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PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT

Conference Program is available at

http://www.sachsforum.com/newyork14/


Event’s agenda available at:
http://www.sachsforum.com/newyork14/newyork14-agenda.html

Wednesday, 19th March 2014
Registration and coffee begins – 08.00
Program begins – 08.15
Networking reception will take place at 18.00 – 20.00

Once you arrive at 7 World Trade Center (250 Greenwich St, New York, NY10007, USA).
Please use the D Elevator Bank to the 40th floor where Sachs Team will welcome you at the registration desk.

For urgent issues, please contact:
Tomas@sachsforum.com (cell number +44 77 043 158 71)
Or Mina@sachsforum.com (cell number +44 74 636 695 04) Cells available from 15th March.

Announcement

LEADERS IN PHARMACEUTICAL BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE will cover the event for the Scientific Media

Dr. Lev-Ari will be in attendance on 3/19/2014 at 

The New York Academy of Sciences.

Editorials of event coverage via our 

Open Access Scientific Journal

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

Date             Views to Date      # of articles      “NIH Clicks”  “Nature Clicks”

3/05/2014      338,958                 1,717                 1,830                   965

  • 369 Articles on Cancer
  • 74 articles on Imaging-based Cancer Patient Management

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Cancer+

  • Cancer e-Book

Series C: e-Books on Cancer & Oncology

Series C Content Consultant: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

VOLUME ONE 

Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis

2014

Stephen J. Williams, PhD, Senior Editor

sjwilliamspa@comcast.net

Tilda Barliya, PhD, Editor

tildabarliya@gmail.com

Ritu Saxena, PhD, Editor

ritu.uab@gmail.com

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-c-e-books-on-cancer-oncology/cancer-biology-and-genomics-for-disease-diagnosis/

SIX SOURCES of INVESTMENT for BioMed INVENTIONS

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Investing and inventing: Is the Tango of Mars and Venus Still on

MEDIA COVERAGE

The Event will be broadcasted via our distributions channels on the Internet and all Search Engines featuring WordPress.com

  • Scientific Journal

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/03/05/milestone-for-our-venture-we-celebrate-our-top-authors-by-number-of-articles-in-the-journal-to-date-1000-301-58-49-46-43-40-28-20/

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  • 53 BioMed Groups on LinkedIn.com

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  • Dr. Lev-Ari’s BioMed Group launched by and managed by on LinkedIn.com – LEADERS IN PHARMACEUTICAL BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE

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2nd ANNUAL

Sachs Cancer Bio Partnering &
Investment Forum

Promoting Public & Private Sector Collaboration & Investment

in Drug Development

19th March 2014 • New York Academy of Sciences • USA  
spi2012

http://www.sachsforum.com/newyork14/

 

The 2nd Annual Sachs Cancer Bio Partnering & Investment Forum is designed to bring together thought leaders from cancer research institutes, patient advocacy groups, pharma and biotech to facilitate partnering and funding/investment. We expect around 200 delegates and there is an online meeting system and meeting facilities to make the event transactional. There will also be a track of about 30 presentations by listed and private biotechnology companies seeking licensing/investment.

divider

The 2nd Annual Sachs Cancer Bio Partnering & Investment Forum will cover the following topics in the program:

  • Advances in Translational Research
  • Strategies for Small Molecule and Biologicals Drug Development
  • Deal Making
  • Public & Private Partnerships
  • Diagnostics
  • Immunotherapies and Cancer Vaccines
  • Case Study

Confirmed Speakers & Chairs include:
Anne Altmeyer, Executive Director Business Development & LicensingNovartis Pharmaceuticals
Ariel Jasie, Executive Director of Business DevelopmentCelgene
Beth Jacobs, Managing PartnerExcellentia Global Partners
Boris Peaker, Executive Director, Biotechnology Equity ResearchOppenheimer & Co. Inc.
Carole Nuechterlein, Head Roche Venture FundF.Hoffmann-La Roche AG Roche Venture Fund
Dan Snyder, President and COOMolecularMD
Daryl Mitteldorf, Executive DirectorGlobal Prostate Cancer Alliance
Dennis Purcell, Senior Managing PartnerAisling Capital
Doug Plessinger, Vice President of Clinical and Medical AffairsArgos Therapeutics, Inc.
Elizabeth Bachert, Senior Director Worldwide Business DevelopmentPfizer
Esteban Pombo-Villar, COOOxford BioTherapeutics AG
Florian Schodel, CEO, Philimmune LLC
Frederick Cope, President and CSONavidea Biopharmaceuticals
Guillaume Vignon, Director of Global BD Oncology, Merck Serono SA
Harren Jhoti, PresidentAstex Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Harry Glorikan, Managing DirectorPrecision for Medicine
James Mulé, Executive Vice President and Associate Center Director for Translational Research,
H Lee Moffit Cancer Center
Keith Knutson, Program Director and Principal Investigator of the Cancer Vaccines and immune Therapies ProgramVaccine and Gene Therapy Institute of Florida
Kevin DeGeeter, AnalystLadenburg Thalmann & Co, Inc.
Klaus Urbahns, Head, Discovery TechnologiesMerck Serono
Kristina Khodova, Project Manager, OncologySkolkovo Foundation
Lorenza Castellon, Business Development ConsultantSuda Ltd.
Louis DeGennaro, Executive VP, CMO, The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society
Louise Perkins, Chief Science OfficerMelanoma Research Alliance
Mara Goldstein, Managing Director, Senior Healthcare AnalystCantor Fitzgerald
Michael Goldberg, Managing PartnerMontaur Capital
Nathan Tinker, Executive DirectorNewYorkBIO
Nicholas Dracopoli, Vice President and Head of OncologyJanssen Research & Development
Peter Hoang, Managing Director, Office of Innovations, Technology Based VenturesThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Philip Gotwals, Executive Director, Oncology Research CollaborationsNovartis Institutes for BioMedical Research
Robert Petit, CSOAdvaxis Inc.
Stephen Brozak, Managing Partner and PresidentWBB Securities, LLC
Steven Tregay, CEOForma Therapeutics
Steven W. Young, PresidentAddario lung Cancer Medical Institute
Stuart Barich, Managing Director, Healthcare Investment BankingOppenheimer & Company
Tariq Kassum MD, Vice President, Business Development and StrategyMillennium Pharmaceuticals
TBC, Cardinal Health
TBC, UCSD
Timothy Herpin, Vice President, Head of Transactions (UK), Business DevelopmentAstraZeneca
Vikas Sharma, Director, Business DevelopmentRexahn Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Walter Capone, PresidentThe Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

View the full list of 2013 Forum Speakers & Chairs >>

divider

Presenting Opportunities for Biotech, Pharmaceutical companies  and Patient Advocacy Groups

Presenting at the forum offers excellent opportunities to showcase activities and highlight investment and partnership opportunities. Biotech companies will be able to communicate investment and licensing opportunities. These are for both public and private companies. The audience is comprised of financial and industry investors. These are streamed 15 minute presentations. The patient advocacy presentations are 30 minutes.

Sachs forums are recognised as the leading international stage for those interested in investing in the biotech and life science industry and are highly transactional. They draw together an exciting cross-section of early-stage/pre-IPO, late-stage and public companies with leading investors, analysts, money managers and pharmas. The Boston forum provides the additional interaction with the academic/scientific and patient advocacy communities.

Sponsorship and Exhibition

Sachs Associates has developed an extensive knowledge of the key individuals operating within the European and global biotech industry. This together with a growing reputation for excellence puts Sachs Associates at the forefront of the industry and provides a powerful tool by which to increase the position of your company in this market.

Raise your company’s profile directly with your potential clients. All of our sponsorship packages are tailor made to each client, allowing your organisation to gain the most out of attending our industry driven events.

To learn more about presenting, exhibition or sponsorship opportunities, please contact
Mina Orda + 44 (0)203 463 4890 or by email: Mina Orda.

 

spi2012
Register Now
Register
To Exhibit
Register
To Present
OVERVIEW sachs Speakers sachs Presenting Companies sachs Attendees sachs Program sachs Sponsors / Supporters sachs Venue sachs Accommodation
Biotech i Europe Investor Forum
sachs sachs
Companies Who Presented at the 2013 Forum Included:
Aileron Therapeutics, Inc.
AnaptysBio, Inc
Argos Therpeutics, Inc
Atossa Genetics
BioCancell Ltd.
BioLineRx Ltd.
Cellectis
CENTROSE
Churchill Pharmaceuticals
Constellation Pharmaceuticals
CureVac GmbH
Dicerna Pharmaceuticals
Etubics Corporation
Genisphere
immatics biotechnologies GmbH
ImmunoGen, Inc
Life Science Nation
MacroGenics, Inc
Melanovus Oncology
MiNA Therapeutics
MolecularMD
Oncolix, Inc.
OncoSec Medical Incorporated
Oxford BioTherapeutics
RAMOT at Tel Aviv University
Rescue Therapeutics, Inc.
Sialix, Inc.
Sorrento Therapeutics
to-BBB technologies BV
TVAX Biomedical, Inc.
The 2nd Annual Sachs Cancer Bio Partnering & Investment Forum is designed to bring together thought leaders from cancer research institutes, patient advocacy groups, pharma and biotech to facilitate partnering and funding/investment. We expect around 200 delegates and there is an online meeting system and meeting facilities to make the event transactional. There will also be a track of about 30 presentations by listed and private biotechnology companies seeking licensing/investment.dividerThe 2nd Annual Sachs Cancer Bio Partnering & Investment Forum will cover the following topics in the program:

  • Advances in Translational Research
  • Strategies for Small Molecule and Biologicals Drug Development
  • Deal Making
  • Public & Private Partnerships

Confirmed Speakers & Chairs include:

The 2nd Annual Sachs Cancer Bio Partnering & Investment Forum will cover the following topics in the program:

  • Advances in Translational Research
  • Strategies for Small Molecule and Biologicals Drug Development
  • Deal Making
  • Public & Private Partnerships
  • Diagnostics
  • Immunotherapies and Cancer Vaccines

Confirmed Speakers & Chairs include:
Anne Altmeyer, Executive Director Business Development & LicensingNovartis Pharmaceuticals
Ariel Jasie, Executive Director of Business DevelopmentCelgene
Beth Jacobs, Managing PartnerExcellentia Global Partners
Boris Peaker, Executive Director, Biotechnology Equity ResearchOppenheimer & Co. Inc.
Carole Nuechterlein, Head Roche Venture FundF.Hoffmann-La Roche AG Roche Venture Fund
Daryl Mitteldorf, Executive DirectorGlobal Prostate Cancer Alliance
Dennis Purcell, Senior Managing PartnerAisling Capital
Doug Plessinger, Vice President of Clinical and Medical AffairsArgos Therapeutics, Inc.
Elizabeth Bachert, Senior Director Worldwide Business DevelopmentPfizer
Esteban Pombo-Villar, COOOxford BioTherapeutics AG
Florian Schodel, CEO, Philimmune LLC
Guillaume Vignon, Director of Global BD Oncology, Merck Serono SA
Harren Jhoti, PresidentAstex Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Harry Glorikan, Managing DirectorPrecision for Medicine
James Mulé, Executive Vice President and Associate Center Director for Translational Research,
H Lee Moffit Cancer Center
Keith Knutson, Program Director and Principal Investigator of the Cancer Vaccines and immune Therapies ProgramVaccine and Gene Therapy Institute of Florida
Klaus Urbahns, Head, Discovery TechnologiesMerck Serono
Kristina Khodova, Project Manager, OncologySkolkovo Foundation
Lorenza Castellon, Business Development ConsultantSuda Ltd.
Louis DeGennaro, Executive VP, CMO, The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society
Louise Perkins, Chief Science OfficerMelanoma Research Alliance
Mara Goldstein, Managing Director, Senior Healthcare AnalystCantor Fitzgerald
Nathan Tinker, Executive DirectorNewYorkBIO
Nicholas Dracopoli, Vice President and Head of OncologyJanssen Research & Development
Peter Hoang, Managing Director, Office of Innovations, Technology Based VenturesThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Philip Gotwals, Executive Director, Oncology Research CollaborationsNovartis Institutes for BioMedical Research
Robert Petit, CSOAdvaxis Inc.
Steven Tregay, CEOForma Therapeutics
Steven W. Young, PresidentAddario lung Cancer Medical Institute
Stuart Barich, Managing Director, Healthcare Investment BankingOppenheimer & Company
Tariq Kassum MD, Vice President, Business Development and StrategyMillennium Pharmaceuticals
Timothy Herpin, Vice President, Head of Transactions (UK), Business DevelopmentAstraZeneca
Walter Capone, PresidentThe Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

_______

View the full list of 2013 Forum Speakers & Chairs >>

dividerPresenting Opportunities for Biotech, Pharmaceutical companies  and Patient Advocacy Groups

Presenting at the forum offers excellent opportunities to showcase activities and highlight investment and partnership opportunities. Biotech companies will be able to communicate investment and licensing opportunities. These are for both public and private companies. The audience is comprised of financial and industry investors. These are streamed 15 minute presentations. The patient advocacy presentations are 30 minutes.

Sachs forums are recognised as the leading international stage for those interested in investing in the biotech and life science industry and are highly transactional. They draw together an exciting cross-section of early-stage/pre-IPO, late-stage and public companies with leading investors, analysts, money managers and pharmas. The Boston forum provides the additional interaction with the academic/scientific and patient advocacy communities.

Sponsorship and Exhibition

Sachs Associates has developed an extensive knowledge of the key individuals operating within the European and global biotech industry. This together with a growing reputation for excellence puts Sachs Associates at the forefront of the industry and provides a powerful tool by which to increase the position of your company in this market.

Raise your company’s profile directly with your potential clients. All of our sponsorship packages are tailor made to each client, allowing your organisation to gain the most out of attending our industry driven events.

To learn more about presenting, exhibition or sponsorship opportunities, please contact
Mina Orda + 44 (0)203 463 4890 or by email: Mina Orda.

SOURCE

http://www.sachsforum.com/newyork14/index.html

From: Mina@sachsforum.com
To: AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu
Sent: Mon Dec 16 12:01:21 UTC 2013

From: Tomas Andrulionis <Tomas@sachsforum.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 16:13:53 +0000
To: “avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu” <avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu>
Conversation: Complimentary Invitation for the 2nd Annual Sachs Cancer Bio Partnering & Investment Forum, 19th March 2014, New York Academy of Sciences

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Our FIRST e-Book on Amazon

(Biomed e-Books) [Kindle Edition]

VIEW COVER PAGE

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

  • Please write a REVIEW of One Article on AMAZON

>200,000 VIEWERS

>1,030 BioMed Articles

>1,230 Clicks from the NIH

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=4346921&trk=hb_side_g

http://twitter.com/pharma_BI

http://www.facebook.com/LeadersInPharmaceuticalBusinessIntelligence

  • Help us Promote our e-Books and we will do same for yours

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

BioMed e-Books Series – Editor-in-Chief

1-617-244-4024

avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

SKYPE: HarpPlayer83

http://www.linkedin.com/in/avivalevari

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

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Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

Founder & Director of Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence Services

 

 

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

These 12 women are powerful voices both in healthcare innovation and on Twitter

October 9, 2012 10:11 am by  | 47 Comments

Women make up only a small fraction of executives in the healthcare industry. But one place where they do have a striking presence is on social media – they account for 62 percent of Twitter users, 60 percent of DocStoc users and 58 percent of Facebook users.

You’d have no trouble finding thought-provoking women in the every part of the healthcare industry to follow on social media – that’s why it was so hard to narrow this list down to just 12. These women are patients, researchers, executives, investors and innovators who are making waves not just in their respective sectors but on social media as well. Feel free to share others who you enjoy following.

Regina Holliday (@ReginaHolliday) is a blogger, painter and founder of “The Walking Gallery” movement who uses social media to advocate for patients’ rights.

Geeta Nayyar (@gnayyar) is AT&T ForHealth’s first chief medical information officer.

Lisa Suennen (@VentureValkyrie) is a founding partner of healthcare investment fund Psilos Group. On the side, she writes hilarious posts at Venture Valkyrie (a syndication partner ofMedCity News).

Linda Avey (@lindaavey) is co-founder of personal genetics company 23andMe and is now focused on Alzheimer’s disease research.

Daphne Zohar (@daphnezohar) is the founder and managing partner at PureTech Ventures, which forms and leads technology and science companies.

Lygeia Ricciardi (@Lygeia) is acting director of the Office of Consumer eHealth at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, a branch of HHS.

Dr. Leslie Saxon (@DrLeslieSaxon) is the chief of cardiology at USC Keck School of Medicine and executive director of the USC Center for Body Computing who tweets about digital health.

Carolyn Buck Luce (@CarolynBuckLuce) is the head of Ernst & Young’s Global Pharmaceutical Sector and an adjunct professor at Columbia University.

Vinny Arora (@FutureDocs), an internal medicine doctor at the Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago, also runs the Future Docs blog.

Naomi Fried (@Naomi Fried) oversees innovation initiatives at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Melissa Cole (@MelissaColeHTR), a senior consultant for Healthcare Transformation Resources, focuses her tweets on patient safety and health IT.

Lesa Mitchell (@lesamitchell) is the vice president of innovation and networks at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2012/10/these-12-women-are-powerful-voices-both-in-healthcare-and-on-twitter/#ixzz2SjivSH8c

SOURCE:

http://medcitynews.com/2012/10/these-12-women-are-powerful-voices-both-in-healthcare-and-on-twitter/

 

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A medical record folder being pulled from the ...

A medical record folder being pulled from the records (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Designer Fund and the White House’s Health Design Challenge

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

The winners of Designer Fund and the White House’s Health Design Challenge have created beautiful, comprehensible, mobile versions. Soon, a combination of the best of the submissions will be open-sourced and implemented as the record format for the Veterans Affair Administration and its 6 million patients.

The challenge was launched in November by the White House and a new community of philanthropic angel investors called Designer Fund. Directed by five-year Facebook designer Ben Blumenfeld and 500 Startups founding team member Enrique Allen, Designer Fund aims to advise and back designer-led startups with a positive social impact.

The Health Design Challenge to redesign the electronic medical record (EMR) was a huge success, pulling in

  • 230 submissions
  • compared to 80 submissions in a previous White House health challenge.

Blumenfeld says that “from a quantity standpoint it was amazing, but from a quality standpoint too. People thought through all sorts of ways for the electronic medical record

  • to expand and live on mobile, and
  • have preventative care in there too.”

The overall winner  solved many of the biggest problems with the existing EMR. Those include

  • medication plans that are tough to understand,
  • unintuitive formatting,
  • impersonal statistics, and
  • the general feel of a decades-old print-out.

It will be the basis of the open-sourced final version of the downloadable medical record that other healthcare providers could adopt.

Nightingale creates an obvious hierarchy for all your health info, and uses styling to make it easy to read.
Patients are shown their statistics on a scale from concerning” to “doing well instead of as raw numbers

Rather than only showing your latest lab results, Nightingale puts them in context of your past tests to show how you’re trending. That’s critical, because

  • if your latest results says your cholesterol is too high but
  • the trend shows it’s coming down quickly,
  • you’re actually taking the right steps and shouldn’t make drastic changes.

Graphical timetables in Nightingale make it obvious when to take which medications. Nightingale is

  • accessible from mobile so
  • you can always check your dosage schedule,
  • which will help people make sure they take the meds on schedule.
  • set email and phone alerts to remind you it’s pill-popping time.

Mobile was a big theme among the top submissions.

Studio TACK, which took second place,

  • laid out ailments on a body map that could be viewed on your phone.

Josh Hemley’s M.ed won best medication design by creating a browsable deck of mobile medicine cards.

The challenge’s winners will split $50,000 in cash. Beyond that, Blumenfeld says healthcare companies he’s talked to are calling the winner’s showcase

  • “the perfect place to recruit from.”

But hopefully the winners see the real prize is helping 6 million VA patients and more truly understand their health

An electronic medical record example

An electronic medical record example (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Image representing Enrique Allen as depicted i...

Image by Enrique Allen via CrunchBase

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Mark Levin’s business is biotechnology, so it’s no surprise he knew zilch about a tech company called LinkedIn as recently as two years ago. But these days Levin sounds like he can barely do his job without it.

“I’m not the most social media savvy person. I haven’t used a lot of these tools at all,” Levin says, referring to blogs and Twitter. “But I’ll never forget, the first message I got from LinkedIn was an e-mail from what looked like someone called link-a-din. I remember asking myself about Mr. Link-a-din. I was trying to figure out ‘who the hell is this person?’”

Levin, a founding partner of Boston-based Third Rock Ventures and one of the more prominent biotech venture capitalists in the U.S., was a LinkedIn Luddite two years ago. To some extent, he still looks like one: his profile contains no photo, no professional biography, and only tidbits of information posted about his employment history. But appearances can be deceiving. He says he has amassed more than 5,000 connections, and the number keeps growing daily. He says he spends at least a half an hour per day on the site, sifting through more than 100 incoming connection requests a week, and firing off dozens more requests to people he wants to get to know. LinkedIn’s algorithms have gotten to know his tendencies so well, the site is constantly suggesting new people in biotech and pharma companies that he might want to meet. He often does.

Mark Levin of Third Rock Ventures

Levin became so obsessive at one point this year that LinkedIn temporarily shut down his account, until he called the company and assured them he’s a real person using the site for business. Just during a 15-minute phone interview with me on Friday, Levin said he got three new connection requests. One was from an MD that caught his eye immediately.

“About 18 months ago or so, I realized that is an extraordinary way to be in contact with people,” Levin says. “Our biggest challenge is to find great people. We don’t know everybody. And you can find a lot of great people here.”

While many in the tech press mock LinkedIn as an oh-so-boring compiler of mere resumes, it has become the indispensable online hub for networking in life sciences—an industry where relationships make the world go round. LinkedIn has a relatively puny user base of 187 million members around the world, compared to Facebook’s 1 billion, and there’s no question people spend way more time engaging with Mark Zuckerberg’s social network. But it’s also true there’s no question which site matters more to the life sciences. LinkedIn is the singular site for finding people in biotech, whether they are biologists, chemists, toxicologists, admin assistants, business development people, finance pros, or CEOs. There were more than 513,000 people in the LinkedIn database who self-identify as members of the “biotechnology” or “pharmaceutical” industry when I searched on those keywords Friday afternoon.

For journalists like me, this is an everyday reporting tool with almost as much value as Twitter, and possibly more. Even though I only use the basic free version of the site, it’s become an awesome clearinghouse of sources that I call on for help with scoops and analysis. I can slice and dice my network of 2,900 contacts by industry, title, location and more. It’s become a treasure trove of personal e-mails for sources, which I never have to manually update when people leave for new jobs, as they often do. It’s even turned into a place where people read a lot of my stories and the resource where I sometimes find new stories to pursue. In fact, I got the idea for this story by noticing that Levin and I have more than 500 connections in common.

for different reasons, but he raves all the same. Nothing great in biotech can happen without a magical mix of an idea, technology, people, and money.

“Our No. 1 goal in life is to know the best people in the industry who are going to make a difference in our companies,” Levin says. “I don’t remember when it exactly became clear, but it was clear to me that a lot of people were using it to stay in touch. We’ve realized it’s an extraordinary recruiting tool. The more I’ve spent time there, the more aggressive I have gotten.”

Levin isn’t kidding about the emphasis on recruiting at Third Rock, which has a “recruiting partner” in Craig Greaves, a former recruiter at Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) and Cubist Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: CBST). Levin says all this connecting and re-connecting sometimes leads somewhere fruitful, sometimes not, just like with all other recruiting techniques.

But Levin and his partner at Third Rock aren’t just fiddling around making random contacts, they are being systematic about the connections they form. Once he forms a connection on LinkedIn, he said he sends the new contact a short follow-up note to see what’s new in their lives or careers. He then e-mails his fellow partners to see if any of them know the person. Third Rock uses a premium version of LinkedIn, which has an application that automatically downloads all of Levin’s new contacts into a central database so that all members of the firm can see the person’s profile, Greaves says.

Sometimes an in-person meeting gets scheduled to follow up right away to see if there might be some kind of potential for a match at a Third Rock company. Often Third Rock uses the site for targeted searches, like, say, for an antibody engineer, Greaves says. Other times, it’s just to get acquainted with people who aren’t looking for work now, but might be able to join a startup, consult, or form a valuable partnership with a Third Rock company sometime later, he says.

“We are laying the groundwork and building a network for the long term,” Greaves says.

No doubt, LinkedIn has its potential for misuse just like any other technology, and users need to think about how to use it properly. Back when the site was formed in 2003, people were urged to connect only with people they knew well, because otherwise people might think you were tainted if a shady operator ended up appearing in your network. I think that stigma has largely gone away, because a connection is perceived now as really just like trading business cards, and not an endorsement or recommendation. People have also long worried about whether bosses might be able to use it to spy on their workers, and suspect whether they were getting restless, looking for a new job. I used to leave my entire connections list accessible on the web for anyone who connected with me, until I started connecting with people I don’t really know, and realized some may have ulterior motives that might interfere with my ability to break news.

There are plenty of areas on the site that leave something to be desired. LinkedIn Groups have always struck me as spammy, so I’ve unsubscribed to most of them. The site can be annoying with its constant urges to “update your profile” or “add skills to your profile” or now to “endorse” various people in your network. The whole site appears to be trying really hard to keep people glued to it like Facebook, by constantly updating their status and checking other people’s employment status, which can be annoying and a waste of time.

But the most irritating thing about LinkedIn, to me anyway, is that even though it has achieved critical mass, many C-suite executives and venture capitalists still resist signing up. For example, when I searched on the 40 names of “young and proven” biotech venture capitalists listed in this column two weeks ago, only 24 of the 40 (60 percent) showed up in the LinkedIn database.

I find it baffling that so many senior people in the industry still resist taking advantage of this resource, and have to wonder if they have some better idea on how to network. There’s no getting around the importance of networking. Biotech is a geographically far-flung industry, with hundreds of companies and vendors, who all need to work together in trusting relationships to keep the whole enterprise afloat.

Industry conferences have always been, and still remain, the gold standard way of networking. But those events take time and money, and nobody can do it every day of the week. LinkedIn is becoming the indispensable resource that glues an entire industry together, and helps people make connections between people and ideas and opportunities that would otherwise never be made. While biotech could certainly use a few more groundbreaking advances to make the drug development process more efficient, one of the fastest-growing new tools for the industry is a free resource just a click away on the Web.

Luke Timmerman is the National Biotech Editor of Xconomy. E-mail him at

ltimmerman@xconomy.com 

SOURCE:

 

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Will ‘gamifying’ drug R&D win more than Facebook fans for Boehringer?

By Tracy Staton, FiercePharma, August 22, 2012

Lots of computer games enlist players in quests to save the world. But how many would-be saviors are developing drugs? We can’t think of any–until now. Boehringer Ingelheim is on the verge of launching Syrum, a Facebook game of test tubes and titrations, not crossbows and assault rifles.

 “The health of the world is in your hands,” Boehringer’s director of digital, John Pugh, tells PSRK, in what could be a voice-over for a YouTube promo video for the game. “And you’re the only one who can save it.”

 Players have to solve a problem–e.g., a pandemic–via drug development, all the way from early discovery through clinical trials and launch. They can enlist help from Facebook friends, and advance in the game by checking into locations via the social network’s mobile app. “It wasn’t built with a view to being an educational platform,” Pugh says. “It’s very much a game which is meant to be engaging and entertaining … In the same way that Farmville doesn’t just appeal to people who like farms, Syrum isn’t just for people who like the pharmaceutical industry.”

But it was education that drew Pugh and his team into the project; as he points out for PSFK, the industry does a lot of it, whether that’s “educating” doctors about products, or teaching patients how to take their meds properly. Just because the game isn’t designed as an educational platform doesn’t mean it can’t educate, in a stealthy, backhanded way.

Syrum has been in development for two years. On Sept. 13, Boehringer will unveil a beta version at a London conference, aiming to get feedback from players for future iterations. “[T]he game will grow and evolve as more people play it,” Pugh says.

He also says Syrum is a “very unique offering from a highly regulated industry.” True. Whether it will remain unique depends, in part, on how Syrum actually fares. Will it attract a following? And if it does, will gamification of drug development actually benefit Boehringer’s business? Image? Relations with patients? Pharma’s social media advocates (and skeptics) will be watching.

John Pugh, Director of Digital for Boehringer Ingelheim, talks about driving innovation in his large organization with the forthcoming game Syrum – which he will launch at PSFK CONFERENCE LONDON on September 13.
 
 
 
 
By Tim Ryan on August 21, 2012.
  • John Pugh is the Director of Digital for Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH – a group of pharmaceutical companies that specialize in research and development for prescription medicine products. He spoke to PSFK recently about driving innovation in a large organization with his forthcoming game Syrum – which he will launch at PSFK CONFERENCE LONDON on September 13.

Your company has a new game, Syrum. What is it – and why is a pharmaceutical company like Boehringer Ingelheim involved in it?

What really sparked my interest in the potential of gaming is that a lot of what we do in pharma is around educating and teaching people; whether that’s teaching doctors about specific products, educating the general public and patients about diseases and healthy ways to live, or teaching people how to take their medication.

Gaming seems to be a useful way and effective way for us to do that. I basically began the journey to try and work out what I could do in gaming that wasn’t an arcade or platform based game — but was something a bit more immersive.

Syrum has been in development for at least two years. At the beginning, we called in lots of experts from different industries, different locations in countries, and with different skill sets. We had various leaders, from specialized futurologists to branding experts, from pharma people to gaming people, and even young entrepreneurs who’d made a million dollars by the age of 17.

We really worked together to create a vision of the future, and one of the strong things that came through was the influence of gaming and gamification.

After two years of hard work, the result is that we are about to launch Syrum, the pharmaceutical industry’s first social game.

syrum-boehringer-ingelheim

Can you tell us a little more about the gameplay in Syrum?

Syrum is a social game. The health of the world is in your hands, and you’re the only one who can save it. In each chapter, you have to solve a particular problem, which could be a disease or a pandemic that is sweeping the world. The player’s goal is to discover cures, create a stable drug, and then create a clinical trial so that you can launch the drug and cure the disease.

It’s a social game, because you can collaborate with friends or other people, and you can give them gifts, even headhunt their staff. As the game progresses, it gets more and more complicated.

syrum-boehringer-ingelheim-game

What do you think people will get out of it?

First, it’s a fun game. It wasn’t built with a view to being an educational platform or anything like that. It’s very much a game which is meant to be engaging and entertaining to play. In the same way that Farmville doesn’t just appeal to people who like farms, Syrum isn’t just for people who like the pharmaceutical industry. It’s for anyone to play.

It’s built on Facebook because that’s the world’s biggest gaming platform. What we really wanted to do was try to use a lot of the features of Facebook. For example we leverage Facebook Places, a service where people can check into locations. It’s really bridging that offline/online world. Places helps players market the products they make. Wherever the players check in through the Facebook mobile app, that data gets integrated into the game and you get rewarded accordingly.

syrum-boehringer-ingelheim-game

When will it be available?

September 13. We are taking a Silicon Valley approach, where we know we have got a really good game that’s stable but we’ll launch a beta version. We really want to make it so that we get lots of feedback from the people who are playing.

We’re offering rewards and prizes for people to give feedback so that we can really create the duration of the game, and develop it, and have more of a crowdsourced collaborative effort to develop the future stages of it, so the game will grow and evolve, as more people play it. This is a very unique offering from a highly regulated industry.

Can we finish by understanding your role within the organization – and how you drive change.

My job is anything which is connected to digital, so that includes apps, mobile, websites, gaming, crowdsourcing, and so forth. Our goal is to find applications for all of that. I bring to this company new ideas and I inspire them, educate them, cajole them, prod them to try new things, particularly in digital. I want BI to stretch out beyond the traditional marketing activities because in pharmaceuticals, and particularly at Boehringer, we’re still very traditional in what we do.

Thanks John!

Come see John talk about the launch of Syrum at PSFK CONFERENCE LONDON.

Syrum / @johnpugh / Boehringer Ingelheim

Click the banner below to purchase tickets and find additional information about this year’s event.

 

via PSFK: http://www.psfk.com/2012/08/pharma-social-game-psfk-london.html#ixzz24IgR5ZEm

http://www.psfk.com/2012/08/pharma-social-game-psfk-london.html

How Sanofi Is Writing The Social Media Rules For Big Pharma Without Running Afoul Of The FDA

BY BEN PAYNTER

 | 

AUGUST 20, 2012

After a Facebook PR meltdown two years ago, Sanofi has emerged as a social media leader with a robust community for diabetics. Here’s how they are writing #TheRules while the FDA catches up.

About This Series

#therules

Follow Fast Company’s roadmap to social media: surefire rules, data, and expert wisdom guaranteed to show why this market is completely unpredictable.READ MORE

The biggest challenge to treating patients with diabetes isn’t doling out medications, it’s making sure that people control their habits. Poor diet and lack of exercise generally create complications with the disease. To combat the problems, researchers in the diabetes division of Sanofi US took an unusual step for Big Pharma: they went social, jumping into online networking with a Facebook page, Twitter presence, and eventually three different engagement platforms.

“Treatment is an important aspect to blood sugar management, but it isn’t the only aspect,” says Laura Kolodjeski, Sanofi’s diabetes community manager, who has become the virtual face of the company. “There is a huge community of people already that live with diabetes and are connecting and sharing [online] to improve each other’s experience with the disease.”

 

Laura Kolodjeski

 

Sanofi now helps direct and police those interactions online. The company won’t release total visitor numbers, but it has about 4,000 followers on Facebook and another 4,000 on Twitter, all of whom are sharing links to broader content. And for better or worse that community is going to grow: About 8 percent of Americans or roughly 26 million people have diabetes, and the Centers for Disease Control predicts that as many as one third of us could have the disease by 2050.

But the social frontier is potentially prickly for Sanofi because the FDA has not yet written the rules about how pharmaceuticals are allowed to engage with potential customers and patients. The only guidelines came out in a December 2011 advisory statement declaring that while allowing virtual comments about things like off-label uses isn’t technically illegal, it’s shady territory; basically, pontificate at your own risk. “We are working on the area and it’s something we feel is important but we don’t have a specific timeline right now,” says Ernest Voyard, senior regulatory council at the FDA’s Office of Prescription Drug Promotion.

For Sanofi, drawing up their own social media strategy is also a defensive move: In 2010, the company’s cancer division suffered a PR nightmare after a patient, who claimed to have experienced permanent hair loss from one of their treatment drugs, posted complaints and photos on that group’s unmonitored Facebook page. John Mack, the editor of Pharma Marketing News, which tracks shifts in the pharmaceutical industry, says such hits are common anytime you try to pioneer a new space. “They’ve had some rough times, but they are learning a lot,” he adds.

Mack considers Sanofi a leader in the category, especially compared with the offerings from other companies. Diabetes juggernaut Novo Nordisk sponsors IndyCar driver Charlie Kimball to tweet @racewithinsulin, including when he injects with their products. And Pfizer’s ThinkScienceNow blog about developments and advances in research is wonky but not exactly customer friendly.

Sanofi has created a template they hope will eventually be deemed both acceptable to the FDA and cool for customers. The lessons they’ve learned in the last two years is a valuable addition to The Social Media Roadmap from our current issue.

Be Transparent

When she took over as social media director, one of the first things Kolodjeski did was post a bio with a photo of herself online at DiscussDiabetes to show who was moderating. She also disclosed that she wasn’t diabetic. Why? To build trust, the kind community members might not have for a faceless company run by mostly non-diabetics. The message: “If Laura is going to work every day to solve [issues] on our behalf, then others must be doing the same,” Kolodjeski says.

Rather than just explain the rules of their forums in a jargon-y “terms of use” agreement Kolodjeski also tapped Mark Gaydos, head of the company’s U.S. regulatory affairs for marketed products division, to do a Q&A about how the sites would function. For instance, anytime someone on the site mentions a product, they are technically promoting it, so there needs to be fair balance of potential benefits and risks explained alongside that per FDA guidelines. That means many posts get quarantined internally before posting, so the company can add additional links or annotations to more information. Sanofi only wants to allow discussion of FDA-approved uses for products–any mention of possible side-benefits or bonuses from tweaking the usual dose regimen is prohibited. To make sure everything meets these requirements, there is often a delay–sometimes up to 24 hours–between when users make comments and those comments become publicly visible.

To explain their business interest, Kolodjeski also interviewed Dennis Urbaniak, the head of the company’s U.S. diabetes business unit to explain what he calls the “360-degree partner” principle–an effort to inspire others to talk more and tap into that as a focus group for new ideas.

Let Users Shape Expansion

Sanofi launched their diabetes Facebook and Twitter handles in September 2010 mainly to offer news updates about the company and its offerings. On Facebook, any clinical questions were directed to a separate tab and often answered privately. On Twitter, medical concerns were covered via direct message. What was missing was a way to collect various poster’s lifestyle tips and inspirational messages all in one place. In January 2011, the company launched DiscussDiabetes to address that. They also run their own stories about successes, including highlights from A1C Champions, another company sponsored group of diabetics who have maintain the best or “A1C” target range of blood sugar levels.

By March of this year, the company took a look at the discussions that were being generated and realized that terms like A1C weren’t actually as universally understood as they once thought. To speed that learning curve, they launched Diabetepedia, which provides both simple definitions and links to other sites showing how terms are actually used in other online conversations.

The final step: After noticing how activity at Diabetepedia was spiking, Sanofi launched another site collecting lots of the content they were already linking to all in one place. The DX, which launched at the end of May, hosts daily dispatches by both Kolodjeski and stable of already popular bloggers (none of whom are paid directly) that include everything from a diabetes related comic strip to mommy blogs for parents with diabetic kids. “We really allowed the community to help identify what might be useful to them and where they might go next,” Kolodjeski says.

Give Users Even More Control

The medical glossary at Diabetepedia doesn’t just provide standard definitions to complex terminology, users are encouraged to submit their own entries, creating a sort of slang dictionary that makes complicated stuff more relatable to newcomers. For instance, glucoaster: that’s shorthand for “a rollercoaster of blood glucose levels, with blood sugar lows followed by blood sugar highs.” User contributions have helped the database grow by 30 percent to include more than 150 terms, all of which make it easier to users themselves to better convey thoughts in future postings.

The company also considers each media outpost an exclusive “channel,” which means there is lots of cross-posting of content from different platforms to make sure users who only tune into one place are being best served. “We certainly have people that overlap but for the most part people have selected which channel they feel represented by and communicate through,” Kolodjeski says. But at each stop, the company still tries to crowdsource bigger ideas.

This year, they asked users to help set priorities for the company’s annual Data Design Diabetes Innovation Challenge, which asks individuals, businesses and non-profits to create new initiatives for using big data to help others struggling with the disease. To help brainstorm for that, Sanofi’s social media troop was given the chance to visit a competition homepage and answer questions about what aspects of life with the disease might be consistently overlooked or ignored. Their answers were used to shape a final guideline for contestants that solutions must address the overall wellness and family life of patients, not just symptom mediation. The winner: a program created by the n4a Diabetes Care Center that matches people with certain cost or risk profiles directly to the services they might need to slow the progression or expense of the disease. Mood problems can be addressed by better disease management, hopefully cutting into the 18 percent of all diabetics who require hospitalization each year.

After realizing just how open users are to sharing and connecting, Sanofi also launched their own new product, the iBGStar, a personal blood glucose monitor that plugs directly into an iPhone or iPod Touch with an app that saves data and maps correlations between blood sugar levels and meal times, carb and sugar intake, and physical activity. Users can share results with their family or email them to health care providers. But the product, which hit the market in May 2012, wasn’t just inspired by early community actions; ensuing reviews and comments in their own forums will help refine future updates. “It’s a big hit with the online community,” Kolodjeski says. “It’s also given us a great opportunity to prove back to them that if we hear someone comment about something, we have the ability to engage in a public manner.”

Correction: An earlier version of this article said that iBGStar came on the market in 2011, it was released in May 2012.

http://www.fastcompany.com/3000457/how-sanofi-writing-social-media-rules-big-pharma-without-running-afoul-fda

Lilly to develop company-wide social media strategy

11 Jul 2012

 
Nearly two years after launching its first major foray into the world of social media in the shape of its LillyPad corporate blog, Eli Lilly is developing a company-wide social media strategy.

Lilly has so far had strict rules about who can use social media on behalf of the company, authorising just a handful of people in corporate communications and government affairs, but now wants to empower other departments to do so.

“There are a lot of parts of the company that are getting interested in social media so I’m working on a strategy that will keep these aligned with one another,” Lilly’s director of corporate communications Greg Kueterman told SMI’s Social Media in the Pharmaceutical Industry conference on Monday.

“We don’t want to have eight different social media platforms that all look and sound very different from one another. So we’re going to try and do something where they all have their own identity but are still consistent within the company.”

Kueterman acknowledged LillyPad, launched September 2010, and the company’s Campaign For Modern Medicines, a US health policy initiative Lilly founded last year that uses Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, were set up “before we had a full blown strategy”.

“But sometimes that is important,” he said. “Because you have to know what you have, before you can make it even bigger.”

The company’s Clinical Open Innovation team, a group working to improve the drug development process, also began using social media earlier this year, with a blog and Twitter account.

The next stage for Lilly will be to continue its expansion of LillyPad (as previewed herein March), following the launch in May of a Canadian version of the corporate blog.

“We’ve started to go global with LillyPad and we’re working with a number of our affiliates to do this. Lilly Canada has been the first one out of the box to do that and they’re off to a nice start,” Kueterman said.

Discussions are underway with the company’s European affiliates in the UK and Belgium along with its operations in Mexico. “Hopefully some of those are going to be launching this year, although we don’t have firm dates yet,” Kueterman said.

“We’re excited that this is a programme that’s going to start picking up momentum. Looking ahead there are still things that we can do much better. I’m never really satisfied with the way things are going with LillyPad – I’m happy, because I think we’re doing things the right way, but I also believe that we can be even more proactive than we are.”

• Links to Lilly’s social media presences can be found in the Pharma Social Media Directory‘s blogsTwitterFacebook and YouTube sections 

http://www.pmlive.com/digital_intelligence_blog/archive/2012/jul_2012/lilly_to_develop_company-wide_social_media_strategy

What Else Can We (Really) Do?

by Greg Kueterman 07/10/12 


On Monday, I had the pleasure of presenting Lilly’s social media history and strategy at a conference in London. The history part was easy: LillyPad — our first major platform — has been around for 22 months. We’re not experiencing the Terrible Twos just yet, but we’ve still got plenty to learn.

The London audience — consisting of European and U.S. communicators and marketing experts at the Social Media for Pharmaceutical Industry conference. — warmly embraced our strategy of addressing issues such as public policy and medical innovation. And the reception was not unusual. Over the last two years, we’ve talked LillyPad in live settings from London to New York to Indianapolis to San Francisco — and our peers typically offer two thumbs up for the good work.

For that, we are grateful. But it’s a good reminder about a couple questions we need to ask more often:

What else can we be doing? What else should we be doing?

As our loyal readers, you know what we offer — and you know what you need to become more informed. We would love to hear more from you: the good, the bad, and the ugly. We’re always looking to enhance LillyPad, and we’ve taken a lot of steps in recent months to do so (more video, more guest blogs, and — we think — clearer, more conversational writing). And while we will remain a non-product communications vehicle, we’re open to any and all ideas that make your LillyPad experience even better.

From London (where I’ve seen more rain in three days than my backyard has seen in two months) thanks for reading!

http://lillypad.lilly.com/entry.php?id=1736

 

 

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Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

On August 18, 2012, I needed scientific inspiration. To nurture my imagination I surf on http://www.mit.edu for 4 hours. Comment, Please.

The following links I am sharing with you from my exploration session to be inspired

Protein that boosts longevity may protect against diabetes: Sirtuins help fight off disorders linked to obesity, new MIT study shows.

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/sirtuins-may-protect-against-diabetes-0807.html#.UC9iyFFg1yk.facebook

Growing the best implant tissue | MIT video

http://video.mit.edu/watch/growing-implant-tissue-on-3-d-scaffolds-12286/

MIT 2012 Commencement Address

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pn24jP0YbTI

Salman Khan talk at TED 2011 (from ted.com)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gM95HHI4gLk&feature=relmfu

 

We are on Facebook

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gM95HHI4gLk&feature=relmfu

Cello Music Concert by Jacqueline du Pre

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&sclient=psy-ab&q=jacqueline+du+pré+elgar+cello+concerto&oq=Jacqueline+du+Pré&gs_l=hp.1.3.0l4.0.0.2.690.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0..0.0.les%3B..0.0…1c.q26G86iICpE&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=4d5ad5fc55e3e15d&biw=1038&bih=778

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