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Posts Tagged ‘Cancer – General’


Showcase: How Deep Learning could help radiologists spend their time more efficiently

Reporter and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

 

The debate on the function AI could or should realize in modern radiology is buoyant presenting wide spectrum of positive expectations and also fears.

The article: A Deep Learning Model to Triage Screening Mammograms: A Simulation Study that was published this month shows the best, and very much feasible, utility for AI in radiology at the present time. It would be of great benefit for radiologists and patients if such applications will be incorporated (with all safety precautions taken) into routine practice as soon as possible.

In a simulation study, a deep learning model to triage mammograms as cancer free improves workflow efficiency and significantly improves specificity while maintaining a noninferior sensitivity.

Background

Recent deep learning (DL) approaches have shown promise in improving sensitivity but have not addressed limitations in radiologist specificity or efficiency.

Purpose

To develop a DL model to triage a portion of mammograms as cancer free, improving performance and workflow efficiency.

Materials and Methods

In this retrospective study, 223 109 consecutive screening mammograms performed in 66 661 women from January 2009 to December 2016 were collected with cancer outcomes obtained through linkage to a regional tumor registry. This cohort was split by patient into 212 272, 25 999, and 26 540 mammograms from 56 831, 7021, and 7176 patients for training, validation, and testing, respectively. A DL model was developed to triage mammograms as cancer free and evaluated on the test set. A DL-triage workflow was simulated in which radiologists skipped mammograms triaged as cancer free (interpreting them as negative for cancer) and read mammograms not triaged as cancer free by using the original interpreting radiologists’ assessments. Sensitivities, specificities, and percentage of mammograms read were calculated, with and without the DL-triage–simulated workflow. Statistics were computed across 5000 bootstrap samples to assess confidence intervals (CIs). Specificities were compared by using a two-tailed t test (P < .05) and sensitivities were compared by using a one-sided t test with a noninferiority margin of 5% (P < .05).

Results

The test set included 7176 women (mean age, 57.8 years ± 10.9 [standard deviation]). When reading all mammograms, radiologists obtained a sensitivity and specificity of 90.6% (173 of 191; 95% CI: 86.6%, 94.7%) and 93.5% (24 625 of 26 349; 95% CI: 93.3%, 93.9%). In the DL-simulated workflow, the radiologists obtained a sensitivity and specificity of 90.1% (172 of 191; 95% CI: 86.0%, 94.3%) and 94.2% (24 814 of 26 349; 95% CI: 94.0%, 94.6%) while reading 80.7% (21 420 of 26 540) of the mammograms. The simulated workflow improved specificity (P = .002) and obtained a noninferior sensitivity with a margin of 5% (P < .001).

Conclusion

This deep learning model has the potential to reduce radiologist workload and significantly improve specificity without harming sensitivity.

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#JPM19 Conference: Lilly Announces Agreement To Acquire Loxo Oncology

Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

 

News announced during the 37th J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference (#JPM19): Drugmaker Eli Lilly and Company announced its plans to acquire Loxo for $8 billion, as part of its oncology strategy, which focuses  “opportunities for first-in-class and best-in-class therapies.”   

 

Please read their press release below.


INDIANAPOLIS and STAMFORD, Conn.Jan. 7, 2019 /PRNewswire/ —

  • Acquisition will broaden the scope of Lilly’s oncology portfolio into precision medicines through the addition of a marketed therapy and a pipeline of highly selective potential medicines for patients with genomically defined cancers.
  • Loxo Oncology’s pipeline includes LOXO-292, an oral RET inhibitor being studied across multiple tumor types, which recently was granted Breakthrough Therapy designation by the FDA and could launch in 2020.
  • Loxo Oncology’s Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib) is an oral TRK inhibitor developed and commercialized in collaboration with Bayer that was recently approved by the FDA.
  • Lilly will commence a tender offer to acquire all outstanding shares of Loxo Oncology for a purchase price of$235.00 per share in cash, or approximately $8.0 billion.
  • Lilly will conduct a conference call with the investment community and media today at 8:45 a.m. EST.

Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) and Loxo Oncology, Inc. (NASDAQ: LOXO) today announced a definitive agreement for Lilly to acquire Loxo Oncology for $235.00 per share in cash, or approximately $8.0 billion. Loxo Oncology is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of highly selective medicines for patients with genomically defined cancers.

The acquisition would be the largest and latest in a series of transactions Lilly has conducted to broaden its cancer treatment efforts with externally sourced opportunities for first-in-class and best-in-class therapies. Loxo Oncology is developing a pipeline of targeted medicines focused on cancers that are uniquely dependent on single gene abnormalities that can be detected by genomic testing.  For patients with cancers that harbor these genomic alterations, a targeted medicine could have the potential to treat the cancer with dramatic effect.

Loxo Oncology has a promising portfolio of approved and investigational medicines, including:

  • LOXO-292, a first-in-class oral RET inhibitor that has been granted Breakthrough Therapy designation by the FDA for three indications, with an initial potential launch in 2020.  LOXO-292 targets cancers with alterations to the rearranged during transfection (RET) kinase. RET fusions and mutations occur across multiple tumor types, including certain lung and thyroid cancers as well as a subset of other cancers.
  • LOXO-305, an oral BTK inhibitor currently in Phase 1/2. LOXO-305 targets cancers with alterations to the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), and is designed to address acquired resistance to currently available BTK inhibitors. BTK is a validated molecular target found across numerous B-cell leukemias and lymphomas.
  • Vitrakvi, a first-in-class oral TRK inhibitor developed and commercialized in collaboration with Bayer that was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Vitrakvi is the first treatment that targets a specific genetic abnormality to receive a tumor-agnostic indication at the time of initial FDA approval.
  • LOXO-195, a follow-on TRK inhibitor also being studied by Loxo Oncology and Bayer for acquired resistance to TRK inhibition, with a potential launch in 2022.

“Using tailored medicines to target key tumor dependencies offers an increasingly robust approach to cancer treatment,” said Daniel Skovronsky, M.D., Ph.D., Lilly’s chief scientific officer and president of Lilly Research Laboratories. “Loxo Oncology’s portfolio of RET, BTK and TRK inhibitors targeted specifically to patients with mutations or fusions in these genes, in combination with advanced diagnostics that allow us to know exactly which patients may benefit, creates new opportunities to improve the lives of people with advanced cancer.”

“We are gratified that Lilly has recognized our contributions to the field of precision medicine and are excited to see our pipeline benefit from the resources and global reach of the Lilly organization,” said Josh Bilenker, M.D., chief executive officer of Loxo Oncology. “Tumor genomic profiling is becoming standard-of-care, and it will be critical to continue innovating against new targets, while anticipating mechanisms of resistance to available therapies, so that patients with advanced cancer have the chance to live longer and better lives.”

“Lilly Oncology is committed to developing innovative, breakthrough medicines that will make a meaningful difference for people with cancer and help them live longer, healthier lives,” said Anne White, president of Lilly Oncology. “The acquisition of Loxo Oncology represents an exciting and immediate opportunity to expand the breadth of our portfolio into precision medicines and target cancers that are caused by specific gene abnormalities. The ability to target tumor dependencies in these populations is a key part of our Lilly Oncology strategy. We look forward to continuing to advance the pioneering scientific innovation begun by Loxo Oncology.”

“We are excited to have reached this agreement with a team that shares our commitment to ensuring that emerging translational science reaches patients in need,” said Jacob Van Naarden, chief operating officer of Loxo Oncology. “We are confident that the work we have started, which includes an FDA approved drug, and a pipeline spanning from Phase 2 to discovery, will continue to thrive in Lilly’s hands.”

Under the terms of the agreement, Lilly will commence a tender offer to acquire all outstanding shares of Loxo Oncology for a purchase price of $235.00 per share in cash, or approximately $8.0 billion. The transaction is not subject to any financing condition and is expected to close by the end of the first quarter of 2019, subject to customary closing conditions, including receipt of required regulatory approvals and the tender of a majority of the outstanding shares of Loxo Oncology’s common stock. Following the successful closing of the tender offer, Lilly will acquire any shares of Loxo Oncology that are not tendered into the tender offer through a second-step merger at the tender offer price.

The tender offer represents a premium of approximately 68 percent to Loxo Oncology’s closing stock price on January 4, 2019, the last trading day before the announcement of the transaction. Loxo Oncology’s board recommends that Loxo Oncology’s shareholders tender their shares in the tender offer.  Additionally, a Loxo Oncology shareholder, beneficially owning approximately 6.6 percent of Loxo Oncology’s outstanding common stock, has agreed to tender its shares in the tender offer.

This transaction will be reflected in Lilly’s financial results and financial guidance according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Lilly will provide an update to its 2019 financial guidance, including the expected impact from the acquisition of Loxo Oncology, as part of its fourth-quarter and full-year 2018 financial results announcement on February 13, 2019.

For Lilly, Deutsche Bank is acting as the exclusive financial advisor and Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP is acting as legal advisor in this transaction. For Loxo Oncology, Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC is acting as exclusive financial advisor and Fenwick & West LLP is acting as legal advisor.

Conference Call and Webcast
Lilly will conduct a conference call with the investment community and media today at 8:45 a.m. EST to discuss the acquisition of Loxo Oncology.  Investors, media and the general public can access a live webcast of the conference call through the Webcasts & Presentations link that will be posted on Lilly’s website at www.lilly.com.  The webcast of the conference call will be available for replay through February 7, 2019.

About LOXO-292
LOXO-292 is an oral and selective investigational new drug in clinical development for the treatment of patients with cancers that harbor abnormalities in the rearranged during transfection (RET) kinase. RET fusions and mutations occur across multiple tumor types with varying frequency. LOXO-292 was designed to inhibit native RET signaling as well as anticipated acquired resistance mechanisms that could otherwise limit the activity of this therapeutic approach. LOXO-292 has been granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation by the U.S. FDA for three indications, and could launch as early as 2020.

About LOXO-305
LOXO-305 is an investigational, highly selective non-covalent Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor. BTK plays a key role in the B-cell antigen receptor signaling pathway, which is required for the development, activation and survival of normal white blood cells, known as B-cells, and malignant B-cells. BTK is a validated molecular target found across numerous B-cell leukemias and lymphomas including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia, mantle cell lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma.

About Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib)
Vitrakvi is an oral TRK inhibitor for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with solid tumors with a neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase (NTRK) gene fusion without a known acquired resistance mutation that are either metastatic or where surgical resection will likely result in severe morbidity, and have no satisfactory alternative treatments or have progressed following treatment. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

About LOXO-195
LOXO-195 is a selective TRK inhibitor that is being investigated to address potential mechanisms of acquired resistance that may emerge in patients receiving Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib) or other multikinase inhibitors with anti-TRK activity.

About Eli Lilly and Company
Lilly is a global healthcare leader that unites caring with discovery to create medicines that make life better for people around the world. We were founded more than a century ago by a man committed to creating high-quality medicines that meet real needs, and today we remain true to that mission in all our work. Across the globe, Lilly employees work to discover and bring life-changing medicines to those who need them, improve the understanding and management of disease, and give back to communities through philanthropy and volunteerism. To learn more about Lilly, please visit us at www.lilly.com and www.lilly.com/newsroom/social-channels. C-LLY

About Loxo Oncology
Loxo Oncology is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of highly selective medicines for patients with genomically defined cancers. Our pipeline focuses on cancers that are uniquely dependent on single gene abnormalities, such that a single drug has the potential to treat the cancer with dramatic effect. We believe that the most selective, purpose-built medicines have the highest probability of maximally inhibiting the intended target, with the intention of delivering best-in-class disease control and safety. Our management team seeks out experienced industry partners, world-class scientific advisors and innovative clinical-regulatory approaches to deliver new cancer therapies to patients as quickly and efficiently as possible. For more information, please visit the company’s website at http://www.loxooncology.com.

Lilly Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements about the benefits of Lilly’s acquisition of Loxo Oncology, Inc. (“Loxo Oncology”). It reflects Lillys current beliefs; however, as with any such undertaking, there are substantial risks and uncertainties in implementing the transaction and in drug developmentAmong other things, there can be no guarantee that the transaction will be completed in the anticipated timeframe, or at all, or that the conditions required to complete the transaction will be met, that Lilly will realize the expected benefits of the transaction, that the molecules will be approved on the anticipated timeline or at all, or that the potential products will be commercially successful. For further discussion of these and other risks and uncertainties, see Lillys most recent Form 10-K and Form 10-Q filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“the SEC”). Lilly will provide an update to certain elements of its 2019 financial guidance as part of its fourth quarter and full-year 2018 financial results announcement. Except as required by law, Lilly undertakes no duty to update forward-looking statements to reflect events after the date of this release.

Loxo Oncology Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains “forward-looking statements” relating to the acquisition of Loxo Oncology by Lilly. Such forward-looking statements include the ability of Loxo Oncology and Lilly to complete the transactions contemplated by the merger agreement, including the parties’ ability to satisfy the conditions to the consummation of the offer and the other conditions set forth in the merger agreement and the possibility of any termination of the merger agreement, as well as the role of targeted genomics and diagnostics in oncology treatment and acceleration of our work in developing medicines. Such forward-looking statements are based upon current expectations that involve risks, changes in circumstances, assumptions and uncertainties. Actual results may differ materially from current expectations because of risks associated with uncertainties as to the timing of the offer and the subsequent merger; uncertainties as to how many of Loxo Oncology’s stockholders will tender their shares in the offer; the risk that competing offers or acquisition proposals will be made; the possibility that various conditions to the consummation of the offer or the merger may not be satisfied or waived; the effects of disruption from the transactions contemplated by the merger agreement on Loxo Oncology’s business and the fact that the announcement and pendency of the transactions may make it more difficult to establish or maintain relationships with employees, suppliers and other business partners; the risk that stockholder litigation in connection with the offer or the merger may result in significant costs of defense, indemnification and liability; other uncertainties pertaining to the business of Loxo Oncology, including those set forth in the “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” sections of Loxo Oncology’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017, which is on file with the SEC and available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. Additional factors may be set forth in those sections of Loxo Oncology’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter endedSeptember 30, 2018, filed with the SEC in the fourth quarter of 2018.  In addition to the risks described above and in Loxo Oncology’s other filings with the SEC, other unknown or unpredictable factors could also affect Loxo Oncology’s results. No forward-looking statements can be guaranteed and actual results may differ materially from such statements. The information contained in this press release is provided only as of the date of this report, and Loxo Oncology undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements either contained in or incorporated by reference into this report on account of new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by law.

Additional Information about the Acquisition and Where to Find It

The tender offer for the outstanding shares of Loxo Oncology referenced in this communication has not yet commenced. This announcement is for informational purposes only and is neither an offer to purchase nor a solicitation of an offer to sell shares of Loxo Oncology, nor is it a substitute for the tender offer materials that Lilly and its acquisition subsidiary will file with the SEC upon commencement of the tender offer. At the time the tender offer is commenced, Lilly and its acquisition subsidiary will file tender offer materials on Schedule TO, and Loxo Oncology will file a Solicitation/Recommendation Statement on Schedule 14D-9 with the SEC with respect to the tender offer. THE TENDER OFFER MATERIALS (INCLUDING AN OFFER TO PURCHASE, A RELATED LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL AND CERTAIN OTHER TENDER OFFER DOCUMENTS) AND THE SOLICITATION/RECOMMENDATION STATEMENT WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION. HOLDERS OF SHARES OF LOXO ONCOLOGY ARE URGED TO READ THESE DOCUMENTS CAREFULLY WHEN THEY BECOME AVAILABLE (AS EACH MAY BE AMENDED OR SUPPLEMENTED FROM TIME TO TIME) BECAUSE THEY WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION THAT HOLDERS OF LOXO ONCOLOGY SECURITIES SHOULD CONSIDER BEFORE MAKING ANY DECISION REGARDING TENDERING THEIR SECURITIES. The Offer to Purchase, the related Letter of Transmittal and certain other tender offer documents, as well as the Solicitation/Recommendation Statement, will be made available to all holders of shares of Loxo Oncology at no expense to them. The tender offer materials and the Solicitation/Recommendation Statement will be made available for free at the SEC’s web site at www.sec.gov

In addition to the Offer to Purchase, the related Letter of Transmittal and certain other tender offer documents, as well as the Solicitation/Recommendation Statement, Lilly and Loxo Oncology file annual, quarterly and special reports and other information with the SEC.  You may read and copy any reports or other information filed by Lilly or Loxo Oncology at the SEC public reference room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Please call the Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room.  Lilly’s and Loxo Oncology’s filings with the SEC are also available to the public from commercial document-retrieval services and at the website maintained by the SEC at www.sec.gov.

SOURCE

Eli Lilly and Company – https://www.lilly.com

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

2017

FDA has approved the world’s first CAR-T therapy, Novartis for Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel) and Gilead’s $12 billion buy of Kite Pharma, no approved drug and Canakinumab for Lung Cancer (may be?)

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/08/30/fda-has-approved-the-worlds-first-car-t-therapy-novartis-for-kymriah-tisagenlecleucel-and-gileads-12-billion-buy-of-kite-pharma-no-approved-drug-and-canakinumab-for-lung-cancer-may-be/

2016

Pioneers of Cancer Cell Therapy:  Turbocharging the Immune System to Battle Cancer Cells — Success in Hematological Cancers vs. Solid Tumors

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/19/pioneers-of-cancer-cell-therapy-turbocharging-the-immune-system-to-battle-cancer-cells-success-in-hematological-cancers-vs-solid-tumors/

2015

Personalized Medicine – The California Initiative

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/10/12/personalized-medicine/

2013

Volume One: Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-one-genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/

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Nathalie’s Story: A Health Journey With A Happy Ending

Patient was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the duodenum over two years ago and had tumor removed at age 35. Interview was conducted 2+ years post-surgery.

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

Nathalie Monette of Laval, the third largest city in Quebec, Canada, counts her blessings each and every day. The 35-year-old is looking forward to making her mark on a bright and promising future as a newly married woman with a supportive family, new job as head of internal communications for a public service organization, and a new lease on life. Diagnosed a little over two years ago with a rare cancer called adenocarcinoma of the duodenum, Nathalie never envisioned that her life would take many twists and turns before she and her doctors arrived at an optimal treatment regimen.

Nathalie describes some of the classic warning signs she had for about six months before her actual medical diagnosis: abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting, acid reflux and loss of weight.

“I felt sick all the time. I was losing weight and had pain in my upper abdomen after eating. My condition was getting worse with each week. My boyfriend, Jeff, at the time, who is now my husband, took me to several doctors who initially listened to my list of symptoms, examined me and told me to take antacids and avoid stress – and sent me home. It was increasingly becoming more difficult to manage my life, my relationships, and my job.”

The doctors in one hospital that she visited even considered she might be having a cardiovascular incident, since she was vomiting, was nauseous and had a stomach ache. Her blood levels were normal, which didn’t help the doctors, who, again, could find no serious health issue and sent her home.

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Nathalie Monette on the day of her wedding to Jeff. Top Left: Nathalie with her parents, Céline and Jean-Claude. Top Right: Nathalie with Jeff, and her two sisters, Julie and Marie-Claude. Below Right: Nathalie and Jeff.

For the next few weeks, Nathalie visited hospital after hospital in search of finding a more steadfast diagnosis of her condition – and a doctor who would listen to her and treat her symptoms.

“I was weak and vomiting. At this point, I kept losing weight — about 40 pounds in a total of six months.”

She decided to take the situation in her own hands and changed her diet, eliminating gluten, spices, and other major food groups. Nothing seemed to relieve her symptoms. She knew reading about possible medical conditions on the internet could cause additional stress. Having worked in the pharmaceutical industry, she was glad she knew where to look and what sources of information could be trusted.

Continued Search For Answers

“The medical system in Quebec is complicated,” she said. “In this public system, there is no family doctor assigned to you who follows your care year after year. And since I was perceived by the system as a young, relatively healthy woman, I was put on a waiting list for 3 to 4 years to be assigned to a general practitioner.”

Frustrated, hopeless and fearful for her health, Jeff got more involved in her diagnosis and took her to yet another hospital. Nathalie’s search took her from hospital to hospital and doctor to doctor with no known diagnosis.

“I was very angry, disappointed and at the end my rope. I just wanted to feel better and live my life.”

Then, one day, there was a ray of hope – and it took six months to find it. At a nearby hospital called Hôpital de St-Eustache where Jeff decided to take her, she came across two young physicians, Dr. Annie-Claude Bergeron, an emergency room doctor, and Dr. Marie-Hélène Gingras, a gastroenterologist, who happened to be Nathalie’s same age. Dr. Bergeron listened to her symptoms, examined her, and was determined to help her. A day later, Dr. Gingras ran several diagnostic tests, including an endoscopy and ultrasound, and more specialized blood tests.

“While undergoing the endoscopy, the doctor couldn’t find anything remarkable and was about to remove it. She decided to push the camera 5cm farther into my duodenum – and found the cause of my illness.”

Finally, Nathalie had definitive results. She had a 3½ cm (1.4 inches) tumor in her duodenum.

Dr. Gingras was devastated by the news she had to share. She called specialists in Montreal who would operate on Nathalie. Dr. Simon Turcotte, physician, hepatopancreatobiliary and liver transplantation expert who specializes in gastrointestinal cancer immunobiology and solid tumor immunotherapy, took her case.

“When Dr. Gingras told me about my condition, I was relieved and afraid at the same time. My heart sank when I got the news.”

Nathalie had a rare cancerous condition that only shows up in a handful of older people. It also was unusual that the tumor was situated in the duodenum rather than the colon, where most tumors of this variety normally occur. She also didn’t have history of that type of cancer in her family. She couldn’t even be tested for any genetic markers, since no genes have been identified as markers for this rare condition.

So, three weeks later, Nathalie was transferred to Hôpital Saint-Luc in Montreal, for a, hopefully, life-saving surgery. She had to trust her new expert, Dr. Turcotte, with her life.

“There was no room for error in removing the tumor. It was situated 1mm from my pancreas and every other vital organ I needed to survive.”

By nature, Nathalie is a strong, fiercely independent woman and there was no doubt she would come through the operation with flying colors.

About one month after surgery, she was scheduled for six months of chemotherapy to ensure that the cancer was eradicated. One day every two weeks, she received a powerful cocktail of Folfox (Leucovorin®, 5-FU, Adrucil® and Eloxatin®).

“Because of the chemotherapy, I had a minimal appetite, could not taste any food, could not drink or touch anything cold and needed to keep my weight at the same level.”

Her parents, Céline and Jean-Claude, two sisters, Julie and Marie-Claude, and Jeff, of course — were of great support and encouragement for her. Jeff insisted to meet with her nutritionist to determine a health plan so that she received the necessary nutrients in her food. Because Nathalie could not taste any food because of the chemotherapy, she tricked her mind by eating meals that she remembered from her childhood days. In that way, she was transported back in time mentally and she thought about the great food she had when she was growing up. Her parents were always on hand to cook these traditional meals that were filled with protein, spices, salt and fat to give her the added boost (and some taste) to help her system recover.

Duodenum, A Complex, Powerful Organ

Nathalie describes the duodenum as a complex organ – a C-shaped, hollow tube about 25-38 cm (10-15 inches) long, largely responsible for the enzymatic breakdown of food in the small intestine.

“This small but powerful organ is the shortest part of the small intestine which regulates the rate of how the stomach empties.”

According to the Inner Body web site, the duodenum receives partially digested food, called chyme, from the stomach and plays a vital role in the chemical digestion of chyme in preparation for absorption in the small intestine. Many chemical secretions from the pancreas, liver and gallbladder mix with the chyme in the duodenum to help chemical digestion. http://www.innerbody.com/image_dige02/dige21.html

Back to Normal

Nathalie’s life is back to normal, as much as it can be after such a medical ordeal.

“The past is just the past. I try not to think about the trauma that I’ve been through. I look forward as that is what is important.”

She got married last August (2015) to Jeff, who demonstrated his love to her the best way possible in caring for her throughout this ordeal. They met on the internet in 2010, at a moment when Nathalie wanted to leave the dating scene to focus on personal projects. They talked, met shortly after, and became great friends. Only a year later did Nathalie accept to be in a relationship with Jeff.

“About one week after my surgery when I was home, Jeff proposed marriage to me. I was visiting my family for Easter and Jeff had prepared everything. He had first asked my parents for my hand in marriage in the hospital a few weeks prior to my surgery. Then he prepared a charade with answers that related to the strength of his feelings for me. Funny enough, I did not understand what was going on at that point. Little did I know, he was declaring his love and it’s when he showed me a ring that I understood. Of course, I was overwhelmed with emotion and very touched that he got my family involved in the event.

“I am under regular care of my medical team of seven doctors – a gastroenterologist, oncologist surgeon, family general practitioner and many other specialists. I’ve had follow-up appointments at three months, six months, and one year. Those appointments include a gastroscopy, colonoscopy, scan, and blood tests, and so far, my health is the best ever. I like to tease the doctors when I see my charts – I look like an athlete on paper! In our Canadian medical system, each specialist treats only that part of the body. I make sure that all my test results are xeroxed and sent in advance of my appointment to each doctor. That takes time, but I am assured that everyone sees the same test results and can make educated decisions. That also makes for a more holistic view of my life.”

Advocate for Patient’ Rights

“Knowledge, access to information and caregiver support are probably the three most important factors in patient care. Medicine on its own is just not enough. Patients need a support system to balance out the highs and lows of searching through a medical condition, diagnosis and treatment plan. I hope one day to advocate for patient voices as it is a much needed part of our medical system.

“In hindsight, I realize all the doctors who saw me during the six months that I suffered prior to my diagnosis could not have known about my condition, unless they ran more tests. Surprisingly, I had done blood tests before that time for long-term disability insurance. The insurer had refused to insure me without explanation. Starting to be very sick, I did not pursue the work with them to understand their decision. Unfortunately, I learned a few weeks after my surgery that their test revealed the count of a certain type of protein was too high, therefore, too risky for them to insure me. They knew I was seriously sick but took about eight months to let me know. Had the insurer shared their results sooner, had doctors ran similar blood tests, or done a scan, I would have been diagnosed way sooner, which could have resulted in not needing chemotherapy.”

Incidence of Adenocarcinoma

Adenocarcinomas or malignant tumors of the duodenum are extremely rare, uncommon and difficult to manage and treat, according to Drs. P.L. Fagniez and N. Rotman in a book chapter in Surgical Treatment – Evidence-Based and Problem-Oriented, a medical textbook that assesses currently accepted clinical practice that takes into account when recommendations for patient treatment are made.The tumors represent 0.3 percent of gastrointestinal tract tumors and up to 50 percent of small bowel malignancies. They may arise from duodenal polyps or they may be associated with Celiac Disease. Five-year-survival varies widely according to published reports in the medical literature, but it is generally reported to be greater than 40 percent if the tumor is surgically removed. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK6953/.

Due to the low incidence of the disease globally, there is no randomized study comparing different types of treatment. In fact, the medical literature only discusses a small number of patients with this condition, who are usually older, or patients who are seen over a period of time. The treatment plan is complete surgical removal of the tumor, which is the only hope for a cure. Nonetheless, good long-term results have been observed with segmented tumor removal, particularly for tumors of the distal part of the duodenum, according to the same book chapter mentioned in the paragraph above.

A Bright Future Ahead

Nathalie believes in second chances and the value of waking up each and every day to new challenges and opportunities.

“Life is to be lived and enjoyed. I love what I do and I cherish my relationships, my work and my free time. In whatever I do, I give 100 percent.”

She believes she is very lucky to have had the diagnosis at this time of her life.

“In a way, my parents, my family, my husband were always present in my health journey. They followed up on doctors’ appointments, helped me with daily living chores, researched the medical literature, contacted new doctors, and generally, were my sounding board on everything. They were invaluable to me and it was my privilege that I am blessed with such a supportive family.

“I believe the road is set for you in life and it is up to all of us to seize the moment. My condition has given me strength to explore who I am and validate the way I always approach life.”

Nathalie Monette provided her permission to publish this interview on July 30, 2016.

 

Search Title:

Duodenum AND Cancer | Open Studies | Exclude Unknown in ClinicalTrials.gov Database. The search was conducted on July 30, 2016 and there were  45 studies found.

Presented, below, is a Subset of Clinical Trials on the List of 45 Studies related to Duodenum AND Cancer

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=duodenum+AND+Cancer&recr=Open&no_unk=Y

SEE LINK, Below for the list of clinical trials currently recruiting:

Subset of Clinical Trials on the List of 45 Studies – Duodenum AND Cancer (6)

Or you may click on the following individual links below for clinical trials that are currently recruiting:

Spectroscopy From Duodenum

Condition: Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma
Intervention: Other: Spectroscopy device

A Randomized Trial of Two Surgical Techniques for Pancreaticojejunostomy in Patients Undergoing Pancreaticoduodenectomy

Conditions: Pancreatic Neoplasms;   Biliary Tract Neoplasms;   Pancreatitis, Chronic;   Duodenal Neoplasms
Intervention: Procedure: pancreaticojejunostomy

Endoscopic Characteristics of Duodenal and Ampullary Lesions

Condition: Duodenal Diseases
Intervention: Other: Tissue Sampling

EUS GUIDED Transduodenal Biopsy Using the 19G Flex

Condition: Abdominal Neoplasms
Intervention: Device: Expect™19Flex needle (Boston Scientific Corp.,Natick,MA,USA)

Study of Gastroduodenal Metallic Stent vs Gastrojejunostomy

Condition: Gastric Cancer
Interventions: Device: gastroduodenal stent placement;   Procedure: gastrojejunostomy

Prevalence of Small Bowel Polyps in Patients With Sporadic Duodenal Adenomas

Condition: Polyps
Intervention: Device: Small bowel video capsule endoscopy (VCE) GIVEN/COVIDIEN LTD

Long-term Outcomes of Endoscopic Resection (ER) of Lesions of the Duodenum and Ampulla

Condition: Adenoma, Villous
Intervention: Procedure: Endoscopic Mucosal Resection

Prophylactic Octreotide to Prevent Post Duodenal EMR and Ampullectomy Bleeding

Condition: Adenoma
Interventions: Drug: octreotide;   Other: No octreotide

 

The Use of a Restrictive Fluid Regimen With Hypertonic Saline for Patients Undergoing Pancreaticoduodenectomy

Condition: Pancreaticoduodenectomy
Interventions: Drug: 3% NaCl Solution;   Drug: Lactated Ringers Solution

Effects of Pancreaticoduodenectomy on Glucose Metabolism

Conditions: Diabetes Mellitus;   Glucose Intolerance
Intervention:  —

 

 

REFERENCES/SOURCES

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=duodenum+AND+Cancer&recr=Open&no_unk=Y

http://www.innerbody.com/image_dige02/dige21.html

Other related articles:

Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK6953/.

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 2016

LIVE 8:10 am – 11:20 am 4/27/2016 Combination Cancer Therapies: Drug Resistance and Therapeutic Index & Cancer Diagnostics: New Uses, New Reimbursements? & New Philanthropy: Patients Driving Innovation@2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/live-810-am-1120-am-4272016-combination-cancer-therapies-drug-resistance-and-therapeutic-index-cancer-diagnostics-new-uses-new-reimbursements-new-philanthropy-patients-driving-i/

Colon cancer and organoids

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/15/colon-cancer-and-organoids/

Checkpoint inhibitors for gastrointestinal cancers

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/14/checkpoint-inhibitors-for-gastrointestinal-cancers/

2015

Gluten-free Diets

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/01/gluten-free-diets/

Gastrointestinal Endocrinology

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/02/10/gastrointestinal-endocrinology/

 

 

 

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Marcela’s Story:  A Liver Transplant Gives the Gift of Life

Patient is HCV Positive, liver transplanted from a 22-year-old donor performed at age 70. Interview conducted 14 years post-liver transplant.

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

For Marcela Almada Calles of Valle de Bravo, Mexico, a picturesque town on the shores of Lake Avándaro about two hours outside of Mexico City where she has lived for 30 years, life is about seizing the moment and having “an open mind and positive attitude.”  An active woman in her 80’s, Marcela’s days are full of professional and personal achievements and a long list of activities still to accomplish. However, life wasn’t always so positive as she put her life on hold for two-and-a-half years to relocate to Los Angeles, California, so that she could have a liver transplant.

“My spirit and attitude have always been what has carried me through life and difficult situations. This time was no different.”

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Marcela Almada Calles.   

Marcela’s story started 20 years ago during a time when she operated a successful event planning and catering business for high-profile government and social dignitaries, pharmaceutical companies, and luxury department stores.

“I normally worked long hours from early morning until evening, until one day, I felt exceptionally tired and it became a huge effort to concentrate. My ankles were swollen and I was out of breath all the time and my skin was yellow. I felt sleepy and would sometimes become tired during the day. This was unusual for me. I knew something was not right.”

At that point, Marcela decided to make an appointment with her local physician and friend, Dr. Sergio Ulloa, a highly regarded rheumatologist and corporate and government affairs leader in Mexico, who examined her and took several blood tests. When the blood results came back, Dr. Ulloa immediately referred her to Dr. Sergio Kershenovich, a well-regarded hepatologist, at his private clinic, who checked her for symptoms of Hepatitis C. After that Marcela decided to get another opinion and went to see Dr. Fernando Quijano, a general surgeon, who immediately wanted her to have surgery because he had found a cancerous tumor in her liver.

“My doctors’ opinions were that I needed to have a liver transplant immediately because I was in liver failure. It appeared that I had a failing liver — and a tumor there as well and my liver was not working properly.”

Relocating Life to the United States

At that point, my six children – Marcela, Luis, Diego, Rodolfo, Gabriela, Mario — who live in parts of Mexico and Singapore became involved in my health care decisions and treatment plan.

“My son, Luis, believed the best treatment for me was to see a liver specialist in the United States so that I received the best care from a leading liver transplantation hospital. He made some connections with friends and that next day, Dr. Francisco Durazo, chief of Transplant Hepatology and medical director of the Dumont UCLA Liver Transplant Center in Los Angeles, told me to come immediately to see him. I remember my children were supportive and concerned, but were afraid for me as we all knew that I had a long road ahead of me.”

At that time, she was put on a national liver transplant list by the UCLA Transplant Center.

“What I didn’t know was that more than 9,000 potential recipients are currently awaiting liver transplants.”  http://transplants.ucla.edu/site.cfm?id=397

“Dr. Durazo was very concerned and told me that my liver was not working at all and I had to have a liver transplant as soon as possible, so he asked me to stay in Los Angeles, since I was now part of a transplant list.”

Evaluation By Transplant Team

Marcela’s case is no different than any other patient awaiting a liver transplant. According to their web site, the UCLA Transplant Center conducts evaluations over two or three days. During this time, the patients meets with a social worker, transplant hepatologist, surgeon, transplant coordinator, psychiatrist and dietitian, as well as other specialists as needed. The evaluation is customized to each patient’s medical condition. Once the evaluation is completed, each patient’s case is presented at a weekly meeting of the UCLA Liver Transplant Consultation Team. This group includes specialists from surgery, adult and pediatric hepatology, cardiology, pulmonary, nephrology, hematology, infectious disease, as well as transplant coordinators and social workers. At this time, the team determines if any other tests are required to ensure the patient’s candidacy for transplant, then the patient and the physician are notified of the recommendation made by the transplant team. http://transplants.ucla.edu/site.cfm?id=401

Waiting For Answers

Marcela arrived at UCLA in Los Angeles with her family on Mother’s Day — May 10, 1999 — for what she describes as “the best time in her life to be alive with the help of medicine and technology.” That meant that she needed to rent an apartment and live near the hospital in case the doctors received an anonymous donor who would give her the gift of life.

“I had to wear a beeper 24 hours a day and I was never alone. My children took turns over the next two-and-a-half years to give up their lives with their families to live with me and help me navigate the health care system and my upcoming surgery.”

Marcela filled her days at her new apartment in Los Angeles reading about her condition, meditating to quiet her mind, watching television, and talking with family, friends and neighbors.

“The doctors called me two times over the next few months, saying they had an anonymous liver donor and I needed to come now to the hospital for tests. Unfortunately, those blood tests and other diagnostic tests showed that I was not a good match, so the doctors sent me home. It was a frustrating time because I wanted to have the liver transplant surgery and move on with my life.”

Finally, after waiting eight months for a liver transplant, Marcela’s outlook on life was greatly improved when an anonymous donor gave her the gift of life – a new, healthy liver.

“The donor’s blood type was a match for me. The surgery took eight hours and it was successful. The doctors told me that my immune system might reject my new liver, so I was given a cocktail of medicines, such as anti-rejection drugs, corticosteroids, calcinurin inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, and antibiotics and watched very closely in the hospital.”

Marcela was then permitted to leave the hospital only a week after her surgery.

“That was the happiest day of my life. My spirits were high and I had a life to live.”

Her children served as her strength.

“My children took turns flying back and forth to Los Angeles to stay with me. They had a long list of instructions from the doctor. I could take some walks and eat small meals for the next few weeks, but I couldn’t exert myself in any way. I developed a cold over the next few weeks, as my immune system was low, so I had to take special care to eat right, get enough sleep and, most of all, relax. My body, spirit and mind had much healing to do.”

For the next 1 ½ years, Los Angeles was my “second” home.

“I needed to remain there after the procedure so my doctors could monitor my progress. During that time, I felt stronger each day. The support of my family was a true blessing for me. They were my eyes and ears – and my greatest advocates. My doctor recommended that I come weekly for check-ups and go through a physical therapy program so that I could regain my liver function and physical strength. I followed all my doctor’s orders.”

Day by day, Marcela believed as if she could conquer the world.

“I decided, one day many months after the surgery, to become ‘irresponsible’ and spent time with a few good friends, Gabriela and Guadalupe, who traveled to see me. For a weekend, we went to Las Vegas to see shows and go to the casinos. I laughed, played and walked all I could. My children didn’t even know what I was up to, but I felt good and wanted to enjoy the world and my new freedom.”

Marcela was able to return home to Valle de Bravo with a fresh perspective, a long list of things to do, and many happy memories.

“Since that time, I have kept myself active and busy; I never let my mind and heart rest. I am also forever grateful to my anonymous liver donor because it is because of a 22-year-old young man who died in an unfortunate automobile accident that I am here today.”

Liver Transplant Facts

The liver is the body’s vital organ that you cannot live without. It serves many critical functions, including metabolism of drugs and toxins, removing degradation products of normal body metabolism and synthesis of many proteins and enzyme, which are necessary for blood to clot. Transplantation is the only cure for liver insufficiency or liver failure because no device or machine reliably performs all the functions of the liver. http://transplant.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/liver-transplantation.aspx

According to a hospital transplant web site, overall, outcomes for liver transplantation are very good, but vary significantly depending on the indication for liver transplant as well as factors associated with the donor. Currently, the overall patient survival one year after liver transplant is 88 percent. Patient survival five years after liver transplant is 73 percent. These results vary significantly based on the indication for liver transplantation. The encouraging trend is that over the past 20 years short- and long-term patient survival has continued to improve. With advances in surgical technique, organ preservation, peri-operative care, and immunosuppression, survival will hopefully continue to improve in the future. http://transplant.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/liver-transplantation.aspx

Life For Marcela Today

Science is helping rebalance medicine with the most innovative discoveries and new ways of treating illness.

“I am happy to be part of the solution with a happy ending, too.”

Today, Marcela leads a rich and full life.

“It’s been 14 years since my liver transplant. I continue to feel healthy and alive. Nothing will keep me from doing what I want to do.”

Marcela has an active social life. She takes frequent vacations around the world, including a three-month holiday to Asia, where she travels multiple times to Bali, Cambodia, China and Singapore, where her daughter lives. She is an avid golfer and organizes tournaments in many private golf courses. She is learning to speak French, which is an easy transition (she says) from speaking Spanish. She plays cards with a group of friends weekly, sings in a musical group, and takes dance lessons, too. Life is very, very good.

Editor’s note: We would like to thank Gabriela Contreras, a global communications consultant and patient advocate, for the tremendous help and support that she provided in locating and scheduling time to talk with Marcela Almada Calles.

Marcela Almada Calles provided her permission to publish this interview on July 21, 2016.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE 

http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/digestive-diseases-liver-transplantation

Other related articles:

Retrieved from http://transplants.ucla.edu/site.cfm?id=397

Retrieved from http://transplant.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/liver-transplantation.aspx

Retrieved from http://transplant.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions–procedures/liver-transplantation.aspx

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

AGENDA for Adoptive T Cell Therapy Delivering CAR, TCR, and TIL from Research to Reality, CHI’S 4TH ANNUAL IMMUNO-ONCOLOGY SUMMIT – SEPTEMBER 1-2, 2016 | Marriott Long Wharf Hotel – Boston, MA

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/15/adoptive-t-cell-therapy-delivering-car-tcr-and-til-from-research-to-reality-chis-4th-annual-immuno-oncology-summit-september-1-2-2016-marriott-long-wharf-hotel-boston-ma/

Technologies For Targeting And Delivering Chemotherapeutics Directly To The Tumour Site

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/technologies-for-targeting-and-delivering-chemotherapeutics-directly-to-the-tumour-site/

2015

3-D Printed Liver

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/16/3-d-printed-liver/

Newly discovered cells regenerate liver tissue without forming tumors

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/08/16/newly-discovered-cells-regenerate-liver-tissue-without-forming-tumors/

Novel Approaches to Cancer Therapy 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/11/novel-approaches-to-cancer-therapy-7-12/

 

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Personalized Immunotherapy: The Immuno-Oncology Summit August 30-31 2016 Boston MA

Reporter: Stephen J Williams, PhD

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business intelligence (LPBI) Group will cover in Real Time using Social Media

The CHI’S 4TH ANNUAL IMMUNO-ONCOLOGY SUMMIT – Personalized Immunotherapy

Personalized Oncology in the Genomic Era: Expanding the Druggable Space

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

will be streaming LIVE from the Marriott Long Wharf Hotel in Boston, MA

REGISTRATION

https://chidb.com/reg/imx/reg.asp

PROGRAM

http://www.immuno-oncologysummit.com/uploadedFiles/Immuno_Oncology_Summit/Agenda/16/2016-The-Immuno-Oncology-Summit-Brochure.pdf

 

 

Plenary Keynotes

TUESDAY | AUGUST 30

Matthew Goldstein

4:00 A New Era of Personalized Therapy: Using Tumor Neoantigens to Unlock the Immune System

Matthew J. Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Translational Medicine, Neon Therapeutics, Inc.

Neon Therapeutics, Inc. launched in 2015 to focus on advancing neoantigen biology to improve cancer patient care. A neoantigen-based product engine will allow Neon to develop further treatment modalities including next-generation vaccines and T cell therapies targeting both personalized as well as shared neoantigens. The company’s first trial will launch later this year investigating the combination of a personalized, vaccine with nivolumab in advanced Melanoma, NSCLC, and Bladder Cancer.

Michael Rosenzweig

4:30 Emerging Innate Immune Targets for Enhancing Adaptive Anti-Tumor Responses

Michael Rosenzweig, Ph.D., Executive Director, Biology-Discovery, IMR Early Discovery, Merck Research Laboratories

Novel cancer immunotherapies targeting T cell checkpoint proteins have emerged as powerful tools to induce profound, durable regression and remission of many types of cancer. Despite these advances, multiple studies have demonstrated that not all patients respond to these therapies, and the ability to predict which patients may respond is limited. Harnessing the innate immune system to augment the adaptive anti-tumor response represents an attractive target for therapy, which has the potential to enhance both the percentage and rate of response to checkpoint blockade.

 

Morganna Freeman

5:00 Reading Tea Leaves:
The Dilemma of Prediction and Prognosis in Immunotherapy

Morganna Freeman, D.O., Associate Director, Melanoma & Cutaneous Oncology Program, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute

With the rapid expansion of immunotherapeutics in oncology, scientifically significant advances have been made with both the depth and duration of antitumor responses. However, not all patients benefit, or quickly relapse, thus much scientific inquiry has been devoted to appropriate patient selection and how such obstacles might be overcome. While more is known about potential biomarkers, accurate prognostication persists as a knowledge gap, and efforts to bridge it will be discussed here.

Personalized Immunotherapy | The Immuno-Oncology Summit
August 30-31, 2016 | Marriott Long Wharf Hotel – Boston, MA

Personalized Immunotherapy
Personalized Oncology in the Genomic Era: Expanding the Druggable Space
August 30-31, 2016 | Learn More | Sponsorship & Exhibit Opportunities | Register by July 29 & SAVE up to $200!

Fueled with advances in genomic technologies, personalized oncology promises to innovate cancer therapy and target the previously undruggable space. Developments in immune checkpoint inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and adoptive T-cell therapies, as well as biomarker-driven immuno-oncology clinical trials, are enabling the next generation of cancer therapy. Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s Inaugural Personalized Immunotherapy meeting brings together clinical immuno-oncologists and thought leaders from pharmaceutical and biotech companies, and leading academic teams to share research and case studies in implementing patient-centric approaches to using the immune system to beat cancer.

TUMOR NEOANTIGENS FOR PERSONALIZED IMMUNOTHERAPY

Basics of Personalized Immunotherapy: What Is a Good Antigen?
Pramod K. Srivastava, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Immunology and Medicine, Director, Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine

Novel Antibodies against Immunogenic Neoantigens
Philip M. Arlen, M.D., President & CEO, Precision Biologics, Inc.

PD-1 Blockade in Tumors with Mismatch-Repair Deficiency
Luis Alberto Diaz, M.D., Associate Professor, Oncology, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center

PERSONALIZED IMMUNOTHERAPY WITH CANCER VACCINES

Cancer Vaccines in the Era of Checkpoint Inhibitors
Keith L. Knutson, Ph.D., Professor, Immunology, Mayo Clinic

Developing Therapeutic Cancer Vaccine Strategies for Prostate Cancer
Ravi Madan, M.D., Clinical Director, Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

Getting Very Personal: Fully Individualized Tumor Neoantigen-Based Vaccine Approaches to Cancer Therapy
Karin Jooss, Ph.D., CSO, Gritstone Oncology

Approaches to Assess Tumor Mutation Load for Selecting Patients for Cancer Immunotherapy
John Simmons, Ph.D., Manager, Research Services, Personal Genome Diagnostics

In situ Vaccination for Lymphoma
Joshua Brody, M.D., Director, Lymphoma Immunotherapy Program, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Immunotherapy Using Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] Vector Vaccines in the Cancer MoonShot 2020 Program
Frank R. Jones, Ph.D., Chairman & CEO, Etubics Corporation

PERSONALIZED CELL THERAPY

Integration of Natural Killer-Based Therapy into the Treatment of Lymphoma
Andrew M. Evens, D.O., Professor and Chief, Hematology/Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine; Director, Tufts Cancer Center

Dendritic Cells: Personalized Cancer Vaccines and Inducers of Multi-Epitope-Specific T Cells for Adoptive Cell Therapy
Pawel Kalinski, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Surgery, Immunology, and Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute

Mesothelin-Targeted CAR T-Cell Therapy for Solid Tumors
Prasad S. Adusumilli, M.D., FACS, Deputy Chief of Translational & Clinical Research, Thoracic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Synthetic Regulation of T Cell Therapies Adds Safety and Enhanced Efficacy to Previously Unpredicted Therapies
David M. Spencer, Ph.D., CSO, Bellicum Pharmaceuticals

Long-Term Relapse-Free Survival of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Receiving a Telomerase- Engineered Dendritic Cell Immunotherapy
Jane Lebkowski, Ph.D., President & CSO, Research and Development, Asterias Biotherapeutics

Activated and Exhausted Tumor Infiltrating B Cells in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Present Antigen and Influence the Phenotype of CD4 Tumor Infiltrating T Cells
Tullia Bruno, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor, Immunology, University of Pittsburgh

About the Immuno-Oncology Summit

CHI’s 4th Annual Immuno-Oncology Summit has been designed to support a coordinated effort by industry players to bring commercial immunotherapies and immunotherapy combinations through clinical development and into the market. This weeklong, nine-meeting set will include topics ranging from early discovery through clinical development as well as emerging areas such as oncolytic virotherapy. Overall, this event will provide a focused look at how researchers are applying new science and technology in the development of the next generation of effective and safe immunotherapies.

Monday, August 29 –
Tuesday, August 30
Tuesday, August 30 –
Wednesday, August 31
Thursday, September 1 –
Friday, September 2
Immunomodulatory Antibodies Combination Immunotherapy Adoptive T Cell Therapy
Oncolytic Virotherapy Personalized Immunotherapy Biomarkers for Immuno-Oncology
Training Seminar: Immunology for Drug Discovery Scientists Preclinical & Translational Immuno-Oncology Clinical Trials for Cancer Immunotherapy

For more info about sponsorship opportunities, including podium presentations and 1-2-1 meetings, please contact:

Companies A-K
Ilana Quigley
Sr Business Development Manager
781-972-5457
iquigley@healthtech.com
Companies L-Z:
Joe Vacca
Associate Director, Business Development
781-972-5431
jvacca@healthtech.com

For conference updates please visit
Immuno-OncologySummit.com/Personalized-Immunotherapy

Cambridge Healthtech Institute, 250 First Avenue, Suite 300, Needham, MA 02494 healthtech.com
Tel: 781-972-5400 | Fax: 781-972-5425

This email is being sent to sjwilliamspa@comcast.net. This email communication is for marketing purposes. If it is not of interest to you, please disregard and we apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.
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GE Healthcare has acquired Biosafe Group SA, a supplier of Integrated Cell Bioprocessing Systems for Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine Industry

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Researchers of University of Texas at San Antonio, USA, have developed a new, non-invasive method which can kill cancer cells in two hours, an advance that may significantly help people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumours, as well as young children stricken with the deadly disease.

 

The method involves injecting a chemical compound, nitrobenzaldehyde, into the tumour and allowing it to diffuse into the tissue. A beam of light is then aimed at the tissue, causing the cells to become very acidic inside and, essentially, commit suicide. Within two hours, up to 95 per cent of the targeted cancer cells are estimated to be dead.

 

The method was tested against triple negative breast cancer, one of the most aggressive types of cancer and one of the hardest to treat. The prognosis for triple negative breast cancer is usually very poor. One treatment in the laboratory was able to stop the tumour from growing and doubled the chances of survival in the mice.

 

According to the researchers all forms of cancer attempt to make cells acidic on the outside and attract the attention of blood vessels as an attempt to get rid of the acid. But, instead, the cancer cells latches onto the blood vessel and uses it to make the tumour grow bigger.

 

Chemotherapy treatments target all cells in the body, and certain chemotherapeutics try to keep cancer cells acidic as a way to kill the cancer. This is what causes many cancer patients to lose their hair and become weak. This method however, is more precise and can target just the tumour.

 

This research is presently extended on drug-resistant cancer cells to make this therapy as strong as possible. The researchers also started to develop a nanoparticle that can be injected into the body to target metastasised cancer cells. The nanoparticle is activated with a wavelength of light which can pass harmlessly through skin, flesh and bone and still activate the nanoparticle.

 

This non-invasive method will help cancer patients with tumours in areas that have proven problematic for surgeons, such as the brain stem, aorta or spine. It could also help people who have received the maximum amount of radiation treatment and can no longer cope with the scarring and pain that goes along with it, or children who are at risk of developing mutations from radiation as they grow older.

 

References:

 

http://www.ndtv.com/health/researchers-develop-new-method-to-kill-cancer-cells-in-2-hours-1424509

 

https://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/new-non-invasive-cancer-therapy-shows-promise-062916.html

 

http://www.mirror.co.uk/science/new-cancer-treatment-can-kill-8341452

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160627214423.htm

 

http://reliawire.com/photodynamic-acidification-therapy/

 

http://www.gizmag.com/making-cancer-cells-acidic/44070/

 

 

http://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/general-oncology/initial-photodynamic-therapy-tests-promising/article/508292/

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160627214423.htm

 

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/health/new-method-can-kill-cancer-cells-in-two-hours-shows-study/article8785315.ece

 

http://www.aol.com/article/2016/07/06/new-cancer-treatment-method-causes-cells-to-commit-suicide/21424984/

 

http://zeenews.india.com/news/health/diseases-conditions/new-method-that-can-kill-cancer-cells-in-2-hours-developed_1901377.html

 

http://www.digitaltrends.com/health-fitness/ultraviolet-light-kills-cancer-cells/

 

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/1385404/light-can-kill-cancer-in-just-two-hours/

 

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/168268/20160704/new-cancer-therapy-method-ultraviolet-light-may-soon-replace-chemotherapy.htm

 

https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/01/scientists-use-light-to-nuke-cancer-cells-in-mice/

 

Nuha Buchanan Kadri, Matthew Gdovin, Nizar Alyassin, Justin Avila, Aryana Cruz, Louis Cruz, Steve Holliday, Zachary Jordan, Cameron Ruiz and Jennifer Watts. Photodynamic acidification therapy to reduce triple negative breast cancer growth in vivo. Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol 34, No 15_suppl (May 20 Supplement), 2016: e12574.

 

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Vectorisation Of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Antibodies

Reporter: David Orchard-Webb, PhD

 

The FDA approved ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) and nivolumab (anti-PD-1) combination in October 2015 for the treatment of advanced melanoma. The antibodies have recently been approved in the UK for the same indication. Over half of patients respond to the combination [1]. These drugs belong to the class of monoclonal antibodies known as immune checkpoint inhibitors. The binding of anti-CTLA-4 antibodies to activated T cells prevents the surface CTLA-4 receptor from binding CD80 and/or CD86 on antigen presenting cells (APCs). Normally CTLA-4 binding to APCs deactivates the T-cell. Antibodies against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) work by a similar mechanism to CTLA-4. These drugs are delivered by repeated intravenous injections (iv) [2].

 

Oncolytic viruses are an emerging class of immunotherapeutics that actively stimulate the immune system by releasing tumour antigens via lysis and by virtue of anti-viral immunity. The first FDA approved oncolytic virus (Imlygic), developed by Amgen/ BioVex, was given the green light in October 2015 for advanced melanoma patients delivered via direct tumour injection. The mechanism of action of oncolytic viruses is highly complementary with checkpoint inhibitor antibodies and multiple trials combining these two classes of agent are under way.

 

At the recent American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana, the oldest biotechnology company in France – Transgene, presented preclinical data concerning oncolytic vaccinia viruses that express whole antibody (mAb), Fragment antigen-binding (Fab) or single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against mouse PD-1 [3]. These combinations proved superior over virus alone in mouse xenografts of melanoma and fibrosarcoma cell lines. Transgene claim that “these results pave the way for next generation of oncolytic vaccinia armed with immunomodulatory therapeutic proteins such as mAbs” (Figure 1) [3].

 

 698848905_d8bf7f415f_z
Figure 1: The convergence of therapeutics based on oncolytic viruses and monoclonal antibodies against immune checkpoint inhibotor proteins. Image Source: Eric Molina. No changes were made. Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0).

 

The combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors and oncolytic virus as a single molecular entity clearly has advantages in terms of manufacturing cost effectiveness. In addition viral vectors have the capacity for perfect specificity to tumours which has potential safety advantages.

 

REFERENCES

 

  1. http://www.bbc.com/news/health-365496740
  2. http://www.cancer.org/cancer/skincancer-melanoma/detailedguide/melanoma-skin-cancer-treating-immunotherapy
  3. http://www.transgene.fr/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/1604-Poster-AACR-format-122-244-v2.pdf

 

Other Related Articles Published In This Open Access Online Journal Include The Following:

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/12/oncolytic-virus-immunotherapy/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/09/23/oncolytic-viruses-a-new-class-of-immunotherapy-drugs-against-cancer/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/16/first-drug-in-checkpoint-inhibitor-class-of-cancer-immunotherapies-has-demonstrated-superiority-over-standard-of-care-in-the-treatment-of-first-line-lung-cancer-patients-mercks-keytryda/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/07/durable-responses-with-checkpoint-inhibitor/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/02/cancer-research-institute-nyc-623-6242016-will-combination-of-adoptive-t-cell-therapy-and-anti-checkpoint-inhibitor-therapies-be-the-next-wave/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/14/checkpoint-inhibitors-for-gastrointestinal-cancers/

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