 220
10.38     Oxford Biomedica PLC 222
10.39     Persongen Biotherapeutics (Suzhou) Co., Ltd. 224
10.40     Poseida Therapeutics, Inc. 226
10.41     Precigen, Inc. 227
10.42     Precision Biosciences, Inc. 229
10.43     Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc. 231
10.44     Takara Bio Inc. 233
10.45     Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. 235
10.46     TC Biopharm Ltd. 237
10.47     Tessa Therapeutics Pte Ltd. 238
10.48     Tmunity Therapeutics, Inc. 239
10.49     Unum Therapeutics Inc. 240
10.50     Xyphos Inc. 242
10.51     Ziopharm Oncology, Inc. 243

CHAPTER 11: CONCLUSION & STRATEGIC RECOMMENTATIONS

11.1     STRATEGIC RECOMMENDATIONS 245
11.2     CONCLUSION 247

 

CONTACT

info@biotechforecasts.com

MIKE WOOD

Marketing Executive

BIOTECH FORECASTS

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Tweet Collection by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 and Re-Tweets for e-Proceedings 14th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020, 8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

Real Time Press Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

e-Proceedings 14th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020, 8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

Real Time Press Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Founder & Director, LPBI Group

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/07/28/14th-annual-biopharma-healthcare-summit-friday-september-4-2020-8-am-est-to-3-30-pm-est-virtual-edition/

 

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Hal Barron, Chief Scientific Officer and President R&D, GlaxoSmithKline GWAS not easy to find which gene drives the association  Functional Genomics gene by gene with phenotypes using machine learning significant help

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Hal Barron, Chief Scientific Officer and President R&D, GSK GWAS not easy to find which gene drives the association  Functional Genomics gene by gene with phenotypes using machine learning significant help

Srihari Gopal
@sgopal2

Enjoyed hearing enthusiasm for Neuroscience R&D by Roy Vagelos at #USAIC20. Wonderful interview by Mathai Mammen

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Nina Kjellson, General Partner, Canaan Data science is a winner in Healthcare Women – Data Science is an excellent match

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Arpa Garay, President, Global Pharmaceuticals, Commercial Analytics, Merck & Co. Data on Patients and identification who will benefit fro which therapy  cultural bias risk aversion

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Najat Khan, Chief Operating Officer, Janssen R&D Data Sciences, Johnson & Johnson Data Validation  Deployment of algorithms embed data by type early on in the crisis to understand the disease

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Sastry Chilukuri, President, Acorn AI- Medidata Opportunities in Data Science in Paharma COVID-19 and Data Science

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Maya Said, Chief Executive Officer, Outcomes4Me Cancer patients taking change of their care Digital Health – consumerization of Health, patient demand to be part of the decision, part the information FDA launched a Program Project Patient Voice

USAIC
@USAIC

We’re taking a quick break at #USAIC20 before our next panel on rare diseases starts at 12:20pm EDT. USAIC would like to thank our Sponsors and Partners for supporting this year’s digital event.

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Roy Vagelos, Chairman of the Board, Regeneron HIV-AIDS: reverse transcriptase converted a lethal disease to a chronic disease, tried hard to make vaccine – the science was not there

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Roy Vagelos, Chairman of the Board, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Congratulates Big Pharma for taking the challenge on COVID-19 Vaccine, Antibody and anti-viral Government funding Merck was independent from Government – to be able to set the price

1

Dr Kapil Khambholja
@kapilmk

Christopher Viehbacher, Gurnet Point Capital touches very sensitive topic at #USAIC20 He claims that we are never going to have real innovation out of big pharma! Well this isn’t new but not entirely true either… any more thoughts?
1
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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Daphne Zohar, Founder & CEO, PureTech Health Disease focus, best science is the decision factors

1

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Christopher Viehbacher, Managing Partner, Gurnet Point Capital Dream of every Biotech – get Big Pharma coming to acquire and pay a lot Morph and adapt

anju ghangurde
@scripanjug

Biogen’s chair Papadopoulos big co mergers is an attempt to solve problems; typically driven by patent expirations.. #usaic20

2

anju ghangurde
@scripanjug

Chris Viehbacher/Gurnet Point Capital on US election: industry will work with whoever wins; we’ll have to ‘morph & adapt’ #usaic20

1

Dr Kapil Khambholja
@kapilmk

of

talks about various philosophies and key reasons why certain projects/molecules are killed early. My counter questions- What are chances of losing hope little early? Do small #biopharma publish negative results to aid to the knowledge pool? #USAIC20

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute DNA repair and epignetics are the future of medicine

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute COlonorectal cancer is increasing immuno therapy 5 drugs marketed 30% cancer patients are treated early detection key vs metastatic 10% of cancer are inherited treatment early

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Rehan Verjee, President, EMD Serono Charities funding cancer research – were impacted and resources will come later and in decreased amount New opportunities support access to Medicine improve investment across the board

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Philip Larsen, Global Head of Research, Bayer AG Repurposing drugs as antiviral from drug screening innovating methods Cytokine storm in OCVID-19 – kinase inhibitors may be antiviral data of tested positive allows research of pathway in new ways

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber 3,000 Telemedicine session in the first week of the Pandemic vs 300 before – patient come back visits patient happy with Telemedicine team virtually need be reimbursed same rate working remotely

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Raju Kucherlapati, Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School New normal as a result of the pandemic role of personalized medicine

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Rehan Verjee, President, EMD Serono entire volume of clinical trials at Roche went down same at EMD delay of 6 month, some were to be initiated but was put on hold Charities funding cancer research were impacted and resources will come later smaller

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Dana Farber saw impact of COVID-19 on immunosuppressed patients coming in for Cancer Tx – switch from IV Tx to Oral 96% decrease in screenings due to Pandemic – increase with Cancer

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Kenneth Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co. Pharma’s obligation for next generations requires investment in R&D vs Politicians running for 4 years Patients must come first vs shareholders vs R&D investment in 2011

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Kenneth Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co. Antibiotic research at Merck – no market incentives on pricing for Merck to invest in antibiotics people will die from bacterial resistance next pandemic be bacterial

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Kenneth Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co. Strategies of Merck = “Medicine is for the People not for Profit” – Ketruda in India is not reembureable in India and million are in need it Partnership are encouraged

Dr Kapil Khambholja
@kapilmk

Chairman Stelios Papadopoulos asks #KennethFrazier if wealthy nations will try to secure large proportion of #COVID19 drugs/vaccines. #KennethFrazie rightly mentions: pharma industry’s responsibility to balance the access to diff countries during pandemic. #USAIC20

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Dr Kapil Khambholja
@kapilmk

Almost 60% participants at #USAIC20 feel that MNCs are more likely to run their #clinicalTrials in #INDIA seeing changing environment here, reveals the poll. Exciting time ahead for scientific fraternity as this can substantially increase the speed of #DrugDevelopment globally

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Barry Bloom, Professor & former Dean, Harvard School of Public Health Vaccine in clinical trials, public need to return for 2nd shot, hesitancy Who will get the Vaccine first in the US  most vulnerable of those causing transmission Pharma’s risk

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr. Barry Bloom, Professor & former Dean, Harvard School of Public Health Testing – PCR expensive does not enable quick testing is expensive result come transmission occurred Antibody testing CRISPR test based Vaccine in clinical trials

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20 Dr Andrew Plump, President of R&D, Takeda Pharmaceuticals COllaboration effort around the Globe in the Pandemic therapy solutions including Vaccines

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Did FDA Reverse Course on Convalescent Plasma Therapy for COVID-19?

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

 

Starting with a timeline of recent announcements by the FDA on convalescent plasma therapy

April 16, 2020

FDA STATEMENT

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Encourages Recovered Patients to Donate Plasma for Development of Blood-Related Therapies

 

As part of the all-of-America approach to fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been working with partners across the U.S. government, academia and industry to expedite the development and availability of critical medical products to treat this novel virus. Today, we are providing an update on one potential treatment called convalescent plasma and encouraging those who have recovered from COVID-19 to donate plasma to help others fight this disease.

Convalescent plasma is an antibody-rich product made from blood donated by people who have recovered from the disease caused by the virus. Prior experience with respiratory viruses and limited data that have emerged from China suggest that convalescent plasma has the potential to lessen the severity or shorten the length of illness caused by COVID-19. It is important that we evaluate this potential therapy in the context of clinical trials, through expanded access, as well as facilitate emergency access for individual patients, as appropriate.

The response to the agency’s recently announced national efforts to facilitate the development of and access to convalescent plasma has been tremendous. More than 1,040 sites and 950 physician investigators nationwide have signed on to participate in the Mayo Clinic-led expanded access protocol. A number of clinical trials are also taking place to evaluate the safety and efficacy of convalescent plasma and the FDA has granted numerous single patient emergency investigational new drug (eIND) applications as well.

Source: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/coronavirus-covid-19-update-fda-encourages-recovered-patients-donate-plasma-development-blood

August 23, 2020

 

Recommendations for Investigational COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma

 

  • FDA issues guidelines on clinical trials and obtaining emergency enrollment concerning convalescent plasma

FDA has issued guidance to provide recommendations to health care providers and investigators on the administration and study of investigational convalescent plasma collected from individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 (COVID-19 convalescent plasma) during the public health emergency.

The guidance provides recommendations on the following:

Because COVID-19 convalescent plasma has not yet been approved for use by FDA, it is regulated as an investigational product.  A health care provider must participate in one of the pathways described below.  FDA does not collect COVID-19 convalescent plasma or provide COVID-19 convalescent plasma.  Health care providers or acute care facilities should instead obtain COVID-19 convalescent plasma from an FDA-registered blood establishment.

Excerpts from the guidance document are provided below.

Background

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) plays a critical role in protecting the United States (U.S.) from threats including emerging infectious diseases, such as the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.  FDA is committed to providing timely guidance to support response efforts to this pandemic.

One investigational treatment being explored for COVID-19 is the use of convalescent plasma collected from individuals who have recovered from COVID-19.  Convalescent plasma that contains antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 or SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) is being studied for administration to patients with COVID-19. Use of convalescent plasma has been studied in outbreaks of other respiratory infections, including the 2003 SARS-CoV-1 epidemic, the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza virus pandemic, and the 2012 MERS-CoV epidemic.

Although promising, convalescent plasma has not yet been shown to be safe and effective as a treatment for COVID-19. Therefore, it is important to study the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 convalescent plasma in clinical trials.

Pathways for Use of Investigational COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma

The following pathways are available for administering or studying the use of COVID-19 convalescent plasma:

  1. Clinical Trials

Investigators wishing to study the use of convalescent plasma in a clinical trial should submit requests to FDA for investigational use under the traditional IND regulatory pathway (21 CFR Part 312). CBER’s Office of Blood Research and Review is committed to engaging with sponsors and reviewing such requests expeditiously. During the COVID-19 pandemic, INDs may be submitted via email to CBERDCC_eMailSub@fda.hhs.gov.

  1. Expanded Access

An IND application for expanded access is an alternative for use of COVID-19 convalescent plasma for patients with serious or immediately life-threatening COVID-19 disease who are not eligible or who are unable to participate in randomized clinical trials (21 CFR 312.305). FDA has worked with multiple federal partners and academia to open an expanded access protocol to facilitate access to COVID-19 convalescent plasma across the nation. Access to this investigational product may be available through participation of acute care facilities in an investigational expanded access protocol under an IND that is already in place.

Currently, the following protocol is in place: National Expanded Access Treatment Protocol

  1. Single Patient Emergency IND

Although participation in clinical trials or an expanded access program are ways for patients to obtain access to convalescent plasma, for various reasons these may not be readily available to all patients in potential need. Therefore, given the public health emergency that the COVID-19 pandemic presents, and while clinical trials are being conducted and a national expanded access protocol is available, FDA also is facilitating access to COVID-19 convalescent plasma for use in patients with serious or immediately life-threatening COVID-19 infections through the process of the patient’s physician requesting a single patient emergency IND (eIND) for the individual patient under 21 CFR 312.310. This process allows the use of an investigational drug for the treatment of an individual patient by a licensed physician upon FDA authorization, if the applicable regulatory criteria are met.  Note, in such case, a licensed physician seeking to administer COVID-19 convalescent plasma to an individual patient must request the eIND (see 21 CFR 312.310(b)).

To Obtain a Single Patient Emergency IND  

The requesting physician may contact FDA by completing Form FDA 3926 (https://www.fda.gov/media/98616/download) and submitting the form by email to CBER_eIND_Covid-19@FDA.HHS.gov.

FACT SHEET FOR PATIENTS AND PARENTS/CAREGIVERS EMERGENCY USE AUTHORIZATION (EUA) OF COVID-19 CONVALESCENT PLASMA FOR TREATMENT OF COVID-19 IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS

  • FDA issues fact sheet for patients on donating plasma

August 23, 2020

 

FDA Issues Emergency Use Authorization for Convalescent Plasma as Potential Promising COVID–19 Treatment, Another Achievement in Administration’s Fight Against Pandemic

 

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for investigational convalescent plasma for the treatment of COVID-19 in hospitalized patients as part of the agency’s ongoing efforts to fight COVID-19. Based on scientific evidence available, the FDA concluded, as outlined in its decision memorandum, this product may be effective in treating COVID-19 and that the known and potential benefits of the product outweigh the known and potential risks of the product.

Today’s action follows the FDA’s extensive review of the science and data generated over the past several months stemming from efforts to facilitate emergency access to convalescent plasma for patients as clinical trials to definitively demonstrate safety and efficacy remain ongoing.

The EUA authorizes the distribution of COVID-19 convalescent plasma in the U.S. and its administration by health care providers, as appropriate, to treat suspected or laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Alex Azar, Health and Human Services Secretary:
“The FDA’s emergency authorization for convalescent plasma is a milestone achievement in President Trump’s efforts to save lives from COVID-19,” said Secretary Azar. “The Trump Administration recognized the potential of convalescent plasma early on. Months ago, the FDA, BARDA, and private partners began work on making this product available across the country while continuing to evaluate data through clinical trials. Our work on convalescent plasma has delivered broader access to the product than is available in any other country and reached more than 70,000 American patients so far. We are deeply grateful to Americans who have already donated and encourage individuals who have recovered from COVID-19 to consider donating convalescent plasma.”

Stephen M. Hahn, M.D., FDA Commissioner:
“I am committed to releasing safe and potentially helpful treatments for COVID-19 as quickly as possible in order to save lives. We’re encouraged by the early promising data that we’ve seen about convalescent plasma. The data from studies conducted this year shows that plasma from patients who’ve recovered from COVID-19 has the potential to help treat those who are suffering from the effects of getting this terrible virus,” said Dr. Hahn. “At the same time, we will continue to work with researchers to continue randomized clinical trials to study the safety and effectiveness of convalescent plasma in treating patients infected with the novel coronavirus.”

Scientific Evidence on Convalescent Plasma

Based on an evaluation of the EUA criteria and the totality of the available scientific evidence, the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research determined that the statutory criteria for issuing an EUA criteria were met.

The FDA determined that it is reasonable to believe that COVID-19 convalescent plasma may be effective in lessening the severity or shortening the length of COVID-19 illness in some hospitalized patients. The agency also determined that the known and potential benefits of the product, when used to treat COVID-19, outweigh the known and potential risks of the product and that that there are no adequate, approved, and available alternative treatments.

 

August 24, 2020

Donate COVID-19 Plasma

 

  • FDA posts video and blog about how to donate plasms if you had been infected with COVID

 

https://youtu.be/PlX15rWdBbY

 

 

Please go to https://www.fda.gov/emergency-preparedness-and-response/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/donate-covid-19-plasma

to read more from FDA

 

 

August 25, 2020

 

CLINICAL MEMORANDUM From: , OBRR/DBCD/CRS To: , OBRR Through: , OBRR/DBCD , OBRR/DBCD , OBRR/DBCD/CRS Re: EUA 26382: Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) Request (original request 8/12/20; amended request 8/23/20) Product: COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Items reviewed: EUA request Fact Sheet for Health Care Providers Fact Sheet for Recipients Sponsor: Robert Kadlec, M.D. Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) Office of Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma (CCP), an unapproved biological product, is proposed for use under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) under section 564 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act),(21 USC 360bbb-3) as a passive immune therapy for the treatment of hospitalized patients with COVID-19, a serious or life-threatening disease. There currently is no adequate, approved, and available alternative to CCP for treating COVID-19. The sponsor has pointed to four lines of evidence to support that CCP may be effective in the treatment of hospitalized patients with COVID-19: 1) History of convalescent plasma for respiratory coronaviruses; 2) Evidence of preclinical safety and efficacy in animal models; 3) Published studies of the safety and efficacy of CCP; and 4) Data on safety and efficacy from the National Expanded Access Treatment Protocol (EAP) sponsored by the Mayo Clinic. Considering the totality of the scientific evidence presented in the EUA, I conclude that current data for the use of CCP in adult hospitalized patients with COVID-19 supports the conclusion that CCP meets the “may be effective” criterion for issuance of an EUA from section 564(c)(2)(A) of the Act. It is reasonable to conclude that the known and potential benefits of CCP outweigh the known and potential risks of CCP for the proposed EUA. Current data suggest the largest clinical benefit is associated with high-titer units of CCP administered early course of the disease.

Source: https://www.fda.gov/media/141480/download

 

And Today August 26, 2020

  • A letter, from Senator Warren, to Commissioner Hahn from Senate Committee asking for documentation for any communication between FDA and White House

August 25, 2020 Dr. Stephen M. Hahn, M.D. Commissioner of Food and Drugs U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 Dear Commissioner Hahn: We write regarding the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) troubling decision earlier this week to issue an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for convalescent plasma as a treatment for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).1 Reports suggests that the FDA granted the EUA amid intense political pressure from President Trump and other Administration officials, despite limited evidence of convalescent plasma’s effectiveness as a COVID-19 treatment.2 To help us better understand whether the issuance of the blood plasma EUA was motivated by politics, we request copies of any and all communications between FDA and White House officials regarding the blood plasma EUA.

Source: https://www.warren.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/2020.08.25%20Letter%20to%20FDA%20re%20Blood%20Plasma%20EUA.pdf

…….. which may have been a response to this article

FDA chief walks back comments on effectiveness of coronavirus plasma treatment

 

From CNBC: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/08/25/fda-chief-walks-back-comments-on-effectiveness-of-coronavirus-plasma-treatment.html

PUBLISHED TUE, AUG 25 202010:45 AM EDTUPDATED TUE, AUG 25 20204:12 PM EDT

Berkeley Lovelace Jr.@BERKELEYJR

Will Feuer@WILLFOIA

KEY POINTS

  • The authorization will allow health-care providers in the U.S. to use the plasma to treat hospitalized patients with Covid-19.
  • The FDA’s emergency use authorization came a day after President Trump accused the agency of delaying enrollment in clinical trials for vaccines or therapeutics.
  • The criticism from Trump and action from the FDA led some scientists to believe the authorization, which came on the eve of the GOP national convention, was politically motivated.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn is walking back comments on the benefits of convalescent plasma, saying he could have done a better job of explaining the data on its effectiveness against the coronavirus after authorizing it for emergency use over the weekend.

Commisioners responses over Twitter

https://twitter.com/SteveFDA/status/1298071603675373569?s=20

https://twitter.com/SteveFDA/status/1298071619236245504?s=20

August 26, 2020

In an interview with Bloomberg’s , FDA Commissioner Hahn reiterates that his decision was based on hard evidence and scientific fact, not political pressure.  The whole interview is at the link below:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-08-25/fda-s-hahn-vows-to-stick-to-the-science-amid-vaccine-pressure?sref=yLCixKPR

Some key points:

  • Dr. Hahn corrected his initial statement about 35% of people would be cured by convalescent plasma. In the interview he stated:

I was trying to do what I do with patients, because patients often understand things in absolute terms versus relative terms. And I should’ve been more careful, there’s no question about it. What I was trying to get to is that if you look at a hundred patients who receive high titre, and a hundred patients who received low titre, the difference between those two particular subset of patients who had these specific criteria was a 35% reduction in mortality. So I frankly did not do a good job of explaining that.

  • FDA colleagues had frank discussion after the statement was made.  He is not asking for other people in HHS to retract their statements, only is concerned that FDA has correct information for physicians and patients
  • Hahn is worried that people will not enroll due to chance they may be given placebo
  • He gave no opinion when asked if FDA should be an independent agency

 

For more articles on COVID19 please go to our Coronavirus Portal at

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/coronavirus-portal/

 

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14th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020, 8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

Real Time Press Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Founder & Director, LPBI Group

 

Tweet Collection by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 and Re-Tweets for e-Proceedings 14th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020, 8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

Real Time Press Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/09/04/tweet-collection-by-pharma_bi-and-aviva1950-and-re-tweets-for-e-proceedings-14th-annual-biopharma-healthcare-summit-friday-september-4-2020-8-am-est-to-3-30-pm-est-virtual-editio/

 

 

 

http://www.usaindiachamber.org

 

 2021 summit- June 22. Marriott Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

 

LPBI’s 2020 VISION

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

#USAIC20

 

 

USAIC has created an ecosystem committed to driving a global dialogue on BioPharma & Healthcare innovation, attracting a diverse mix of senior industry professionals and catalyzing partnerships, new ideas, networks and regulatory reform. This unique platform creates mutually beneficial opportunities and relationships for the global Life Sciences & Healthcare industry.

14th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020, 8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

 

Speakers


Kenneth Frazier
Chairman of the Board & CEO
Merck & Co.

Dr. Andrew Plump
President of R&D
Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Dr. Laurie Glimcher
President & CEO
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Roy Vagelos
Chairman of the Board
Regeneron

Dr. Stelios Papadopoulos
Chairman of the Board
Biogen

Dr. Mathai Mammen
Global Head of Janssen R&D
Johnson & Johnson

Christopher Viehbacher
Managing Partner
Gurnet Point Capital

Hari Bhartia
Founder & Co-Chairman
Jubilant Bhartia Group

Dr. Hal Barron
President, R&D and CSO
GlaxoSmithKline

Prof. K. Vijay Raghavan
Principal Scientific Advisor
Government of India

Sanat Chattopadhyay
President- Merck Manufacturing Division
Merck & Co.

Dr. George Yancopoulos
Co-Founder, President & CSO
Regeneron

Kiran Mazumdar Shaw
Executive Chairperson
Biocon

Dr. Elias Zerhouni
Professor Emeritus
Johns Hopkins University

Dr. David Reese
Executive Vice President- R&D
Amgen

Dr. Alfred Sandrock
Executive Vice President, R&D
Biogen

Dr. Naresh Trehan
Chairman
Medanta – the Medicity

Dr. Najat Khan
Chief Operating Officer, Data Sciences
Janssen- Johnson & Johnson

Dr. Richard Hatchett
Chief Executive Officer
CEPI

Amitabh Kant
Chief Executive Officer
NITI Aayog

Dr. Martin Mackay
Co-Founder
Rallybio

Dr. Daniel Curran
Head of the Rare Diseases TA
Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Daphne Zohar
Founder & CEO
PureTech Health

Dr. David Meeker
Chairman & CEO
Rhythm Pharmaceuticals

Dr. John Orloff
EVP and Head of R&D
Alexion

Dr. Mandeep Bhandari
Joint Secretary
Ministry of Health, India

Dr. Barry Bloom
Professor & former Dean
Harvard School of Public Health

Dr. Anne Heatherington
Head of Data Sciences Institute
Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Dr. Philip Larsen
Global Head of Research
Bayer AG

Dr. Timothy Yu
Assistant Professor in Pediatrics
Harvard Medical School

Rehan Verjee
President
EMD Serono

Sastry Chilukuri
Executive Vice President
Medidata

Arpa Garay
President, Commercial Analytics
Merck & Co.

Dr. William Chin
Professor of Medicine, Emeritus
Harvard Medical School

Dr. V G Somani
Drugs Controller General of India
Government of India

Dr. Rajeev Venkayya
President-Global Vaccines
Takeda

Dr. Steve Uden
Co-Founder
Rallybio

Muna Bhanji
SVP, Global Market Access
Merck & Co.

Dr. Maya Said
Chief Executive Officer
Outcomes4Me

Dr. Raju Kucherlapati
Professor of Genetics
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Tony Ho
Head of R&D
CRISPR Therapeutics

Dr. Sanjeev Sinha
Professor of Medicine
All India Institute of Medical Sciences

Nina Kjellson
General Partner
Canaan

Dr. Michael Rosenblatt
Chief Medical Officer
Flagship Pioneering

Dr. Shiv Kumar Sarin
Director
Institute of Liver & Biliary Sciences

Matt Wilsey
Co-Founder & Chairman
Grace Science Foundation

Dr. Samuel Waksal
Founder
Meira GTx

Dr. Alise Reicin
Former President, Global Clinical Dev.
Celgene

Dr. Toni Choueiri
Director
Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Dhaval Patel
EVP & Chief Scientific Officer
UCB

Dr. Nirmal Kumar Ganguly
Former Director General
Indian Council of Medical Research

Dr. Peter Mueller
President
The Muller Health Foundation

Dr. Timothy Clackson
President & CTO
Xilio Therapeutics
 

 

14th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020,

8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

 

Chair and Master of Ceremonies (Emcee)– Dr. Andrew Plump, President of R&D, Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Timings are Eastern Standard Time (EST)

Time Topic
8 AM – 8-10 AM Welcome addressKarun Rishi, President, USAIC

  • COVID-19 Pandemic is a Global crisis
  • India can play a special role in R&D and in Manufacturing including Vaccine development

Opening commentsDr Andrew Plump, President of R&D, Takeda Pharmaceuticals

  • Global Summit around the World – JP Morgan of the East as we were called – it is Now a Global Conference vs East Coast
  • Record number of Drugs approved as New Drugs with special quality
  • explosion of modality of therapies to include Gene Therapy
  • Billion underserved vs N-of-One drug
  • India’s President Modi allow healthcare access to 1/2Billion
  • collaboration across the World COVID Alliance in vaccine development
  • Global effort, China recovery is remarkable
  • India battle the infection and it is growing – Public Health
  • Remarkable Speakers
8-10 AM – 8-50 AM Panel Discussion- COVID-19: Where are we now? Where are we going?

Panelists:
Dr. Barry Bloom, Professor & former Dean, Harvard School of Public Health

  • Testing – PCR expensive does not enable quick testing is expensive result come transmission occurred
  • Antibody testing
  • CRISPR test based
  • Vaccine in clinical trials, public need to return for 2nd shot, hesitancy
  • Who will get the Vaccine first? in the US  most vulnerable of those causing transmission
  • Pharma takes risk when efficacious level is unknown
    Dr. George Yancopoulos, Co-Founder, President & CSO, Regeneron
  • Repurpose – be careful
  • Ebola vaccine development approach is been REUSED for COVID-19
  • Existential threat by Disease – preparedness is ridiculous as size of investment – far where we need to be
  • Untreatable disease burden COVID-19 cost of healthcare calls massive increases as a society and Private sector Moderna invested in new technology from Academe to the Industry
  • Universal HealthCare will cripple the the healthcare systems
    Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, Executive Chairperson, Biocon
  • Safety in proof of concept
  • Children focus for emergency use
  • validation of repurpose drugs
  • oral vaccine involve sequential processing, approval and TRUST,
  • concerns about risks
  • accelerate the process is the opportunity
    Dr. Rajeev Venkayya, President of the Global Vaccine Business Unit, Takeda
  • Public confidence in COVID-19 Vaccine
  • The Group with concerns at present is larger than 15 years ago due to the accelerate process od the development process
  • political influences on CDC emergency authorization given prior to election
  • hesitancy – influence of social media, conspiracies
  • Transparency by Pharma and by Regulatory Agencies
  • Independent reviews
    Dr. Richard Hatchett, CEO, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI)
  • 78 countries ready to participate, Healthcare workers priority to be ready end of next year

 

Moderator:
Dr. William Chin, Professor of Medicine, Emeritus, Harvard Medical School

8-50 AM – 8-55 AM Break + Polling
8-55 AM – 9-10 AM India Regulatory update

Dr. Mandeep Bhandari, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, India

  • COVID related – support for Clinical Trials support to the Industry, innovators, processes and infrastructure is in place

Dr. V G Somani, Drug Controller General of India, Central Drug Control Organization

  • partnership, time line, transparency
  • interaction online with regulators
  • 30 days approval pre and post approval – progress achieved
  • Online presubmission very useful to both sides
  • Ecosystems on early development: Gene therapy

Moderator:
Muna Bhanji, Senior Vice President,  Merck & Co.

  • India’s preparedness
9-10 AM – 9-15 AM Break + Polling
9-15 AM – 9-55 AM Fireside Chat

Kenneth Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co.

Strategies of Merck = “Medicine is for the People not for Profit”

  • AntiViral – nucleocide – orally bioavailable
  • Vaccine in early development – BSV Vaccine used in EBOLA – attenuated virus vector platform experience – 1 single doze, deployed Globally
  • Vaccine modified Measles Vaccine, novel platform – out patient and Hospital
  • Antibiotic research at Merck – no market incentives on pricing for Merck to invest in antibiotics
  • people will die from bacterial resistance infection and next pandemic will be bacterial not viral

Moderator:
Dr. Stelios Papadopoulos, Chairman of the Board, Biogen

  • Most important comments on urgency in investment in drug development by multiple constituencies made by
  • Dr. George Yancopoulos, Co-Founder, President & CSO, Regeneron
  • Access to therapy
9-55 AM – 10 AM Break + Polling
10 AM – 10-40 AM India Innovation Landscape

Panelists:
Amitabh Kant, Chief Executive Officer, National Institution for Transforming India (NITI)

  • Innovation in drug discovery collaboration for clinical trial infrastructure
  • BioEconomy BioSimilar the largest number approved anywhere
  • Incentives for size and scale
  • Ingredients manufacturing to become India’s priority
  • Investment in R&D and Human Capital in the BioEconomy

Hari Bhartia, Founder & Co-Chairman, Jubilant Bhartia Group

  • US history of innovations cluster and infrastructure: Academe, VC, small medium Biopharma, Government involvement
  • India: Contract research – 20 years history, lagging the ability to take risk
  • Changing, pricing of drug increased, innovating drug for local consumption, and it can be taken to US for a better price
  • Cancer immunology in India under development
  • India was Leading Chemistry Research – China’s government invested and took the market
  • Indian companies bigger in size – free on requirement imposed on China
  • India will be a great supplier to US Market to build high capacity raw materials

Dr. K. Vijay Raghavan, Principal Scientific Advisor, Government of India

Resources are necessary 30% from Industry vs Government and Academe with great students and labs

Indian context – Personalized Medicine – Telemedicine and IT infrastructure allowing innovation in a 1Billion Population- sheer volume of quality professional

Dr. Naresh Trehan, Chairman, Medanta – the Medicity

  • Ecosystem ready for Government to promote innovations to conduct clinical trial with global acceptance standard
  • diverse gene pool in population to innovate for new molecule to market
  • Vaccine under development on Phase 1,2,3 – regulatory mechanism is in place
  • genetic drugs, BioSimilar dominance in the market – biotech can do clinical trials in India vs abroad

Moderator:
Sanat Chattopadhyay, President, Merck Manufacturing Division; Merck & Co.

  • Largest producer of generic drugs
  • antiretroviral drug produced by Indian Pharma
  • Biotech innovations growing middle class – how innovation , infrastructure and shift to research
  • Diversify and become self reliance
10-40 AM – 10-45 AM Break + Polling
10-45 AM – 11-25 AM Panel Discussion- Oncology: Changing landscape- COVID learnings and the promise of new technologies

Panelists:
Dr. Alise Reicin, Former President, Global Clinical Development, Celgene

  • Clinical trial were impacted by association of patients to trials
  • anti bacterial resistance requires investment – needs will be greater for antibiotics in the future
  • Cancer mutation next therapy biomarkers for mutations to be developed

Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

  • Dana Farber saw impact of COVID-19 on immunosuppressant population of patients coming in for Cancer Tx – switch from IV Tx to Oral
  • 96% decrease in screenings due to Pandemic – increase with Cancer diagnosis in coming years
  • No clinical Trials in Cancer were suspended – all continued
  • Telemedicine and working at home very efficient
  • Genomics of COVID-19 studies at Dana Farber same pathway identifies
  • safety and efficacy must be achieved – not to approve drugs without phase I & Phase II endpoints

Dr. Philip Larsen, Global Head of Research, Bayer AG

  • Repurposing drugs as antiviral from drug screening innovating methods
  • Cytokine storm in OCVID-19 – kinase inhibitors may be antiviral  – dat of tested positive allows research of pathway in new ways
  • Regulatory agencies in US and Europe for types of drugs vs single patient drugs

Rehan Verjee, President, EMD Serono

  • entire volume of clinical trials at Roche went down same at EMD
  • delay of 6 month, some were to be initiated but was put on hold
  • Charities funding cancer research – were impacted and resources will come later and in decreased amount
  • New opportunities support access to Medicine
  • improve investment across the board
  • Antibody cytotoxic with precision

Dr. Tony Ho, Head of Research and Development, CRISPR Therapeutics

  • challenges overcome by testing at home

Moderator:
Dr. Raju Kucherlapati, Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School

  • New normal as a result of the pandemic role of personalized medicine
  • Cancer cure – what are the prospects
11-25 AM – 11-30 AM Break + Polling
11-30 AM – 12-10 PM Panel Discussion- Industry & Investment Outlook

Panelists:
Christopher Viehbacher, Managing Partner, Gurnet Point Capital

  • IPOs can have advantages in Pandemics – Travel curtails all deals done virtually in greater efficiency
  • Drug pricing is a target by White house
  • Dream of every Biotech – get Big Pharma coming to acquire and pay a lot
  • Morph and adapt

Daphne Zohar, Founder & CEO, PureTech Health

  • kill project early financial incentive not in line in the industry
  • incentive to move resources among project and kill early project experiments to find which project to kill
  • Innovations – pattern recognition, fast followers academic translation
  • Disease focus, best science is the decision factors

Dr. Elias Zerhouni, Professor Emeritus, Johns Hopkins University

  • Digital Health
  • CVS opens clinics
  • R&D – Capital is low
  • Network of global innovation hubs vc investor channel like in the past
  • Value of company driven by hits blockbusters

 

Dr. Stelios Papadopoulos, Chairman, Biogen

  • Worst pandemic in our lifetime
  • stock market if hot – in balance in supply and demand, interest rates low, excess supply of equities in entertainment, Travel, hospitality
  • Healthcare was defensive therapeutics needed – opportunity to innovate in HC – shift money from entertainment, Travel hospitality to HC
  • Recovery will shift money away from Healthcare
  • IP Protection and patent expiration – biotech are cases not trends

Moderator:

Dr. Andrew Plump,

President of Research & Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Moderator Presenter: Dr. Michael Rosenblatt, CEO

12-10 PM – 12-20 PM Break + Polling
12-20 PM – 1 PM Panel Discussion- Rare Diseases: No longer forgotten; but more to be achieved

ROI is not there, regulatory requirements reduced, Registry

Panelists:
Dr. Alfred Sandrock, Executive Vice President, Research & Development, Biogen

  • Multiple Sclerosis therapy
  • cost effectiveness is not there vs save a life
  • Appeal opportunity is there and regulators are people

Dr. Daniel Curran, Head of the Rare Diseases Therapeutic Area Unit, Takeda

  • Takeda collaborates with Grace Science Foundation

Dr. David Meeker, Chairman & CEO , Rhythm Pharmaceuticals

  • Cystic Fibrosis 

Dr. John Orloff, Head of Research & Development, Alexion

  • ALS
  • Duchenne Muscular Destrophy
  • HUS
  • ASO
  • gene therapy – one time therapy: Valuation for the industry of long term therapy: US (long term non existence) vs Europe and Japan (much appreciated

Matt Wilsey, Co-Founder & Chairman, Grace Science Foundation

  • Ultra-rare (500 Patients) vs Ultra Ultra-rare (50 Patients)
  • 70 patients in the World, Grace disease, Parent drive the search for drug
  • Manufacturing cost comes down
  • Price is dynamic

Moderator:
Dr. Steve Uden, Co-Founder, Rallybio

  • Regulators are people

 

1 PM – 1-05 PM Break + Polling
1-05 PM – 1-50 PM Fireside Chat

Dr. Roy Vagelos, Chairman of the Board, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

  • Congratulate Big Pharma for taking the challenge on COVID-19
  • Vaccine, Antibody and anti-viral
  • Government funding
  • Merck was independent from Government – to be independent and be able to set the price
  • HIV-AIDS: reverse transcriptase converted a lethal disease to a chronic disease, tried hard to make vaccine – the science was not there
  • Industry role: Competition of drug discovery capacity is been built, global needs, price need be low for global reach
  • Government is a already a player hoping without a control on pricing
  • 300Million people were treated FREE by Merck’s Family Program HepC
  • 9% in China immunize the newborn with HepB 1994 100% babies immunized – no profit to Merck – eradication of HepB in China
  • Neuro degeneration – science supports drug development
  • Role of R&D Scientists in Drug discovery?

Moderator:
Dr. Mathai Mammen, Global Head of Janssen Research & Development, Johnson & Johnson

  • COVID-19 drug development: Response by Big Pharma
  • Industry role in Access to medicines, biologics, antibodies, vaccines
  • Role of R&D Scientists in Drug discovery?
  • PAHTN – use Machine Learning on top of data collected routinely,

 

1-50 PM – 1-55 PM Break + Polling
1-55 PM – 2-35 PM Panel Discussion- Digital & Data Science in Healthcare: Pragmatic Insights from the Real-World

Panelists:
Dr. Anne Heatherington, Head of Data Sciences Institute, Takeda Pharmaceuticals

  • Reliance on Data – AI and Data in Pharma alliance with MIT
  • collaboration of Data for COVID-19
  • Women need education in STEM and in Data Science

Arpa Garay, President, Global Pharmaceuticals, Commercial Analytics, Merck & Co.

  • Data on Patients and identification who will benefit fro which therapy
  •  cultural bias risk aversion
  • Invest early on in STEM

Dr. Maya Said, Chief Executive Officer, Outcomes4Me

  • Cancer patients taking change of their care
  • Digital Health – consumerization of Health, patient demand to be part of the decision, part of the information
  • FDA launched a Program Project Patient Voice

https://www.fda.gov/about-fda/oncology-center-excellence/project-patient-voice

  • Women should not undersell themselves

Dr. Najat Khan, Chief Operating Officer, Janssen R&D Data Sciences, Johnson & Johnson

  • Validation
  • Deployment of algorithms
  • embed data by type early on in the crisis to understand the disease
  • Compare the Big IT-Data and Pharma where are the barriers?
  • STEM and Women in Pharma – the opportunity must be right

Nina Kjellson, General Partner, Canaan

  • Data science is a winner in Healthcare
  • Women – Data Science is an excellent match

Moderator:
Sastry Chilukuri, President, Acorn AI- Medidata

  • Opportunities in Data Science in Pharma
  • COVID-19 and Data Science
  • STEM and Women in Pharma

 

2-35 PM – 2-40 PM Break + Polling
2-40 PM – 3-20 PM Panel Discussion- R&D Strategies and Trends: Innovation – The Big I

Panelists:
Dr. Andrew Plump, President of Research & Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals

  • Enter for Plasma and for manufacturing vs discovery
  • Change how pharma behaved inefficiently in the past – with COVID-19 new behaviors in the industry
  • End of Century most diseases could be cured

Dr. David Reese, Executive Vice President, Research and Development, Amgen

  • Interaction with regulator was most favorable

Dr. Hal Barron, Chief Scientific Officer and President R&D, GlaxoSmithKline

  • Cytokine storm – few approaches
  • Control molecule GSK owned
  • GWAS not easy to find which gene drives the association
  • Functional Genomics gene by gene with phenotypes using machine learning significant help

Dr. Mathai Mammen, Global Head of Janssen Research & Development, Johnson & Johnson

  • Neuro-modulation: Symptomology Outcomes – no correlation
  • Vaccine platform used in the past for several vaccines: Selection process from several candidates, cell line enter Clinical waiting for data
  • Using same platform with several proteins – great communality in the development
  • Regulator deepen trust relationship which will carry for the future
  • Pulmonologists and cardiologist in the COVIS-19 Patients – remove drugs monitoring on drugs

Moderator:
Duval Patel presented the Moderator

Moderator:

Martin Mackay, Co-Founder, RallyBio

 

3-20 PM – 3-30 PM Closing Remarks

  • Every year it is getting better
  • India – innovate and make drugs for every country and for India
  • Diversity and inclusion
  • Leadership in Pharma Industry in all Panels
  • Massive impact can be made

 

Poll Questions for September 4

Polling Time (EST) Polling Topic
8-50 AM COVID-19 PanelQuestion 1: What do you foresee as the most likely outcome of the race to develop a vaccine?

  • Heightened international tensions due to inequities in distribution
  • Use of the vaccine as an instrument of geopolitics
  • Collaboration between governments to use vaccine to end the pandemic
  • All of the above

Question 2: What minimum criteria would you like to see for approval of COVID19 vaccines, assuming adequate efficacy?

  • Immune response in people over 60 years
  • Durability of response
  • Antibody plus T-cell response
  • Emergency Use Authorization with caveats followed by final approval
9-10 AM India Regulatory UpdateHow will MNCs respond to the recent regulatory changes for BioPharmas in India? They are _____ to run clinical trials there:

  • More likely
  • Less likely
  • Equally likely
9-55 AM Fireside Chat: Ken Frazier

The BioPharma industry this year has publicly committed itself to greater diversity. What specific measures do you expect to see?

  • Increasing diversity in clinical trials
  • Increasing diversity at the C-suite and board level
  • Increasing diversity throughout the company
  • All of the above
  • None of the above
10-40 AM India Innovation LandscapeWhat is the most important step India could take to become a global leader in life sciences innovation?”

  • Implement government policies to incentivize innovative drug development
  • Increase availability of financing for BioPharmas
  • Improve clinical trial infrastructure
  • Increase IP protection
11-25 AM Oncology PanelQuestion 1:

Changes in policy and reimbursement over the next five years will impact innovation in cancer therapeutics

  • Not at all
  • Slightly
  • Moderately
  • Significantly

Question 2: What therapeutic innovation do you think will have the biggest impact on cancer in the next five years?

  • Cell-based immunotherapies
  • Antibody-based immunotherapies
  • Bispecific / multi-specific antibodies
  • Antibody drug conjugates
12-10 PM Industry & Investment Outlook PanelMore and more funding has been going into preclinical companies — do you expect this trend to continue?

  • Yes
  • No

R&D Strategies and Trends Panel

COVID-19 has led to an unprecedented level of collaboration among stakeholders in the biopharma industry. Where do you expect to see the biggest increase in collaborations post-pandemic?

  • Discovery/preclinical research
  • Clinical development
  • Manufacturing
  • Commercialization
1 PM Rare Diseases PanelWhat is the biggest barrier to access to Orphan drugs in low-income countries?

  • Price, Access and Availability
  • Disease recognition and diagnosis
  • Lack of patient education regarding new therapies
  • Ultra-rarity of certain diseases creates barriers for BioPharma companies to pursue therapeutic
1-50 PM Fireside Chat: Roy VagelosQuestion 1:

Will pharma’s reputation continue its positive trend or return to negative base line beyond the pandemic

  • Yes
  • No

Question 2:

COVID-19 has put the spotlight on BioPharma as an essential player in the return to normalcy. What primary action do you think the industry needs to take to maintain a positive reputation beyond the pandemic?

  • Continue developing innovative drug pricing models
  • Increase drug pricing transparency
  • Increase data sharing and transparency
  • Improving availability and access in low income countries
2-35 PM Digital & Data Sciences PanelWhere has COVID-19 had the biggest impact on your adoption and use of digital health technologies?

  • Remote clinical trials and patient monitoring
  • Real-world data collection and analysis
  • Virtual drug launches

 

@@@@

In these unprecedented times due to COVID-19, USAIC is offering Free Registration for its annual summit.

Click for free registration

 

AGENDA & SPEAKERS

Chair and Master of Ceremonies (Emcee)– Dr. Andrew Plump, President of R&D, Takeda Pharmaceuticals
Summit Theme: “From N of One to N of a Billion”

  • Moderated Fireside Chat- Kenneth Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co. and Stelios Papadopoulos, Chairman of the Board, Biogen
  • Moderated Fireside Chat- Roy Vagelos, Chairman of the Board, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Mathai Mammen, Global Head of R&D, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson
  • Moderated Fireside Chat- K. VijayRaghavan, Principal Scientific Advisor, Government of India and Amitabh Kant, CEO, National Institution for Transforming India (NITI)

Panel Discussions:

  • Covid-19: Where are we now? Where are we going?
  • Oncology: A never ending tunnel?
  • Rare Diseases: Breaking Barriers for a Healthy Brain
  • Digital & Data Sciences: Leveraging data and digital to achieve healthcare solutions
  • Industry & Investment Outlook
  • R&D Strategies and Trends: Innovation – The Big I

Program and speakers subject to change*

14th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020, 8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

Speakers


Kenneth Frazier
Chairman of the Board & CEO
Merck & Co.

Dr. Andrew Plump
President of R&D
Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Dr. Laurie Glimcher
President & CEO
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dr. Roy Vagelos
Chairman of the Board
Regeneron

Dr. Stelios Papadopoulos
Chairman of the Board
Biogen

Christopher Viehbacher
Managing Partner
Gurnet Point Capital

Dr. Mathai Mammen
Global Head of R&D
Janssen- Johnson & Johnson

Kiran Mazumdar Shaw
Chairperson & Managing Director
Biocon

Dr. Hal Barron
President, R&D and CSO
GlaxoSmithKline

Prof. K. Vijay Raghavan
Principal Scientific Advisor
Government of India

Dr. George Yancopoulos
Co-Founder, President & CSO
Regeneron

Dr. Elias Zerhouni
Professor Emeritus
Johns Hopkins University

Daphne Zohar
Founder & CEO
PureTech Health

Sanat Chattopadhyay
President- Merck Manufacturing Division
Merck & Co.

Dr. David Reese
Executive Vice President- R&D
Amgen

Hari Bhartia
Founder & Co-Chairman
Jubilant Bhartia Group

Dr. Alfred Sandrock
Exe Vice President R&D & CMO
Biogen

Dr. Najat Khan
Chief Operating Officer, Data Sciences
Janssen- Johnson & Johnson

Dr. Richard Hatchett
Chief Executive Officer
CEPI

Amitabh Kant
Chief Executive Officer
NITI Aayog

Dr. Martin Mackay
Co-Founder
Rallybio

Dr. Daniel Curran
Head of the Rare Diseases TA
Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Dr. Alise Reicin
Former President, Global Clinical Dev.
Celgene

Dr. David Meeker
Chairman & CEO
Rhythm Pharmaceuticals

Dr. John Orloff
EVP and Head of R&D
Alexion

Dr. Barry Bloom
Professor & former Dean
Harvard School of Public Health

Dr. Mandeep Bhandari
Joint Secretary
Ministry of Health, India

Arpa Garay
President, Commercial Analytics
Merck & Co.

Dr. Steve Uden
Co-Founder
Rallybio

Dr. Philip Larsen
Global Head of Research
Bayer AG

Sastry Chilukuri
Executive Vice President
Medidata

Dr. William Chin
Professor of Medicine, Emeritus
Harvard Medical School

Dr. Anne Heatherington
Head of Data Sciences Institute
Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Dr. V G Somani
Drugs Controller General of India
Government of India

Dr. Rajeev Venkayya
President-Global Vaccines
Takeda

Dr. Raju Kucherlapati
Professor of Genetics
Harvard Medical School

Matt Wilsey
Co-Founder & Chairman
Grace Science Foundation

Muna Bhanji
SVP, Global Market Access
Merck & Co.

Dr. Maya Said
Chief Executive Officer
Outcomes4Me

Rehan Verjee
President
EMD Serono
Pharmasia News Biospectrum India Online

SOURCE:

https://usaindiachamber.org/speaker.php

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Top 15 pharmas, then=2026 and now=2020: How the next five years will shake up Big Pharma’s rankings

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The Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) Partnership on May 18, 2020: Leadership of AbbVie, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Bristol Myers Squibb, Eisai, Eli Lilly, Evotec, Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, KSQ Therapeutics, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, Sanofi, Takeda, and Vir. We also thank multiple NIH institutes (especially NIAID), the FDA, BARDA, CDC, the European Medicines Agency, the Department of Defense, the VA, and the Foundation for NIH

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

May 18, 2020

Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) An Unprecedented Partnership for Unprecedented Times

JAMA. Published online May 18, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.8920

First reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, COVID-19 is caused by a highly transmissible novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2). By March 2020, as COVID-19 moved rapidly throughout Europe and the US, most researchers and regulators from around the world agreed that it would be necessary to go beyond “business as usual” to contain this formidable infectious agent. The biomedical research enterprise was more than willing to respond to the challenge of COVID-19, but it soon became apparent that much-needed coordination among important constituencies was lacking.

Clinical trials of investigational vaccines began as early as January, but with the earliest possible distribution predicted to be 12 to 18 months away. Clinical trials of experimental therapies had also been initiated, but most, except for a trial testing the antiviral drug remdesivir,2 were small and not randomized. In the US, there was no true overarching national process in either the public or private sector to prioritize candidate therapeutic agents or vaccines, and no efforts were underway to develop a clear inventory of clinical trial capacity that could be brought to bear on this public health emergency. Many key factors had to change if COVID-19 was to be addressed effectively in a relatively short time frame.

On April 3, leaders of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), with coordination by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), met with multiple leaders of research and development from biopharmaceutical firms, along with leaders of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and academic experts. Participants sought urgently to identify research gaps and to discuss opportunities to collaborate in an accelerated fashion to address the complex challenges of COVID-19.

These critical discussions culminated in a decision to form a public-private partnership to focus on speeding the development and deployment of therapeutics and vaccines for COVID-19. The group assembled 4 working groups to focus on preclinical therapeutics, clinical therapeutics, clinical trial capacity, and vaccines (Figure). In addition to the founding members, the working groups’ membership consisted of senior scientists from each company or agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and the Department of Defense.

Figure.

Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines

ACTIV’s 4 working groups, each with one cochair from NIH and one from industry, have made rapid progress in establishing goals, setting timetables, and forming subgroups focused on specific issues (Figure). The goals of the working group, along with a few examples of their accomplishments to date, include the following.

 

The Preclinical Working Group was charged to standardize and share preclinical evaluation resources and methods and accelerate testing of candidate therapies and vaccines to support entry into clinical trials. The aim is to increase access to validated animal models and to enhance comparison of approaches to identify informative assays. For example, through the ACTIV partnership, this group aims to extend preclinical researchers’ access to high-throughput screening systems, especially those located in the Biosafety Level 3 (BSL3) facilities currently required for many SARS-CoV-2 studies. This group also is defining a prioritization approach for animal use, assay selection and staging of testing, as well as completing an inventory of animal models, assays, and BSL 3/4 facilities.

 

The Therapeutics Clinical Working Group has been charged to prioritize and accelerate clinical evaluation of a long list of therapeutic candidates for COVID-19 with near-term potential. The goals have been to prioritize and test potential therapeutic agents for COVID-19 that have already been in human clinical trials. These may include agents with either direct-acting or host-directed antiviral activity, including immunomodulators, severe symptom modulators, neutralizing antibodies, or vaccines. To help achieve these goals, the group has established a steering committee with relevant expertise and objectivity to set criteria for evaluating and ranking potential candidate therapies submitted by industry partners. Following a rigorous scientific review, the prioritization subgroup has developed a complete inventory of approximately 170 already identified therapeutic candidates that have acceptable safety profiles and different mechanisms of action. On May 6, the group presented its first list of repurposed agents recommended for inclusion in ACTIV’s master protocol for adaptive clinical trials. Of the 39 agents that underwent final prioritization review, the group identified 6 agents—including immunomodulators and supportive therapies—that it proposes to move forward into the master protocol clinical trial(s) expected to begin later in May.

 

The Clinical Trial Capacity Working Group is charged with assembling and coordinating existing networks of clinical trials to increase efficiency and build capacity. This will include developing an inventory of clinical trial networks supported by NIH and other funders in the public and private sectors, including contract research organizations. For each network, the working group seeks to identify their specialization in different populations and disease stages to leverage infrastructure and expertise from across multiple networks, and establish a coordination mechanism across networks to expedite trials, track incidence across sites, and project future capacity. The clinical trials inventory subgroup has already identified 44 networks, with access to adult populations and within domestic reach, for potential inclusion in COVID-19 trials. Meanwhile, the survey subgroup has developed 2 survey instruments to assess the capabilities and capacities of those networks, and its innovation subgroup has developed a matrix to guide deployment of innovative solutions throughout the trial life cycle.

 

The Vaccines Working Group has been charged to accelerate evaluation of vaccine candidates to enable rapid authorization or approval.4 This includes development of a harmonized master protocol for adaptive trials of multiple vaccines, as well as development of a trial network that could enroll as many as 100 000 volunteers in areas where COVID-19 is actively circulating. The group also aims to identify biomarkers to speed authorization or approval and to provide evidence to address cross-cutting safety concerns, such as immune enhancement. Multiple vaccine candidates will be evaluated, and the most promising will move to a phase 2/3 adaptive trial platform utilizing large geographic networks in the US and globally.5 Because time is of the essence, ACTIV will aim to have the next vaccine candidates ready to enter clinical trials by July 1, 2020.

References

1.

Desai  A .  Twentieth-century lessons for a modern coronavirus pandemic.   JAMA. Published online April 27, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4165
ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar

2.

NIH clinical trial shows remdesivir accelerates recovery from advanced COVID-19. National Institutes of Health. Published April 29, 2020. Accessed May 7, 2020. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-clinical-trial-shows-remdesivir-accelerates-recovery-advanced-covid-19

3.

NIH to launch public-private partnership to speed COVID-19 vaccine and treatment options. National Institutes of Health. Published April 17, 2020. Accessed May 7, 2020. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-launch-public-private-partnership-speed-covid-19-vaccine-treatment-options

4.

Corey  L , Mascola  JR , Fauci  AS , Collins  FS .  A strategic approach to COVID-19 vaccine R&D.   Science. Published online May 11, 2020. doi:10.1126/science.abc5312PubMedGoogle Scholar

5.

Angus  DC .  Optimizing the trade-off between learning and doing in a pandemic.   JAMA. Published online March 30, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4984
ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar

6.

Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) portal. National Institutes of Health. Accessed May 15, 2020. https://www.nih.gov/ACTIV

7.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP). National Institutes of Health. Published February 4, 2014. Accessed May 7, 2020. https://www.nih.gov/research-training/accelerating-medicines-partnership-amp
SOURCE

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Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 27, 2020 Opening Remarks and Clinical Session 11:45am-1:15pm Advances in Cancer Drug Discovery

SESSION VMS.CH01.01 – Advances in Cancer Drug Design and Discovery

April 27, 2020, 11:45 AM – 1:15 PM
Virtual Meeting: All Session Times Are U.S. EDT
DESCRIPTIONAll session times are U.S. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT).

Session Type
Virtual Minisymposium
Track(s)
Cancer Chemistry
14 Presentations
11:45 AM – 11:45 AM
– ChairpersonZoran Rankovic. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

11:45 AM – 11:45 AM
– ChairpersonChristopher G. Nasveschuk. C4 Therapeutics, Watertown, MA

11:45 AM – 11:50 AM
– IntroductionZoran Rankovic. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

11:50 AM – 12:00 PM
1036 – Discovery of a highly potent, efficacious and orally active small-molecule inhibitor of embryonic ectoderm development (EED)Changwei Wang, Rohan Kalyan Rej, Jianfeng Lu, Mi Wang, Kaitlin P. Harvey, Chao-Yie Yang, Ester Fernandez-Salas, Jeanne Stuckey, Elyse Petrunak, Caroline Foster, Yunlong Zhou, Rubin Zhou, Guozhi Tang, Jianyong Chen, Shaomeng Wang. Rogel Cancer Center and Departments of Internal Medicine, Pharmacology, and Medicinal Chemistry, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, Ascentage Pharma Group, Taizhou, Jiangsu, China

12:00 PM – 12:05 PM
– Discussion

12:05 PM – 12:15 PM
1037 – Orally available small molecule CD73 inhibitor reverses immunosuppression through blocking of adenosine productionXiaohui Du, Brian Blank, Brenda Chan, Xi Chen, Yuping Chen, Frank Duong, Lori Friedman, Tom Huang, Melissa R. Junttila, Wayne Kong, Todd Metzger, Jared Moore, Daqing Sun, Jessica Sun, Dena Sutimantanapi, Natalie Yuen, Tatiana Zavorotinskaya. ORIC Pharmaceuticals, South San Francisco, CA, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, South San Francisco, CA, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, South San Francisco, CA, ORIC Pharmaceuticals, South San Francisco, CA

12:15 PM – 12:20 PM
– Discussion

12:20 PM – 12:30 PM
1038 – A potent and selective PARP14 inhibitor decreases pro-tumor macrophage function and elicits inflammatory responses in tumor explantsLaurie Schenkel, Jennifer Molina, Kerren Swinger, Ryan Abo, Danielle Blackwell, Anne Cheung, William Church, Kristy Kuplast-Barr, Alvin Lu, Elena Minissale, Mario Niepel, Melissa Vasbinder, Tim Wigle, Victoria Richon, Heike Keilhack, Kevin Kuntz. Ribon Therapeutics, Cambridge, MA

12:30 PM – 12:35 PM
– Discussion

12:35 PM – 12:45 PM
1039 – Fragment-based drug discovery to identify small molecule allosteric inhibitors of SHP2. Philip J. Day, Valerio Berdini, Juan Castro, Gianni Chessari, Thomas G. Davies, James E. H. Day, Satoshi Fukaya, Chris Hamlett, Keisha Hearn, Steve Hiscock, Rhian Holvey, Satoru Ito, Yasuo Kodama, Kenichi Matsuo, Yoko Nakatsuru, Nick Palmer, Amanda Price, Tadashi Shimamura, Jeffrey D. St. Denis, Nicola G. Wallis, Glyn Williams, Christopher N. Johnson. Astex Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, United Kingdom, Taiho Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Tsukuba, Japan

Abstract: The ubiquitously expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 is required for signalling downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and plays a role in regulating many cellular processes. Recent advances have shown that genetic knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 suppresses RAS/MAPK signalling and inhibits proliferation of RTK-driven cancer cell lines. SHP2 is now understood to act upstream of RAS and plays a role in KRAS-driven cancers, an area of research which is rapidly growing. Considering that RTK deregulation often leads to a wide range of cancers and the newly appreciated role of SHP2 in KRAS-driven cancers, SHP2 inhibitors are therefore a promising therapeutic approach.
SHP2 contains two N-terminal tandem SH2 domains (N-SH2, C-SH2), a catalytic phosphatase domain and a C-terminal tail. SHP2 switches between “open” active and “closed” inactive forms due to autoinhibitory interactions between the N-SH2 domain and the phosphatase domain. Historically, phosphatases were deemed undruggable as there had been no advancements with active site inhibitors. We hypothesised that fragment screening would be highly applicable and amenable to this target to enable alternative means of inhibition through identification of allosteric binding sites. Here we describe the first reported fragment screen against SHP2.
Using our fragment-based PyramidTM approach, screening was carried out on two constructs of SHP2; a closed autoinhibited C-terminal truncated form (phosphatase and both SH2 domains), as well as the phosphatase-only domain. A combination of screening methods such as X-ray crystallography and NMR were employed to identify fragment hits at multiple sites on SHP2, including the tunnel-like allosteric site reported by Chen et al, 2016. Initial fragment hits had affinities for SHP2 in the range of 1mM as measured by ITC. Binding of these hits was improved using structure-guided design to generate compounds which inhibit SHP2 phosphatase activity and are promising starting points for further optimization.

  • anti estrogen receptor therapy: ER degraders is one class
  • AZ9833 enhances degradation of ER alpha
  • worked in preclinical mouse model (however very specific)
  • PK parameters were good for orally available in rodents;  also in vitro and in vivo correlation correlated in rats but not in dogs so they were not sure if good to go in humans
  • they were below Km in rats but already at saturated in dogs, dogs were high clearance
  • predicted human bioavailability at 40%

 

12:45 PM – 12:50 PM
– Discussion

12:50 PM – 1:00 PM
1042 – Preclinical pharmacokinetic and metabolic characterization of the next generation oral SERD AZD9833Eric T. Gangl, Roshini Markandu, Pradeep Sharma, Andy Sykes, Petar Pop-Damkov, Pablo Morentin Gutierrez, James S. Scott, Dermot F. McGinnity, Adrian J. Fretland, Teresa Klinowska. AstraZeneca, Waltham, MA

1:00 PM – 1:05 PM
– Discussion

1:05 PM – 1:15 PM
– Closing RemarksChristopher G. Nasveschuk. MA

Follow on Twitter at:

@pharma_BI

@AACR

@GenomeInstitute

@CureCancerNow

@UCLAJCCC

#AACR20

#AACR2020

#curecancernow

#pharmanews

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The Problem and Challenges of Commercialization

Curator and Reporter: Joel Shertok, PhD

 

As the old saying goes,

Anybody can do something once; the problem is: can you do it twice, or for that matter, over and over again?

This is the essential issue faced by those personnel in the throes of the commercialization process.

Any successful commercial process has to meet a number of criteria:

  1. The process must be reproducible — it must yield the same product/results given the same inputs.
  2. The process must be economically viable: given the constraints of raw material, energy, and labor costs, depreciation schedules for equipment, expected process failures, R/D, Marketing, and Sales support costs, the process needs to yield both a profit and positive cash flow
  3. The process should be implemented using readily available commercial components and control instrumentation. On occasion, successful implementation of a project will require specialized components; however these components themselves must meet the criteria for successful commercialization
  4. The process must be “simple” enough so that suitably trained operators can manage the process. A unit that requires Ph.D.’s to maintain operations is doomed to failure

History is replete with novel processes that worked on the lab scale, but were failures when a commercial operation was attempted. The issues that are most responsible for lab-to-production failure are listed under the general classification of “scale-up”. Scale-up principles are covered in my monograph, “The Art of Scale-up” (www.artofscaleup.com), but in general follow these rules:

  • Identification of those process parameters that will have major impact on commercial viability: reaction kinetics, mass transfer vs. temperature/kinetic control; if multi-phase systems are involved, the type and energy of required stirring; heat transfer considerations; side reactions; etc.

  • Materials of construction; raw material and product hazards; etc.

  • Regulatory considerations: FDA, OSHA, EPA.

Failure to address any of these issues prior to commercialization will lead to surprises during commercialization.

In addition to the engineering/scale-up aspects of commercialization, there are several other criteria that may need attention:

  1. When to launch a product – where will the new product fit into the overall corporate product portfolio?
  2. Where is the proper location to launch?  A product aimed at flu symptom suppression in cold-weather conditions may not do well in Florida; ….. super-sweet tea does well in the South, and not so well in New England, so that a product to replace sugar might do well in the South.
  3. Who is going to use the product?  Are you targeting doctor’s offices, hospitals, or direct to consumer routes?
  4. How to launch – social media and “influencers” have given rise to new avenues of product introductions.

The old aphorism of “measure twice, cut once” has a special resonance when doing commercialization of a new process or product. The more the process is thought out ahead of time, the less issues there will be down the road. In the commercial world, there is constant pressure to rush things to meet management deadlines, which always leads to problems and extra expense. A crusty of R/D chemist once remarked, “There is never time to do it right, but always time to do it twice.” Everyone needs to keep this in the back of their mind

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eProceedings – Day 1: Charles River Laboratories – 3rd World Congress, Delivering Therapies to the Clinic Faster, September 23 – 24, 2019, 25 Edwin H. Land Boulevard, Cambridge, MA

 

https://events.criver.com/event/9eab0ee1-982e-42c6-a4cd-fb43f9f2f1d0/confirmation:7c68cf9b-c599-469e-b602-42178c77e4f9

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group will cover this event in Real Time for pharmaceuticalintelligence.com 

Confirmation Number: 8ZNCBYNGHCK

In attendance generating in realtime event’s eProceeding and social media coverage by

 

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Director & Founder

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston

Editor-in-Chief

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com 

e-Mail: avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu

(M) 617-775-0451

https://cal.berkeley.edu/AvivaLev-Ari,PhD,RN

SkypeID: HarpPlayer83          LinkedIn Profile        Twitter Profile

#crlworldcon

@CRiverLabs

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

 

 

Join us this year as we explore novel approaches to drug development that effectively reduce program timelines and accelerate delivery to the clinic. Using a variety of case studies, our speakers will illustrate methods that successfully cut time to market and highlight how artificial intelligence and genomics are expediting target discovery and drug development. In an agenda that includes presentations, panel discussions, and short technology demonstrations, you will learn how the latest science and regulatory strategies are helping us get drugs to patients faster than ever.

AGENDA

Day One, September 23, 2019

  • Novel approaches to silence disease drivers
  • The role of AI in expediting drug discovery

Monday, September 23

8:30 – 9:00 a.m. Introduction and Welcome Remarks James C. Foster, Chairman of the Board, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Charles River
9:00 – 9:30 a.m. 2019 Award Winner: A Silicon Valley Approach to Understanding and Treating Disease Matt Wilsey, Chairman, President, and Co-Founder, Grace Science Foundation
9:30 – 10:15 a.m. Keynote Session Brian Hubbard, PhD, Chief Executive Officer, Dogma Therapeutics
10:15 – 10:30 a.m. Break
10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Novel Approaches to Silence Disease Drivers Systemic Delivery of Investigational RNAi Therapeutics: Safety Considerations and Clinical Outcomes Peter Smith, PhD, Senior Vice President, Early Development, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Novel Approaches to Silence Disease Drivers: Considerations for Viral Vector Manufacturing to Support Product Commercialization Richard Snyder, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer and Founder, Brammer Bio
12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 – 1:45 p.m. Accelerating Drug Discovery Through the Power of Microscopy Images Anne E. Carpenter, Ph.D., Institute Scientist, Sr. Director, Imaging Platform, Merkin Institute Fellow, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT
1:45 – 2:30 p.m. The Role of AI in Expediting Drug Discovery Target Identification for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Using Machine Learning: The Case for nference Tyler Wagner PhD, Head of Cardiovascular Research, nference
2:30 – 2:45 p.m. Break
2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Technobite Sessions with Emulate Bio and University of Pittsburgh Drug Discovery Institute

Kyung Jin H Jang, VP of Bio Product development, Emulate, Inc.

Albert Gough, PhD, U Pittsburg School of Medicine

3:30 – 4:15 p.m. Artificial Intelligence Panel Discussion: Real World Applications from Discovery to Clinic Moderated by Carey Goldberg, WBUR
4:15 – 4:45 p.m. Jack’s Journey Jake and Elizabeth Burke, Cure NF with Jack
4:45 – 5:00 p.m. Closing Remarks
5:00 – 6:00 p.m. Networking Reception

 

 

Day Two – September 24, 2019

  • How genomics is expediting drug discovery
  • Accelerating therapies through the regulatory process

Tuesday, September 24

8:45 – 9:00 a.m. Opening Remarks and Recap James C. Foster, Chairman of the Board, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Charles River
9:00 – 9:30 a.m. 2018 Award Winner Update David Hysong, Patient Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Shepherd Therapeutics William Siders, CDO, Shepherd Therapeutics
9:30 – 10:15 a.m. Advances in Human Genetics and Therapeutic Modalities Enable Novel Therapies Eric Green, Vice President of Research and Development, Maze Therapeutics
10:15 – 11:00 a.m. How Genomics is Expediting Drug Discovery Manuel Rivas, Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University
11:00 – 11:15 a.m. Break
11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Genomics Panel Discussion: Signposting Targets That Will Speed the Path to Market Moderated by Martin Mackay, Co-Founder, RallyBio
12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 – 1:45 p.m Truly Personalized Medicines for Ultra-rare Diseases: New Opportunities in Genomic Medicine Timothy Yu, Attending Physician, Division of Genetics and Genomics and Assistant Professor in Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital
1:45 – 2:30 p.m. Application of Machine Learning Technology for the Assessment of Bulbar Symptoms in ALS Fernando Vieira, Chief Scientific Officer, ALS Therapy Development Institute
2:30 – 2:45 p.m. Break
2:45 – 3:30 p.m. Accelerating Rare Disease Therapies Through the Regulatory Process Martine Zimmermann, Senior Vice President and Head of Global Regulatory Affairs, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
3:30 – 4:00 p.m. Wearing ALL the Hats: From Impossible to Possible Allyson Berent, Chief Operating Officer, GeneTx Biotherapeutics
4:00 – 4:15 p.m. Closing Remarks

 

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  • Find a cause and work with passion
  • CVD increased 53% from 2005 to 2016
  • Cholesterol, LDL receptor and CV disease
  • Genetics  evolution and discovery of PCSK9
  1. A PCSK9 Variant lowers CV risk
  2. complete lack of PCSK9 is safe – protects from CVD
  • LDL receptor
  • Statins do not work on LDL receptor if the mutation exists
  • Antibody and antisense for the PCSK9 mutation – Inexpensive Oral Medications can change Global Diseases
  • Dogma of Drug DIscovery: Approach a Patent vs Approach a Disease
  • Ligands bind within a cryptic binding pocket adjacent to a novel PCSK9 polymorphism

12 years of drug discovery

  1. 2003: PCSK9 mutation discovered
  2. 2005:
  3. 2006:
  4. 2012;
  5. 2012: Dogma Scientists begin
  6. compound found binds to primates
  7. 2015:
  8. 2018: Efficiency DGM-4403 lowers LDL-c by 55% 0ver 14 days
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  • 2014 – @Moderna, mRNA
  • 2017 – Alnylam

RNAi – delivery is the most difficult

  • gene silencing changes medicine and diseases
  • Small Interfeering RNA (siRNA) Therapeutics
  • Delivery challenges – stability and targeting
  • RNA Interference (RNAi) – Onpattro (patisiran)
  • GalNAc-siRNA Conjugates – delivery to the hepatocytes
  • N-Acetyl Galactosamine (GalNACc-siRNA conjugates
  • Hepatocyte specific : Liver across species: ASGPR expression
  • Metabolic Stability: Chemistry to Improve siRNA
  • Platform for genetic diseases
  • Evolution of COnjugate Design: GalNAc-siRNA – enhanced stabilization chemistry
  • ALN-TTRSC02 compared to Revusiran
  • ALN-TTRsc02 (advanced) –  – tetrameric protein binds transports serum retinol binding
  • AL Amyloidosis
  • ApoA1 Amyloidosis
  • ATTR Amyloidosis – manufacture in the Liver: Hereditery vs non-hereditary – Wild-Type
  • Patisiran Therapeutic Hypothesis – siRNA targeting TTR formulated
  • Pharmacology of TTR siRNA in Animal Model
  • V30M TTR Transgenic Mouse Model: Patisiran Phase 1 Study to Phase 3 APOLLA Study Design for any TTR mutation – Prior tetramer stabilizer used permitted
  • hATTR Amyloidosis and APOLLO Assessment: Phase 3 is Global – Cardiomyopathy – potential,
  • Patisiran met all secondary Endpoints: Canadian, Japanese approval – US approved indication, European approved
  • Alnylam Investigational RNAi Therapeutics:
  • Pipeline: Genetic medicines
  • Hepatic Infectious diseases
  • CNS & Ocular
  • Cardiovascular
11:15 AM-12:00 PM
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  • Viral-Vector-mediated in vivo Gene Therapy
  • VVS Viral Vector Platforms:
  1. Adenovirus immunogenicity
  2. Lentivirus
  3. Retrovirus
  4. Herpes
  5. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors: Glybera, Luxturna
  6. Zolgenzma
  • Establish the product specifications based on data (CQAs)
  • Is the vector product: parenteral or anciliary material

Considerations:

  • Large scall vs small
  • lot demand vs platform choice
  • Proof of concept
  • Own/License the manufacturing reagents (portability) vs reliance on providers
  • Process and Analytical Design & Development: Cell line: Mamalian, others
  • Raw materials: Viral clearance steps – cell banks generation
  • impurity profiles
  • Cell Substrates
  • Cell clone screening
  • Preclinical/Clinical, Alachua, FL; Phase III/Commercial: Cambridge & Lexington
  • Biologics Upstream Process Flow: Master cell banks
  • Transient Transfection Process (Lenti and AAV)
  • rAAV Proviral cell line
  • Production Vector-based Process (Baculo or HSV)
  • Product purification: Filtration methods, Chromatography, centrifugal separation: Concentration/filtration
  • Formulation
  • Compatibility wiht vial: Glass, CZ, COP: absorption vs Inactivation
  • Single use
  • Frozen storage
  • Storage, Packing and Distribution
  • Technology Transfer: Research vs Mature Process (Qualified cell bank)
  • Plasmids: E.coli MCB backbone
  • Analytics Design & Development: Testing: Nucleic-acid based, protein-based
  1. AAV Vector Lot Release Assays
  2. Lentivirus
  • QA: QA Management System –
  • Analytical Assays
  • FDA Issues SIX New Draft Guidance Documents in 7/2018
  • Process Validation: Life cycle approach: Process caracterizationProcess performance qualification
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  • assayGene clusterbased on morphological similarity: Express each gene, gene painting Image analysis, cluster morphological profiles
  • identification of allelle that are not constitutively activating mutants.
  • weakly supervised deep learning to extract features
  • identify similarities and differences among treatments at the same population level
  • Predict many distinct expensive assays on a huge compound library using a single cell painting
  1. Test 5,000 compounds in the assay of interest as well as cell painting
  2. Find combination of iamge-based features that predict in the assay of interest
  3. Predict “hit” from existing 1Million compound cell paining data set
The Role of AI in Expediting Drug Discovery Target Identification for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Using Machine Learning: The Case for nference
Tyler Wagner PhD, Head of Cardiovascular Research, nference
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  • Lung-Chip Applications
  • Pulmonary inflammation
  • Intestine-chip Applications
  • Liver-Chip: Building Tissue Complexity: Co-culture, tri-culture, quatro-culture, Transcriptomic Analysis
  • Liver-Chip: Kupffer cells Characterization
  • Stellate Cells
  • parenchymal channel, non-parenchymal channel
  • Liver Chip: Predicting species differences in liver toxicity: Effects of Bosentan on Albumin secretion
  • Acetaminophen Toxicity in Liver-Chip: APAP Metabolism: detected changes in morphology, ATP, GSH – Dosepdependent increase of ROS
  • Steatosis and Stellate Cell Activation: and Species difference in Toxicity Liver chip data correlates with in vivo data
  • Predict Human safety risks with liver chip
Albert Gough, PhD, U Pittsburg School of Medicine
  • Approaches for repurposing drugs:
  1. Integrated, fluidic organ MPD,
  2. cells, 3D structures,
  3. O2 Modulation & Sensing
  4. Biosensors
  5. secretome
  • Higher Biomimetic content Higher throughput
  • regulatory liver-pancreas axis in Type 2 Diabetes model
  • Estradiol-Induced proliferation of mutants in Breast Cancer varies from 2D monoculture to 3D LAMP
  • MPS Models:
  1. celle and organ Structure in MPS
  2. Single organ MPS & Coupled organ
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Carey Goldberg, WBUR
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September 24, 2019

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