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Archive for the ‘Breast Cancer – impalpable breast lesions’ Category


Relations between Breast Cancer and DIET: amino acid called asparagine

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

Diet may influence the spread of a deadly type of breast cancer, study finds

February 7, 2018, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Diet may influence the spread of a deadly type of breast cancer, study finds
Three-dimensional cell culture of breast cancer cells. Credit: National Institutes of Health (Dao Tiensinh)

A single protein building block commonly found in food may hold a key to preventing the spread of an often-deadly type of breast cancer, according to a new multicenter study published today in the medical journal Nature.

Investigators found that by limiting an amino acid called asparagine in laboratory mice with triple-negative breast cancer, they could dramatically reduce the ability of the cancer to travel to distant sites in the body. Among other techniques, the team used dietary restrictions to limit asparagine.

Foods rich in asparagine include dairy, whey, beef, poultry, eggs, fish, seafood, asparagus, potatoes, legumes, nuts, seeds, soy and whole grains. Foods low in asparagine include most fruits and vegetables.

“Our study adds to a growing body of evidence that suggests diet can influence the course of the disease,” said Simon Knott, PhD, associate director of the Center for Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics at Cedars-Sinai and one of two first authors of the study. The research was conducted at more than a dozen institutions.

If further research confirms the findings in human cells, limiting the amount of asparagine cancer patients ingest could be a potential strategy to augment existing therapies and to prevent the spread of breast cancer, Knott added.

The researchers studied triple-negative breast cancer cells, which grow and spread faster than most other types of cancer cells. It is called triple negative because it lacks receptors for the hormones estrogen and progesterone and makes little of a protein called HER2. As a result, it resists common treatments—which target these factors and has a higher-than-average mortality rate.

Research from past studies found that most tumor cells remain in the primary breast site, but a subset of cells leaves the breast and enters the bloodstream. Those cells colonize in the lungs, brain and liver, where they proliferate. The study team wanted to understand the particular traits of the tumor cells circulating in the blood and in the sites where the cancer has spread.

The researchers discovered that the appearance of asparagine synthetase—the enzyme cells used to make asparagine—in a primary tumor was strongly associated with later cancer spread.

The researchers also found that metastasis was greatly limited by reducing asparagine synthetase, treatment with the chemotherapy drug L-asparaginase, or dietary restriction. When the lab mice were given food rich in asparagine, the cancer cells spread more rapidly.

“The study results are extremely suggestive that changes in diet might impact both how an individual responds to primary therapy and their chances of lethal disease spreading later in life,” said the study’s senior author, Gregory J. Hannon, PhD, professor of Cancer Molecular Biology and director, Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge in England.

Investigators now are considering conducting an early-phase clinical trial in which healthy participants would consume a low-asparagine diet. If the diet results in decreased levels of asparagine, the next scientific step would involve a clinical trial with cancer patients. That trial likely would employ dietary restrictions as well as chemotherapy and immunotherapy, Knott said.

Studying the effects of asparagine also could alter treatments for other types of cancer, investigators say.

“This study may have implications not only for breast cancer, but for many metastatic cancers,” said Ravi Thadhani, MD, MPH, vice dean, Research and Graduate Research Education, at Cedars-Sinai.

 Explore further: Researchers identify specific protein that helps breast cancer to spread

More information: Simon R. V. Knott et al, Asparagine bioavailability governs metastasis in a model of breast cancer, Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/nature25465

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Standard of care for localization of impalpable breast lesions, aka Magseed, @ UCSF as First Adopter

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

PRESS RELEASE

23rd January 2017

  

UCSF first to adopt Magseed as standard of care for localization of impalpable breast lesions

Magseed technology guides surgeons during a breast lumpectomy to simplify treatment and improve patient experience

 

Cambridge, UK & San Francisco, CA, 23rd January 2017: Endomag, the cancer healthcare company, announced today that the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has become the first US site to adopt Magseed™ as its standard of care for localization of impalpable breast lesions. Magseed™ is a simpler, more effective alternative to traditional wire localization methods.

 

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women, with 1.7 million new cases of breast cancer globally every year, and is expected to double by 2030. Due to a rise in national screening programmes and an increase in public awareness, breast cancer is being caught at an earlier stage meaning that the tumors are smaller, less defined and harder to feel, with as many as 50% of all breast tumors impalpable at the time of diagnosis. In these cases, a technique called wire localization is typically used by surgeons to locate the tumor.

 

Although widely used, wire localization commonly causes complications. On average 1 in every 4 breast wire localizations result in cancerous tissue being left behind and requiring additional surgery because the wire has become dislodged between when it was implanted and when it was removed during surgery. Additionally, there is a risk of infection due to the wire protruding from the skin, so the placement of the wire must be done on the same day as surgery. These issues result in unnecessary anxiety for patients, delays to the surgical lists and fewer patients being treated as a consequence.

 

Dr. Eric Mayes, CEO of Endomag noted “The wire localization technique has remained largely the same since it was introduced over 30 years ago and it causes a lot of anxiety for patients. We wanted to create a technique that could simplify the localization process and improve the patient experience.”

 

Magseed™ is smaller than a grain of rice and can be placed into the tumor for up to 30 days, allowing the patient to return home ahead of surgery. Once implanted, the seed is not easily dislodged and patients are not restricted in movement or activity. During surgery the seed is detected with the Sentimag® probe to guide accurate removal of the tumor and maximising the amount of healthy tissue left behind. Unlike radioactive alternatives that involve strict regulatory oversight and complex logistics, the Magseed™ technique can be widely adopted by any hospital, regardless of size.

 

Dr. Laura Esserman (Breast Surgeon, UCSF) “We are excited to have a set of safe, easy to use tools that will improve the efficiency of identifying breast lesions and dramatically improve the experience of patients and clinicians, as well as the workflow in the operating room.”

 

 

Dr. Michael Alvarado (Breast Surgeon, UCSF) “We have been looking for a better alternative to wire localization for some time, as the wire procedure adds additional stress for the patients on the day of surgery and often causes delays to our operating schedule. Very early in our evaluation of the magnetic seed technique we found that we could avoid a same-day placement, and the surgeries could be completed in less time, without compromising accuracy. This offers a tangible benefit to both our clinical team and, most importantly, our patients.”

 

ENDS

 

Photo: X-ray showing a complete surgical specimen with negative margins and Magseed™ in the centre, next to the cancer.

For a high res image please contact lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com

 

For further information please contact:

Zyme Communications

Lorna Cuddon

Tel: +44 (0)7811 996 942

Email: lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com

 

About Endomag http://www.endomag.com 

Endomag is a pioneer in the use of magnetism for minimally-invasive surgical guidance.  By addressing unmet needs in availability, affordability and workflow efficiency for surgical oncology, we support our mission to improve the global standard of cancer care for everyone, everywhere.

 

Founded as a spin-out from the University of Houston and the University College London (UCL) in 2007, we continue to develop our unique clinical platform that uses magnetic fields to power diagnostic and therapeutic devices.  The company has sales in over 30 countries worldwide and is headquartered in Cambridge, United Kingdom.

 

UC Disclaimer

The information stated above was prepared by Endomag, and reflects solely the opinion of the corporation. Nothing in this statement shall be construed to imply any support or endorsement of Endomag, or any of its products, by The Regents of the University of California, its officers, agents and employees.

SOURCE

From: Lorna Cuddon <lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com>

Reply-To: <lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com>

Date: Monday, January 23, 2017 at 9:16 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: UCSF first to adopt Magseed as standard of care for localization of impalpable breast lesions

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