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Archive for the ‘Surgical Procedure’ Category


Forthcoming e-Book on Amazon.com

Inspiring Book for Cancer Survivors, Cancer Patients and Cardiac Patients

 

“The VOICES of Patients, Hospitals CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures”

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076HGB6MZ

 

CLICK, below for All the 11 we published on Amazon.com

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_ebooks_9?ie=UTF8&text=Aviva+Lev-Ari&search-alias=digital-text&field-author=Aviva+Lev-Ari&sort=relevancerank

The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Care Givers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

2017 

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, Northampton, MA

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

and

Contributing Editor and Author

Gail S. Thornton, PhD(c)

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, New Jersey

gailsthornton@yahoo.com

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Editor-in-Chief BioMed e-Series of e-Books

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, Boston

avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu

BioMedical e-Books e-Series:

Cardiovascular, Genomics, Cancer, BioMed, Patient-centered Medicine

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

Abbreviated electronic Table of Contents (eTOCs)

Part One: Perceptions of Care

Chapter 1

1.1    Personal Tale of JL’s Whole Genome Sequencing
1.2    Live Notes from @AACR’s #cbi16 Meeting on Precision 
1.3    Live Notes from @AACR’s #cbi16 Meeting on Precision 
1.4    Supportive Treatments: Hold the Mind Strong During Cancer
1.5    Finding My Voice: A Laryngectomee’s Story
 

Chapter 2

2.1     Delivery of Care – See Live links in the body of the e-Book, below

2.2  Hospital CEO:  A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park 
2.3  Drug Discovery for Cancer Cure:  Value for Patients – Turning 
2.4  Hospital CEO: A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care 
2.5  Hospital CEO:  University Children’s Hospital Zurich 

2.6 Hospital CEO: Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries

Part Two: The Voice of Cancer Survivors

Chapter 3

3.1    Cancer Companion Diagnostics

3.2    lncRNAs in Human Cancers
3.3    Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance
3.4    Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers for Personalized Cancer 
 

Chapter 4

4.1 Personalized Medicine: Cancer Cell Biology and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

4.2    Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse 
 

Chapter 5

5.1       Thyroid Cancer

5.1.1    Experience with Thyroid Cancer
5.1.2    Cancer Signaling Pathways and Tumor Progression
5.2      Brain Surgery
5.2.1   A Cousin’s Experience with a Pituitary Acromegaly
5.2.2    Loss of Normal Growth Regulation
5.2.3    Glioma, Glioblastoma and Neurooncology
5.3       Breast Cancer
5.3.1    Faces of Breast Cancer – Find Your Story, Join the Conversation
5.3.2    An Emotional and Thoughtful Decision Over BRAC1 and Surgery
5.4       Ovarian Cancer
5.4.1    A Curated History of the Science Behind the Ovarian Cancer
5.4.2    Good and Bad News Reported for Ovarian Cancer Therapy
5.4.3    Almudena’s Story:  A Life of Hope, Rejuvenation and Strength
5.5       Hematological Malignancies
5.5.1    Hematological Malignancy Diagnostics
5.5.2    Hematological Cancer Classification
5.5.3    Chemotherapy in AML
5.5.4    Update on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
5.5.5    Rituximab for a variety of B-cell malignancies
5.5.6    T cell-mediated immune responses & signaling pathways 
5.5.7    Gene expression and adaptive immune resistance mechanism
5.5.8    Sunitinib brings Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) to R
5.5.9    Management of Follicular Lymphoma
5.5.10   Gene Expression and Adaptive Immune Resistance Mechanisms 
5.6       Other Types of Cancer
5.6.1    Lung Cancer Therapy
5.6.2    Non-small Cell Lung Cancer drugs
5.6.3    Colon Cancer
5.6.4    GERD and esophageal adenocarcinoma
5.6.5    Melanoma
5.6.6   Adenocarcinoma of the Duodenum – Nathalie’s Story: A Health 
5.7     Organ Transplantation
5.7.1     Marcela’s Story: A Liver Transplant Gives the Gift of Life 
 

Chapter 6

6.1   Nutrition: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com
6.2   Epigenetics, Environment and Cancer: Articles of Note 
6.3   The relationship of stress hypermetabolism to essential 
6.4   Cancer Drug-Resistance Mechanism
6.5   Biochemistry and Dysmetabolism of Aging and Serious Illness
6.6   Experience of and Alleviation of Pain
 

Chapter 7

7.1   Metabolomics: its applications in food and nutrition research
7.2   Neutraceuticals

Part Three: The Voice of Open Heart Surgery Survivors

Chapter 8
8.1   A Patient’s Perspective: On Open Heart Surgery
8.2   Triple-bypass operation at age 69 – Ralph’s Story
8.3   A Fantastic Vessel-Clearing Innovation on The vessel-clearing 

 

VIEWS – All time for HEALTH CARE PROVIDER INSTITUTIONS –

LIVE Interviews by Gail Thornton

 

TITLE

URL

# Views

on 4/12/2017

Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries

# Views

on 4/12/2017

60

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/03/23/swiss-paraplegic-centre-nottwil-switzerland-a-world-class-clinic-for-spinal-cord-injuries/

 

60
University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland – A Prominent Center of Pediatric Research and Medicine

# Views

on 4/12/2017

84

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/21/university-childrens-hospital-zurich-universitats-kinderspital-zurich-switzerland-a-prominent-center-of-pediatric-research-and-medicine/

 

84
A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care — Richmond University Medical Center, New York’s Leader in Health Care and Medical Education

# Views

on 4/12/2017

 139

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/17/a-rich-tradition-of-patient-focused-care-richmond-university-medical-center-new-yorks-leader-in-health-care-and-medical-education/

 

139
Value for Patients – Turning Advances in Science: A Case Study of a Leading Global Pharmaceutical Company – Astellas Pharma Inc.

# Views

on 4/12/2017

329

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/24/value-for-patients-turning-advances-in-science-a-case-study-of-a-leading-global-pharmaceutical-company-astellas-pharma-inc/

 

329
A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

# Views

on 4/12/2017

670

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/22/a-new-standard-in-health-care-farrer-park-hospital-singapores-first-fully-integrated-healthcarehospitality-complex/

 

670

VIEWS – All time for Patient Experience

LIVE Interviews by Gail Thornton

 

TITLE

URL # Views
WEGO Health Awards Competition Focuses on Patients

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

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https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/09/13/wego-health-awards-competition-focuses-on-patients/

 

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Almudena’s Story: A Life of Hope, Rejuvenation and Strength

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

109

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/10/almudenas-story-a-life-of-hope-rejuvenation-and-strength/

 

109
Nathalie’s Story: A Health Journey With A Happy Ending

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

300

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/30/nathalies-story-a-health-journey-with-a-happy-ending/

 

300
Ralph’s Story: An Entertainer at Heart

# Views

on 4/12/2017

143

 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/30/ralphs-story-an-entertainer-at-heart/

 

143
Marcela’s Story: A Liver Transplant Gives the Gift of Life

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

48

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/23/marcelas-story-a-liver-transplant-gives-the-gift-of-life/

 

48
The Role of Big Data in Medicine

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

55

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/16/the-role-of-big-data-in-medicine/

 

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A Revolutionary, Personalized Approach in Brain Tumor Research

 

# Views

on 4/12/2017

46

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/11/a-revolutionary-personalized-approach-in-brain-tumor-research/

 

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President Carter’s Status

Author: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

Most Experts Not Surprised by Carter’s Status 

But early response does not mean ‘cure’

http://www.medpagetoday.com/HematologyOncology/SkinCancer/55076

 

http://clf1.medpagetoday.com/media/images/55xxx/55076.jpg

by Charles Bankhead
Staff Writer, MedPage Today

 

Former President Jimmy Carter’s announcement that he is free of metastatic melanoma surprised many people but, not most melanoma specialists contacted by MedPage Today.

With the evolution of modern radiation therapy techniques and targeted drugs, more patients with metastatic melanoma achieve complete and partial remissions, including remission of small brain metastases like the ones identified during the evaluation and initial treatment of Carter. However, the experts — none of whom have direct knowledge of Carter’s treatment or medical records — cautioned that early remission offers no assurance that the former president is out of the woods.

“If I had a patient of my own with four small brain mets undergoing [stereotactic radiation therapy], I would tell them that I fully expected the radiation to take care of those four lesions,” said Vernon K. Sondak, MD, of Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa. “The fact that President Carter reports that it has done just that is not a surprise to me at all.

“I would also tell my patient that the focused radiation only treats the known cancer in the brain, and that if other small areas of cancer are present, they will likely eventually grow large enough to need radiation or other treatment as well, and that periodic brain scans will be required to monitor for this possibility.”

Carter also is being treated with the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda), which is known to stimulate immune cells that then migrate to tumor sites to eradicate the lesions, noted Anna Pavlick, DO, of NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City.

“Melanoma is no longer a death sentence, and we are really changing what happens to patients,” said Pavlick. “It really is amazing.”

Carter’s melanoma story began to emerge in early August when he had surgery to remove what was described as “a small mass” from his liver. Following the surgery, Carter announced that his doctors had discovered four small melanoma lesions in his brain, confirming a suspicion the specialists had shared with him at the time of the surgery.

Carter subsequently underwent focused radiation therapy to eradicate the brain lesions and initiated a 12-week course of treatment with pembrolizumab. The radiation therapy-targeted therapy combination was a logical option for Carter, given observations that the PD-L1 inhibitor has synergy with radiation, noted Stergios Moschos, MD, of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at Chapel Hill.

“I have seen this in other patients with metastatic melanoma,” said Gary K. Schwartz, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. “It is remarkable but absolutely possible within the realm of immunotherapy today.”

Although Carter’s announcement is undeniably good news, the optimism should be tempered by a long-term perspective, suggested Nagla Abdel Karim, MD, PhD, of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center.

“We do have similar stories; however, we would be careful to call it a ‘complete remission’ and ‘disease control’ and not a ‘cure,’ so far,” said Karim. “We would resume therapy and follow-up any autoimmune side effects. Most important is the quality of life, which he seems to enjoy, and we are very happy with that.”

Darrell S. Rigel, MD, also of NYU Langone Medical Center, represented the lone dissenter among specialists who responded to MedPage Today‘s request for comments.

“I’m happy for him, but it’s very unusual, especially in older men, who usually have a worse prognosis,” said Rigel. “He is on a new drug that may have a little more promise, but there is no definitive cure at this point.”

 

 

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Factors in Patient Experience

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

Defining Patient Experience

http://www.theberylinstitute.org/?page=definingpatientexp

“The definition will allow me as a driver in improving the patient experience at our organization to include those key elements (interactions, current culture, perceptions, across the continuum of care) in our discussions to encourage a more integrated, quality experience that exceeds the expectations of each patient.”

To develop the Institute’s definition of patient experience, we formed a work group of patient experience leaders from a cross-section of healthcare organizations. The group shared perspectives, insights and backgrounds on what patient experience means to them and collaboratively created this definition. We believe it provides a terrific starting point for the conversation around this important issue.

Critical to the understanding and application of this definition is a broader explanation of its key elements:

Interactions Culture Perceptions Continuum of Care
The orchestrated touch-points of people, processes, policies, communications, actions, and environment The vision, values, people (at all levels and in all parts of the organization) and community What is recognized, understood and remembered by patients and support people. Perceptions vary based on individual experiences such as beliefs, values, cultural background, etc. Before, during and after the delivery of care

The History of Patient Experience

Hear perspectives from two leading Patient Experience thought leaders. Wendy Leebov, Partner at Language of Caring, and Mary Malone, President of Malone Advisory Services, discuss the history of patient experience and its growth in the healthcare industry. Perfect as tools to share with growing patient experience professionals or to reenergize efforts for experienced leaders, learn about the many influences that led to the existing patient experience movement and how we all have an impact in this emerging field.

Learn more about the history of patient experience in the PX Body of Knowledge History course where you will grasp the core foundation of patient experience and review the evolving role of patient experience in healthcare today.

https://youtu.be/_kwZ-xeOj8Y

Defining Patient Experience

Authors: Jason A. Wolf PhD, Victoria Niederhauser DrPH, RN, Dianne Marshburn PhD, RN, NE-BC, Sherri L. LaVela PhD, MPH, MBA
Publication: Patient Experience Journal

In recent years, perceptions of performance and quality of healthcare organizations have begun to move beyond examining the provision of excellent clinical care, alone, and to consider and embrace the patient experience as an important indicator. There is a need to determine the extent to which clear and formal definitions exist, have common overarching themes, and/or have unique, but important constructs that should be considered more widely. In this article, we provide a 14-year synthesis of existing literature and other sources (2000-2014) that have been used to define patient experience. A total of 18 sources (articles or organizational websites) were identified that provided a tangible, explicit definition of patient experience. A narrative synthesis was undertaken to categorize literature (and other sources) according to constructs of the definitions provided. The objectives of the synthesis were to: (1) identify the key elements, constructs, and themes that were commonly and frequently cited in existing definitions of ‘patient experience,’ (2) summarize these findings into what might be considered a common shared definition, and (3) identify important constructs that may be missing from and may enhance existing definition(s). The overarching premise was to identify and promote a working definition of patient experience that is applicable and practical for research, quality improvement efforts, and general clinical practice. Our findings identified several concepts and recommendations to consider with regard to the definition of patient experience. First, the patient experience reflects occurrences and events that happen independently and collectively across the continuum of care. Also, it is important to move beyond results from surveys, for example those that specifically capture concepts such as ‘patient satisfaction,’ because patient experience is more than satisfaction alone. Embedded within patient experience is a focus on individualized care and tailoring of services to meet patient needs and engage them as partners in their care. Next, the patient experience is strongly tied to patients’ expectations and whether they were positively realized (beyond clinical outcomes or health status). Finally, the patient experience is integrally tied to the principles and practice of patient- and family- centered care. As patient experience continues to emerge as an important focus area across healthcare globally, the need for a standard consistent definition becomes even more evident, making it critical to ensure patient experience remains a viable, respected, and highly embraced part of the healthcare conversation.

Patient Experience Journal 2014;  1:(1), Article 3.
Available at: http://pxjournal.org/journal/vol1/iss1/3

In practice and research the concept of patient experience has had varied uses and is often discussed with little more explanation than the term itself. Although very little has been published about the complexities with regard to defining patient experience, the 2009 HealthLeaders Media Patient Experience Leadership Survey 3 discovered that when it comes to defining patient experience, there are widely divergent views within the healthcare industry. They found that 35% of respondents agreed that patient experience equals “patient-centered care,” 29% agreed it was “an orchestrated set of activities that is meaningfully customized for each patient,” and 23% said it involved “providing excellent customer service.” The remaining responses reflected patient experience meant, “creating a healing environment,” being “consistent with what’s measured by HCAHPS,” or “other” than the options provided in the survey. In asking the question, “Does your organization have a formal definition of patient experience?” of healthcare organizations in its recent Patient Experience Benchmarking Study, The Beryl Institute discovered that on average 45% of US-based hospitals1 and 35% of non US-based healthcare organizations reported having a formal definition. The question this raises is that as patient experience is identified as a priority item, would healthcare efforts be best served by having a formally accepted definition of patient experience?

The efforts that shaped The Beryl Institute’s definition came from the voices of practice and a review of current research and use in 2010. A workgroup of healthcare leaders from a variety of patient experience roles identified the key elements shaping their work in the patient experience. Within individual organizations, inquiries were made of peers and patients to identify key themes and these larger concepts were pulled together in collective data that was aligned around main themes. The four themes that emerged were personal interactions, organization culture, patient and family perceptions, and across the care continuum. From the themes, a definition was created and then validated through the broader Institute community for further feedback and refinement. The definition is currently being used (with or without adaptations) by a number of healthcare facilities globally as their own definition of patient experience. However, there is much ground yet to be covered in moving towards alignment around a clear and shared definition of patient experience. The purpose of this article was to provide a 14-year synthesis of existing literature and other sources that have been used to define patient experience. Given the breadth and depth of information, we aimed to examine key concepts and compare/contrast multiple definitions, and ultimately to recommend a working definition that we feel can be used to across healthcare settings to capture the patient experience.

Need for Definition We identified 18 sources (websites or articles) that explicitly provide a definition for the patient experience (Table 1). The latest data from both the most recent HeathLeader’s survey and The Beryl Institute’s State of Patient Experience benchmarking research identified patient experience as a top priority; however they also identify there is a divergent nature of patient experience and need for a clear and concise definition. In the article “What is the Patient Experience”? from the Gallup Business Journal, the authors’ suggest that the ideal patient experience is created by meeting four basic emotional needs: confidence, integrity, pride and passion, ultimately asserting that experience is about engaging patients. The author offers in closing, “Engaged healthcare is better healthcare, for everyone. And that’s the best definition of the patient experience”.6

Continuum of Care Several authors argue that the patient experience is not just one encounter, but spans over time and includes many touch points. In a recent publication, Deloitte LLP’s Health Sciences Practice7 contends that organizations need to focus on the patient experience to gain and maintain a competitive advantage. They define the patient experience as much broader than the care itself, describing specific touch points or times when there is interaction with the organization and the patient. Their definition, “The Patient Experience refers to the quality and value of all of the interactions—direct and indirect, clinical and nonclinical—spanning the entire duration of the patient/provider relationship” represents a continuum of interactions. In a recent article, although Stempniak8 does not define patient experience directly, he does offer two quotes that provide some insight. The first from Pat Ryan, CEO of Press Ganey who said, “Let’s look at the patient experience in total as reducing suffering and reducing anxiety… across the entire continuum of care, from the first phone call to the patient’s being discharged.” The second is a statement from Dr. Jim Merlino, Chief Experience Officer at the Cleveland Clinic who admits, the biggest challenge in this effort is figuring out where to start, and defining exactly what the “patient experience” means. Pemberton & Richardson9 provide an overview of a development process of a patient experience vision, told through a story and framed by a series of six active steps a patient goes through during an episode of care, which included: reputation, arrival, contract, stay, treatment and after stay. While there is no direct statement of how they defined the patient experience, they identified the importance of culture and staff engagement in driving an effective patient experience effort.

Beyond Survey Results Several articles argue that the patient experience should be defined more broadly than just using the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey domains.

Aligned with Patient-Centered Care Principles Other definitions focus on patient-centered care principles. Weiss and Tyink13 discuss the opportunity to provide the ideal patient experience through creating a patient-centric culture. The components of a patientcentric culture encompass competent, high-quality care, personalized care, timely responses, care coordination, and are reliable and responsive. They suggest that the patient experience is about a brand experience and is driven by what happens at the point of contact between the patient, the practice, and the provider.

Focus on Expectations

Focus on Individualized Care

More than Satisfaction

As our review of literature and sources showed, there is an absence of a commonly used definition around patient experience in healthcare. While there has been increasing numbers of articles, research and writing on the subject in recent years, little has been seen in the way of coalescing around an accepted statement. Much of this is due to the reality that in all but a few cases a truly concise, applicable and replicable definition was not offered. Other influences may be the competing interests that influence the day-today operations of healthcare overall.

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Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Experience

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

 

Getting It Right: The Link Between the Patient Experience and Hospital Reputation

Katie Johnson, Ph.D., Director of Research and Analytics, National Research: 02/21/2014 –
See more at: http://www.nationalresearch.com/blog/33/#sthash.z8OlwguT.dpuf

 

When you get your daily vanilla latte, you know what to expect every single time—a great cup of Joe. And because of your positive morning (or afternoon) experience, you’ll keep going back. Does this same notion apply in healthcare? Absolutely.

But if you had a poor experience at your hospital, would you go back? Probably not.

It’s not rocket science that when you have a positive, favorable consumer experience with a product or service, you will keep going back for more—you may even adopt brand loyalty. However, as simple as this sounds, healthcare providers are not always “getting it right.”

According to a study by the National Research Corporation Market Insights Survey, the largest healthcare consumer survey in the U.S., eight percent of patients said their hospital experience was poor enough to not recommend the healthcare facility to family or friends. In addition, nine percent of patients rated their overall hospital care and services poorly.

When patients have a highly engaged, positive experience with their hospital, it’s a win-win situation. Hospital reputation is everything. And this rings true even more so today, since the patient experience is tied to hospital reimbursements. Below is a list of research-based evidence that explains why reputation matters:

    • Patient experience is important. It’s important because treating patients well is the right thing to do. It’s important because a positive patient experience is related to better health outcomes (including lower readmission rates). It’s important because Value Based Purchasing has tied Medicare reimbursement to HCAHPS scores. It’s also important, we have found, because of its impact on hospital reputation.

 

    • Hospital reputation is important. Why should hospitals care about their reputations? Hospital reputation plays a part in the selection process among would-be patients. Approximately nine in 10 people indicate that reputation is important when selecting a hospital. Further, once an individual selects and utilizes a hospital, he or she is more likely to utilize that same facility for future healthcare needs (pending a positive experience, of course).

 

    • Hospital reputation is related to patient experience. Our research has shown that hospitals providing positive patient experiences have better reputations. In other words, hospitals that are rated highly by their discharged patients are also rated highly by the general public (whether they’ve had a direct hospital experience or not).

 

    • We’ve found evidence to support an important chain of events. Patient experience drives reputation. Reputation drives utilization. Utilization drives future utilization.

 

    • Some aspects of reputation are more closely related to patient experience than others. The top five correlates, in descending order, are:
      • most personalized care
      • best accommodations
      • highest patient safety
      • best nurses
      • best overall quality

 

    • Today’s patient experience is related to tomorrow’s reputation. It takes time for reputations to form and change, and there is evidence of lag-time in the relationship between patient experience and hospital reputation. Correlations are strongest when patient experience is measured at the first time, and reputation is measured at the second time and six months later. This lag relationship indicates that the quality of the patient experience being administered in a hospital today is significantly related to the reputation of that hospital six months from now.

 

    • “Bad” hospital reputations are even more important. Facilities delivering poor patient experiences are four times more likely to have poor reputations than facilities delivering good patient experiences. Bad news travels fast and wide. In order to improve a poor reputation brought on by a poor patient experience, facilities would be wise to turn their attention inward and focus on improving the experiences they provide their patients.

 

  • We have a roadmap. The figure below is designed for healthcare leaders who would like to explore potential improvement strategies based on where their facilities are situated on the continuum of patient experience and reputation. While all strive to be in the top right category, scoring well on both patient experience and reputation, the reality is that the majority of facilities will find themselves located in one of the other three groups. Facilities in the top or bottom groups on the left side would do well to focus on the patient experience first and foremost. As we’ve learned, if the quality of patient experience is low, there is little that can be done effectively in terms of marketing and advertising. Facilities in the bottom right quadrant (high quality patient experience, but with reputations not reflective of that), should put resources into spreading the word and advertise the strength of their patient experience. It’s important that those in the community are made aware of the high-caliber care being delivered.

 

http://www.nationalresearch.com/uploads/Image/blog/BlogPic2-21-14.jpg

 

Research Brief: The Link Between the Patient Experience and Hospital Reputation

Hospitals and health systems across the United States are focusing increased effort on the delivery of superior patient experience, and with good reason. The provision of top-notch patient care translates to tangible benefits to both patients and their families, as well as to the healthcare facility itself.

In a research brief published by National Research Corporation in February 2014, The Link Between Patient Experience and Hospital Reputation, Dr. Katie Johnson presents findings showing how the patient experience is directly tied to a hospital or health system’s reputation. Research is derived from the National Research Market Insights Survey, the largest online healthcare consumer survey in the United States.

 

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