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Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Symposium: New Drugs on the Horizon Part 3 12:30-1:25 PM

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

New Drugs on the Horizon: Part 3
Introduction

Andrew J. Phillips, C4 Therapeutics

  • symposium brought by AACR CICR and had about 30 proposals for talks and chose three talks
  • unfortunately the networking event is not possible but hope to see you soon in good health

ABBV-184: A novel survivin specific T cell receptor/CD3 bispecific therapeutic that targets both solid tumor and hematological malignancies

Edward B Reilly
AbbVie Inc. @abbvie

  • T-cell receptors (TCR) can recognize the intracellular targets whereas antibodies only recognize the 25% of potential extracellular targets
  • survivin is expressed in multiple cancers and correlates with poor survival and prognosis
  • CD3 bispecific TCR to survivn (Ab to CD3 on T- cells and TCR to survivin on cancer cells presented in MHC Class A3)
  • ABBV184  effective in vivo in lung cancer models as single agent;
  • in humanized mouse tumor models CD3/survivin bispecific can recruit T cells into solid tumors; multiple immune cells CD4 and CD8 positive T cells were found to infiltrate into tumor
  • therapeutic window as measured by cytokine release assays in tumor vs. normal cells very wide (>25 fold)
  • ABBV184 does not bind platelets and has good in vivo safety profile
  • First- in human dose determination trial: used in vitro cancer cell assays to determine 1st human dose
  • looking at AML and lung cancer indications
  • phase 1 trial is underway for safety and efficacy and determine phase 2 dose
  • survivin has very few mutations so they are not worried about a changing epitope of their target TCR peptide of choice

The discovery of TNO155: A first in class SHP2 inhibitor

Matthew J. LaMarche
Novartis @Novartis

  • SHP2 is an intracellular phosphatase that is upstream of MEK ERK pathway; has an SH2 domain and PTP domain
  • knockdown of SHP2 inhibits tumor growth and colony formation in soft agar
  • 55 TKIs there are very little phosphatase inhibitors; difficult to target the active catalytic site; inhibitors can be oxidized at the active site; so they tried to target the two domains and developed an allosteric inhibitor at binding site where three domains come together and stabilize it
  • they produced a number of chemical scaffolds that would bind and stabilize this allosteric site
  • block the redox reaction by blocking the cysteine in the binding site
  • lead compound had phototoxicity; used SAR analysis to improve affinity and reduce phototox effects
  • was very difficult to balance efficacy, binding properties, and tox by adjusting stuctures
  • TNO155 is their lead into trials
  • SHP2 expressed in T cells and they find good combo with I/O with uptick of CD8 cells
  • TNO155 is very selective no SHP1 inhibition; SHP2 can autoinhibit itself when three domains come together and stabilize; no cross reactivity with other phosphatases
  • they screened 1.5 million compounds and got low hit rate so that is why they needed to chemically engineer and improve on the classes they found as near hits

Closing Remarks

 

Xiaojing Wang
Genentech, Inc. @genentech

Follow on Twitter at:

@pharma_BI

@AACR

@CureCancerNow

@pharmanews

@BiotechWorld

@HopkinsMedicine

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Celgene Triumphs in Legal Battle over Revlimid Patent: Curation of Patents, Litigations, and Impact on Drug Pricing

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

From Celgene

REVLIMID® (lenalidomide) in combination with dexamethasone is indicated for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). as maintenance therapy in patients with MM following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT). and indicated for the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anemia due to low- or intermediate-1–risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with a deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities.

REVLIMID is also indicated for the treatment of patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) whose disease has relapsed or progressed after two prior therapies, one of which included bortezomib.

REVLIMID® sales for the fourth quarter 2018 increased 16 percent to $2,549 million. Fourth quarter U.S. sales of $1,729 million and international sales of $820 million increased 17 percent and 15 percent, respectively. REVLIMID® sales growth was driven by increases in treatment duration and market share. Full year REVLIMID® sales were $9,685 million, an increase of 18 percent year-over-year. (from Celgene press release)

However, Celgene’s Revlimid basically has no competition in the multiple myeloma market and there are no generics of Revlimid, even though Revlimid is a conger of thalidomide, the 1950 era drug developed for depression and resulted in the infamous thalidomide baby cases.

The problem is highlighted in two reports:

As seen in Fortune: Celgene Boosted Price of Top Cancer Drug on Day of Mega Deal

By BLOOMBERG

January 4, 2019

On the same day Celgene Corp. was announcing that it would be acquired by Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. in the biggest pharma deal ever, the company was also raising the price of its blockbuster cancer drug. The Summit, New Jersey-based biotechnology company, which has routinely increased the prices of its top-selling drugs, boosted the price of a 10-milligram dose of Revlimid by 3.5 percent to $719.82 effective Jan. 3, according to price data compiled by Bloomberg Intelligence and First Databank. Cancer patients need many doses of Revlimid a year, and the overall cost can approach $200,000. The same dose cost $247.28 at the end of 2007.

As reported on NPR by Alison Kodjak: Celgene’s Patent Fortress Protects Revlimid, Thalidomide: How A DrugMaker Gamed the Patent System to Keep Generic Competition Away

When Celgene Corp. first started marketing the drug Revlimid to treat multiple myeloma in 2006, the price was $6,195 for 21 capsules, a month’s supply.By the time David Mitchell started taking Revlimid in November 2010, Celgene had bumped the price up to about $8,000 a month. When he took his last month’s worth of pills in April 2016, the sticker price had reached $10,691. By last March, the list price had reached $16,691. Revlimid appears to have caught the attention of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, who used it as an example Wednesday — without naming it outright — of how some drug’s prices rise with impunity. He said the copay for the average senior taking the drug rose from $115 to about $690 per month in the last year. Celgene can keep raising the price of Revlimid because the drug has no competition. It’s been around for more than a decade and its original patent expires next year. But today it looks like another four years could pass with no generic competitor to Revlimid.

 

Therefore, when the European company Alvogen tired to produce a generic version of this drug and took Celgene to court, Celgene quickly shored up its patent fight as outlined below.

As reported in Biopharmadive.com:

 

Celgene dodges Alvogen bid to overturn Revlimid patent

Here is Celgene’s patent on Revlimid (thalidomide).

Some notes:

  • notice the multiple congeners, chemical derivatives
  • notice the multiple drug combination claims especially with using other antibodies with thalidomide (second active ingredient)
  • note multiple dosage forms

Methods for treatment of multiple myeloma using 3-(4-amino-1-oxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-piperidine-2,6-dione

Abstract
Methods of treating, preventing and/or managing cancer as well as and diseases and disorders associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis are disclosed. Specific methods encompass the administration of an immunomodulatory compound alone or in combination with a second active ingredient. The invention further relates to methods of reducing or avoiding adverse side effects associated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy or immunotherapy which comprise the administration of an immunomodulatory compound. Pharmaceutical compositions, single unit dosage forms, and kits suitable for use in methods of the invention are also disclosed.

Images (1)

Classifications
A61K31/454 Non condensed piperidines, e.g. piperocaine containing further heterocyclic ring systems containing a five-membered ring with nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. pimozide, domperidone
View 21 more classifications

US7968569B2

United States

Inventor
Jerome B. Zeldis
Current Assignee
Celgene Corp

Worldwide applications

Application US10/438,213 events
2002-05-17
Priority to US38084202P
2011-06-28
Application granted
Application status is Active
Adjusted expiration
Show all events

Description

This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional application No. 60/380,842, filed May 17, 2002, and No. 60/424,600, filed Nov. 6, 2002, the entireties of which are incorporated herein by reference.

1. FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to methods of treating, preventing and/or managing specific cancers, and other diseases including, but not limited to, those associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis, by the administration of one or more immunomodulatory compounds alone or in combination with other therapeutics. In particular, the invention encompasses the use of specific combinations, or “cocktails,” of drugs and other therapy, e.g., radiation to treat these specific cancers, including those refractory to conventional therapy. The invention also relates to pharmaceutical compositions and dosing regimens.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

2.1 Pathobiology of Cancer and Other Diseases

Cancer is characterized primarily by an increase in the number of abnormal cells derived from a given normal tissue, invasion of adjacent tissues by these abnormal cells, or lymphatic or blood-borne spread of malignant cells to regional lymph nodes and to distant sites (metastasis). Clinical data and molecular biologic studies indicate that cancer is a multistep process that begins with minor preneoplastic changes, which may under certain conditions progress to neoplasia. The neoplastic lesion may evolve clonally and develop an increasing capacity for invasion, growth, metastasis, and heterogeneity, especially under conditions in which the neoplastic cells escape the host’s immune surveillance. Roitt, I., Brostoff, J and Kale, D., Immunology, 17.1-17.12 (3rd ed., Mosby, St. Louis, Mo., 1993).

There is an enormous variety of cancers which are described in detail in the medical literature. Examples includes cancer of the lung, colon, rectum, prostate, breast, brain, and intestine. The incidence of cancer continues to climb as the general population ages, as new cancers develop, and as susceptible populations (e.g., people infected with AIDS or excessively exposed to sunlight) grow. A tremendous demand therefore exists for new methods and compositions that can be used to treat patients with cancer.

Many types of cancers are associated with new blood vessel formation, a process known as angiogenesis. Several of the mechanisms involved in tumor-induced angiogenesis have been elucidated. The most direct of these mechanisms is the secretion by the tumor cells of cytokines with angiogenic properties. Examples of these cytokines include acidic and basic fibroblastic growth factor (a,b-FGF), angiogenin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and TNF-α. Alternatively, tumor cells can release angiogenic peptides through the production of proteases and the subsequent breakdown of the extracellular matrix where some cytokines are stored (e.g., b-FGF). Angiogenesis can also be induced indirectly through the recruitment of inflammatory cells (particularly macrophages) and their subsequent release of angiogenic cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, bFGF).

A variety of other diseases and disorders are also associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis. For example, enhanced or unregulated angiogenesis has been implicated in a number of diseases and medical conditions including, but not limited to, ocular neovascular diseases, choroidal neovascular diseases, retina neovascular diseases, rubeosis (neovascularization of the angle), viral diseases, genetic diseases, inflammatory diseases, allergic diseases, and autoimmune diseases. Examples of such diseases and conditions include, but are not limited to: diabetic retinopathy; retinopathy of prematurity; corneal graft rejection; neovascular glaucoma; retrolental fibroplasia; and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

Accordingly, compounds that can control angiogenesis or inhibit the production of certain cytokines, including TNF-α, may be useful in the treatment and prevention of various diseases and conditions.

2.2 Methods of Treating Cancer

Current cancer therapy may involve surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and/or radiation treatment to eradicate neoplastic cells in a patient (see, for example, Stockdale, 1998, Medicine, vol. 3, Rubenstein and Federman, eds., Chapter 12, Section IV). Recently, cancer therapy could also involve biological therapy or immunotherapy. All of these approaches pose significant drawbacks for the patient. Surgery, for example, may be contraindicated due to the health of a patient or may be unacceptable to the patient. Additionally, surgery may not completely remove neoplastic tissue. Radiation therapy is only effective when the neoplastic tissue exhibits a higher sensitivity to radiation than normal tissue. Radiation therapy can also often elicit serious side effects. Hormonal therapy is rarely given as a single agent. Although hormonal therapy can be effective, it is often used to prevent or delay recurrence of cancer after other treatments have removed the majority of cancer cells. Biological therapies and immunotherapies are limited in number and may produce side effects such as rashes or swellings, flu-like symptoms, including fever, chills and fatigue, digestive tract problems or allergic reactions.

With respect to chemotherapy, there are a variety of chemotherapeutic agents available for treatment of cancer. A majority of cancer chemotherapeutics act by inhibiting DNA synthesis, either directly, or indirectly by inhibiting the biosynthesis of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate precursors, to prevent DNA replication and concomitant cell division. Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman’s: The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, Tenth Ed. (McGraw Hill, New York).

Despite availability of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, chemotherapy has many drawbacks. Stockdale, Medicine, vol. 3, Rubenstein and Federman, eds., ch. 12, sect. 10, 1998. Almost all chemotherapeutic agents are toxic, and chemotherapy causes significant, and often dangerous side effects including severe nausea, bone marrow depression, and immunosuppression. Additionally, even with administration of combinations of chemotherapeutic agents, many tumor cells are resistant or develop resistance to the chemotherapeutic agents. In fact, those cells resistant to the particular chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment protocol often prove to be resistant to other drugs, even if those agents act by different mechanism from those of the drugs used in the specific treatment. This phenomenon is referred to as pleiotropic drug or multidrug resistance. Because of the drug resistance, many cancers prove refractory to standard chemotherapeutic treatment protocols.

Other diseases or conditions associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis are also difficult to treat. However, some compounds such as protamine, hepain and steroids have been proposed to be useful in the treatment of certain specific diseases. Taylor et al., Nature 297:307 (1982); Folkman et al., Science 221:719 (1983); and U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,001,116 and 4,994,443. Thalidomide and certain derivatives of it have also been proposed for the treatment of such diseases and conditions. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,593,990, 5,629,327, 5,712,291, 6,071,948 and 6,114,355 to D’Amato.

Still, there is a significant need for safe and effective methods of treating, preventing and managing cancer and other diseases and conditions, particularly for diseases that are refractory to standard treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, while reducing or avoiding the toxicities and/or side effects associated with the conventional therapies.

2.3 IMIDS™

A number of studies have been conducted with the aim of providing compounds that can safely and effectively be used to treat diseases associated with abnormal production of TNF-α See, e.g., Marriott, J. B., et al., Expert Opin. Biol. Ther. 1(4):1-8 (2001); G. W. Muller, et al., Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 39(17): 3238-3240 (1996); and G. W. Muller, et al, Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 8: 2669-2674 (1998). Some studies have focused on a group of compounds selected for their capacity to potently inhibit TNF-α production by LPS stimulated PBMC. L. G. Corral, et al., Ann. Rheum. Dis. 58:(Suppl I) 1107-1113 (1999). These compounds, which are referred to as IMiDS™ (Celgene Corporation) or Immunomodulatory Drugs, show not only potent inhibition of TNF-α but also marked inhibition of LPS induced monocyte IL1β and IL12 production. LPS induced IL6 is also inhibited by immunomodulatory compounds, albeit partially. These compounds are potent stimulators of LPS induced IL10. Id. Particular examples of IMiD™s include, but are not limited to, the substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) phthalimides and substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-1-oxoisoindoles described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,281,230 and 6,316,471, both to G. W. Muller, et al.

3. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention encompasses methods of treating and preventing certain types of cancer, including primary and metastatic cancer, as well as cancers that are refractory or resistant to conventional chemotherapy. The methods comprise administering to a patient in need of such treatment or prevention a therapeutically or prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof. The invention also encompasses methods of managing certain cancers (e.g., preventing or prolonging their recurrence, or lengthening the time of remission) which comprise administering to a patient in need of such management a prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound of the invention, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof.

In particular methods of the invention, an immunomodulatory compound is administered in combination with a therapy conventionally used to treat, prevent or manage cancer. Examples of such conventional therapies include, but are not limited to, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy and immunotherapy.

This invention also encompasses methods of treating, managing or preventing diseases and disorders other than cancer that are associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis, which comprise administering to a patient in need of such treatment, management or prevention a therapeutically or prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof.

In other methods of the invention, an immunomodulatory compound is administered in combination with a therapy conventionally used to treat, prevent or manage diseases or disorders associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis. Examples of such conventional therapies include, but are not limited to, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy and immunotherapy.

This invention encompasses pharmaceutical compositions, single unit dosage forms, dosing regimens and kits which comprise an immunomodulatory compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof, and a second, or additional, active agent. Second active agents include specific combinations, or “cocktails,” of drugs.

4. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURE

FIG. 1 shows a comparison of the effects of 3-(4-amino-1-oxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-piperidine-2,6-dione (Revimid™) and thalidomide in inhibiting the proliferation of multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines in an in vitro study. The uptake of [3H]-thymidine by different MM cell lines (MM. 1S, Hs Sultan, U266 and RPMI-8226) was measured as an indicator of the cell proliferation.

5. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

A first embodiment of the invention encompasses methods of treating, managing, or preventing cancer which comprises administering to a patient in need of such treatment or prevention a therapeutically or prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound of the invention, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof.

In particular methods encompassed by this embodiment, the immunomodulatory compound is administered in combination with another drug (“second active agent”) or method of treating, managing, or preventing cancer. Second active agents include small molecules and large molecules (e.g., proteins and antibodies), examples of which are provided herein, as well as stem cells. Methods, or therapies, that can be used in combination with the administration of the immunomodulatory compound include, but are not limited to, surgery, blood transfusions, immunotherapy, biological therapy, radiation therapy, and other non-drug based therapies presently used to treat, prevent or manage cancer.

Another embodiment of the invention encompasses methods of treating, managing or preventing diseases and disorders other than cancer that are characterized by undesired angiogenesis. These methods comprise the administration of a therapeutically or prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof.

Examples of diseases and disorders associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis include, but are not limited to, inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, viral diseases, genetic diseases, allergic diseases, bacterial diseases, ocular neovascular diseases, choroidal neovascular diseases, retina neovascular diseases, and rubeosis (neovascularization of the angle).

In particular methods encompassed by this embodiment, the immunomodulatory compound is administer in combination with a second active agent or method of treating, managing, or preventing the disease or condition. Second active agents include small molecules and large molecules (e.g., proteins and antibodies), examples of which are provided herein, as well as stem cells. Methods, or therapies, that can be used in combination with the administration of the immunomodulatory compound include, but are not limited to, surgery, blood transfusions, immunotherapy, biological therapy, radiation therapy, and other non-drug based therapies presently used to treat, prevent or manage disease and conditions associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis.

The invention also encompasses pharmaceutical compositions (e.g., single unit dosage forms) that can be used in methods disclosed herein. Particular pharmaceutical compositions comprise an immunomodulatory compound of the invention, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof, and a second active agent.

5.1 Immunomodulatory Compounds

Compounds used in the invention include immunomodulatory compounds that are racemic, stereomerically enriched or stereomerically pure, and pharmaceutically acceptable salts, solvates, hydrates, stereoisomers, clathrates, and prodrugs thereof. Preferred compounds used in the invention are small organic molecules having a molecular weight less than about 1,000 g/mol, and are not proteins, peptides, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides or other macromolecules.

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the terms “immunomodulatory compounds” and “IMiDs™” (Celgene Corporation) encompasses small organic molecules that markedly inhibit TNF-α, LPS induced monocyte IL1β and IL12, and partially inhibit IL6 production. Specific immunomodulatory compounds are discussed below.

TNF-α is an inflammatory cytokine produced by macrophages and monocytes during acute inflammation. TNF-α is responsible for a diverse range of signaling events within cells. TNF-α may play a pathological role in cancer. Without being limited by theory, one of the biological effects exerted by the immunomodulatory compounds of the invention is the reduction of synthesis of TNF-α. Immunomodulatory compounds of the invention enhance the degradation of TNF-αmRNA.

Further, without being limited by theory, immunomodulatory compounds used in the invention may also be potent co-stimulators of T cells and increase cell proliferation dramatically in a dose dependent manner. Immunomodulatory compounds of the invention may also have a greater co-stimulatory effect on the CD8+ T cell subset than on the CD4+ T cell subset. In addition, the compounds preferably have anti-inflammatory properties, and efficiently co-stimulate T cells.

Specific examples of immunomodulatory compounds of the invention, include, but are not limited to, cyano and carboxy derivatives of substituted styrenes such as those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,929,117; 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxo-3-fluoropiperidin-3-yl) isoindolines and 1,3-dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxo-3-fluoropiperidine-3-yl) isoindolines such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,874,448; the tetra substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperdin-3-yl)-1-oxoisoindolines described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,798,368; 1-oxo and 1,3-dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) isoindolines (e.g., 4-methyl derivatives of thalidomide and EM-12), including, but not limited to, those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,635,517; and a class of non-polypeptide cyclic amides disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,698,579 and 5,877,200; analogs and derivatives of thalidomide, including hydrolysis products, metabolites, derivatives and precursors of thalidomide, such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,593,990, 5,629,327, and 6,071,948 to D’Amato; aminothalidomide, as well as analogs, hydrolysis products, metabolites, derivatives and precursors of aminothalidomide, and substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) phthalimides and substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-1-oxoisoindoles such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,281,230 and 6,316,471; isoindole-imide compounds such as those described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/972,487 filed on Oct. 5, 2001, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/032,286 filed on Dec. 21, 2001, and International Application No. PCT/US01/50401 (International Publication No. WO 02/059106). The entireties of each of the patents and patent applications identified herein are incorporated herein by reference. Immunomodulatory compounds of the invention do not include thalidomide.

Other specific immunomodulatory compounds of the invention include, but are not limited to, 1-oxo- and 1,3 dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) isoindolines substituted with amino in the benzo ring as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,635,517 which is incorporated herein by reference. These compounds have the structure I:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00001


in which one of X and Y is C═O, the other of X and Y is C═O or CH2, and Ris hydrogen or lower alkyl, in particular methyl. Specific immunomodulatory compounds include, but are not limited to:

  • 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-4-aminoisoindoline;
  • 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-5-aminoisoindoline;
  • 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-6-aminoisoindoline;
  • 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-7-aminoisoindoline;
  • 1,3-dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-4-aminoisoindoline; and
  • 1,3-dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-5-aminoisoindoline.

Other specific immunomodulatory compounds of the invention belong to a class of substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) phthalimides and substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-1-oxoisoindoles, such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,281,230; 6,316,471; 6,335,349; and 6,476,052, and International Patent Application No. PCT/US97/13375 (International Publication No. WO 98/03502), each of which is incorporated herein by reference. Compounds representative of this class are of the formulas:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00002


wherein Ris hydrogen or methyl. In a separate embodiment, the invention encompasses the use of enantiomerically pure forms (e.g. optically pure (R) or (S) enantiomers) of these compounds.

Still other specific immunomodulatory compounds of the invention belong to a class of isoindole-imides disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 10/032,286 and 09/972,487, and International Application No. PCT/US01/50401 (International Publication No. WO 02/059106), each of which are incorporated herein by reference. Representative compounds are of formula II:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00003

and pharmaceutically acceptable salts, hydrates, solvates, clathrates, enantiomers, diastereomers, racemates, and mixtures of stereoisomers thereof, wherein:

one of X and Y is C═O and the other is CHor C═O;

Ris H, (C1-C8)alkyl, (C3-C7)cycloalkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, C(O)R3, C(S)R3, C(O)OR4, (C1-C8)alkyl-N(R6)2, (C1-C8)alkyl-OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-C(O)OR5, C(O)NHR3, C(S)NHR3, C(O)NR3R3′, C(S)NR3R3′ or (C1-C8)alkyl-O(CO)R5;

Ris H, F, benzyl, (C1-C8)alkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, or (C2-C8)alkynyl;

Rand R3′ are independently (C1-C8)alkyl, (C3-C7)cycloalkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, (C0-C8)alkyl-N(R6)2, (C1-C8)alkyl-OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-C(O)OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-O(CO)R5, or C(O)OR5;

Ris (C1-C8)alkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, (C1-C4)alkyl-OR5, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, or (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl;

Ris (C1-C8)alkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, or (C2-C5)heteroaryl;

each occurrence of Ris independently H, (C1-C8)alkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C2-C5)heteroaryl, or (C0-C8)alkyl-C(O)O—Ror the R6groups can join to form a heterocycloalkyl group;

n is 0 or 1; and

* represents a chiral-carbon center.

In specific compounds of formula II, when n is 0 then Ris (C3-C7)cycloalkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, C(O)R3, C(O)OR4, (C1-C8)alkyl-N(R6)2, (C1-C8)alkyl-OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-C(O)OR5, C(S)NHR3, or (C1-C8)alkyl O(CO)R5;

Ris H or (C1-C8)alkyl; and

Ris (C1-C8)alkyl, (C3-C7)cycloalkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, (C5-C8)alkyl-N(R6)2; (C0-C8)alkyl-NH—C(O)O—R5; (C1-C8)alkyl-OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-C(O)OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-O(CO)R5, or C(O)OR5; and the other variables have the same definitions.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris H or (C1-C4)alkyl.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris (C1-C8)alkyl or benzyl.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris H, (C1-C8)alkyl, benzyl, CH2OCH3, CH2CH2OCH3, or

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00004

In another embodiment of the compounds of formula II, Ris

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00005


wherein Q is O or S, and each occurrence of Ris independently H, (C1-C8)alkyl, benzyl, CH2OCH3, or CH2CH2OCH3.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris C(O)R3.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, (C1-C5)alkyl, aryl, or (C0-C4)alkyl-OR5.

In other specific compounds of formula II, heteroaryl is pyridyl, furyl, or thienyl.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris C(O)OR4.

In other specific compounds of formula II, the H of C(O)NHC(O) can be replaced with (C1-C4)alkyl, aryl, or benzyl.

Still other specific immunomodulatory compounds of the invention belong to a class of isoindole-imides disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/781,179, International Publication No. WO 98/54170, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,395,754, each of which are incorporated herein by reference. Representative compounds are of formula III:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00006


and pharmaceutically acceptable salts, hydrates, solvates, clathrates, enantiomers, diastereomers, racemates, and mixtures of stereoisomers thereof, wherein:

one of X and Y is C═O and the other is CHor C═O;

R is H or CH2OCOR′;

(i) each of R1, R2, R3, or R4, independently of the others, is halo, alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms, or alkoxy of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or (ii) one of R1, R2, R3, or Ris nitro or —NHRand the remaining of R1, R2, R3, or Rare hydrogen;

Ris hydrogen or alkyl of 1 to 8 carbons

Rhydrogen, alkyl of 1 to 8 carbon atoms, benzo, chloro, or fluoro;

R′ is R7—CHR10—N(R8R9);

Ris m-phenylene or p-phenylene or —(CnH2n)— in which n has a value of 0 to 4;

each of Rand Rtaken independently of the other is hydrogen or alkyl of 1 to 8 carbon atoms, or Rand Rtaken together are tetramethylene, pentamethylene, hexamethylene, or —CH2CH2[X]X1CH2CH2— in which [X]Xis —O—, —S—, or —NH—;

R10 is hydrogen, alkyl of to 8 carbon atoms, or phenyl; and

* represents a chiral-carbon center.

The most preferred immunomodulatory compounds of the invention are 4-(amino)-2-(2,6-dioxo(3-piperidyl))-isoindoline-1,3-dione and 3-(4-amino-1-oxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-piperidine-2,6-dione. The compounds can be obtained via standard, synthetic methods (see e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,635,517, incorporated herein by reference). The compounds are available from Celgene Corporation, Warren, N.J. 4-(Amino)-2-(2,6-dioxo(3-piperidyl))-isoindoline-1,3-dione (ACTIMID™) has the following chemical structure:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00007


The compound 3-(4-amino-1-oxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-piperidine-2,6-dione (REVIMID™) has the following chemical structure:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00008

Compounds of the invention can either be commercially purchased or prepared according to the methods described in the patents or patent publications disclosed herein. Further, optically pure compounds can be asymmetrically synthesized or resolved using known resolving agents or chiral columns as well as other standard synthetic organic chemistry techniques.

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “pharmaceutically acceptable salt” encompasses non-toxic acid and base addition salts of the compound to which the term refers. Acceptable non-toxic acid addition salts include those derived from organic and inorganic acids or bases know in the art, which include, for example, hydrochloric acid, hydrobromic acid, phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, methanesulphonic acid, acetic acid, tartaric acid, lactic acid, succinic acid, citric acid, malic acid, maleic acid, sorbic acid, aconitic acid, salicylic acid, phthalic acid, embolic acid, enanthic acid, and the like.

Compounds that are acidic in nature are capable of forming salts with various pharmaceutically acceptable bases. The bases that can be used to prepare pharmaceutically acceptable base addition salts of such acidic compounds are those that form non-toxic base addition salts, i.e., salts containing pharmacologically acceptable cations such as, but not limited to, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salts and the calcium, magnesium, sodium or potassium salts in particular. Suitable organic bases include, but are not limited to, N,N-dibenzylethylenediamine, chloroprocaine, choline, diethanolamine, ethylenediamine, meglumaine (N-methylglucamine), lysine, and procaine.

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “prodrug” means a derivative of a compound that can hydrolyze, oxidize, or otherwise react under biological conditions (in vitro or in vivo) to provide the compound. Examples of prodrugs include, but are not limited to, derivatives of immunomodulatory compounds of the invention that comprise biohydrolyzable moieties such as biohydrolyzable amides, biohydrolyzable esters, biohydrolyzable carbamates, biohydrolyzable carbonates, biohydrolyzable ureides, and biohydrolyzable phosphate analogues. Other examples of prodrugs include derivatives of immunomodulatory compounds of the invention that comprise —NO, —NO2, —ONO, or —ONOmoieties. Prodrugs can typically be prepared using well-known methods, such as those described in 1 Burger’s Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Discovery, 172-178, 949-982 (Manfred E. Wolff ed., 5th ed. 1995), and Design of Prodrugs (H. Bundgaard ed., Elselvier, N.Y. 1985).

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the terms “biohydrolyzable amide,” “biohydrolyzable ester,” “biohydrolyzable carbamate,” “biohydrolyzable carbonate,” “biohydrolyzable ureide,” “biohydrolyzable phosphate” mean an amide, ester, carbamate, carbonate, ureide, or phosphate, respectively, of a compound that either: 1) does not interfere with the biological activity of the compound but can confer upon that compound advantageous properties in vivo, such as uptake, duration of action, or onset of action; or 2) is biologically inactive but is converted in vivo to the biologically active compound. Examples of biohydrolyzable esters include, but are not limited to, lower alkyl esters, lower acyloxyalkyl esters (such as acetoxylmethyl, acetoxyethyl, aminocarbonyloxymethyl, pivaloyloxymethyl, and pivaloyloxyethyl esters), lactonyl esters (such as phthalidyl and thiophthalidyl esters), lower alkoxyacyloxyalkyl esters (such as methoxycarbonyl-oxymethyl, ethoxycarbonyloxyethyl and isopropoxycarbonyloxyethyl esters), alkoxyalkyl esters, choline esters, and acylamino alkyl esters (such as acetamidomethyl esters). Examples of biohydrolyzable amides include, but are not limited to, lower alkyl amides, α-amino acid amides, alkoxyacyl amides, and alkylaminoalkylcarbonyl amides. Examples of biohydrolyzable carbamates include, but are not limited to, lower alkylamines, substituted ethylenediamines, amino acids, hydroxyalkylamines, heterocyclic and heteroaromatic amines, and polyether amines.

Various immunomodulatory compounds of the invention contain one or more chiral centers, and can exist as racemic mixtures of enantiomers or mixtures of diastereomers. This invention encompasses the use of stereomerically pure forms of such compounds, as well as the use of mixtures of those forms. For example, mixtures comprising equal or unequal amounts of the enantiomers of a particular immunomodulatory compounds of the invention may be used in methods and compositions of the invention. These isomers may be asymmetrically synthesized or resolved using standard techniques such as chiral columns or chiral resolving agents. See, e.g., Jacques, J., et al., Enantiomers, Racemates and Resolutions(Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1981); Wilen, S. H., et al., Tetrahedron 33:2725 (1977); Eliel, E. L., Stereochemistry of Carbon Compounds (McGraw-Hill, N.Y., 1962); and Wilen, S. H., Tables of Resolving Agents and Optical Resolutions p. 268 (E. L. Eliel, Ed., Univ. of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, Ind., 1972).

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “stereomerically pure” means a composition that comprises one stereoisomer of a compound and is substantially free of other stereoisomers of that compound. For example, a stereomerically pure composition of a compound having one chiral center will be substantially free of the opposite enantiomer of the compound. A stereomerically pure composition of a compound having two chiral centers will be substantially free of other diastereomers of the compound. A typical stereomerically pure compound comprises greater than about 80% by weight of one stereoisomer of the compound and less than about 20% by weight of other stereoisomers of the compound, more preferably greater than about 90% by weight of one stereoisomer of the compound and less than about 10% by weight of the other stereoisomers of the compound, even more preferably greater than about 95% by weight of one stereoisomer of the compound and less than about 5% by weight of the other stereoisomers of the compound, and most preferably greater than about 97% by weight of one stereoisomer of the compound and less than about 3% by weight of the other stereoisomers of the compound. As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “stereomerically enriched” means a composition that comprises greater than about 60% by weight of one stereoisomer of a compound, preferably greater than about 70% by weight, more preferably greater than about 80% by weight of one stereoisomer of a compound. As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “enantiomerically pure” means a stereomerically pure composition of a compound having one chiral center. Similarly, the term “stereomerically enriched” means a stereomerically enriched composition of a compound having one chiral center.

It should be noted that if there is a discrepancy between a depicted structure and a name given that structure, the depicted structure is to be accorded more weight. In addition, if the stereochemistry of a structure or a portion of a structure is not indicated with, for example, bold or dashed lines, the structure or portion of the structure is to be interpreted as encompassing all stereoisomers of it.

5.2 Second Active Agents

Immunomodulatory compounds can be combined with other pharmacologically active compounds (“second active agents”) in methods and compositions of the invention. It is believed that certain combinations work synergistically in the treatment of particular types of cancer and certain diseases and conditions associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis. Immunomodulatory compounds can also work to alleviate adverse effects associated with certain second active agents, and some second active agents can be used to alleviate adverse effects associated with immunomodulatory compounds.

One or more second active ingredients or agents can be used in the methods and compositions of the invention together with an immunomodulatory compound. Second active agents can be large molecules (e.g., proteins) or small molecules (e.g., synthetic inorganic, organometallic, or organic molecules).

Examples of large molecule active agents include, but are not limited to, hematopoietic growth factors, cytokines, and monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Typical large molecule active agents are biological molecules, such as naturally occurring or artificially made proteins. Proteins that are particularly useful in this invention include proteins that stimulate the survival and/or proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells and immunologically active poietic cells in vitro or in vivo. Others stimulate the division and differentiation of committed erythroid progenitors in cells in vitro or in vivo. Particular proteins include, but are not limited to: interleukins, such as IL-2 (including recombinant IL-II (“rIL2”) and canarypox IL-2), IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18; interferons, such as interferon alfa-2a, interferon alfa-2b, interferon alfa-n1, interferon alfa-n3, interferon beta-I a, and interferon gamma-I b; GM-CF and GM-CSF; and EPO.

Particular proteins that can be used in the methods and compositions of the invention include, but are not limited to: filgrastim, which is sold in the United States under the trade name Neupogen® (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, Calif.); sargramostim, which is sold in the United States under the trade name Leukine® (Immunex, Seattle, Wash.); and recombinant EPO, which is sold in the United States under the trade name Epogen® (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, Calif.).

Recombinant and mutated forms of GM-CSF can be prepared as described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,391,485; 5,393,870; and 5,229,496; all of which are incorporated herein by reference. Recombinant and mutated forms of G-CSF can be prepared as described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,810,643; 4,999,291; 5,528,823; and 5,580,755; all of which are incorporated herein by reference.

This invention encompasses the use of native, naturally occurring, and recombinant proteins. The invention further encompasses mutants and derivatives (e.g., modified forms) of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit, in vivo, at least some of the pharmacological activity of the proteins upon which they are based. Examples of mutants include, but are not limited to, proteins that have one or more amino acid residues that differ from the corresponding residues in the naturally occurring forms of the proteins. Also encompassed by the term “mutants” are proteins that lack carbohydrate moieties normally present in their naturally occurring forms (e.g., nonglycosylated forms). Examples of derivatives include, but are not limited to, pegylated derivatives and fusion proteins, such as proteins formed by fusing IgG1 or IgG3 to the protein or active portion of the protein of interest. See, e.g., Penichet, M. L. and Morrison, S. L., J. Immunol. Methods 248:91-101 (2001).

Antibodies that can be used in combination with compounds of the invention include monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Examples of antibodies include, but are not limited to, trastuzumab (Herceptin®), rituximab (Rituxan®), bevacizumab (Avastin™), pertuzumab (Omnitarg™), tositumomab (Bexxar®), edrecolomab (Panorex®), and G250. Compounds of the invention can also be combined with, or used in combination with, anti-TNF-α antibodies.

Other posts on Revlimid, Celgene, and other such Patent Litigation on this Open Access Journal Include:

From Thalidomide to Revlimid: Celgene to Bristol Myers to possibly Pfizer; A Curation of Deals, Discovery and the State of Pharma

REVLIMID® (Lenalidomide) Approved by the European Commission for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Previously Untreated Multiple Myeloma who are Not Eligible for Transplant

FDA: Rejects NDA filing: “clinical and non-clinical pharmacology sections of the application were not sufficient to complete a review”: Celgene’s Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis Drug – Ozanimod

The top 15 best-selling cancer drugs in 2022 & Projected Sales in 2020 of World’s Top Ten Oncology Drugs

Monoclonal antibody treatment of Multiple Myeloma

At California Central District Court Juno Therapeutics, Inc. et al v. Kite Pharma, Inc. – Multi-party Patent Infringement

 

Read Full Post »


A Timeline of Dr. Gottlieb’s Tenure at the FDA: 2017-2019

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

From FiercePharma.com

FDA chief Scott Gottlieb steps down, leaving pet projects behind

Scott Gottlieb FDA
FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb was appointed by President Trump in 2017. (FDA)

Also under his command, the FDA took quick and decisive action on drug costs. The commissioner worked to boost generic approvals and crack down on regulatory “gaming” that stifles competition. He additionally blamed branded drug companies for an “anemic” U.S. biosimilars market and recently blasted insulin pricing.

His sudden departure will likely leave many agency efforts to lower costs up in the air. After the news broke, many pharma watchers posted on Twitter that Gottlieb’s resignation is a loss for the industry.

During his tenure as FDA commissioner, Gottlieb’s name had been floated for HHS chief when former HHS secretary Tom Price resigned due to a travel scandal, but Gottlieb said he was best suited for the FDA commissioner job. Now, former Eli Lilly executive Alex Azar serves as HHS secretary, and on Tuesday afternoon, Azar praised Gottlieb for his work at the agency.

Also read from FiercePharma:

Gottlieb’s quick goodbye triggers investor panic, biopharma bewilderment and at least one good riddance

AUDIT Podcast

An emergency Scott Gottlieb podcast

 

Why is Scott Gottlieb quitting the FDA? Who will replace him?

 

A Timeline of Dr. Gottlieb’s Tenure at the FDA

From FiercePharma.com

New FDA commissioner Gottlieb unveils price-fighting strategies

Scott Gottlieb
New FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb laid out some approaches the agency will take to fight high prices.

UPDATED 3/19/2019

Dr. Norman E. Sharpless was named acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday. For the last 18 months, he had been director of the National Cancer Institute.CreditTom Williams/CQ Roll Call, via Getty Images
Image
Dr. Norman E. Sharpless was named acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday. For the last 18 months, he had been director of the National Cancer Institute.CreditCreditTom Williams/CQ Roll Call, via Getty Images

WASHINGTON — Dr. Norman E. (Ned) Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute, will serve as acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, Alex M. Azar III, secretary of health and human services, announced on Tuesday.

Dr. Sharpless temporarily will fill the post being vacated by Dr. Scott Gottlieb, who stunned public health experts, lawmakers and consumer groups last week when he abruptly announced that he was resigningfor personal reasons.

Dr. Sharpless has been director of the cancer center, part of the National Institutes of Health, since October 2017. He is also chief of the aging biology and cancer section in the National Institute on Aging’s Laboratory of Genetics and Genomics. His research focuses on the relationship between aging and cancer, and development of new treatments for melanoma, lung cancer and breast cancer.

“Dr. Sharpless’s deep scientific background and expertise will make him a strong leader for F.D.A.,” said Mr. Azar, in a statement. “There will be no let up in the agency’s focus, from ongoing efforts on drug approvals and combating the opioid crisis to modernizing food safety and addressing the rapid rise in youth use of e-cigarettes.”

Dr. Douglas Lowy, known for seminal research on the link between human papillomavirus and multiple cancer types including cervical, and ultimately leading to development of a vaccine, will be named head of the NCI to replace Dr. Sharpless. Dr. Lowy currently is Deputy Director of the NCI.

Other posts on the Food and Drug Administration and FDA Approvals during Dr. Gotlieb’s Tenure on this Open Access Journal Include:

 

Regulatory Affairs: Publications on FDA-related Issues – Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

FDA Approves La Jolla’s Angiotensin 2

In 2018, FDA approved an all-time record of 62 new therapeutic drugs (NTDs) [Not including diagnostic imaging agents, included are combination products with at least one new molecular entity as an active ingredient] with average Peak Sales per NTD $1.2Billion.

Alnylam Announces First-Ever FDA Approval of an RNAi Therapeutic, ONPATTRO™ (patisiran) for the Treatment of the Polyneuropathy of Hereditary Transthyretin-Mediated Amyloidosis in Adults

FDA: Rejects NDA filing: “clinical and non-clinical pharmacology sections of the application were not sufficient to complete a review”: Celgene’s Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis Drug – Ozanimod

Expanded Stroke Thrombectomy Guidelines: FDA expands treatment window for use (Up to 24 Hours Post-Stroke) of clot retrieval devices (Stryker’s Trevo Stent) in certain stroke patients

In 2017, FDA approved a record number of 19 personalized medicines — 16 new molecular entities and 3 gene therapies – PMC’s annual analysis, titled Personalized Medicine at FDA: 2017 Progress Report

FDA Approval marks first presentation of bivalirudin in frozen, premixed, ready-to-use formulation

Skin Regeneration Therapy One of First Tissue Engineering Products Evaluated by FDA

FDA approval on 12/1/2017 of Amgen’s evolocumb (Repatha) a PCSK9 inhibitor for the prevention of heart attacks, strokes, and coronary revascularizations in patients with established cardiovascular disease

FDA Approval of Anti-Depression Digital Pill Tracks Use When Swallowed and transmits to MDs Smartphone – A Breakthrough in Medication Remote Compliance Monitoring

Medical Devices Early Feasibility FDA’s Pathway – Accelerated Recruitment for Randomized Clinical Trials: Replacement and Repair of Mitral Valves

Novartis’ Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel), FDA approved genetically engineered immune cells, would charge $475,000 per patient, will use Programs that Payers will pay only for Responding Patients 

FDA has approved the world’s first CAR-T therapy, Novartis for Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel) and Gilead’s $12 billion buy of Kite Pharma, no approved drug and Canakinumab for Lung Cancer (may be?)

FDA: CAR-T therapy outweigh its risks tisagenlecleucel, manufactured by Novartis of Basel – 52 out of 63 participants — 82.5% — experienced overall remissions – young patients with Leukaemia [ALL]

‘Landmark FDA approval bolsters personalized medicine’ by Edward Abrahams, PhD, President, PMC

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Supreme Court to review key Biosimilar Dispute between drugmakers Amgen and Novartis’ Sandoz unit over the process for launching a biosimilar version of a branded biologic

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Dive Brief:

  • The Supreme Court last week agreed to review a dispute between drugmakers Amgen and Novartis’ Sandoz unit over the process for launching a biosimilar version of a branded biologic, setting the stage for an important ruling later this year.
  • At issue are key provisions of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCIA) which govern when a biosimilar developer needs to give notice to branded drugmakers of its intent to sell a biosimilar, which are highly similar, copycat versions of pricey biologic drugs.
  • While the legal details are technical, the case will set an important precedent for the emerging field and could clarify how biosimilars are brought to market.

The case also involves whether biosimilar drugmakers are required to disclose a copy of a biosimilar application and information about its manufacturing processes to the branded drugmaker — a process known as the “patent dance.”

see Dive Insight:

Supreme Court to review key biosimilar dispute

http://www.biopharmadive.com/news/supreme-court-biosimilar-cert-amgen-sandoz/434115/

 

SOURCES

ANALYSIS OF SOLICITOR GENERAL’S BRIEF IN SANDOZ V. AMGEN

http://www.bigmoleculewatch.com/2016/12/09/analysis-of-solicitor-generals-brief-in-sandoz-v-amgen/

Read Full Post »


Biosimilar and Biosuperior Anti-TNF Antibodies from CHI

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Start by reviewing Fundamentals of BioSimilars:

Lev-Ari, A. 7/30/2012 Biosimilars: Intellectual Property Creation and Protection by Pioneer and by Biosimilar Manufacturers

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/30/biosimilars-intellectual-property-creation-and-protection-by-pioneer-and-by-biosimilar-manufacturers/

Lev-Ari, A. 7/29/2012 Biosimilars: Financials 2012 vs. 2008

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/30/biosimilars-financials-2012-vs-2008/

Lev-Ari, A. 7/29/2012 Biosimilars: CMC Issues and Regulatory Requirements

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/29/biosimilars-cmc-issues-and-regulatory-requirements/

 

Continue by reviewing 2016 Report on BioSimilars:

Dear Colleague,

I want to make you aware of these affiliated reports under our Biosimilar series that are now available:

Global Biosimilar Market Outlook
Global Biosimilar Market
Competitor Analysis: Biosimilar and Biosuperior Anti-TNF Antibodies
Biosimilars Manufacturing: Key Considerations and Expected Outsourcing Practices
Competitor Analysis: CD20 Antibodies-Rituximab Biosimilars and Biobetters/Biosuperiors
Competitor Analysis: Anti-VEGF/R Biosimilars and Biosuperirors of Avastin, Cyramza, Eylea and Lucentis
Competitor Analysis: Biosimilar and Biosuperior Therapeutic Antibodies
Biosimilars-Regulatory Framework and Pipeline Analysis
The OTC Drugs Market: Commercial Trends and Rx-to-OTC Switch Prospects –
The Future of Biosimilars 2015
Competitor Analysis: EGF-R Antibodies – Biosimilars and Biosuperiors – of Erbitux
Medical Affairs Reputations (EU5): Biosimilar mAbs in Inflammatory Disorders
Biosimilars: US Payer Perspectives

Click here to view our full list of Biosimilar Reports.

Join Insight Pharma Reports on LinkedIn Today!

To take advantage of savings, contact Dan Miller at 781-972-5492 or DMiller@healthtech.com.

Thank you.

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From: Daniel Miller <danielm@healthtech.com>

Date: Wednesday, August 10, 2016 at 1:20 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Competitor Analysis: Biosimilar and Biosuperior Anti-TNF Antibodies

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Regulatory Focus: Biosimilar ‘Patent Dance’: Federal Circuit Rules 180-Day Notice is Mandatory

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

Stat: Court ruling on biosimilar launches could increase health care costs
Regulatory Focus: Biosimilar ‘Patent Dance’: Federal Circuit Rules 180-Day Notice is Mandatory
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit: Amgen Inc. vs. Apotex Inc.

READ MORE @SOURCE, Below

 

SOURCE

http://www.biopharmadive.com/news/federal-appeals-court-reaffirms-biosimilar-launch-rules/422091/

Read Full Post »


Plenary Session:  Biosimilars, 2016 MassBio Annual Meeting  03/31/2016 8:00 AM – 04/01/2016 3:00 PM Royal Sonesta Hotel, Cambridge, MA

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston

covers in REAL TIME

2016 MassBio Annual Meeting  03/31/2016 8:00 AM – 04/01/2016 3:00 PM Royal Sonesta Hotel, Cambridge, MA

 In Attendance, steaming LIVE using Social Media

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Editor-in-Chief

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

Director & Founder

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston

https://www.massbio.org/events/2016-massbio-annual-meeting-1120

2016 MassBio Annual Meeting  03/31/2016 8:00 AM – 04/01/2016 3:00 PM Royal Sonesta, Cambridge MA

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/02/2016-massbio-annual-meeting-03312016-800-am-04012016-300-pm-royal-sonesta-cambridge-ma/

 

 

Plenary Session:  Biosimilars – Celebrate 10ht birthday next month: Head of Biologic, Tail of Specialty Pharmaceutical

  • Sige Gutman, Chair, Life Sciences Patent Practice, Proskauer Rose (Moderator)
  1. MOA should be considered different
  2. Uptake of one BioSImilar accepted
  3. Clinical trials for BioSimilars
  4. DPCIA – Congress required exchange of Inforamtion , Upon FDA Approval, no problems of IP Reference Product Sponsor – identify all Patents composition, Methods of Manufacturing, Methods of Composition – WHAT CLAIMS in the applicants in need to wait for expiration. Initial list all paptent, Applicant need to provide information on each applicant as FREEDOM TO OPERATE in the marketplace, if no agreement in 50 days will be litigated, Phase One litigations
  5. unenforcability, infingements – ANGEN and SANDOS
  6. Is the Patent dance optional? 351K Application – 130 days notive
  7. Fedearal Court decided that dance optional is in fact optional – Matter in front of Supreme Court
  8. Pharmacovigilenge for BioSimilars – collective initiative on classes of therapies
  • Jim Roach, CMO, Momenta
  • Alex Waldron, Vice President of Global Commercial Operations, Epirus Biopharmaceuticals
  1. 15% discount – will not drive uptake
  2. Sandos – in the US using lessons from Europe
  3. Sandos – Uptake in Europe was slow
  4. poor correlation Price and Market share
  5. 2014 – Lauunch in the with SAles Force, Medical Laisons,
  6. Fixed Business model help the uptake
  7. BioSImilars are expensive and NO pressure to decrease cost
  8. no studies done for a=b b=c a=c
  • FDA Representative
  1. Ex-Vivo will provide bioequivalence

Read Full Post »


2016 MassBio Annual Meeting  03/31/2016 8:00 AM – 04/01/2016 3:00 PM Royal Sonesta, Cambridge MA

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston

will cover in REAL TIME

2016 MassBio Annual Meeting  03/31/2016 8:00 AM – 04/01/2016 3:00 PM Royal Sonesta Hotel, Cambridge MA

 In Attendance, streaming LIVE using Social Media

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Editor-in-Chief

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

 

https://www.massbio.org/events/2016-massbio-annual-meeting-1120

The MassBio Annual Meeting focuses on the most critical challenges facing the Massachusetts life sciences industry. The meeting program is designed by a steering committee of industry leaders and the agenda encompasses keynote presentations, panel discussions, interactive working sessions and extensive networking opportunities.

The MassBio Annual Meeting also includes the Innovative Leadership Award Luncheon, which honors an industry leader for his or her contribution to moving the life sciences industry forward.

AGENDA

 

Day 1

UPDATED on 3/21/2016

John Maraganore to be Honored with Innovative Leadership Award

MassBio is pleased to announce that John Maraganore, Ph.D., CEO of Alnylam Pharmaceuticals will be awarded the 2015 Henri A. Termeer Innovative Leadership Award at MassBio’s 2016 Annual Meeting.

John will accept his award and make keynote remarks at the Awards Luncheon on March 31. 

Read a few recent news stories on John Maraganore and Alnylam:

 

Alnylam buys Norton site for $200m drug manufacturing plant 

Boston Globe, 2/11/2016

Can Pharma Clean Up Its Act on Drug Pricing? Q&A With Alnylam CEO John Maraganore 

Forbes, 11/17/2015

 

UPDATED on 3/17/2016

Just Announced: Kate Marshall to Deliver Opening Keynote!

MassBio is thrilled to announce that Kate Marshall, high school honors student, athlete and CF advocate, will share her experiences as a patient and how the biotech industry has changed her life.

 

Learn more about Kate in this video: 

Sports Illustrated High School Athlete of the Month: Kate Marshall

 SOURCE

Reply-To: <communications@massbio.org>

Date: Thursday, March 17, 2016 at 3:57 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Just Announced: Opening Keynote from Kate Marshall, Student, Athlete & CF Advocate at Annual Meeting

Networking

Breakfast & Registration

8:00 AM 9:00 AM
Plenary Session

Welcome & MassBio Board Elections

9:00 AM
Plenary

Opening Remarks from Governor Charlie Baker

9:20 AM
Plenary

Opening Keynote

9:30 AM 10:15 AM
Networking

Coffee Break

10:15 AM 10:30 AM
Better Business

Advanced Manufacturing

10:30 AM 11:30 AM
Trends in Science

The Microbiome

10:30 AM 11:30 AM
Plenary

Luncheon & Awards

11:45 AM 1:30 PM
Plenary

Price & Value

1:30 PM 2:30 PM
Better Business

Digital Healthcare

2:30 PM 3:15 PM
Trends in Science

Biosimilars

2:30 PM 3:15
Networking

Afternoon Break

3:15 PM 3:30 PM
Better Business

An Evolving Paradigm of Drug Discovery – Externalization, Virtualization, De-virtualization, Contract Research & Strategic Partnerships

3:30 PM 4:15 PM
Trends in Science

Technology in Clinical Trials

3:30 PM 4:15 PM
Networking

Reception

4:15 PM 6:30 PM

Day 2

Networking

Breakfast

8:00 AM 8:40 AM
Better Business

The Future of Finance & Capital Markets

8:30 AM 9:30 AM
Trends in Science

Immunotherapy in Combination

8:30 AM 9:30 AM
Better Business

Innovative Pricing Models: The Future is Now

9:30 AM 10:30 AM
Trends in Science

Science in Space

9:30 AM 10:30 AM
Networking

Coffee Break

10:30 AM 11:00 AM
Plenary

The 2016 National Landscape

11:00 AM 12:00 PM
Networking

Lunch

12:00 PM 12:45 PM
Plenary

Closing Keynote by Dr. Tony Coles, Yumanity Therapeutics

12:45 PM 1:30 PM
Networking

Dessert Buffet

1:30 PM 2:00 PM

 

Speakers

Plenary Sessions 

Price & Value 

  • Katrine Bosley, CEO, Editas
  • Jeff Elton, Managing Director, Global Life Sciences Management Consulting, Predictive Health Intelligence, Accenture (Moderator)
  • John Glasspool, Executive Vice President and Head of Corporate Strategy and Customer Operations, Baxalta
  • Peter Neumann, Director of the Center for the Evaluation of Value and Risk in Health, Tufts University

The 2016 National Landscape

  • Jeanne Blake, Medical Television Journalist/News Anchor, Author, and Founder of Blake Works (Moderator)
  • Ted Buckley, Senior Director, US Government Relations and Public Policy, Shire
  • Amir Nashat, Managing Partner, Polaris
  • Paris Panayiotopoulos, CEO, ARIAD

Advanced Manufacturing 

  • John Aunins, Executive Vice President of Bioprocess & Manufacturing and Chief Technology Officer, Seres

Innovative Pricing Pricing Models: The Future is Now

  • Laurie Bartlett Keating, Senior Vice President, Counsel, Alnylam
  • Sue Hager, Vice President, Corporate Communications and Government Affairs, Foundation Medicine
  • Steven Hass, Vice President for Patient Outcomes and Medical Economics, Sanofi Genzyme
  • Roger Longman, CEO, Real Endpoint
  • Peter Pitts, President and Co-Founder, CPMI (Moderator)

The Future of Finance & Capital Markets

  • Francois Maisonrouge, Senior Managing Director, Evercore (Moderator)
  • Roger Pomeranz, President, CEO and Chairman, Seres
  • Rajeev Shah, Managing Director & Portfolio Manager, RA Capital

An Evolving Paradigm of Drug Discovery – Externalization, Virtualization, De-virtualization, Contract Research & Strategic Partnerships

  • Ryan Brady, Vice President, Business Development, Evotec (Moderator)
  • Brian Bronk, Principal, Sunrise Ventures, Sanofi Global R&D
  • Arpita Maiti, Director, External R&D Innovation, Inflammation & Immunology, Pfizer
  • Jeff Nye, Vice President, Neuroscience Innovation, Johnson & Johnson
  • John Tomayko, CMO, Spero Therapeutics
  • Samantha Truex, Chief Business Officer, Padlock Therapeutics

Digital Healthcare

  • Dana Ball, CEO, Unitio/T1D
  • Brian Dolan, Editor-in-Chief, MobiHealth News (Moderator)
  • Naomi Fried, Vice President, Medical Information, Innovation and External Partnerships, Biogen
  • Joe Kvedar, Vice President, Connected Health, Partners
  • Laurance Stuntz, Director, MA E-Health Institute, MeHI/MassTech

Technology in Clinical Trials

  • Yamo Deniz, Head of Rare Disease Medical Affairs, Sanofi Genzyme
  • Hannes Smarason, Co-Founder & COO, WuXi NEXTCODE

The Microbiome 

  • Jose-Carlos Gutierrez-Ramos, CEO, Synlogic

Immunotherapy in Combination

  • Donnie McGrath, Vice President, Bristol Myers-Squibb
  • John Orloff, Executive Vice President, Head of Research & Development and Chief Scientific Officer, Baxalta
  • Helen Sabzevari, CSO & Co-Founder, Compass Therapeutics

Biosimilars 

  • Sige Gutman, Chair, Life Sciences Patent Practice, Proskauer Rose (Moderator)
  • Jim Roach, CMO, Momenta
  • Alex Waldron, Vice President of Global Commercial Operations, Epirus Biopharmaceuticals

Science in Space

  • Dr. George Church, Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School & Director, PersonalGenomes.org
  • Kris Kimel, Co-Founder & Chairman of the Board, Space Tango
  • Mike Roberts, Deputy Chief Scientist, Center for the Advancement of Science in Space
  • Dr. Ting Wu, Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Director, Consortium for Space Genetics and Director, Personal Genetics Education (pgEd.org) Project (Moderator)

 

 

Just Announced!

Tony Coles to give closing keynote at Annual Meeting!

Dr. Coles is a founding investor and the chairman and chief executive officer of Yumanity Therapeutics, a Cambridge, MA-based biotechnology company focused on transforming drug discovery for neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Dr. Coles also serves as chairman and chief executive officer of TRATE Enterprises, LLC, a privately held company.

Previously, Dr. Coles was chairman and chief executive officer of Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which was acquired by Amgen in late 2013. Under his leadership, Onyx introduced two new innovative cancer medicines to patients and established the company’s international presence outside of the U.S. Prior to joining Onyx in 2008, he was president, chief executive officer and a member of the board of directors of NPS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Before joining NPS Pharmaceuticals in 2005, Dr. Coles was senior vice president of commercial operations at Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc., and earlier, held a number of executive positions at Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. Additionally, from 1992 until 1996, Dr. Coles held a number of positions of increasing responsibility at Merck & Co., Inc.

Educated at Johns Hopkins University, he earned an M.D. from Duke University and a master’s degree in public health from Harvard University. He completed his cardiology and internal medicine training at Massachusetts General Hospital and was a research fellow at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Coles currently serves on the board of CRISPR Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing transformative gene-based medicines for patients with serious diseases  He also serves as a member of the board of directors of McKesson Corporation (NYSE: MCK), is vice chair of the board of trustees for Johns Hopkins University and is a member of the board of trustees for Johns Hopkins Medicine. In March 2015, Dr. Coles was named to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) working group tasked with charting the course for President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, now part of the PMI Cohort Program Advisory Panel. Dr. Coles also serves as a member of the council for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.; a member of the board of trustees for The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City; and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher.

Governor Charlie Baker to make opening remarks at the Annual Meeting!

Since taking office in January, 2015, Governor Charlie Baker has been making Massachusetts a great place to live, work, start a business and raise a family while delivering a customer service oriented state government that is as thrifty, creative and hard working as the people of Massachusetts.Governor Baker called on an expert, bipartisan team of Republicans, Democrats and Independents to lead his cabinet.

Together, they are fulfilling his commitment to building stronger and safer communities for our children and families; keeping our roads and bridges safe and reliable; protecting our natural resources; and ensuring our schools and students are successful and safe.

From resolve in the face of unprecedented snow and freezing temperatures, to working to fix the MBTA, the Department of Children and Families, the Health Connector and Registry of Motor Vehicles, to balancing budgets despite billions in deficits all without raising taxes – the Baker Political Administration is making state government truly work for the people of Massachusetts.

SOURCE

https://www.massbio.org/events/2016-massbio-annual-meeting-1120

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Three-day Course by UC San Diego’s Rady School of Management Center for Executive Development: Biotech Demystified: The Science Behind Business

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

Biotech Demystified: The Science Behind Business

 

 

Joanna Skubisz

Associate, Communications Planning w firmie Underscore Marketing LLC

 

 

This 3-day hands-on educational program on September 14, 15 & 16, 2015 offered by UC San Diego’s Rady School of Management Center for Executive Development is designed specifically for non-scientist business professionals in the Biotech, Pharma and Life Science industries. It provides participants with a practical understanding of the basic science powering their businesses, giving them the essential tools needed to succeed in today’s life science industries. It provides executives, investors and decision makers with a practical understanding of the basic science powering the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries.

San Diego is one of the nation’s top-ranking biotech centers and is home to more than 500 biotech and four major research institutions. Biotech Demystified is offered through the Rady School of Management Center for Executive Development in collaboration with UC San Diego’s Division of Biological Sciences and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Led by a rich collection of biomedical research faculty from UC San Diego, attendees will dive into a deep pool of contemporary bioscience that include the following topics:

• Science fundamentals

• Cell biology and molecular biology

• Stem cell research

• Personalized medicine and drug delivery

• Cancer and therapeutic approaches

• Biosimilars and biobetters

• Genetic and genome mapping

• Hands-on lab experience with DNA testing

View the course details & register here http://bit.ly/BiotechDemystified.

SOURCE

From: Professionals in the Pharmaceutical and Biotech Industry <groups-noreply@linkedin.com>

Date: Wednesday, August 5, 2015 at 12:32 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: [New announcement] Biotech Demystified: The Science Behind Business

Read Full Post »


Innovation in Cancer Biopharmaceutical Intelligence [11.5]

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

The content of this article, with several interesting features is as follows:

11.5.1 Carmen Drahl..A Great Organic Chemist and Science Writer

11.5.2 Anthony Melvin Crasto

11.5.3 Amgen files ‘breakthrough’ leukemia drug in the US

11.5.4 Ginseng fights fatigue in cancer patients, Mayo Clinic-led study finds

11.5.5 The 10-Hydroxy-2-Decenoic Acid (10-2-HDA) content in Royal Jelly, is said to possess strong inhibition of malignant cell growth, namely transferable AKR leukemia, TA3 breast malignancy

11.5.6 A Microcapillary Flow Disc (MFD) Reactor for Organic Synthesis

11.5.7 Pauline Lau. Biochemist, Instrumental Analysis, Molecular and Clinical Diagnostics, and Pharmaceuticals

11.5.8  Kinetic and perfusion modeling of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and urea in cancer with arbitrary RF flip angles

11.5.9 ZSTK 474

11.5.10 Marrow-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Safely Shrink Multiple Myelomas

Introduction

The following content is a series of discussions that identify innovation in therapeutics and individuals who are leaders in pharmaceutical innovation.

11.5.1 Carmen Drahl. A Great Organic Chemist and Science Writer

Her eyes fit a stellar career path. She is a talent in organic and medicinal chemistry, and an informed reporter.

Extract from Dr. Anthony Melvin Castro,  Organic Chemistry

Carmen Drahl

Carmen Drahl

CARMEN DRAHL

Award-winning science communicator and social media power user based in Washington, DC.

Carmen Drahl is a multimedia science journalist and chemistry communicator based in Washington, DC.

ScienceAlum

ScienceAlum

A social media evangelist, Carmen started her first chemistry blog in 2006. Today, she regularly leverages Twitter, Facebook, and Google Plus Hangouts in her reporting.

Carmen has written about how life may have originated on Earth, explained how new medications get their names, and covered the ongoing issues plaguing the forensic science community. Her video on the food science behind 3D printed cocktail garnishes won the 2014 Folio Eddie Award for Best Association Video.

Until December 2014, Carmen worked at Chemical & Engineering News magazine. Her work has also been featured at Scientific American’s blog network, SiriusXM’s Doctor Radio, and elsewhere.

Carmen holds a Ph.D. in chemistry from Princeton University.

Ph.D. with Erik J. Sorensen.  She was on a team that completed the first total synthesis of abyssomicin C, a molecule found in small quantities in nature that showed hints of promise as a potential antibiotic. I constructed molecular probes from abyssomicin for proteomics studies of its biological activity.

M.A. with George L. McLendon worked toward developing a drug conjugate as a potential treatment for cancer. I synthesized a photosensitizer dye-peptide conjugate for targeting the cell death pathway called apoptosis.

Jacobus Fellowship Recipients - Carmen Drahl - Princeton

Jacobus Fellowship Recipients – Carmen Drahl – Princeton

Jacobus Fellowship Recipients – Carmen Drahl – Princeton

At a reception before the Alumni Day luncheon, President Tilghman (third from left) congratulated the winners of the University’s highest awards for students: (from left) Pyne Prize winners Lester Mackey and Alisha Holland; and Jacobus Fellowship recipients Sarah Pourciau, Egemen Kolemen and Carmen Drahl.

Specialties:

interviewing, science writing, social media, Twitter, Storify, YouTube, public speaking, hosting, video production, iPhone videography, non-linear video editing, blogging (WordPress and Blogger), HTML website coding

Carmen Drahl

By the time I discovered science blogs I knew my career goals were changing. I’d already been lucky enough to audit a science writing course at Princeton taught by Mike Lemonick from TIME, and thought that maybe science writing was a good choice for me. After reading chemistry blogs for a while I realized “Hey, I can do this!” and started my own blog, She Blinded Me with Science, in July 2006. It was the typical grad student blog, a mix of posts about papers I liked and life in the lab.

Carmen Drahl pic1

Carmen Drahl

At C&E News I’ve contributed to its C&ENtral Science blog, which premiered in spring 2008. I’ve experimented with a few different kinds of posts- observations and on-the-street interviews when

I run into something chemistry-related in DC, in-depth posts from meetings, and video demos of iPod apps. One of my favorite things to do is toy with new audio/video/etc technology for the blog.

Meant to treat: tumors with loss-of-function in the tumor suppressor protein PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog)- 2nd most inactivated tumor suppressor after p53- cancers where this is often the case include prostate and endometrial

Mode of action: inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-beta (PI3K-beta). Several lines of evidence suggest that proliferation in certain PTEN-deficient tumor cell lines is driven primarily by PI3K-beta.

Medicinal chemistry tidbits: The GSK team seemed boxed in because in 3 out of 4 animals used in preclinical testing, promising drug candidates had high clearance. It turned out that a carbonyl group that they thought was critical for interacting with the back pocket of the PI3K-beta enzyme wasn’t so critical after all. When they realized they could replace the carbonyl with a variety of functional groups, GSK2636771 eventually emerged. GSK2636771B (shown)

GSK2636771B-300x224

GSK2636771B-300×224

11.5.2 Anthony Melvin Crasto

Principal Scientist, Process research

Glenmark Generics Ltd.

Anthony Melvin Crasto Ph.D

Worlddrugtracker, Principal scientist, Process research, Glenmark-Generics Ltd & Founder of Several Linkedin Gps

IndiaPharmaceuticals
Glenmark Generics Ltd., Glenmark Pharmaceuticals

Previous
Glenmark Pharmaceuticals, Innovassynth, RPG Life Sciences

Education
Institute of Chemical Technology (UDCT)

December 2005 – Present (9 years 6 months) Mahape, Navimumbai, India,
email  amcrasto@gmail.com

Currently working with GLENMARK GENERICS LTD research centre as Principal Scientist, process research (bulk actives) at Mahape ,Navi Mumbai,and leading a team of scientists in developing APIs for regulated markets, this involves visualization and execution of novel routes, polymorphs, and developing intellectual property to protect the invention. This involves all aspects of synthesis in lab and commercialization on plant , support for DMF filing.

Currently involved in development of several targets for regulated markets. Provide support to US/European marketing team for developing and execution of new projects

Process Development :-

  • Providing guidance and support for process development for challenging of patents in regulated market.
  • Design patent non-infringing scalable synthetic routes/process and scale-up of API’s
  • Bench and Pilot scale synthesis transformations in hands on
  • Optimization of the process, ie,developing industrially feasible process.
  • Preparation of PDR, filing of patent and DMF
  • Lead a group of Scientists and Group Leaders(for docs).

Skill sets:- Technical skills:

Synthesis:

  • Development of novel synthetic routes/process for pharmaceuticals and successful implementation of the technology in pilot plant
  • Conducted various reactions at laboratory and production scales.
  • Synthesized various classes of compounds.
  • Experienced to work under cGMP condition

EX Hoechst Marion Roussel(SANOFI AVENTIS), RPG Life Sciences,Innovassynth, SEARLE,AGREVO,IOC

Glenmark Generics Ltd.

Research Activities Covered in Entire Career

1) Extensive range of chemistry and scale of manufacture from laboratory, scale up laboratory, pilot plant, plant scale including third party activity.

Applied intellectual and synthetic skills to the process development of pharmaceutical drugs/their intermediates, and natural products, neutraceuticals, mettalocenes, speciality chemicals, flavours and fragrances in the laboratory and monitor them during plant trials.

Act as a technology transfer man and provide all data required for transfer from lab to commercialization.

Use of Internet and manual literature search methods to decide on non-infringing route

Write DHR for API before implementation of novel route in the plant and assist for all batches for the DMF purposes, very well versed with IPR issues

Ability to develop novel routes for API,s and draft patents,well versed with polymorphism issues.

Several patents filed in US/EU

Total experience 23+ in industry.

Currently working as principal scientist and leading a team of scientists in developing APIs for regulated markets, this involves novel routes, polymorphs, and developing intellectual property to protect the invention. This involves all aspects of synthesis and commercialization and assist in providing support for DMF filing.

11.5.3 Amgen files ‘breakthrough’ leukemia drug in the US

Daily News | Sept 22, 2014

Selina Mckee

Biotechnology giant Amgen has filed its investigational cancer immunotherapy blinatumomab in the US for the treatment of certain forms of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).

Specifically, the Biologic License Application seeks approval to market the drug for patients with Philadelphia-negative (Ph-) relapsed/refractory B-precursor forms of the aggressive blood/bone marrow cancer.

Blinatumomab is the first of Amgen’s BiTE antibody constructs, a novel immunotherapy approach under which antibodies are modified to engage two different targets simultaneously. The drug has already been awarded both ‘Orphan’ and ‘Breakthrough’ status by the Food and Drug Administration, indicating that it could offer a significant advance over available therapies on at least one clinically significant endpoint.

The submission includes data from a Phase II which successfully met its primary endpoint, showing a complete response (no leukaemia cells detectable with microscopy) rate of 43% in patients with relapsed/refractory ALL, including those with resistance to previous treatment approaches.

“Currently, there is no broadly accepted standard treatment regimen for adult patients with relapsed or refractory ALL,” noted Anthony Stein, clinical professor, Haematology/Oncology at City of Hope, adding that “blinatumomab has the potential to significantly advance treatment options for patients living with this difficult-to-treat disease”.

In the US, it is estimated that more than 6,000 cases of ALL will be diagnosed in 2014. In adult patients with relapsed or refractory ALL, median overall survival is just three to five months, further highlighting the urgent need for new treatment options.

Read more at: http://www.pharmatimes.com/Article/14-09-22/Amgen_files_breakthrough_leukaemia_drug_in_the_US.aspx#ixzz3aL5d1ZnJ

Follow us: @PharmaTimes on Twitter

11.5.4 Ginseng fights fatigue in cancer patients, Mayo Clinic-led study finds

By Ralph Turchiano on Aug 5, 2014 •

High doses of the herb American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) over two months reduced cancer-related fatigue in patients more effectively than a placebo, a Mayo Clinic-led study found. Sixty percent of patients studied had breast cancer. The findings are being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual meeting.

Researchers studied 340 patients who had completed cancer treatment or were being treated for cancer at one of 40 community medical centers. Each day, participants received a placebo or 2,000 milligrams of ginseng administered in capsules containing pure, ground American ginseng root.

“Off-the-shelf ginseng is sometimes processed using ethanol, which can give it estrogen-like properties that may be harmful to breast cancer patients,” says researcher Debra Barton, Ph.D., of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

At four weeks, the pure ginseng provided only a slight improvement in fatigue symptoms. However, at eight weeks, ginseng offered cancer patients significant improvement in general exhaustion — feelings of being “pooped,” “worn out,” “fatigued,” “sluggish,” “run-down,” or “tired” — compared to the placebo group.

11.5.5 The 10-Hydroxy-2-Decenoic Acid (10-2-HDA) content in Royal Jelly, is said to possess strong inhibition of malignant cell growth, namely transferable AKR leukemia, TA3 breast malignancy

Royal Jelly - queen larvae

Royal Jelly – queen larvae

Royal Jelly – queen larvae

Royal jelly is a honey bee secretion that is used in the nutrition of larvae, as well as adult queens.[1] It is secreted from the glands in the hypopharynx of worker bees, and fed to all larvae in the colony, regardless of sex or caste.[2]

When worker bees decide to make a new queen, because the old one is either weakening or dead, they choose several small larvae and feed them with copious amounts of royal jelly in specially constructed queen cells. This type of feeding triggers the development of queen morphology, including the fully developed ovaries needed to lay eggs.[3]

Other Common Names:  Apilak, Gelée Royale, Queen Bee Jelly

Royal Jelly has been called the “Crown Jewel” of the beehive that has become extremely popular since the 1950s as a wonderful source of energy and natural way to increase stamina; perhaps that is the reason why the Queen Bee is so strong and enduring.  It is also thought to be a great nutritional source of enzymes, proteins, sugars and amino acids, but there is no scientific proof to verify the supplement’s efficacy for its use as an overall health tonic.

Royal Jelly is a thick, milky material that is secreted from the hypopharyngea- salivary glands in the heads of the young nurse bees between the sixth and twelfth days of life, and when honey and pollen are combined and refined within the nurse bee, Royal Jelly is naturally created.  While all larvæ in a colony are fed Royal Jelly, it is the only food that is fed to the Queen Bee throughout her life; other adult bees do not consume it at all.  All female eggs may produce a Queen Bee, but this occurs only when – during the whole development of the larvæ – she is cared for and fed by this material – in large quantities.

As a result of this special nutrition, the Queen develops reproductive organs (while the worker bee develops traits that relate only to work, i.e., stronger mandibles, brood food, wax glands and pollen baskets).  The Queen develops in about fifteen days, while the workers require twenty-one; and finally, the Queen endures for several years, while workers survive only a few months. “10-2 HDA,” thought to be the principle active substance in Royal Jelly, makes the Queen Bee fifty percent larger than the other female worker bees and gives her incredible stamina, ovulation ability and longevity, living four to five years longer than worker bees who only live forty or more days.  Perhaps this is the reason why so many positive qualities have been attributed to Royal Jelly as a truly rare gift of nature, but it should be noted that there is no clinical evidence to support the claims.

There is even great controversy as to the constituents included in the supplement.  Most researchers claim that it includes all the B-vitamins and vitamins A, C, D and E; some disagree.  It does contain proteins, sugars, lipids (essential fatty acids), many essential amino acids, collagen, lecithin, enzymes and minerals, in addition to the very valuable 10-2-HDA (10-Hydroxy-2-Decenoic Acid).  It is said that Royal Jelly may be most effective when combined with honey.

The 10-Hydroxy-2-Decenoic Acid (10-2-HDA) content in Royal Jelly, is said to possess strong inhibition of malignant cell growth, namely transferable AKR leukemia, TA3 breast malignancy, etc., and recent studies indicated immuno-regulation and anti-malignancy activities.  It can promote the growth of T-lymphocyte subsets, Interleukin-2 and the generation of tumor necrosis factor.  Much research is being conducted on this valuable active constituent, which has exhibited positive physiological and pharmacological effects including vasodilative and hypotensive activities, antihypercholesterolemic activity and anti-inflammatory functions.

10-2-HDA (10-Hydroxy-2-Decenoic Acid)

10-2-HDA (10-Hydroxy-2-Decenoic Acid)

11.5.6  A Microcapillary Flow Disc (MFD) Reactor for Organic Synthesis
OCT 28, 2014

A Microcapillary Flow Disc (MFD) Reactor for Organic Synthesis,
C.H. Hornung, M.R. Mackley, I.R. Baxendale and S.V. Ley and, Org. Proc. Res. Dev., 2007, 11, 399-405.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/op700015f

This paper reports proof of concept, development, and trials for a novel plastic microcapillary flow disc (MFD) reactor. The MFD was constructed from a flexible, plastic microcapillary film (MCF), comprising parallel capillary channels with diameters in the range of 80−250 μm. MCFs were wound into spirals and heat treated to form solid discs, which were then capable of carrying out continuous flow reactions at elevated temperatures and pressures and with a controlled residence time. Three reaction schemes were conducted in the system, namely the synthesis of oxazoles, the formation of an allyl-ether, and a Diels−Alder reaction. Reaction scales of up to four kilograms per day could be achieved. The potential benefits of the MFD technology are compared against those of other reactor geometries including both conventional lab-scale and other microscale devices.

11.5.7 Pauline Lau. Biochemist, Instrumental Analysis, Molecular and Clinical Diagnostics, and Pharmaceuticals.

She was born on the China-Russian border, near the end of the rail line.  When they came to US her mother saw bagels and said, look – they have round bread.

At the meetings she always took us to the best Chinese restaurant, and said not to ask what’s in the food.  They always brought out a fish fresh from the tank and showed it to us.  When she went to Roche, where she became a legend. she got a house on the lake. They had to remove the roof to put a round banquet table in her house. At a meeting in Mexico, we saw the amazing too good to be true Monarch butterflies filling the trees.  Her photographic skills are suberb.  She’ll live to 100.

Carl Garber just retired and gave me the address.  I just found your photo calender!

Yes, I have been hiding in Taiwan for the past almost 10 years.  I moved from diagnostic to pharma and selling mostly biosimilar products to pharmaceutical emerging countries which has strong market growth comparing to US/EU.

Pauline Lau Group

Pauline Lau Group

Pauline Lau Group

Pauline Lau Group
http://www.gbimonthly.com/v9_2014/v9spreport_2014_2.html

I do not go back to US often now.  We have an office in Taipei.  Here is a recent magazine article about our company.  You will see few of my employees and I in front of our 28th floor office window.

I am rushing out for Singapore and will be meeting there for a few days.

11.5.8  Kinetic and perfusion modeling of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and urea in cancer with arbitrary RF flip angles

Naeim Bahrami, Christine Leon Swisher, Cornelius Von Morze, Daniel B. Vigneron, Peder E. Z. Larson
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California – San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA
Quant Imaging MedSurg 2014; 4(1):24-32
http://dx.doi.org:/10.3978/j.issn.2223-4292.2014.02.02

Abstract: The accurate detection and characterization of cancerous tissue is still a major problem for the clinical management of individual cancer patients and for monitoring their response to therapy. MRI with hyperpolarized agents is a promising technique for cancer characterization because it can non-invasively provide a local assessment of the tissue metabolic profile. In this work, we measured the kinetics of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate and 13C-urea in prostate and liver tumor models using a compressed sensing dynamic MRSI method. A kinetic model fitting method was developed that incorporated arbitrary RF flip angle excitation and measured a pyruvate to lactate conversion rate, Kpl, of 0.050 and 0.052 (1/s) in prostate and liver tumors, respectively, which was significantly higher than Kpl in healthy tissues [Kpl =0.028 (1/s), P<0.001]. Kpl was highly correlated to the total lactate to total pyruvate signal ratio (correlation coefficient =0.95). We additionally characterized the total pyruvate and urea perfusion, as in cancerous tissue there is both existing vasculature and neovascularization as different kinds of lesions surpass the normal blood supply, including small circulation disturbance in some of the abnormal vessels. A significantly higher perfusion of pyruvate (accounting for conversion to lactate and alanine) relative to urea perfusion was seen in cancerous tissues (liver cancer and prostate cancer) compared to healthy tissues (P<0.001), presumably due to high pyruvate uptake in tumors. Keywords: Hyperpolarized carbon-13; metabolic imaging; cancer; perfusion; kinetic modeling; dynamic MRSI

Hyperpolarization is the nuclear spin polarization of a material far beyond thermal equilibrium conditions. The accurate and correct diagnosis and characterization of cancer is still a major problem for the clinical management of every kind of cancer patients, including individual prostate or liver cancer patients, and also in order to monitor their response to therapy (1-3). Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with hyperpolarized 13C labeled substrates is a new method to study any cancers that may be able to simultaneously and noninvasively assess changes in metabolic intermediates from multiple biochemical pathways of interest. Recent studies have shown a large amount of potential applications of hyperpolarized (HP) 13C MRSI for the in vivo monitoring of cellular metabolism and the characterization of disease. The low natural abundance and sensitivity of 13C compared to protons poses a technical challenge using conventional approaches (4,5). Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of 13C labeled pyruvate and subsequent rapid dissolution generates a contrast agent with a four order-of-magnitude sensitivity enhancement that is injected and gives the ability to monitor the spatial distribution of pyruvate and its conversion to lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate. The conversion of pyruvate to lactate catalyzed by the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase is of particular interest, as the kinetics of this process have been shown to be sensitive to the presence and severity of disease in preclinical models (6,7). HP MRSI can also be used to measure perfusion that in cancer can reflect spatially heterogeneous changes to existing vasculature and neovascularization as tumors surpass the normal blood supply, including microcirculatory disturbance in abnormal vessels. Tumor perfusion data in addition to the metabolic data available from spectroscopic imaging of 13C pyruvate would be of important value in exploring the complex relationship between perfusion and metabolism in cancer at both preclinical and clinical research levels (8-11). The primary purpose of this research was to study the dynamics of simultaneously injected HP [1-13C]-pyruvate and 13C-urea to provide improved characterization of cancerous tissues. To achieve rapid, 2 s temporal resolution, whole mouse MRSI we used a 18-fold accelerated compressed sensing acquisition and reconstruction with smaller flip angles for pyruvate and urea compared to lactate and alanine for efficient usage of the hyperpolarized magnetization by preserving the substrate. This flip angle scheme required using a modified kinetic model that accounts for arbitrary RF flip angles (12-15). Data was acquired in mice with prostate and liver cancer and comparisons were made to normal tissues such as kidney and healthy liver of the metabolite concentrations, including Urea, Pyruvate, and Lactate, the conversion constant (Kpl) between pyruvate to lactate, and the conversion constant (Kpa) between pyruvate to alanine. We also created novel parameterizations of the total pyruvate and urea perfusions in order to assess vascular delivery and tissue uptake. A key new feature of our modeling is the ability to detect metabolic conversion, magnetization exchange between compounds, and perfusion when using arbitrary RF flip angles for different compounds.

We observed a strong correlation between Kpl and the total lactate to total pyruvate ratio, as others have also shown. The ratio is a simpler calculation and easier to implement than the kinetic modeling. However, we have determined through simulation that the total lactate to total pyruvate ratio is highly influenced by the delivery time of pyruvate, so care should be taken when using this ratio if variable vascular delivery rates are expected. Both the kinetic modeling and metabolite ratio are highly influenced by the actual RF flip angles, and precise B1 calibration is important for quantitative measurements. Measurement of urea perfusion can be a marker vascular delivery since urea primarily stays in the vasculature. Liver is a very vascular organ and the opened capillary shape of liver vasculature likely caused high urea perfusion in liver. The kidneys are highly vascularized and are also responsible for concentrating urea for removal in the urine. In tumors, the tissue request for blood is high but in a more uncontrolled way because of the abnormality of blood vasculature and circulation inside most tumors. Thus the urea perfusion in tumors is likely more sporadic and random. Urea cannot perfuse well in some parts of tumor particularly in suspected necrotic regions. On the other hand, some parts of tumor have more metabolic activity and, therefore, these parts need more blood and more vessels, and consequently should have more urea perfusion. Our total pyruvate and urea perfusion parameterizations are different from conventional perfusion modeling, and were designed as a simple representation of the total amount of these compounds that are present in the tissue. In particular, the total pyruvate perfusion also includes any pyruvate or metabolic products that remain in the tissue, in addition to those present in the vasculature. The urea perfusion should primarily represent the vasculature delivery since it primarily stays in the vessels, while the total pyruvate perfusion can also be a marker for vascular delivery but also includes tissue uptake. We hypothesize that when the pyruvate perfusion is higher relative to urea perfusion it represents a higher amount of uptake of the pyruvate that is flowing into the tissue.

Conclusions In this study we fit metabolite T1 values, conversion rates, Kpa, and Kpl, and measured novel pyruvate and urea perfusion parameterizations across cancerous and normal tissues from data acquired with a multiband RF excitation, compressed sensing dynamic MRSI pulse sequence. Our modeling allowed for use of arbitrary RF flip angles between metabolites, which in turn allows for efficient usage of the hyperpolarized magnetization. We observed a high correlation between our Kpl fits and the total lactate to pyruvate signal ratio, suggesting either could be used to characterize pyruvate-lactate metabolism. Through the novel pyruvate and urea perfusion parameterizations we were able to quantify the increased uptake of pyruvate in cancerous tissues, which correlated with increased metabolic conversion to lactate. These provided a more complete characterization of cancerous tissue metabolism and perfusion.

11.5.9  ZSTK474

(Dr. Anthony Melvin Castro)

zstk474

zstk474

ZSTK474 is a cell permeable and reversible P13K inhibitor with an IC₅₀ at 6nm. It was identified as part of a screening library, selected for its ability to block tumor cell growth. ZSTK474 has shown strong antitumor activities against human cancer xenographs when administered orally to mice without a significant toxic effect.

Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) has been implicated in a variety of diseases including cancer. A number of PI3K inhibitors have recently been developed for use in cancer therapy. ZSTK474 is a highly promising antitumor agent targeting PI3K. We previously reported that ZSTK474 showed potent inhibition against four class I PI3K isoforms but not against 140 protein kinases.

However, whether ZSTK474 inhibits DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), which is structurally similar to PI3K, remains unknown. To investigate the inhibition of DNA-PK, we developed a new DNA-PK assay method using Kinase-Glo. The inhibition activity of ZSTK474 against DNA-PK was determined, and shown to be far weaker compared with that observed against PI3K. The inhibition selectivity of ZSTK474 for PI3K over DNA-PK was significantly higher than other PI3K inhibitors, namely NVP-BEZ235, PI-103 and LY294002.

PATENT                                                                                                          SUBMITTED GRANTED

Heterocyclic compound and antitumor agent containing the same as active ingredient [US7071189]                                                                                                                                                               2004-06-17   2006-07-04

Treatment of prostate cancer, melanoma or hepatic cancer [US2007244110]                                                                                                                                                                                                   2007-10-18

Heterocyclic compound and antitumor agent containing the same as effective ingredient [US7307077]                                                                                                                                                           2006-11-02   2007-12-11

Immunosuppressive agent and anti-tumor agent comprising heterocyclic compound as active ingredient [us7750001]                                                                                                                                   2008-05-15   2010-07-06

Pyrimidinyl and 1,3,5-triazinyl benzimidazoles and their use in cancer therapy [us2011009405]                                                                                                                                                                       2011-01-13

Substituted pyrimidines and triazines and their use in cancer therapy [us2011053907]                                                                                                                                                                                     2011-03-03

Immunosuppressive agent and anti-tumor agent comprising heterocyclic compound as active ingredient [us2010267700]                                                                                                                             2010-10-21

Amorphous body composed of heterocyclic compound, solid dispersion and pharmaceutical preparation each comprising the same, and process for production of the same [us8227463]                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           2010-09-30    2012-07-24

Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridines and their use in cancer therapy
[us2010226881]                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 2010-09-09

Pyrimidinyl and 1,3,5-triazinyl benzimidazole sulfonamides and their use in cancer therapy [us2010249099]                                                                                                                                                   2010-09-30

11.5.10 Marrow-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Safely Shrink Multiple Myelomas

 Medical researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have published a report that appeared in the journal Science Translational Medicine in which they describe, for the first time, the safe use of a patient’s own immune cells to treat the white blood cell cancer multiple myeloma. There are more than 20,000 new cases of multiple myeloma and more than 10,000 deaths each year in United States. It is the second most common cancer originating in the blood.

The procedure under investigation in this study is called utilizes a specific type of tumor-targeting T cells, known as marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes (MILs). “What we learned in this small trial is that large numbers of activated MILs can selectively target and kill myeloma cells,” says Johns Hopkins immunologist Ivan Borrello, M.D., who led the clinical trial.

According to Borrello, MILs are the foot soldiers of the immune system that attack invading bacteria or viruses. Unfortunately, they are typically inactive and too few in number to have a measurable effect on cancers.

Experiments conducted is Borrello’s laboratory and in the laboratory of competing and collaborating scientists have shown that when myeloma cells are exposed to activated MILs in culture, these cells could not only selectively target the tumor cells, but they could also effectively destroy them.

To move this procedure from the laboratory into the clinic, Borrello and his collaborators enrolled 25 patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed multiple myeloma. Only 22 were able to receive this new treatment, however.

The Hopkins team extracted and purified MILs from the bone marrow of each patient and grew them in the laboratory to increase their numbers. Then they activated the MILs by exposing them to microscopic beads coated with immune activating antibodies. These antibodies bind to specific cell surface proteins on the MILs that induce profound changes in the cells. This induction step wakes the MILs up and readies them to sniff out tumor cells. These laboratory-manipulated MILs were then intravenously injected back into each patient (each of the 22 patients with their own cells). Three days before these injections of expanded MILs, all patients received high doses of chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant, which are standard treatments for multiple myeloma.

One year after receiving the MILs therapy, 13 of the 22 patients had at least a partial response to the therapy (their cancers had shrunk by at least 50 percent) Seven patients experienced at least a 90 percent reduction in tumor cell volume and lived and average of 25.1 months without cancer progression. The remaining 15 patients had an average of 11.8 progression-free months following their MIL therapy. None of the participants experienced serious side effects from the MIL therapy.

According to Borrello, several U.S. cancer centers have conducted similar experimental treatments (adoptive T cell therapy). However, only this Johns Hopkins team has used MILs. Other types of tumor-infiltrating cells can be used for such treatments, but Borrello noted that these cells are usually less plentiful in patients’ tumors and may not grow as well outside the body.

In nonblood-based tumors, such as melanoma, only about half of those patients have T cells in their tumors that can be harvested, and only about one-half of those harvested cells can be grown. “Typically, immune cells from solid tumors, called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, can be harvested and grown in only about 25 percent of patients who could potentially be eligible for the therapy. But in our clinical trial, we were able to harvest and grow MILs from all 22 patients,” says Kimberly Noonan, Ph.D., a research associate at the Johns Hopkins Universithttp://www.fiercevaccines.com/special-reports/gvax-pancreasy School of Medicine.

This small trial helped Noonan and her colleagues learn more about which patients may benefit from MILs therapy. As an example, they were able to determine how many of the MILs grown in the lab were specifically targeted to the patient’s tumor and whether they continued to target the tumor after being infused. They also found that patients whose bone marrow before treatment contained a high number of certain immune cells, known as central memory cells, also had better response to MILs therapy. Patients who began treatment with signs of an overactive immune response did not respond as well.

Noonan says the research team has used these data to guide two other ongoing MILs clinical trials. Those studies, she says, are trying to extend anti-tumor response and tumor specificity by combining the MILs transplant with a Johns Hopkins-developed cancer vaccine called GVAX and the myeloma druglenalidomide, which stimulates T cell responses.

These trials also have elucidated new ways to grow the MILs. “In most of these trials, you see that the more cells you get, the better response you get in patients. Learning how to improve cell growth may therefore improve the therapy,” says Noonan.

Kimmel Cancer Center scientists are also developing MILs treatments to address solid tumors such as lung, esophageal and gastric cancers, as well as the pediatric cancers neuroblastoma and Ewing’s sarcoma.

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