Advertisements
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Personalized and Precision Medicine & Genomic Research’ Category


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide and the most common cause of long-term disability amongst adults, more particularly in patients with diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension. Increasing evidence suggests that disordered physiological variables following acute ischaemic stroke, especially hyperglycaemia, adversely affect outcomes.

 

Post-stroke hyperglycaemia is common (up to 50% of patients) and may be rather prolonged, regardless of diabetes status. A substantial body of evidence has demonstrated that hyperglycaemia has a deleterious effect upon clinical and morphological stroke outcomes. Therefore, hyperglycaemia represents an attractive physiological target for acute stroke therapies.

 

However, whether intensive glycaemic manipulation positively influences the fate of ischaemic tissue remains unknown. One major adverse event of management of hyperglycaemia with insulin (either glucose-potassium-insulin infusions or intensive insulin therapy) is the occurrence of hypoglycaemia, which can also induce cerebral damage.

 

Doctors all over the world have debated whether intensive glucose management, which requires the use of IV insulin to bring blood sugar levels down to 80-130 mg/dL, or standard glucose control using insulin shots, which aims to get glucose below 180 mg/dL, lead to better outcomes after stroke.

 

A period of hyperglycemia is common, with elevated blood glucose in the periinfarct period consistently linked with poor outcome in patients with and without diabetes. The mechanisms that underlie this deleterious effect of dysglycemia on ischemic neuronal tissue remain to be established, although in vitro research, functional imaging, and animal work have provided clues.

 

While prompt correction of hyperglycemia can be achieved, trials of acute insulin administration in stroke and other critical care populations have been equivocal. Diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia per se are associated with poor cerebrovascular health, both in terms of stroke risk and outcome thereafter.

 

Interventions to control blood sugar are available but evidence of cerebrovascular efficacy are lacking. In diabetes, glycemic control should be part of a global approach to vascular risk while in acute stroke, theoretical data suggest intervention to lower markedly elevated blood glucose may be of benefit, especially if thrombolysis is administered.

 

Both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia may lead to further brain injury and clinical deterioration; that is the reason these conditions should be avoided after stroke. Yet, when correcting hyperglycaemia, great care should be taken not to switch the patient into hypoglycaemia, and subsequently aggressive insulin administration treatment should be avoided.

 

Early identification and prompt management of hyperglycaemia, especially in acute ischaemic stroke, is recommended. Although the appropriate level of blood glucose during acute stroke is still debated, a reasonable approach is to keep the patient in a mildly hyperglycaemic state, rather than risking hypoglycaemia, using continuous glucose monitoring.

 

The primary results from the Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) study, a large, multisite clinical study showed that intensive glucose management did not improve functional outcomes at 90 days after stroke compared to standard glucose therapy. In addition, intense glucose therapy increased the risk of very low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) and required a higher level of care such as increased supervision from nursing staff, compared to standard treatment.

 

References:

 

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-provides-answer-long-held-debate-blood-sugar-control-after-stroke

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27873213

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19342845

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20491782

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21211743

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18690907

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


Record Innovations in Drug Discovery by Koch Institute @MIT Members and Affiliates

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

In Good Company

Trovagene announced a new patent for the use of the drug onvansertib in combination with other anti-androgen drugs for the treatment of prostate cancer. Last fall, Trovagene secured exclusive rights to develop combination therapies and clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer based in part on Bridge Project-funded research. Read more.

Lyndra Therapeutics, co-founded by KI member Bob Langer, raised $55 million in its Series B round, with new investors including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and Gilead Sciences. Phase 2 trials for its ultra long-acting drug delivery capsule are expected to begin next year. Read more.

Dragonfly Therapeutics, co-founded by KI director Tyler Jacks, has committed $10 million to launch the first clinical studies of its TriNKETs (Tri-specific, NK cell Engager Therapies) platform for both solid tumor and hematological cancers. Read more.

Following its record-breaking IPO, Moderna Therapeutics (co-founded by KI member Bob Langer) published preclinical data in Science Translational Medicine demonstrating the promise of its mRNA-2752 program in several cancers. Read more.

Dewpoint Therapeutics launched with a $60 million Series A, aims to translate recent insights into biomolecular condensates from the laboratory of co-founder and KI member Rick Young to drug discovery. Read more.

KI member Bob Langer and collaborator Omid Farokhzad co-founded Seer— combining nanotechnology, protein chemistry, and machine learning—to develop liquid biopsy tests for the early detection of cancer and other diseases. Read more.

Epizyme, co-founded by KI member Bob Horvitz, is submitting a New Drug Application to gain accelerated approval of tazemetostat for patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma. Read more.

Ribon Therapeutics, founded by former KI member Paul Chang, launched with $65 million in a Series B funding round with Victoria Richon, a veteran of Sanofi and Epizyme, at the helm. Ribon focuses on developing PARP7 inhibitors for cancer treatment. Read more.

SOURCE

From: MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research <cancersolutions=mit.edu@cmail19.com> on behalf of MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research <cancersolutions@mit.edu>

Reply-To: <ki-communications@mit.edu>

Date: Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 3:15 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Lung Microbiome Corrupted in Cancer; Angelika Amon wins 2019 Vilcek Award; Lunch Lines of Inquiry

Read Full Post »


Cell Therapy Market to Grow Beyond Oncology As Big Pharma Expands Investments

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Collaborations of Big Pharma with small to mid-segment companies are currently focusing R&D on precision medicine. The market is valued at $2.70 billion in 2017 and is expected to reach $8.21 billion in 2025. A varied therapeutic focus and implementation of advanced manufacturing technologies such as single-use bioreactors, will pave a way for unique cell-gene and stem cell – gene combination therapies.
Novartis and Gilead are the first companies to adopt pay for performance business for their CAR-T cell therapies. In addition to innovative pricing models, Pharma companies are also showing a preference for risk sharing and fast-to-market models in order to support the development of novel therapies. Moreover, developments in cell culturing techniques alongside the use of different stem cells such as adipose-derived stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cell will reinforce the market with superior treatment options for non-oncological conditions such as neurological, musculoskeletal, and dermatological conditions.

With the high request for cell therapies, numerous growth opportunities can occur such as:

  • With more than 959 ongoing regenerative medicine clinical trials, the market finds opportunity across both stem cell and non-stem cell-based therapies.
  • Curative combination therapies which help find application in identifying the right patient as well as predicting the immune response in cancer patients.
  • Implementation of IT solutions and single-use manufacturing techniques for optimizing small-volume, high-value manufacturing of novel cell therapies, thus dropping the time to market radically.
  • Emerging Business Models which aid market players focus on academic and research collaborations together with industry collaborations to support therapeutic and technological innovations.

Source

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/cell-therapy-market-to-grow-beyond-oncology-as-big-pharma-expands-investments-826628110.html

 

Read Full Post »


@Amazon.com @pharma_BI BUNDLES for $274 #Patients #Voices #Precision #Medicine #Physiology #Genomics #Therapeutics #3D #BioPrinting: Series E: Volumes 1,2,3,4 by Editors:

Larry H Bernstein @bernstein_h  

Gail Thornton @GailThornt 

Aviva Lev-Ari @AVIVA1950 

 

Series E: Patient-Centered Medicine – LINKS to e-Books & Cover Pages for Volumes 1,2,3,4

 

  • Volume 1: The VOICES of Patients, Hospitals CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures. On Amazon.com  since 10/16/2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076HGB6MZ

  • Volume 2: Medical Scientific Discoveries for the 21st Century & Interviews with Scientific Leaders. On Amazon.com since12/9/2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078313281

 

 

  • Volume 3: Milestones in Physiology: Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics. On Amazon.com since 12/27/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019VH97LU

  • Volume 4: Medical 3D BioPrinting – The Revolution in Medicine, Technologies for Patient-centered Medicine: From R&D in Biologics to New Medical Devices. On Amazon.com  since 12/30/2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078QVDV2W

Read Full Post »


The Puzzle of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells: The MIT Stem Cell Initiative

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

The MIT Stem Cell Initiative is looking to research fundamental biological questions about normal adult stem cells and their malignant counterparts, cancer stem cells. The MIT Stem Cell Initiative is applying new technologies and approaches in pursuit of this goal. In particular, the MIT Stem Cell Initiative has focused on the breast and colon, as these tissues are quite different from each other, yet each constitutes a major portion of cancer occurrence. The program purposes are to

(a) identify the stem cells and cancer stem cells in various tissues and tumor types,

(b) control how these cells change during aging or with disease progression and

(c) determine the similarities and differences between

  • normal cells, and
  • cancer stem cells,

with the goal of finding weaknesses in cancer stem cells that can be feasible and exact targets for treatment.

In due course, the ability to identify, purify, and establish several populations of stem cells and cancer stem cells could aid researchers to understand the biology of these cells, and learn how to exploit them more efficiently in regenerative medicine applications and target them in cancer.

Normal adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells within a tissue that divide to produce two daughter cells and divide periodically to replenish or repair the tissue. One of the two daughter cells remain in the stem cell state and the other adopts a partially differentiated state, then goes on to divide and differentiate further to harvest multiple cell types that form that tissue. The division process is through a precise process to ensure that tissues are restricted to the appropriate size and cell content.

Cancer stem cells perform the same division but, rather than differentiating, the additional cells produced by the second daughter cell amass to form the bulk of the tumor.

  • Cancer stem cells can regrow the tumor, and
  • are frequently resistant to chemotherapy.

This exclusive ability of normal and cancer stem cells to both self-renew and form a tissue or tumor is referred to by researchers as “stemness,” and has important implications for biomedical applications.

As a result, cancer stem cells are thought to be responsible for

  • tumor recurrence after remission, and also for the
  • formation of metastases, which account for the majority of cancer-associated deaths.

Accordingly, an anti-cancer stem cell therapy that can target and kill cancer stem cells is one of the holy grail of cancer treatment as means to suppress both tumor recurrence and metastatic disease. One of the important tasks to studying normal and cancer stem cells, and to ultimately harnessing that knowledge is developing the ability to identify, purify, and propagate these cells. Accordingly, the main goal in stem cell and cancer stem cell research is discovering ways to distinguish them, preferably by identifying unique surface markers that can be used to cleanse stem cell and cancer stem cell populations and enable their study.

New technologies are permitting the researchers to make significant headway in these investigations, progress that was not possible just a few years ago. Explicitly, they are using

  • a mixture of specially cultured cells,
  • highly controllable mouse models of cancer, and s
  • ingle-cell RNA sequencing and
  • computational analysis techniques that are extremely matched to extracting an excessive deal of information from the moderately small number of stem cells.

SOURCE

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-initiative-delves-into-stem-cell-biology-1015

Read Full Post »


37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: News at #JPM2019 for Jan. 10, 2019: Deals and Announcements

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

From Biospace.com

 

JP Morgan Healthcare Conference Update: Sage, Mersana, Shutdown Woes and Babies

Speaker presenting to audience at a conference

With the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference winding down, companies remain busy striking deals and informing investors about pipeline advances. BioSpace snagged some of the interesting news bits to come out of the conference from Wednesday.

SAGE Therapeutics – Following a positive Phase III report that its postpartum depression treatment candidate SAGE-217 hit the mark in its late-stage clinical trial, Sage Therapeutics is eying the potential to have multiple treatment options available for patients. At the start of J.P. Morgan, Sage said that patients treated with SAGE-217 had a statistically significant improvement of 17.8 points in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, compared to 13.6 for placebo. The company plans to seek approval for SAGE-2017, but before that, the FDA is expected to make a decision on Zulresso in March. Zulresso already passed muster from advisory committees in November, and if approved, would be the first drug specifically for postpartum depression. In an interview with the Business Journal, Chief Business Officer Mike Cloonan said the company believes there is room in the market for both medications, particularly since the medications address different patient populations.

 

Mersana Therapeutics – After a breakup with Takeda Pharmaceutical and the shelving of its lead product, Cambridge, Mass.-based Mersana is making a new path. Even though a partial clinical hold was lifted following the death of a patient the company opted to shelve development of XMT-1522. During a presentation at JPM, CEO Anna Protopapas noted that many other companies are developing therapies that target the HER2 protein, which led to the decision, according to the Boston Business Journal. Protopapas said the HER2 space is highly competitive and now the company will focus on its other asset, XMT-1536, an ADC targeting NaPi2b, an antigen highly expressed in the majority of non-squamous NSCLC and epithelial ovarian cancer. XMT-1536 is currently in Phase 1 clinical trials for NaPi2b-expressing cancers, including ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and other cancers. Data on XMT-1536 is expected in the first half of 2019.

Novavax – During a JPM presentation, Stan Erck, CEO of Novavax, pointed to the company’s RSV vaccine, which is in late-stage development. The vaccine is being developed for the mother, in order to protect an infant. The mother transfers the antibodies to the infant, which will provide the baby with protection from RSV in its first six months. Erck called the program historic. He said the Phase III program is in its fourth year and the company has vaccinated 4,636 women. He said they are tracking the women and the babies. Researchers call the mothers every week through the first six months of the baby’s life to acquire data. Erck said the company anticipates announcing trial data this quarter. If approved, Erck said the market for the vaccine could be a significant revenue driver.

“You have 3.9 million birth cohorts and we expect 80 percent to 90 percent of those mothers to be vaccinated as a pediatric vaccine and in the U.S. the market rate is somewhere between $750 million and a $1 billion and then double that for worldwide market. So it’s a large market and we will be first to market in this,” Erck said, according to a transcript of the presentation.

Denali Therapeutics – Denali forged a collaboration with Germany-based SIRION Biotech to develop gene therapies for central nervous disorders. The two companies plan to develop adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to enable therapeutics to cross the blood-brain barrier for clinical applications in neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS and certain other diseases of the CNS.

AstraZeneca – Pharma giant AstraZeneca reported that in 2019 net prices on average across the portfolio will decrease versus 2018. With a backdrop of intense public and government scrutiny over pricing, Market Access head Rick Suarez said the company is increasing its pricing transparency. Additionally, he said the company is looking at new ways to price drugs, such as value-based reimbursement agreements with payers, Pink Sheet reported.

Amarin Corporation – As the company eyes a potential label expansion approval for its cardiovascular disease treatment Vascepa, Amarin Corporation has been proactively hiring hundreds of sales reps. In the fourth quarter, the company hired 265 new sales reps, giving the company a sales team of more than 400, CEO John Thero said. Thero noted that is a label expansion is granted by the FDA, “revenues will increase at least 50 percent over what we did in the prior year, which would give us revenues of approximate $350 million in 2019.”

Government Woes – As the partial government shutdown in the United States continues into its third week, biotech leaders at JPM raised concern as the FDA’s carryover funds are dwindling. With no new funding coming in, reviews of New Drug Applications won’t be able to continue past February, Pink Sheet said. While reviews are currently ongoing, no New Drug Applications are being accepted by the FDA at this time. With the halt of NDA applications, that has also caused some companies to delay plans for an initial public offering. It’s hard to raise potential investor excitement without the regulatory support of a potential drug approval. During a panel discussion, Jonathan Leff, a partner at Deerfield Management, noted that the ongoing government shutdown is a reminder of how “overwhelmingly dependent the whole industry of biotech and drug development is on government,” Pink Sheet said.

Other posts on the JP Morgan 2019 Healthcare Conference on this Open Access Journal include:

#JPM19 Conference: Lilly Announces Agreement To Acquire Loxo Oncology

36th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE January 8 – 11, 2018

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019; Opening Videos, Novartis expands Cell Therapies, January 7 – 10, 2019, Westin St. Francis Hotel | San Francisco, California

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: News at #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019: Deals and Announcements

 

Read Full Post »


2019 Trends in Precision Medicine: A Perspective from Foundation Medicine

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

BIOPHARMADIAGNOSTICS

Foundation Medicine appoints new CEO; exec provides forecasts for precision medicine in 2019

With the approval of Loxo’s Vitrakvi, pan-cancer drugs and an emphasis on real-world data are likely to become important trends trends this year.

A next-generation sequencing firm that last year became wholly owned by Swiss drugmaker Roche has appointed a new leader.

Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Foundation Medicine said Monday that it had appointed Cindy Perettie as CEO, effective Feb. 4. Succeeding Troy Cox, Perettie was most recently senior vice president for global oncology product strategy at Roche’s oncology unit. She previously had begun working for Genentech in 2004 and continued working there through that company’s 2009 acquisition by Roche, before moving to the Sarah Cannon Research Institute as president for global development innovations.

Foundation Medicine markets genomic sequencing products for use in oncology, including in next-generation sequencing for solid and hematological cancers and liquid biopsy. Roche, which was already a majority shareholder in the company, bought the rest of it in June for $2.4 billion.

The Roche acquisition and new executive appointment have come at a time when genomic sequencing has become a crucial component of precision medicine.

In an interview at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, Chief Business Officer Melanie Nallicheri did not comment on Perettie’s appointment, but discussed some of her expectations for what 2019 has in store for precision medicine.

In particular, she said the November approval of Loxo Oncology and Bayer’s Vitrakvi (larotrectinib) is a taste of things to come. “This is the second pan-cancer approval,” she said. “So the notion of really moving away from cancer as a tissue disease to cancer as a genomic disease, we’re starting to see that take hold.

Loxo has a partnership with Illumina to develop a companion diagnostic for Vitrakvi, though Nallicheri noted that Foundation Medicine works with the company as well. Eli Lilly & Co. said Monday it would acquire Loxo for $8 billion.

When there was only one such approval, namely for Merck & Co.’s Keytruda (pembrolizumab) in microsatellite instability-high and mismatch repair-deficiency cancers in 2017, it may have been possible to say that was a one-off, she said. But Vitrakvi’s approval changes that. Yet, even the Keytruda approval may be predictive. Quantitative biomarkers like MSI-H and tumor mutational burden can support approval, so that’s probably an important trend of which more will be seen.

Another area in which Nallicheri said Foundation Medicine can have a role is in providing real-world clinical data, which she said is also likely to become an important trend in 2019, particularly given the guidance from the Food and Drug Administration. A guidance released last month outlined a new framework for advancing real-world evidence to support drug and biologic development. In addition, in a breakout session at JPM Tuesday, executives from Roche emphasized the potential for historical data to serve as a synthetic control arm, pointing to the Swiss drugmaker’s $1.9 billion acquisition of Flatiron Health in February 2018. “The idea that you can replace control arms with historical data is tangible,” Roche CEO Severin Schwan said in the session. “This is not just a hypothesis – it’s real life.”

SOURCE

https://medcitynews.com/2019/01/foundation-medicine-appoints-new-ceo-exec-provides-forecasts-for-precision-medicine-in-2019/?rf=1

 

Other related articles published on this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

#JPM19 Conference: Lilly Announces Agreement To Acquire Loxo Oncology

PMC Strategic Plan for 2019

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019; Opening Videos, Novartis expands Cell Therapies, January 7 – 10, 2019, Westin St. Francis Hotel | San Francisco, California

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: News at #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019: Deals and Announcements

 

Series B: Frontiers in Genomics Research

  • VOLUME 1: Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine. On Amazon.com since 11/23/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018DHBUO6

  • VOLUME 2: Latest in Genomics Methodologies for Therapeutics: Gene Editing, NGS & BioInformatics, Simulations and the Genome Ontology

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-two-genomics-methodologies-ngs-bioinformatics-simulations-and-the-genome-ontology/

Work-in-Progress

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »