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Archive for the ‘Pharmaceutical Industry Competitive Intelligence’ Category


Precision Medicine Market size worth $87.7BIL by 2023

 Article Publication Request by

Jui Kate | SEO Analyst

Global Market Insights

E-mail: jui.k@gminsights.com | Web: www.gminsights.com 

Published Date: July 25, 2016   Author: Global Market Insights, Inc.

Precision Medicine Market size is expected to reach USD 87.79 billion by 2023; as per a new research report by Global Market Insights, Inc.
Increasing demand for personalized medicine specifically in cancer treatments and advancements in new healthcare technologies will drive precision global medicine market size. Favorable government regulations and standards will help sustain revenue growth.
The individualized diagnosis approach has dramatically improved owing to large-scale biologic database development, efficient methods for patient characterization, and computational tools to analyze large data sets. Emphasizing the need for public health database, The White House dedicated USD 55 million for creation of its largest database ‘Precision Medicine Initiative’ (PMI).

 

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Recent research advances have helped expand benefits to various aspects of healthcare by enabling better understanding of disease mechanisms, assessment of disease risks and prediction of optimal therapy. A large number of investments in diagnostic research will further accelerate the shift from treatment to preventive medicine in healthcare.
Gene sequencing market size was over USD 8 billion in 2015. Post announcement of the PMI, FDA has recently issued draft guidelines on next generation sequencing-based tests to develop a new kind of healthcare that takes into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments and lifestyles.
Browse key industry insights spread across 94 pages with 85 market data tables & 62 figures & charts from the report, “Precision Medicine Market Size By Technology (Big Data Analytics, Gene Sequencing, Drug Discovery, Bioinformatics, Companion Diagnostics), By Application (Oncology, CNS, Immunology, Respiratory), Industry Analysis Report, Regional Outlook (U.S., Canada, Germany, UK, France, Scandinavia, Italy, Japan, China, India, Singapore, Mexico, Brazil, South Africa, UAE, Qatar, Saudi Arabia), Application Potential, Price Trends, Competitive Market Share & Forecast, 2016 – 2023” in detail along with the table of contents:

https://www.gminsights.com/industry-analysis/precision-medicine-market
Key insights from the report include:

  • Drug discovery technology contributed over USD 9 billion to the global precision medicine market size in 2015, and is estimated to expand at 8.3% CAGR from 2016 to 2023. NGS and other such technologies will open new opportunities for industry participants. Regulation of NGS based test development will help create regulatory processes for genetic test development and application.
  • The global companion diagnostics market is predicted to reach USD 17 billion by 2023. It plays a significant role in development of targeted drugs, thus speeding up the move towards more precise and individualized pharmacotherapy.
  • Oncology application was over 30% of the precision medicine market share in 2015. There have been significant developments taken place across the globe in the area of breast cancer and other related cancers. Predictive biomarkers in lung cancer therapy targets receptors such as c-ros oncogene 1 receptor tyrosine kinase (ROS1), Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), Immune Checkpoints, and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK).
  • U.S. precision medicine market share accounted for over 65% of the North American revenue in 2015, and is anticipated to continue witnessing growth due to increased government initiatives. For instance, The President’s budget in 2016 has allocated USD 130 million to the NIH for development of a national research cohort of a million voluntary U.S. participants, and the data is linked to EHR for easy access to academic scientists and physicians.
  • China contributed 25% to the Asia Pacific precision medicine market size in 2015, mainly due to considerable government initiatives supporting growth in the region. Pfizer, Novartis, Covance, Medtronics, Qiagen, Quest Diagnostics, Roche Holding, Teva Pharmaceuticals, and Biocrates Life Sciences are some notable industry participants.

Global Market Insights has segmented the precision medicine industry on the basis of technology, application, and region:

  • Precision Medicine Market Technology Analysis (Revenue, USD Million; 2013 – 2023)
    • Big data analytics
    • Gene Sequencing
    • Drug discovery
    • Bio Informatics
    • Companion Diagnostics
  • Precision Medicine Market Application Analysis (Revenue, USD Million; 2013 – 2023)
    • Oncology
    • CNS
    • Immunology
    • Respiratory
  • Precision Medicine Market Regional Analysis (Revenue, USD Million; 2013 – 2023)
    • North America
      • U.S.
      • Canada
    • Europe
      • UK
      • Germany
      • France
      • Italy
      • Scandinavia
    • Asia Pacific
      • China
      • Japan
      • India
      • Singapore
    • Latin America
      • Mexico
      • Brazil
    • MEA
      • South Africa
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Qatar
      • UAE

SOURCE

From: Jui Kate <jui.k@gminsights.com>

Date: Friday, February 17, 2017 at 6:35 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Article Publication Request

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Pharmacovigilance Market size to exceed $8BIL by 2024

Article Publication Request by

Jui Kate | SEO Analyst

Global Market Insights

E-mail: jui.k@gminsights.com | Web: www.gminsights.com 

Published Date: December 13, 2016   Author: Global Market Insights, Inc.

Pharmacovigilance Market size is expected to exceed USD 8 billion by 2024; according to a new research report by Global Market Insights, Inc.
Growing number of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) coupled with increasing prevalence of chronic diseases will drive global pharmacovigilance market size. Furthermore, growing geriatric population base is associated with increased drug consumption for treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes, oncology cardiovascular and respiratory disorders.
Rising demand for drugs has driven the need for new drug development through clinical trials. Pharmaceutical companies are collaborating with CROs to streamline R&D, medical writing, manufacturing operations, clinical data management and other pharmacovigilance activities to achieve greater efficiency at reduced cost. Outsourcing should enable better regulatory compliance, higher productivity and improved strategic outcomes spurring pharmacovigilance market growth.
Increasing number of National pharmacovigilance centers across the globe along with rising patient awareness regarding adverse drug events will stimulate global pharmacovigilance market growth. However, lack of skilled professionals and risk associated with data security and web-based drug sales will hamper business expansion.

 

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The phase IV clinical trial market size was valued more than USD 2 billion in 2015 and is expected to grow at over 10% by 2024. Phase IV studies ensure that restrictions could be imposed on a drug being sold depending on its safety performance.
Contract outsourcing market size was valued over USD 1 billion in 2015, poised to grow at 12.2% from 2016 to 2024 and surpass USD 4 billion by 2024. Contract outsourcing reduces overall economic losses linked with drug approval delays and trial failures. It is widely opted by companies to avoid huge investments and delegate such activities to specialized firms in this area.
U.S. pharmacovigilance market size was valued at more than USD 1 billion in 2015, with expectations to grow at 10.7% over the forecast period, owing to favorable governmental regulations, huge clinical trial volume and presence of large scale research companies. Additionally, growing patient concerns related to the drug safety and rising adverse drug events related mortality rates will positively impact pharmacovigilance market share.
Spain pharmacovigilance market size was valued over USD 230 million in 2015 and should witness 10.2% CAGR from 2016 to 2024, to surpass USD 550 million by 2024. Rising demand for new drug development, growing geriatric population and increasing outsourcing by pharmaceutical companies should fuel regional industry growth. India pharmacovigilance market growth was more than 14% from 2016 to 2024, and expected to reach USD 668 million by 2024. The strong and robust growth is attributed to increasing number of clinical trials conducted across Asian countries, owing to low cost trial advantage over developed countries.
Key industry players such as Quintiles offer literature monitoring, safety aggregate reporting, benefit risk management, analytics and signal detection services. Synowledge offer signal detection services, which help clinical experts determine medical significance with the use of hi-tech visualization techniques.
Many industry participants are focusing on outsourcing pharmacovigilance services as a feasible cost reduction avenue. Outsourcing helps achieve better pharmacovigilance through regulatory compliance, better quality, enhanced productivity and improved strategic outcomes.
Browse key industry insights spread across 111 pages with 66 market data tables & 6 figures& charts from the report, “Pharmacovigilance Market Size By Clinical Trial Phase (Preclinical, Phase I, Phase II, Phase III, Phase IV), By Service Provider (In-house, Contract outsourcing) Industry Analysis Report, Regional Outlook (U.S., Canada, UK, Germany, Spain, Italy, France, China, Japan, India, Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Qatar), Application Potential, Price Trends, Competitive Market Share & Forecast, 2016 – 2024” in detail along with the table of contents:

https://www.gminsights.com/industry-analysis/pharmacovigilance-market
Key insights from the report include:

  • Europe pharmacovigilance market size was over USD 790 million in 2015 growing at anticipated close to 10% CAGR. Germany, UK, Spain together contributed for over 70% of regional pharmacovigilance market share in 2015.
  • Brazil pharmacovigilance market share was more than 60% of regional revenue for 2015, with target slated to exceed USD 300 million by 2024. South Africa pharmacovigilance market size was more than USD 37 million and anticipated for over 5% growth.
  • Phase III clinical trial market size was more than USD 450 million in 2015, with expectations to grow over 10% CAGR, due to increasing requirement for drug safety monitoring and evaluation.
  • Contract outsourcing held more than 50% of pharmacovigilance market share with target market size of over USD 1.7 billion in 2015. Increasing outsourcing trend adopted by pharmaceutical companies will serve as a high impact driver for the business growth.
  • Global pharmacovigilance market will be driven by collaboration between pharmaceutical companies and contract research organizations (CROs). The key industry participants include Accenture, Quintiles, Cognizant Technology Solutions, Boehringer Ingelheim, Covance, PAREXEL International Corporation, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Janssen Research & Development, Synowlwedge, United BioSource Corporation and ICON.

Pharmacovigilance market research report includes in-depth industry coverage with estimates & forecast in terms of revenue in USD million from 2012 to 2024, for the following segments:

Pharmacovigilance Market By Clinical Trial

  • Preclinical
  • Phase I
  • Phase II
  • Phase III
  • Phase IV

Pharmacovigilance Market By End User

  • In-house
  • Contract outsourcing

 

The above information is provided for the following regions and countries:

  • North America
    • U.S.
    • Canada
  • Europe
    • Germany
    • UK
    • France
    • Italy
    • Spain
  • Asia Pacific
    • China
    • Japan
    • India
    • Australia
  • Latin America
    • Argentina
    • Brazil
    • Mexico
  • Middle East and Africa
    • South Africa
    • Saudi Arabia
    • UAE
    • Qatar

SOURCE

From: Jui Kate <jui.k@gminsights.com>

Date: Friday, February 17, 2017 at 6:35 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Article Publication Request

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Teva – Dr. Sol J. Barer Named Chairman of the Board, Appoints Dr. Yitzhak Peterburg as Interim Chief Executive Officer, Succeeding Erez Vigodman

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

February 06, 2017 4:53 p.m.
Teva Appoints Dr. Yitzhak Peterburg as Interim Chief Executive Officer, Succeeding Erez Vigodman

Dr. Sol J. Barer Named Chairman of the Board

JERUSALEM–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Feb. 6, 2017– Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE and TASE:TEVA) today announced that Dr. Yitzhak Peterburg, who has served as Chairman of the Teva Board of Directors since January 2015, has been appointed Interim President and Chief Executive Officer, effective immediately. This follows the mutual agreement between the Board of Teva and Erez Vigodman that Mr. Vigodman is stepping down. Mr. Vigodman’s service on the Teva Board of Directors has also ended.

In accordance with the Israeli Companies Law, Dr. Yitzhak Peterburg has stepped down from his role as Chairman in order to serve as Interim Chief Executive Officer. Prior to rejoining Teva’s Board of Directors in 2012, Dr. Peterburg led the Company’s innovative R&D efforts as Teva’s Group Vice President, Global Branded Products, from October 2010 until October 2011, after serving on Teva’s Board of Directors from 2009 until July 2010. Previously, he served as President and CEO of Cellcom Israel Ltd. from 2003 to 2005, Director General of Clalit Health Services, the leading healthcare provider in Israel, from 1997 to 2002 and CEO of Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva, from 1995 to 1997.

The Board has elected Dr. Sol J. Barer, who has been a member of the Teva Board since January 2015, as Chairman. Dr. Barer brings deep knowledge of the global pharmaceutical industry. He was a founder of the biotechnology group at Celanese Corporation, later spun off as Celgene Corporation, where he served in top leadership roles from 1987 to 2011, including as Chairman and CEO from 2007 to 2010.

The Company’s Board of Directors is undertaking a search to identify a permanent Chief Executive Officer with the assistance of a search firm.

“I believe that now is the right time for me to step down,” said Mr. Vigodman. “It has been a privilege to lead Teva, and I am proud of all we have accomplished. I am confident that the Company’s future is bright.”

Dr. Yitzhak Peterburg said, “The Company is focusing on executing its strategic priorities to transform Teva, with immediate focus on realizing the cost synergies and strategic benefits of the Actavis Generics acquisition. I look forward to working with the entire Teva team to conduct a thorough review of the business to find additional opportunities to enhance value for shareholders. Teva has a deep bench of talented leaders and today’s announcement has no impact on our ability to execute going forward. With the strength of our generics pipeline, unique R&D capabilities and unparalleled footprint, coupled with our existing assets and growing pipeline in specialty medicines, I believe in Teva and the Company’s long-term growth prospects.”

Dr. Barer said, “We are grateful to Yitzhak for taking on the role of interim CEO. Teva’s Board of Directors, with its decades of collective pharmaceutical industry experience, will continue to play an active role in driving the Company’s strategy, and I look forward to working with the management team to execute on the value creation opportunities ahead. We intend to conduct a comprehensive search to identify the best person to lead the Company for years to come. On behalf of the Board, I want to thank Erez for his many contributions to Teva over the years and wish him well in the future.”


SOURCE

http://ir.tevapharm.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=73925&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=2243437

http://www.biopharmadive.com/news/teva-ceo-out-erez-vigodman-exit-successor/435574/

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Expedite Use of Agents in Clinical Trials: New Drug Formulary Created – The NCI Formulary is a public-private partnership between NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

New Drug Formulary Will Help Expedite Use of Agents in Clinical Trials

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) today launched a new drug formulary (the “NCI Formulary”) that will enable investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers to have quicker access to approved and investigational agents for use in preclinical studies and cancer clinical trials. The NCI Formulary could ultimately translate into speeding the availability of more-effective treatment options to patients with cancer.

The NCI Formulary is a public-private partnership between NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. It is also one of NCI’s efforts in support of the Cancer Moonshot, answering Vice President Biden’s call for greater collaboration and faster development of new therapies for patients. The availability of agents through the NCI Formulary will expedite the start of clinical trials by alleviating the lengthy negotiation process — sometimes up to 18 months — that has been required for investigators to access such agents on their own.

“The NCI Formulary will help researchers begin testing promising drug combinations more quickly, potentially helping patients much sooner,” said NCI Acting Director Douglas Lowy, M.D. “Rather than spending time negotiating agreements, investigators will be able to focus on the important research that can ultimately lead to improved cancer care.”

The NCI Formulary launched today with fifteen targeted agents from six pharmaceutical companies:

  • Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • Eli Lilly and Company
  • Genentech
  • Kyowa Hakko Kirin
  • Loxo Oncology
  • Xcovery Holding Company LLC

“The agreements with these companies demonstrate our shared commitment to expedite cancer clinical trials and improve outcomes for patients,” said James Doroshow, M.D., NCI Deputy Director for Clinical and Translational Research. “It represents a new drug development paradigm that will enhance the efficiency with which new treatments are discovered.”

The establishment of the NCI Formulary will enable NCI to act as an intermediary between investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers and participating pharmaceutical companies, facilitating and streamlining the arrangements for access to and use of pharmaceutical agents. Following company approval, investigators will be able to obtain agents from the available formulary list and test them in new preclinical or clinical studies, including combination studies of formulary agents from different companies.

The NCI Formulary leverages lessons learned through NCI’s Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and the NCI-MATCH trial, a study in which targeted agents from different companies are being tested alone or in combination in patients with genetic mutations that are targeted by these drugs. As the use of genomic sequencing data becomes more common in selecting cancer therapies, requests for access to multiple targeted agents for the conduct of clinical trials are becoming more common.

“We are very pleased that several additional pharmaceutical companies have already pledged a willingness to participate and are in various stages of negotiation with NCI,” said Dr. Doroshow, who is also director of NCI’s Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis. “By the end of 2017, we expect to have doubled the number of partnerships and drugs available in the NCI Formulary.”

CTEP staff continue to discuss the NCI Formulary with pharmaceutical companies to make additional proprietary agents available for studies initiated by investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers.

The Formulary will complement NIH’s plans for another new public-private partnership in oncology, the Partnership to Accelerate Cancer Therapies (PACT). Through PACT, the NIH, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, biopharmaceutical groups in the private sector, foundations, and cancer advocacy organizations will come together to support new research projects to accelerate progress in cancer research as part of the Cancer Moonshot. PACT research will center on the identification and validation of biomarkers of response and resistance to cancer therapies, with special emphasis on immunotherapies. PACT will also establish a platform for selecting and testing combination therapies. PACT is expected to launch in 2017.

About the National Cancer Institute (NCI): NCI leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH’s efforts to dramatically reduce the prevalence of cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at cancer.gov or call NCI’s Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

SOURCE

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-drug-formulary-will-help-expedite-use-agents-clinical-trials

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Top 32 Pharma companies: Perception of Pharma Companies Pairing of the Most Admired Pharma Companies – A Survey by eyeforpharma, its mission is to make Pharma companies more open and valued

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Perception of Pharma Companies Pairing

Pfizer or Otsuka?

Pfizer
Otsuka

*2Eli Lilly or Celgene?

Eli Lilly
Celgene

*3Sanofi or Merck KGaA (EMD)?

Sanofi
Merck KGaA (EMD)

*4Amgen or Bristol-Myers Squibb?

Amgen
Bristol-Myers Squibb

*5Janssen (J&J) or Valeant?

Johnson & Johnson (Janssen)
Valeant

*6AstraZeneca or UCB?

AstraZeneca
UCB

*7Roche (Genentech) or Biogen?

Roche (Genentech)
Biogen

*8Teva or Servier?

Teva
Servier

*9Novartis or Astellas?

Novartis
Astellas

*10Bayer or Boehringer Ingelheim?

Bayer
Boehringer Ingelheim

*11Gilead or Eisai?

Gilead
Eisai

*12Allergan or Daiichi Sankyo?

Allergan
Daiichi Sankyo

*13GlaxoSmithKline or Mylan?

GlaxoSmithKline
Mylan

*14Abbvie or Shire?

Abbvie
Shire

*15Merck & Co (MSD) or Takeda?

Merck & Co (MSD)
Takeda

*16Novo Nordisk or CSL?

Novo Nordisk
CSL
SOURCES

From: Andy Robertson <arobertson@eyeforpharma.com>

Reply-To: Andy Robertson <arobertson@eyeforpharma.com>

Date: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 at 8:33 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Novartis vs Astellas – who wins?

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Projected Sales in 2020 of World’s Top Ten Oncology Drugs

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 1/17/2017

The top 15 best-selling cancer drugs in 2022

All told, by 2022, the top 15 cancer drugs are expected to collectively make almost $90 billion in sales. To put that in perspective, that represents about one-fourth of the entire U.S. pharma market in 2014, according to QuintilesIMS data. It’s also bigger than pharma’s haul in Japan or China that year.

It will likely be no revelation that three drugs among the top six on our list—provided courtesy of EvaluatePharma and Chempetitive—come from the highly touted PD-1/PD-L1 or checkpoint inhibitor class.

The top 15 best-selling cancer drugs in 2022

SOURCE

http://www.fiercepharma.com/special-report/special-report-top-15-best-selling-cancer-drugs-2022?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal&mrkid=993697&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWW1aa1kyRmpaV1poTlRZMiIsInQiOiJkSEU3WFdzNHd4cnhmc2NQN0tSUjNVbEY4NDQyUUdHZ29NY2cwWEM1OHRxRmdWWHowVDY5eDMxWkdhZ1ZucHAxTjk5ZmJRWERKT2V4UExCUFd3U25vTkdQWk9ZQWVPQkszUVlVeUFjTjVqcXJJVDB1a1ZDWmNJZ0U4UHhEQUhHdiJ9

Projected Sales in 2020 of World’s Top Ten Oncology Drugs

 

Top Oncology Medicines

Projected Sales in 2020

Revlimid (Celgene)

Generic Name: Lenalidomide

$10,110 Million

 

Imbruvica (AbbVie/J&J)

Generic Name: Ibrutinib

$8,213 Million

 

Avastin (Roche)

Generic Name: Bevacizumab

$ 6,733 Million

 

Opdivo (BMS)

Generic Name: Nivolumab

$ 6,201 Million

 

Xtandi (Medivation & Astellas)

Generic Name: Enzalutamide

$5,700 Million

 

Rituxan (Roche)

Generic Name: Rituximab

$5,407 Million

 

Ibrance (Pfizer)

Generic Name: Palbociclib

$4,722 Million

 

Perjeta (Roche)

Generic Name: Pertuzumab

$4,669 Million

 

Herceptin (Roche)

Generic Name: Trastuzumab

$4,573 Million

 

Keytruda (Merck)

Generic Name: Pembrolizumab

$3,560 Million


SOURCE

https://igeahub.com/2016/04/01/worlds-top-ten-cancer-drugs-by-2020/

World’s Top Ten Cancer Drugs by 2020

Igea gives professionals, patients and investors interested in pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, healthcare technology, diagnostics and medical devices the most relevant, actionable news, information and analysis available anywhere. Our goal is to provide expert insights, analysis and information from industry leaders with a deep understanding of life sciences, medicine and healthcare. Created and curated by Luca Dezzani, MD, Global Medical Director at Novartis Oncology*, Igea offers an insider’s view on the most important developments in life sciences, healthcare technology, digital health and more.


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Milestones in Physiology & Discoveries in Medicine and Genomics: Request for Book Review Writing on Amazon.com


physiology-cover-seriese-vol-3individualsaddlebrown-page2

Milestones in Physiology

Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics

Patient-centric Perspective 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019VH97LU 

2015

 

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

Preface

Introduction 

Chapter 1: Evolution of the Foundation for Diagnostics and Pharmaceuticals Industries

1.1  Outline of Medical Discoveries between 1880 and 1980

1.2 The History of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology in the late 19th and 20th Century

1.3 The Classification of Microbiota

1.4 Selected Contributions to Chemistry from 1880 to 1980

1.5 The Evolution of Clinical Chemistry in the 20th Century

1.6 Milestones in the Evolution of Diagnostics in the US HealthCare System: 1920s to Pre-Genomics

 

Chapter 2. The search for the evolution of function of proteins, enzymes and metal catalysts in life processes

2.1 The life and work of Allan Wilson
2.2  The  evolution of myoglobin and hemoglobin
2.3  More complexity in proteins evolution
2.4  Life on earth is traced to oxygen binding
2.5  The colors of life function
2.6  The colors of respiration and electron transport
2.7  Highlights of a green evolution

 

Chapter 3. Evolution of New Relationships in Neuroendocrine States
3.1 Pituitary endocrine axis
3.2 Thyroid function
3.3 Sex hormones
3.4 Adrenal Cortex
3.5 Pancreatic Islets
3.6 Parathyroids
3.7 Gastointestinal hormones
3.8 Endocrine action on midbrain
3.9 Neural activity regulating endocrine response

3.10 Genomic Promise for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Dementias, Autism Spectrum, Schizophrenia, and Serious Depression

 

Chapter 4.  Problems of the Circulation, Altitude, and Immunity

4.1 Innervation of Heart and Heart Rate
4.2 Action of hormones on the circulation
4.3 Allogeneic Transfusion Reactions
4.4 Graft-versus Host reaction
4.5 Unique problems of perinatal period
4.6. High altitude sickness
4.7 Deep water adaptation
4.8 Heart-Lung-and Kidney
4.9 Acute Lung Injury

4.10 Reconstruction of Life Processes requires both Genomics and Metabolomics to explain Phenotypes and Phylogenetics

 

Chapter 5. Problems of Diets and Lifestyle Changes

5.1 Anorexia nervosa
5.2 Voluntary and Involuntary S-insufficiency
5.3 Diarrheas – bacterial and nonbacterial
5.4 Gluten-free diets
5.5 Diet and cholesterol
5.6 Diet and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
5.7 Diet and exercise
5.8 Anxiety and quality of Life
5.9 Nutritional Supplements

 

Chapter 6. Advances in Genomics, Therapeutics and Pharmacogenomics

6.1 Natural Products Chemistry

6.2 The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance

6.3 Viruses, Vaccines and immunotherapy

6.4 Genomics and Metabolomics Advances in Cancer

6.5 Proteomics – Protein Interaction

6.6 Pharmacogenomics

6.7 Biomarker Guided Therapy

6.8 The Emergence of a Pharmaceutical Industry in the 20th Century: Diagnostics Industry and Drug Development in the Genomics Era: Mid 80s to Present

6.09 The Union of Biomarkers and Drug Development

6.10 Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

6.11 Epigenomics and Companion Diagnostics

 

Chapter  7

Integration of Physiology, Genomics and Pharmacotherapy

7.1 Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

7.2 Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD

7.3 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

7.4 Synthetic Biology: On Advanced Genome Interpretation for Gene Variants and Pathways: What is the Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

7.5 Diagnosing Diseases & Gene Therapy: Precision Genome Editing and Cost-effective microRNA Profiling

7.6 Imaging Biomarker for Arterial Stiffness: Pathways in Pharmacotherapy for Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia Management

7.7 Neuroprotective Therapies: Pharmacogenomics vs Psychotropic drugs and Cholinesterase Inhibitors

7.8 Metabolite Identification Combining Genetic and Metabolic Information: Genetic association links unknown metabolites to functionally related genes

7.9 Preserved vs Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available and Needed Therapies

7.10 Biosimilars: Intellectual Property Creation and Protection by Pioneer and by

7.11 Demonstrate Biosimilarity: New FDA Biosimilar Guidelines

 

Chapter 7.  Biopharma Today

8.1 A Great University engaged in Drug Discovery: University of Pittsburgh

8.2 Introduction – The Evolution of Cancer Therapy and Cancer Research: How We Got Here?

8.3 Predicting Tumor Response, Progression, and Time to Recurrence

8.4 Targeting Untargetable Proto-Oncogenes

8.5 Innovation: Drug Discovery, Medical Devices and Digital Health

8.6 Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse Effects

8.7 Nanotechnology and Ocular Drug Delivery: Part I

8.8 Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) system and nanotechnology: Part II

8.9 The Delicate Connection: IDO (Indolamine 2, 3 dehydrogenase) and Cancer Immunology

8.10 Natural Drug Target Discovery and Translational Medicine in Human Microbiome

8.11 From Genomics of Microorganisms to Translational Medicine

8.12 Confined Indolamine 2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) Controls the Homeostasis of Immune Responses for Good and Bad

 

Chapter 9. BioPharma – Future Trends

9.1 Artificial Intelligence Versus the Scientist: Who Will Win?

9.2 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on KannaLife Sciences and the Discipline and Potential of Pharmacognosy

9.3 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on Computer-Aided Drug Design and Gfree Bio, LLC

9.4 Heroes in Medical Research: The Postdoctoral Fellow

9.5 NIH Considers Guidelines for CAR-T therapy: Report from Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee

9.6 1st Pitch Life Science- Philadelphia- What VCs Really Think of your Pitch

9.7 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

9.8 Heroes in Medical Research: Green Fluorescent Protein and the Rough Road in Science

9.9 Issues in Personalized Medicine in Cancer: Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

9.10 The SCID Pig II: Researchers Develop Another SCID Pig, And Another Great Model For Cancer Research

Epilogue

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