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Archive for the ‘Scientific & Biotech Conferences: Press Coverage’ Category


DISCOVER BRIGHAM | NOVEMBER 7, 2019, 10AM – 6PM

#DISCOVERBRIGHAM

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

 Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN will be attending and will cover presentations in real time

ABOUT BRIGHAM RESEARCH

Discover Brigham is hosted by the Brigham Research Institute (BRI), under the umbrella of Brigham Health. Launched in 2005, the BRI’s mission is to accelerate discoveries that improve human health by bridging the gaps between science, communication and funding. The BRI’s resources help to foster groundbreaking interdepartmental and interdisciplinary research. They provide a voice for the research community and raise the profile of Brigham Research.

Speakers

http://www.discoverbrigham.org/speakers/

 

AGENDA

http://www.discoverbrigham.org/agenda/

ASK A QUESTION WITH SLI.DO!

DO YOU WANT TO SUBMIT A QUESTION TO A SPEAKER OF A SESSION? YOU CAN DO IT THROUGH SLI.DO!

2. ENTER THE EVENT CODE: DB19. THEN HIT JOIN!
3. PICK THE SESSION YOU WANT TO ASK A QUESTION. THEN ASK YOUR QUESTION!
4. YOUR QUESTION WILL BE REVIEWED AND MAY BE FORWARDED TO THE CHAIR TO ASK THE SPEAKER(S).

IT WORKS ON ANY DEVICE, YOU DO NOT NEED TO INSTALL ANYTHING!

 

Registration will open at 9:00 AM and will be located throughout the hospital including

  • Schlager Atrium (formerly known as Cabot Atrium, 45 Francis Street Lobby),
  • Schuster Lobby (75 Francis Street Entrance),
  • Shapiro Cardiovascular Center (70 Francis Street Entrance), and the
  • Hale Building for Transformative Medicine (HBTM) 1st Floor (60 Fenwood Road).

 

Click here for directions to these locations.  

NAVIGATING THE BRIGHAM IS EASIER THAN EVER

Need directions to a clinic, conference room, public space, or help assisting someone who looks lost?

Try our browser-based wayfinding tool and mobile app, BWH Maps,
which provides real-time location tracking and directions in the hospital.

Look for BWH Maps on the Apple App Store and Google Play Store,
or visit maps.brighamandwomens.org.

REGISTRATION LOCATIONS

Please visit one of the registration desks listed below to check-in, receive your badge, and collect any necessary materials. Registration will begin starting at 9:00 AM at each of the locations below.

 

Click on each location below for directions. 

  • SCHLAGER ATRIUM, FORMERLY KNOWN AS CABOT ATRIUM (45 FRANCIS ST. LOBBY)
  • SCHUSTER LOBBY (75 FRANCIS ST. LOBBY)
  • CARL J. AND RUTH SHAPIRO
    CARDIOVASCULAR CENTER
  • HALE BUILDING FOR
    TRANSFORMATIVE MEDICINE

SESSION LOCATIONS

Below you will find directions to each of the session locations.

MARSHALL A. WOLF CONFERENCE ROOM

HALE BUILDING FOR TRANSFORMATIVE MEDICINE

SESSION ROOM

FROM 60 FENWOOD ROAD:
Enter at 60 Fenwood Rd lobby entrance.

STAIRS:
Take the lobby staircase to the 2nd floor. Walk past the balcony overlooking the atrium and take the stairs on the left (Stair 2) to the 3rd floor. Once on the 3rd floor, exit the stairwell and take a right. The room is to your right through the double glass door, straight ahead.

ELEVATOR:
Take S Elevator to 3rd floor. Take a right out of the elevator. The room is past the stairwell, on your right through the double glass doors.

HALE VTC 02006B CONFERENCE ROOM

HALE BUILDING FOR TRANSFORMATIVE MEDICINE

OVERFLOW ROOM FOR MARSHALL A. WOLF CONFERENCE ROOM

FROM 60 FENWOOD ROAD:
Enter at 60 Fenwood Rd lobby entrance.

STAIRS:
Take the lobby staircase to the 2nd floor. The conference room will be on your right near the display monitor.

ELEVATOR:
Enter at 60 Fenwood Rd main entrance and take the S Elevator to the 2nd floor. Once you exit the elevator, take a right and walk past the balcony overlooking the atrium and the conference room will be straight ahead near the display monitor.

ZINNER BREAKOUT ROOM

CARL J. AND RUTH SHAPIRO CARDIOVASCULAR CENTER

SESSION ROOM

FROM 70 FRANCIS STREET:
The Zinner Breakout Room is located in the Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Cardiovascular Center at 70 Francis Street, Boston, MA. Upon entering the building at the street level, walk straight towards the escalators in the rear of the building. The Zinner Conference Center is located on your right; the Breakout room is through the large doors on the left.

ZINNER BOARDROOM

CARL J. AND RUTH SHAPIRO CARDIOVASCULAR CENTER

OVERFLOW ROOM FOR ZINNER BREAKOUT ROOM

FROM 70 FRANCIS STREET:
The Zinner Boardroom is located in the Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Cardiovascular Center at 70 Francis Street, Boston, MA. Upon entering the building at the street level, walk straight towards the escalator, keeping to the left side of the building. The Conference Center is located on your right; the Boardroom is through the large doors on the back wall.

BORNSTEIN FAMILY AMPHITHEATER

MAIN PIKE, 45 FRANCIS STREET LOBBY

SESSION ROOM

FROM 45 FRANCIS STREET:
Coming from 45 Francis Street lobby, walk towards the Main Pike (2nd floor hallway). Then take left on the Main Pike, 2nd door on right.

AGENDA

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Opening remarks

Elizabeth G. Nabel, MD, President Brigham Health, Prof. Medicine @HarvardMed

  • 8th event since 2012
  • show casing amazing research
  • Open to the Public: Patients, Families to educate
  • 90 Posters
  • Health equity perspective as DNA of the Brigham
  • Learn a new idea, meet someone new, create a new idea

Keynote Introduction

David Bates, MD @DBatesSafety

KEYNOTE

KYU RHEE, MD, MPP, VICE PRESIDENT & CHIEF HEALTH OFFICER, IBM CORPORATION & IBM WATSON HEALTH

MAIN PIKE, 45 FRANCIS STREET LOBBY
  • Partnership BWH & IBM WATSON
  • Big data of claims from providers to payers
  • Waiting rookms in Healthcare delivery
  • Government: ACA
  • AI Spring is here, no more Winter for AI
  • Health disparities, salaries, sexual orientation – improving health of populations
  • Science & Security
  • Red Hat – data security – big data statoscope
  • Healthcare Culture & Technology Culture: IBM & Amazon hire healthcare professionals
  • Cost: Burnout, managing population health,
  • Reduce physicians burnout
  • Culture Tech – Competition by IBM’s Project Debater

11:15 AM – 12:50 PM

1:00 – 1:50 PM

FROM 70 FRANCIS STREET:
The Zinner Breakout Room is located in the Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Cardiovascular Center at 70 Francis Street, Boston, MA. Upon entering the building at the street level, walk straight towards the escalators in the rear of the building. The Zinner Conference Center is located on your right; the Breakout room is through the large doors on the left.

Aaron Goldman
HaeLin Jang
Greog K. Gerber
  • Microbiome – Bacteria and Fungus therapies – computational tools for applications on microbiome
  • Diagnostics
  • Microbiome in early childhood
  • temporal variability during adulthood
  • host disease bacteriptherapeutics: C-Diff
  • Bugs as drugs
  • Gnotobiotic mice model for c-Diff in mice
  • MDSINE – Microbial dynamin model interaction model
  • cancer microbiome: Bacteria causing cancer, cancer changing the bacteria environment

 

Jeff Karp BENG PhD @MrJeffKarp

  • tissue based patch to seal open foramane ovale. Project remained in Academic settings however
  • GLUE component was commercialized
  • bioinspiration from living organs in Nature, slugs
  1. Viscose secretions
  2. Hydrophobic secretions and snails and sand castle worms

1:00 – 1:50 PM

Lina Matta, PharmD
Joji Suzuki, MD
Lisa WIchmann
Kevin Elias, MD
Daiva Braunfelds,MBA HPH
Elizabeth Cullen, MS

2:00 – 2:50 PM

3:00 – 3:50 PM

David Levin
Christopher baugh
Kathryn Britton
Joanne Feinberg Goldstein
Amrita Shahani
If patient meets criteria for Home Hospital : all services are sent home.
2016 – Pilot randomized controlled trial
2017-2018 – Repeat of Pilot on larger population
2018 – High-volume single arm innovation services
2019 – studies within home hospital wtth sensors at home
2020 – continue
Operation and Research lead to innovations

Anna Krichevsky, PhD HMS Initiative for RNA Medicine

  • paradox of organismal complexity and # protein encoding genes
  • Human genome, 70% Transcriptome Non-coding RNA only 2% encode proteins
  • Non-coding RNA small, long, multifunctional
  • biogenesis of offending RNAs can be drugged
  • RNA novel therapies: RNA as a Drug,
  • Indications: Brain Tumors and AD: MicroRNA (miRNA)the smallest Glioblastoma – only 4 drugs FDA approved in 25 years miRNA – 10b inhibition kills gliomacells miR-132 most neuroprotective RNA
  • Cardiovascular

Paul Anderson, MD, PhD

  • ALS and FTD – Fronto Temporal Dimensia
  • Riluzone 1970 – anti Anti-glutamateric
  • Edarabone 2017 drugs approved – anti-oxidative
  • Andogenesis role in Motor protection from Stress Cytoplasmatic tRNA – ANdiogenin (ANG) production
  • 20 amino acids
  • 5″-tiRNAs assemble G-quadruples – G4
  • point mutationin ANG (mANG) reduce its RNanase
  • G4-containing DNA analogs of 5″-tiRNA (Ala)

Marc Feinberg, MD

  • Cardiovascular: CAD, Insulin resistence – Vascular inflammation
  • Impaired angiogenesis: post MI repair CHF
  • MiRNA therapeutics for Atherosclerosis – miR-181b: Aortic ECs Athero (mice) CAD (Human)
  • miRNA _ Liposomes injected in the vessel wall – reduction of inflammation in vessel – microRNA Group
  • monocyte – How can we increase or amintain mir-181b expression in endothelial cells?
  • LncRNA Therapeutics for vascular Senescence and Atherosclerosis – no effect on leucocyte accumulation no difference in inflammation
  • DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)
  • Does Loss SNHG12 triggers vascular senescence in the vessel wall

 

Clemens Scherzer, MD

  • The Protein RNA Brain
  • Dopamin p
  • BRAINCODE: 64% RNA: mRNA, ncRNA,
  • cell-type-spacific putative enhancer RNAs (eRNAs)
  • eRNAs indicate active genetic switches
  • central dogma in Biology: DNA, non-coding RNA, Protein
  • Top 10 Markers
  • Neuropsychiatric Disease: Parkinson: How do genetic variants function in specific brain cells: neurons, microglia, astrocytes
  • genetic variants of neuropsychiatric diseases over-localize to active eRNA sites in dopamine neurons
  • enhancers RNA – ADHD,
  • enhacers RNA – schizoprania, bipolar, addiction – antopsychotic Vlporic acid
  • BRAINCODE Project: BWH MGH HMS

5:00 – 6:00 PM

AWARDS & RECEPTION

SPECIAL PHOTO-OP TO CELEBRATE YOU!
WE WILL TAKE A GROUP PHOTO DURING THE RECEPTION AND AWARDS CEREMONY TO CELEBRATE YOU, OUR INNOVATORS!
THE PHOTO WILL BE DISPLAYED AT THE BRIGHAM IN THE HALE BUILDING. WE HOPE YOU CAN JOIN US IN CELEBRATING YOUR ACHIEVEMENTS.

SOURCE

http://www.discoverbrigham.org/agenda/

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Real Time Coverage @BIOConvention #BIO2019: Gene Therapy 2.0: No Longer Science Fiction 1:00-2:15 pm June 3 Philadelphia PA

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams Ph.D. @StephenJWillia2

kkjk

Other Articles on Gene Therapy on this Open Access Journal Include:

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Real Time Coverage @BIOConvention #BIO2019: Precision Medicine Beyond Oncology June 5 Philadelphia PA

Reporter: Stephen J Williams PhD @StephenJWillia2

Precision Medicine has helped transform cancer care from one-size-fits-all chemotherapy to a new era, where patients’ tumors can be analyzed and therapy selected based on their genetic makeup. Until now, however, precision medicine’s impact has been far less in other therapeutic areas, many of which are ripe for transformation. Efforts are underway to bring the successes of precision medicine to neurology, immunology, ophthalmology, and other areas. This move raises key questions of how the lessons learned in oncology can be used to advance precision medicine in other fields, what types of data and tools will be important to personalizing treatment in these areas, and what sorts of partnerships and payer initiatives will be needed to support these approaches and their ultimate commercialization and use. The panel will also provide an in depth look at precision medicine approaches aimed at better understanding and improving patient care in highly complex disease areas like neurology.
Speaker panel:  The big issue now with precision medicine is there is so much data and hard to put experimental design and controls around randomly collected data.
  • The frontier is how to CURATE randomly collected data to make some sense of it
  • One speaker was at a cancer meeting and the oncologist had no idea what to make of genomic reports they were given.  Then there is a lack of action or worse a misdiagnosis.
  • So for e.g. with Artificial Intelligence algorithms to analyze image data you can see things you can’t see with naked eye but if data quality not good the algorithms are useless – if data not curated properly data is wasted
Data needs to be organized and curated. 
If relying of AI for big data analysis the big question still is: what are the rates of false negative and false positives?  Have to make sure so no misdiagnosis.

Please follow LIVE on TWITTER using the following @ handles and # hashtags:

@Handles

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

@BIOConvention

# Hashtags

#BIO2019 (official meeting hashtag)

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Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD @StephenJWillia2

Science and technology bring tremendous value to society in years of life and quality of life, yet the public often perceives science as difficult, irrelevant or even threatening. Moreover, the inspirational and moving stories of scientists and innovators working around the world are often hidden or misrepresented in popular culture. Whose responsibility is it to communicate science and engage the public in supporting the scientific enterprise? Can everyone be a Champion of Science and what are the solutions to enlist and engage more champions of science across generations and geographies? How do we work together to enhance transparency, accessibility and relevance of science for everyone, everywhere? Can science become more inclusive and engage hearts and not only minds?

Join this exciting session as Johnson & Johnson announces the winners of the Champions of Science – BioGENEius Storytelling Challenge, and brings together other key stakeholders in a discussion about the importance of engaging the public to fall in love in science all over again.

Sponsored by: Johnson & Johnson Innovation

Seema: We need to solve the problem of the lack of trust in scientists.  Some of JNJ winners of their acheivement program went on to become Nobel Laureates.   Arthur Horwich and Hans Ullrich won the Jannsen Award for discovering compounds that could refold proteins, including protein chaperones.  Many diseases occur because of protein misfolding like neuro-degenerative diseases.
Seema:  Great science going on in Africa.  JNJ wanted to showcase the great science in Africa. they awarded four individuals with storytelling award (Emily).
Dr. Horwich: got interested in science early on.  Worked on N terminal mitochondrial signal peptides.  also then got interested in how proteins fold and unfold and refold since the 1950s.  He had changed the thinking of how proteins are processed within cells and over many years he had worked on this.
Emily Wang:  Parents and schoolteachers prodded her curiosity in biology. The impact of day to day work of scientists is arduous but the little things can lead to advances that may help people.  If passionate and have a great mentor then can get a foot in the door.  Worked at Stanford in the lab.
Dr. Mukherjee: He likes to cure diseases, physican first, scientist second, writer third but he doesn’t separate this.  In older times scientists wrote to think and true today. How we visualize the word, or use our hands, is similar.  He takes the word translational research very seriously.  Can you say in one sentence how this will help patients in three years?
There are multitude ways of love for science.
Dr. Pinela: loved asking big question and loved storytelling but asking bigger questions. Moved from Columbia and moved to US; loved the freedom and government funding situation at that time.  Need the training and mentorship so mentors are a very big aspect in innovation as it led her to entrepreneurship.  We need to use technology to disrupt and innovate.
Nsikin:  A lot of mentors nurture curiosity.  People like to see them in that story of curiosity.  That is how is bases the PBS science videos: did  a study on engagement and people wants a morality, and a science identity (an inner nerd in all of us i.e. spark the interest).  The feedback if they focus on this has been positive.

Please follow LIVE on TWITTER using the following @ handles and # hashtags:

@Handles

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

@BIOConvention

# Hashtags

#BIO2019 (official meeting hashtag)

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Real Time Coverage @BIOConvention #BIO2019: June 4 Morning Sessions; Global Biotech Investment & Public-Private Partnerships

Reporter: Stephen J Williams PhD @StephenJWillia2

Each country have their own needs and most important drug cost structure. Must involve patients and providers.
BCI survey: countries output different, who improved who didnt
Is industry having collaboration with government? hardly ten percent by survey and worse vice versa
Transparancy and holistic view important for collaboration
Korea: lack of communication need input from government on pricing; wants global open innovation and enhance RD investments
Tawain: price, price but based on efficacy; pharma needs to talk with doctors hospital patients, find balance
Pitts: we need trust; staff that country offices with people who know that country. Price not defining value
Columbia:  need to attract investors

Please follow LIVE on TWITTER using the following @ handles and # hashtags:

@Handles

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

@BIOConvention

# Hashtags

#BIO2019 (official meeting hashtag)

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Real Time Coverage @BIOConvention #BIO2019: Understanding the Voices of Patients: Unique Perspectives on Healthcare; June 4 11:00 AM

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD @StephenJWillia2

 

Description

The role of the patient has evolved dramatically over the past decade. Not only are patients increasingly more involved in their healthcare decision making, they are also passionate advocates who work tirelessly to advance drug development research and development and secure a public policy environment that is patient-centric. Join a discussion with patient advocates as they discuss their journeys to diagnosis and their viewpoints on our healthcare system. They will share their perspectives on what it means to be a patient and how they are advocating in their own unique ways to achieve a common goal: bringing new treatments to patients.

Speakers
Christopher Anselmo: affected by MS but did not understand why he should be involved in a study at the time or share your story but he saw others who benefited from both of these and now is fervent patient advocate. Each patient is worth their weight in gold as needed for other patient support.  The why needs to be asked of oneself before go out to other patients or into new trials. Might not see through to end if don’t have that discussion of why doing this.
Eve Bukowski:  she had stomach aches, went to hospital, and diagnosed with constipation, but had stage III colon cancer.  She was campaigning for Hillary Clinton but then started to campaign for her life.  She wound up having multiple therapies and even many I/O trials.  Fighting cancer is a mental challenge.   She has been fighting for eleven years but has an amazing strength and will.
Emily Kramer: cystic fibrosis patient.  Advocates for research as she has a mutant allele (nonsense mut) that is not targeted by the current new therapy against known mutants of CFTR.  So started Emily’s Entourage for this orphan of an orphan disease.  Funded $4 million in grants and helped develop a new startup and get early seed funding.  Noticed that the infrastructure to get these drugs to market was broken and also is investing to shore up these breaks in drug pipeline infrastructure for orphan diseases. For progressive diseases she would like drug developers to shift the timelines or speed with which they get to take a chance and try that new possibility. As a patient advocacy org, they want to partner every step of the way with biotech/pharma, they understand co’s and stakeholders can only do so much but let’s break out of convention.
Julie: many patient advocacy groups go person to person and make a support network.

Please follow LIVE on TWITTER using the following @ handles and # hashtags:

@Handles

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

@BIOConvention

# Hashtags

#BIO2019 (official meeting hashtag)

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SINGLE CELL GENOMICS 2019, September 24-26, 2019, Djurönäset, Stockholm, Sweden

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

http://www.weizmann.ac.il/conferences/SCG2019/single-cell-genomics-2019

 

Organizing committee

  • Ido Amit
  • Amos Tanay
  • Sten Linnarsson
  • Rickard Sandberg
  • Aviv Regev
  • John Marioni
  • Alexander van Oudenaarden

Sponsored by:


Single cell genomics has emerged as a revolutionary technology transforming nearly every field of biomedical research. Through its many applications (single cell genome sequencing, single cell transcriptomics, various single cell epigenetic profiling approaches, and spatially resolved methods), researchers can characterize the genetic and functional properties of individual cells in their native conditions, leading to numerous experimental and clinical opportunities. As technology is leaping forward, many critical questions are arising:

• How can the behavior of groups of thousands or tens of thousands of single cells be analyzed and modeled?

• How can samples of precise single-cell-states be converted to inferred cellular behaviour, in space and time?

• How can multimodal single-cell datasets be integrated?

• What can we learn about cell-cell interactions?

• What are the immediate implications to fields like neuroscience, immunology, cancer research and stem cells?

• What will the longer-term impacts be for clinical research and practice?

The conference will bring together many of the pioneers and leading experts in the field to three days of extensive, interdisciplinary and informal discussion. Our goal is to create a forum where knowledge is shared, hoping to define together the agenda of this new community. The meeting will include presentations from invited leaders and several selected abstracts, a poster session and many opportunities for interaction. We encourage students and postdocs to participate by presenting abstracts.

Speakers

  • Ed Boyden, MIT
  • Long Cai, CalTech
  • Joe Ecker, Salk Institute
  • Guoji Guo, Zhejiang University
  • Shalev Itzkovitz, Weizmann Institute of Science
  • Maria Kasper, Karolinska Institutet
  • Job Kind, Hubrecht institute
  • Allon Klein, Harvard
  • Keren Leeat, Standford
  • Ed Lein, Allen Institute
  • Evan Macosko, Broad Institute
  • Dana Pe’er, MSKCC
  • Nikolaus Rajewsky, Max Delbrück
  • Alex Shalek, MIT
  • Fabian Theis, Helmholtz Munich
  • Barbara Treutlein, Max Planck Institute
  • Hongkui Zeng, Allen Institute
  • Xiaowei Zhuang, Harvard

Program – pending

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