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Archive for the ‘Personalized and Precision Medicine & Genomic Research’ Category


Breakthroughs: Insights From the Personalized Medicine & Diagnostics Track at the 2017 BIO International Convention

Guest Author: David Davenport, Office Administrator, Personalized Medicine Coalition

 

“Health care today is reactive and costly … anything but personalized … but we are now entering a new era where health care is becoming proactive, preventive, highly personalized and most importantly predictive,” said J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., Founder, President, CEO, J. Craig Venter Institute, during his opening keynote at the Personalized Medicine and Diagnostics Track at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego from June 21 – 22. The track, co-organized by PMC, brought together thought leaders to discuss breakthroughs in advancing personalized medicine. From those conversations several themes emerged:

Complex genetic data require a “knowledge network” to translate into personalized care.

During the session titled The Next Frontier: Navigating Clinical Adoption of Personalized Medicine, moderated by PMC Vice President for Science Policy Daryl Pritchard, Ph.D., panelists discussed how to accelerate the clinical adoption of innovative personalized therapies. Jennifer Levin Carter, M.D., Founder and Chief Medical Officer of N-of-One, a clinical diagnostic testing interpretation service company, explained that as data grows in complexity, there is a growing need for partnerships to efficiently analyze the data and develop effective targeted treatment plans. India Hook-Barnard, Ph.D., Director of Research Strategy, Associate Director of Precision Medicine, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), agreed and discussed the need to build a “knowledge network” that can harness data and expertise to inform provider-patient decision-making.

Discussing how personalized medicine can be integrated into community health centers lacking large research budgets, Lynn Dressler, Dr.P.H., Director of Personalized Medicine and Pharmacogenomics at Mission Health Systems, a rural community health care delivery system in Asheville, North Carolina, discussed the need to better educate physicians and patients as well as the role that a knowledge network could play in providing easy and cost-effective access to diagnostic testing services.

Delivering personalized medicine requires innovative partnerships involving industry, IT companies, providers, payers and the government.

During It’s a Converging World: Innovative Partnerships and Precision Medicine, a panel moderated by Kristin Pothier, Global Head of Life Sciences Strategy, Ernst & Young, discussed the need for “open data” where improved patient care is the shared goal, and how public-private partnerships that address education, evidence development and access to care can help foster personalized medicine.

During a session titled Nevada as a New Model for Population Health Study, Nevada-based health system Renown Health outlined a study in which it partnered with genetic testing company 23andMe to examine whether free access to genetic testing changes participants’ practices in managing their own health and facilitates the utilization of personalized medicine.

In the era of personalized medicine, measuring and delivering value requires a paradigm shift from population-based to individual-based evidence.

Following a discussion on regulatory and reimbursement challenges moderated by Bruce Quinn, M.D., Ph.D., Principal, Bruce Quinn Associates, during which panelists called for the simplification of payment structures to be more consistent, more efficient and more connected to the patient market, a panel moderated by Jennifer Snow, Director of Health Policy at Xcenda, discussed how value assessment frameworks must adapt to consider the value of personalized medicine. During The Whole Picture: Consideration of Personalized Medicine in Value Assessment Frameworks, panelist Mitch Higashi, Ph.D., Vice President, Health Economics and Outcomes Research, U.S., Bristol-Myers Squibb, called for patient-centered definitions of value and advocated for the inclusion of predictive biomarkers in all value frameworks. Donna Cryer, J.D., President, CEO, Global Liver Institute, added that the “patient must be the ultimate ‘arbiter of value’” and urged “transparency” in how value assessment frameworks are used.

Noting that different assessment frameworks have different goals, Roger Longman, CEO, Real Endpoints, called for more dynamic frameworks that allow different stakeholders to “use the same criteria but weigh them differently.” The panel concluded that to advance personalized medicine, value frameworks must be meaningful, practical and predictive for patients; reflect evolving evidence needs like real-world evidence; and consider breakthrough payment structures like bundled payments.

From Promise to Practice: The Way Forward for Personalized Medicine

During the concluding session, Creating a Universal Biomarker Program, moderated by Ian Wright, Owner, Strategic Innovations LLC, on behalf of Cedars-Sinai Precision Health, panelists discussed how to make patients the point of reference for their own care, as opposed to being compared to the “normal” range of population averages in treatment decisions using biomarkers. The speakers concluded that moving in that direction requires providers to establish baselines for each patient, along with tools and metrics to facilitate the approach.

In the words of Donna Cryer, “personalized medicine is the definition of value for a patient.” With the ability to detect diseases before they even express themselves, the promise of personalized medicine has never been greater.

However, changing the health care system to improve patient access to valuable personalized medicines requires innovation and collaboration. As PMC President Edward Abrahams, Ph.D., said during his opening remarks for the track, that change

“doesn’t come easily,” but “breakthrough” discussions like these continue to move us forward.

The complete track agenda can be downloaded here.

 

SOURCE

From: <pmc@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org>

Date: Monday, July 10, 2017 at 10:51 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Breakthroughs From the 2017 BIO Convention’s PM & Dx Track

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Ido Sagi – PhD Student @HUJI, 2017 Kaye Innovation Award winner for leading research that yielded the first successful isolation and maintenance of haploid embryonic stem cells in humans.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Ido Sagi – PhD Student, Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, HUJI, Israel

  • Ido Sagi’s research focuses on studying genetic and epigenetic phenomena in human pluripotent stem cells, and his work has been published in leading scientific journals, including NatureNature Genetics and Cell Stem Cell.
  • Ido Sagi received BSc summa cum laude in Life Sciences from the Hebrew University, and currently pursues a PhD at the laboratory of Prof. Nissim Benvenisty at the university’s Department of Genetics in the Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences.

The Kaye Innovation Awards at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have been awarded annually since 1994. Isaac Kaye of England, a prominent industrialist in the pharmaceutical industry, established the awards to encourage faculty, staff and students of the Hebrew University to develop innovative methods and inventions with good commercial potential, which will benefit the university and society.

Publications – Ido Sagi

Comparable frequencies of coding mutations and loss of imprinting in human pluripotent cells derived by nuclear transfer and defined factors.
Cell Stem Cell 2014 Nov 6;15(5):634-42. Epub 2014 Nov 6.
The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA; Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center & Department of Pediatrics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

November 2014

 



Stem cells: Aspiring to naivety.
Nature 2016 12 30;540(7632):211-212. Epub 2016 Nov 30.
The Azrieli Center for Stem Cells and Genetic Research, Department of Genetics, Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904, Israel.
November 2016

Download Full Paper

SOURCE

Other related articles on Genetic and Epigenetic phenomena in human pluripotent stem cells published by LPBI Group can be found in the following e-Books on Amazon.com

e-Books in Medicine

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_ebooks_9?ie=UTF8&text=Aviva+Lev-Ari&search-alias=digital-text&field-author=Aviva+Lev-Ari&sort=relevancerank

9 results for Kindle Store : “Aviva Lev-Ari”

  • Product Details

    Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics

    Nov 28, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Justin D. Pearlman MD ME PhD MA FACC and Stephen J. Williams PhD
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    Cancer Therapies: Metabolic, Genomics, Interventional, Immunotherapy and Nanotechnology in Therapy Delivery (Series C Book 2)

    May 13, 2017 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H. Bernstein and Demet Sag
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    Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms (Biomed e-Books Book 1)

    Jun 20, 2013 | Kindle eBook

    by Margaret Baker PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN
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    Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis (Series C: e-Books on Cancer & Oncology Book 1)

    Aug 10, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H Bernstein MD FCAP and Prabodh Kumar Kandala PhD
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    Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine (Frontiers in Genomics Research Book 1)

    Nov 22, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Sudipta Saha PhD and Ritu Saxena PhD
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    Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics (BioMedicine – Metabolomics, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Book 1)

    Jul 21, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H. Bernstein MD FCAP and Prabodah Kandala PhD
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    Milestones in Physiology: Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics (Series E: Patient-Centered Medicine Book 3)

    Dec 26, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H. Bernstein MD FACP and Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN
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    Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutic Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases

    Dec 26, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Justin D. Pearlman MD ME PhD MA FACC and Ritu Saxena PhD
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    Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation: The Art of Scientific & Medical Curation

    Nov 29, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H. Bernstein MD FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN
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Personalized Medicine been Positively affected by FDA Drug Approval Record

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

FDA to Clear Path for Drugs Aimed at Cancer-Causing Genes

By Anna Edney and Michelle Cortez

June 20, 2017, 10:41 AM EDT June 20, 2017, 3:02 PM EDT

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-06-20/fda-moves-to-clear-path-for-drugs-aimed-at-cancer-causing-genes

 

 

‘Landmark FDA approval bolsters personalized medicine’

PMC – An Op-Ed in STAT News

by Edward Abrahams

June 21, 2017

Our understanding of cancer has been morphing from a tissue-specific disease — think lung cancer or breast cancer — to a disease characterized more by specific genes or biomarkers than by location. A recent FDA decision underscores that transition and further opens the door to personalized medicine.

Two years ago, the director of the FDA’s Office of Hematology and Oncology Products told the Associated Press that there was no precedent for the agency to approve a drug aimed at treating tumors that generate a specific biomarker no matter where the cancer is in the body. Such a drug had long been seen as the epitome of personalized medicine. But with the rapid pace of progress in the field, director Dr. Richard Pazdur said, such an approval could one day be possible.

That day has arrived.

In a milestone decision for personalized medicine, the FDA approved Merck’s pembrolizumab (Keytruda) late last month for the treatment of tumors that express one of two biomarkers regardless of where in the body the tumors are located. The decision marks the first time FDA has approved a cancer drug for an indication based on the expression of specific biomarkers rather than the tumor’s location in the body.

Keytruda is designed to help the immune system recognize and destroy cancer cells by targeting a specific cellular pathway. The FDA notes that the two biomarkers — microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) and mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) — affect the proper repair of DNA inside cells.

The approval represents an important first for the field of personalized medicine, which anticipates an era in which physicians use molecular tests to classify different forms of cancer based on the biomarkers they express, then choose the right treatment for it. In contrast to standard cancer treatments, which are given to large populations of patients even though only a fraction of them will benefit, Keytruda was approved only for the 4 percent of cancer patients whose tumors exhibit MSI-H or dMMR mutations. That may help the health system save money by focusing resources only on patients who are likely to benefit from Keytruda.

Such “personalized” strategies now dominate the landscape for cancer drug development. Personalized medicines account for nearly 1 of every 4 FDA approvals from 2014 to 2016, and the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development estimates that more than 70 percent of cancer drugs now in development are personalized medicines.

While this is encouraging, the U.S. research, regulatory, and reimbursement systems aren’t aligned to stimulate the development of personalized medicines, and may even deter progress.

The Trump administration’s proposal to cut biomedical research spending at the National Institutes of Health by 18 percent in fiscal year 2018, for example, would undermine its ability to fund more studies like the National Cancer Institute’s Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (MATCH) trial, which is designed to test targeted therapies across tumor types.

While the regulatory landscape for these targeted medicines is clear, the path to market for the molecular tests that do the targeting is not. That uncertainty continues to stifle investment in the innovative tests that make personalized medicine possible. The result is a clinical environment in which the patients who could benefit from personalized medicines are often never identified because the necessary tests aren’t available to them.

Finally, increasing pressure on pharmaceutical and diagnostic companies to decrease prices without considering their value to individual patients and the health system could also deter investment in innovative solutions that address unmet medical needs, particularly for smaller patient populations.

Confronted with unprecedented opportunities in personalized medicine, policymakers would do well to ensure that our research, regulatory, and reimbursement systems facilitate the development of and access to these promising new therapies. Only then can we ensure that Keytruda’s groundbreaking approval represents the beginning of a new era that promises better health and a more cost-effective health system.

Edward Abrahams, Ph.D., is president of the Personalized Medicine Coalition.

 

 

 

SOURCE

From: <cwells@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org>

Date: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at 1:38 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: PMC in STAT: “Landmark FDA Approval Bolsters Personalized Medicine”

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The Future of Hospitals – How Medical Care and Technology Work Together to Advance Patient Care 

Curator: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

Gap Medics (https://www.gapmedics.com/blog/), the world’s leading provider of hospital work experience placements for high school and university students, recently released their “Futuristic Hospitals” infographic. The infographic reviews a collection of top hospitals in the world based on several key factors:

  • overall patient care,
  • innovative medical and technological excellence,
  • efforts toward sustainability,
  • environmental stewardship, and
  • social responsibility, as well as
  • other innovative health care features

to help advance the field of medicine and, ultimately, patient care.

Futuristic Hospitals Infographic

Image SOURCE: Infographic of Futuristic Hospitals courtesy of Evolved Digital and Gap Medics. Reprinted here with Permission from the Source.

 

“Many leading hospital facilities are now rolling out significant improvements and changes that couldn’t have been envisioned 10 years ago,” said Ian McIntosh, Director, Evolved Digital (http://evolveddigital.co.uk/), a U.K.-based digital marketing company specializing in search engine optimization and content marketing, whose team created the infographic for Gap Medics.

Science and innovation are working together to help convey higher expectations for quality medical and health care and advancements in the hospital experience for health care providers, patients and their families.

Particularly, the infographic analyzed prominent hospitals around the world so patients and their families can learn about the latest advances and efforts in patient care and hospital and medical technology.

In this infographic, we investigated the most cutting-edge hospital facilities in the world, where best-in-class technology and innovative medical care are making a difference in providing a quality experience all over the world.

“Gap Medics creates programs offered to thousands of students from Europe, Asia and the United States so they have the opportunity to gain insights into the work of doctors, nurses, physician assistants, midwives and dentists before the students begin their clinical training,” said Dave Brown, Director, Gap Medics, a U.K.-based company that provides hospital work experience between 1-8 weeks to students 16 years of age and older.

This one-in-a-lifetime opportunity helps students better understand their chosen career path, develop as people, and strengthen their university application process.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

http://evolveddigital.co.uk/

https://www.gapmedics.com/blog/2017/03/27/futuristic-hospitals/

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

“Sudden Cardiac Death,” SudD is in Ferrer inCode’s Suite of Cardiovascular Genetic Tests to be Commercialized in the US

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/10/sudden-cardiac-death-sudd-is-in-ferrer-incodes-suite-of-cardiovascular-genetic-tests-to-be-commercialized-in-the-us/

 

Hybrid Cath Lab/OR Suite’s da Vinci Surgical Robot of Intuitive Surgical gets FDA Warning Letter on Robot Track Record

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/19/hybrid-cath-labor-suites-da-vinci-surgical-robot-of-intuitive-surgical-gets-fda-warning-letter-on-robot-track-record/

 

3D Cardiovascular Theater – Hybrid Cath Lab/OR Suite, Hybrid Surgery, Complications Post PCI and Repeat Sternotomy

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/19/3d-cardiovascular-theater-hybrid-cath-labor-suite-hybrid-surgery-complications-post-pci-and-repeat-sternotomy/

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Pharmacotyping Pancreatic Cancer Patients in the Future: Two Approaches – ORGANOIDS by David Tuveson and Hans Clevers and/or MICRODOSING Devices by Robert Langer

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

This curation provides the resources for edification on Pharmacotyping Pancreatic Cancer Patients in the Future

 

  • Professor Hans Clevers at Clevers Group, Hubrecht University

https://www.hubrecht.eu/onderzoekers/clevers-group/

  • Prof. Robert Langer, MIT

http://web.mit.edu/langerlab/langer.html

Langer’s articles on Drug Delivery

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=Langer+on+Drug+Delivery&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixsd2w88TTAhVG4iYKHRaIAvEQgQMIJDAA

organoids, which I know you’re pretty involved in with Hans Clevers. What are your plans for organoids of pancreatic cancer?

Organoids are a really terrific model of a patient’s tumour that you generate from tissue that is either removed at the time of surgery or when they get a small needle biopsy. Culturing the tissue and observing an outgrowth of it is usually successful and when you have the cells, you can perform molecular diagnostics of any type. With a patient-derived organoid, you can sequence the exome and the RNA, and you can perform drug testing, which I call ‘pharmacotyping’, where you’re evaluating compounds that by themselves or in combination show potency against the cells. A major goal of our lab is to work towards being able to use organoids to choose therapies that will work for an individual patient – personalized medicine.

Organoids could be made moot by implantable microdevices for drug delivery into tumors, developed by Bob Langer. These devices are the size of a pencil lead and contain reservoirs that release microdoses of different drugs; the device can be injected into the tumor to deliver drugs, and can then be carefully dissected out and analyzed to gain insight into the sensitivity of cancer cells to different anticancer agents. Bob and I are kind of engaged in a friendly contest to see whether organoids or microdosing devices are going to come out on top. I suspect that both approaches will be important for pharmacotyping cancer patients in the future.

From the science side, we use organoids to discover things about pancreatic cancer. They’re great models, probably the best that I know of to rapidly discover new things about cancer because you can grow normal tissue as well as malignant tissue. So, from the same patient you can do a comparison easily to find out what’s different in the tumor. Organoids are crazy interesting, and when I see other people in the pancreatic cancer field I tell them, you should stop what you’re doing and work on these because it’s the faster way of studying this disease.

SOURCE

Other related articles on Pancreatic Cancer and Drug Delivery published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Pancreatic Cancer: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/26/pancreatic-cancer-articles-of-note-pharmaceuticalintelligence-com/

Keyword Search: “Pancreatic Cancer” – 275 Article Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Pancreatic+Cancer&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

Keyword Search: Drug Delivery: 542 Articles Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Drug+Delivery&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

Keyword Search: Personalized Medicine: 597 Article Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Personalized+Medicine&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

  • Cancer Biology & Genomics for Disease Diagnosis, on Amazon since 8/11/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K

 

 

VOLUME TWO WILL BE AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM ON MAY 1, 2017

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Forthcoming e-Book on Amazon.com

The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Care Givers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

2017 

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, Northampton, MA

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

and

Contributing Editor and Author

Gail S. Thornton, PhD(c)

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, New Jersey

gailsthornton@yahoo.com

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Editor-in-Chief BioMed e-Series of e-Books

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, Boston

avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu

BioMedical e-Books e-Series:

Cardiovascular, Genomics, Cancer, BioMed, Patient-centered Medicine

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

Abbreviated electronic Table of Contents (eTOCs)

Part One: Perceptions of Care

Chapter 1

1.1    Personal Tale of JL’s Whole Genome Sequencing
1.2    Live Notes from @AACR’s #cbi16 Meeting on Precision 
1.3    Live Notes from @AACR’s #cbi16 Meeting on Precision 
1.4    Supportive Treatments: Hold the Mind Strong During Cancer
1.5    Finding My Voice: A Laryngectomee’s Story
 

Chapter 2

2.1     Delivery of Care – See Live links in the body of the e-Book, below

2.2  Hospital CEO:  A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park 
2.3  Drug Discovery for Cancer Cure:  Value for Patients – Turning 
2.4  Hospital CEO: A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care 
2.5  Hospital CEO:  University Children’s Hospital Zurich 

2.6 Hospital CEO: Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries

Part Two: The Voice of Cancer Survivors

Chapter 3

3.1    Cancer Companion Diagnostics

3.2    lncRNAs in Human Cancers
3.3    Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance
3.4    Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers for Personalized Cancer 
 

Chapter 4

4.1 Personalized Medicine: Cancer Cell Biology and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

4.2    Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse 
 

Chapter 5

5.1       Thyroid Cancer

5.1.1    Experience with Thyroid Cancer
5.1.2    Cancer Signaling Pathways and Tumor Progression
5.2      Brain Surgery
5.2.1   A Cousin’s Experience with a Pituitary Acromegaly
5.2.2    Loss of Normal Growth Regulation
5.2.3    Glioma, Glioblastoma and Neurooncology
5.3       Breast Cancer
5.3.1    Faces of Breast Cancer – Find Your Story, Join the Conversation
5.3.2    An Emotional and Thoughtful Decision Over BRAC1 and Surgery
5.4       Ovarian Cancer
5.4.1    A Curated History of the Science Behind the Ovarian Cancer
5.4.2    Good and Bad News Reported for Ovarian Cancer Therapy
5.4.3    Almudena’s Story:  A Life of Hope, Rejuvenation and Strength
5.5       Hematological Malignancies
5.5.1    Hematological Malignancy Diagnostics
5.5.2    Hematological Cancer Classification
5.5.3    Chemotherapy in AML
5.5.4    Update on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
5.5.5    Rituximab for a variety of B-cell malignancies
5.5.6    T cell-mediated immune responses & signaling pathways 
5.5.7    Gene expression and adaptive immune resistance mechanism
5.5.8    Sunitinib brings Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) to R
5.5.9    Management of Follicular Lymphoma
5.5.10   Gene Expression and Adaptive Immune Resistance Mechanisms 
5.6       Other Types of Cancer
5.6.1    Lung Cancer Therapy
5.6.2    Non-small Cell Lung Cancer drugs
5.6.3    Colon Cancer
5.6.4    GERD and esophageal adenocarcinoma
5.6.5    Melanoma
5.6.6   Adenocarcinoma of the Duodenum – Nathalie’s Story: A Health 
5.7     Organ Transplantation
5.7.1     Marcela’s Story: A Liver Transplant Gives the Gift of Life 
 

Chapter 6

6.1   Nutrition: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com
6.2   Epigenetics, Environment and Cancer: Articles of Note 
6.3   The relationship of stress hypermetabolism to essential 
6.4   Cancer Drug-Resistance Mechanism
6.5   Biochemistry and Dysmetabolism of Aging and Serious Illness
6.6   Experience of and Alleviation of Pain
 

Chapter 7

7.1   Metabolomics: its applications in food and nutrition research
7.2   Neutraceuticals

Part Three: The Voice of Open Heart Surgery Survivors

Chapter 8
8.1   A Patient’s Perspective: On Open Heart Surgery
8.2   Triple-bypass operation at age 69 – Ralph’s Story
8.3   A Fantastic Vessel-Clearing Innovation on The vessel-clearing 

 

VIEWS – All time for HEALTH CARE PROVIDER INSTITUTIONS –

LIVE Interviews by Gail Thornton

 

TITLE

URL

# Views

on 4/12/2017

Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries

# Views

on 4/12/2017

60

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/03/23/swiss-paraplegic-centre-nottwil-switzerland-a-world-class-clinic-for-spinal-cord-injuries/

 

60
University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland – A Prominent Center of Pediatric Research and Medicine

# Views

on 4/12/2017

84

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/21/university-childrens-hospital-zurich-universitats-kinderspital-zurich-switzerland-a-prominent-center-of-pediatric-research-and-medicine/

 

84
A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care — Richmond University Medical Center, New York’s Leader in Health Care and Medical Education

# Views

on 4/12/2017

 139

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/17/a-rich-tradition-of-patient-focused-care-richmond-university-medical-center-new-yorks-leader-in-health-care-and-medical-education/

 

139
Value for Patients – Turning Advances in Science: A Case Study of a Leading Global Pharmaceutical Company – Astellas Pharma Inc.

# Views

on 4/12/2017

329

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/24/value-for-patients-turning-advances-in-science-a-case-study-of-a-leading-global-pharmaceutical-company-astellas-pharma-inc/

 

329
A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

# Views

on 4/12/2017

670

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/22/a-new-standard-in-health-care-farrer-park-hospital-singapores-first-fully-integrated-healthcarehospitality-complex/

 

670

VIEWS – All time for Patient Experience

LIVE Interviews by Gail Thornton

 

TITLE

URL # Views
WEGO Health Awards Competition Focuses on Patients

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

17

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/09/13/wego-health-awards-competition-focuses-on-patients/

 

17
Almudena’s Story: A Life of Hope, Rejuvenation and Strength

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

109

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/10/almudenas-story-a-life-of-hope-rejuvenation-and-strength/

 

109
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The 13th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference: “From Concept to the Clinic”, November 14 – 16, 2017, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

The 13th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference will blend an exploration of all the issues facing personalized medicine with practical insights from both clinical experts and patients on how to move evolving concepts into the clinic. Among other topics, the program will cover value frameworks and pharmaceutical pricing, the implications of gene therapy and gene editing, the Trump administration’s perspectives on personalized medicine, and the role of big data.

The dialogue at the conference shapes the community’s agenda and guides the Coalition’s work. Anyone with an interest in the field is welcome to participate.

 

SOURCE

From: <pmc@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org>

Date: Monday, March 13, 2017 at 10:19 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: The 13th Annual PM Conference: “From Concept to the Clinic”

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