Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘3D Printing for Medical Application’ Category


3D Printing for Surgical Planning: The Clinical and Economic Promise using Quantitative Clinical Evidence

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

The Clinical and Economic Promise of 3D Printing for Surgical Planning

M A K I N G  T H E  C A S E  T H R O U G H  Q U A N T I TAT I V E CLINICAL EVIDENCE

Stratasys engaged Quorum Consulting, experts in health economics and outcomes research, to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the clinical and economic evidence on 3D printing for surgical planning. This white paper, authored by Quorum Consulting, summarizes the result of that analysis.

Wade Aubry1,2, Raj Stewart1 , Chance Scott1 , Jeffrey Chu1

The modern emphasis on evidence-based medicine centers on three core tenets: • Best available research findings • Clinical expertise • Patient value Incorporating cutting-edge technology alongside these principles – often delicately balancing material innovation against scientific rigor, state-of-the-art professional training and experience, and attempts to provide the best care while respecting patient perspectives – is a challenge. 3D printing, however, aligns with the first two tenets, and when appropriately employed, may inform and indirectly influence the third.1

1 Quorum Consulting, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA

2 University of California, San Francisco; San Francisco, CA, USA

 

3D printing was used in surgical planning applications in a wide range of specialties including cardiothoracic, orthopedic, neurological, reconstructive and transplant surgeries, as well as gastroenterology and surgical oncology. When examining these use cases, five general benefits emerge in association with 3D printing for surgical planning:

  • Patient communication
  • Anatomic familiarity
  • Procedure practice
  • Procedure selection
  • Patient selection / rule-out

 

INDICATION-SPECIFIC UTILIZATION AND EVIDENCEBASED EFFECTIVENESS DATA / RESULTS

  • Cardiothoracic surgery
  • Neurosurgery
  • Reconstructive surgeries

 

CONCLUSION

In a healthcare environment continuing to shift towards value- and outcome-contingent systems that penalize providers for inefficiencies and suboptimal outcomes in rendered care, 3D printed models for surgical planning – with their ability to facilitate procedural efficiency, improve treatment outcomes, and reduce downstream re-intervention costs – offer high potential value. Patients, clinicians and hospitals all have a vested interest in quality, affordable patient care and service, and surgical planning with 3D models appeals to each of these stakeholders.

Accordingly, results and trends from published literature and healthcare data support the effectiveness of 3D printing for surgical planning. As shown for several surgical procedures, clinicians with access to 3D printed models are able to provide better, more efficient care likely to improve patient outcomes and reduce the need for additional surgical interventions. Procedures that would most justify the financial and resource cost in creating 3D printed patient models are those with long operating times, high Relative Value Units (RVUs), greater risk and uncertainty, and risk of complications. Concurrently, this quality care is also potentially less costly and more profitable to providers. Amidst the growing commercial market for 3D printers and related technologies, there are some key differentiators when evaluating utility for surgical planning. As reflected in clinician surveys, the most effective 3D models should capably depict complex, fine anatomy with high fidelity to actual patient physiologies. This degree of fidelity crosses several characteristics:

  • Accurate depiction of a variety of colors
  • Simulation of multiple textures
  • Manipulability,

including the ability to be dissected or probed with surgical instruments.22 Given these real-world requirements, next generation multi-material and multi-color 3D printers likely represent the best option for facilities and clinicians. Viewed objectively, additional data addressing the quantitative impact of 3D printed models is needed. Preferably, this data will be generated from well-designed, patient outcome-oriented studies. However, in the interim, the tide of evidence favors 3D printed models for surgical planning, particularly for leading-edge clinicians and healthcare administrators who are able to recognize its value.

A Brief RVU Primer:

Relative Value Units (RVUs) are used by Medicare to determine reimbursement rates for a given service:

• For each service, Medicare determines the cost value of three primary components – physician’s work, practice expenses and malpractice insurance.

• These three components are then adjusted based on differences in living and business costs nationwide, using a factor called the Geographic Practice Cost Index (GPCI).

• The adjusted values are multiplied by an annual conversion factor, established by the U.S. Congress, and totaled to calculate final reimbursement rates.

SOURCE

http://s3.amazonaws.com/engineering.whitepapers/Stratasys/SurgicalPlanningPromise_Quorum_WP.pdf

From: Medical Design & Outsourcing <newsletters@e.medicaldesignandoutsourcing.com>

Reply-To: <newsletters@e.medicaldesignandoutsourcing.com>

Date: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at 2:00 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: The Clinical and Economic Promise of Surgical Planning Using 3D Printing

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal including the following:

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Technologies for Patient-centered Medicine: From R&D in Biologics to New Medical Devices

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers: R&D at WPI

Curator: Marzan Khan, B.Sc

 

A team of mechanical engineers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) have developed a fascinating technology – a liquid biopsy chip that captures and detects metastatic cancer cells, just from a small blood sample of cancer patients(1). This device is a recent development in the scientific field and holds tremendous potential that will allow doctors to spot signs of metastasis for a variety of cancers at an early stage and initiate an appropriate course of treatment(1).

Metastasis occurs when cancer cells break away from their site of origin and spread to other parts of the body via the lymph or the bloodstream, where they give rise to secondary tumors(2). By this time, the cancer is at an advanced stage and it becomes increasingly difficult to fight the disease. The cells that are shed by primary and metastatic cancers are called circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their numbers lie in the range of 1–77,200/m(3). The basis of the liquid biopsy chip test is to capture these circulating tumor cells in the patient’s blood and identify the cell type through specific interaction with antibodies(4).

The chip is comprised of individual test units or small elements, about 3 millimeters wide(4). Each small element contains a network of carbon nanotube sensors in a well which are functionalized with antibodies(4). These antibodies will bind cell-surface antigens or protein markers unique for each type of cancer cell. Specific interaction between a cell surface protein and its corresponding antibody is a thermodynamic event that causes a change in free energy which is transduced into electricity(3). This electrical signature is picked up by the semi-conducting carbon nanotubes and can be seen as electrical spikes(4). Specific interactions create an increase in electrical signal, whereas non-specific interactions cause a decrease in signal or no change at all(4). Capture efficiency of cancer cells with the chip has been reported to range between 62-100%(4).

The liquid biopsy chip is also more advanced than microfluidics for several reasons. Firstly, the nanotube-chip arrays can capture as well as detect cancer cells, while microfluidics can only capture(4). Samples do not need to be processed for labeling or fixation, so the cell structures are preserved(4). Unlike microfluidics, these nanotubes will also capture tiny structures called exosomes spanning the nanometer range that are produced from cancer cells and carry the same biomarkers(4).

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-associated deaths in the United states, with a survival window of 5 years in only 6% of the cases with treatment(5). In most patients, the disease has already metastasized at the time of diagnosis due to the lack of early-diagnostic markers, affecting some of the major organs such as liver, lungs and the peritoneum(5,6). Despite surgical resection of the primary tumor, the recurrence of local and metastatic tumors is rampant(5). Metastasis is the major cause of mortality in cancers(5). The liquid biopsy chip, that identifies CTCs can thus become an effective diagnostic tool in early detection of cancer as well as provide information into the efficacy of treatment(3). At present, ongoing experiments with this device involve testing for breast cancers but Dr. Balaji Panchapakesan and his team of engineers at WPI are optimistic about incorporating pancreatic and lung cancers into their research.

REFERENCES

1.Nanophenotype. Researchers build liquid biopsy chip that detects metastatic cancer cells in blood: One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers. 27 Dec 2016. Genesis Nanotechnology,Inc

https://genesisnanotech.wordpress.com/2016/12/27/researchers-build-liquid-biopsy-chip-that-detects-metastatic-cancer-cells-in-blood-one-blood-sample-can-be-tested-for-a-comprehensive-array-of-cancer-cell-markers/

2.Martin TA, Ye L, Sanders AJ, et al. Cancer Invasion and Metastasis: Molecular and Cellular Perspective. In: Madame Curie Bioscience Database [Internet]. Austin (TX): Landes Bioscience; 2000-2013.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK164700/

3.F Khosravi, B King, S Rai, G Kloecker, E Wickstrom, B Panchapakesan. Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells. 23 Dec 2013. IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine 7 (4), 20-26

Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells

4.Farhad Khosravi, Patrick J Trainor, Christopher Lambert, Goetz Kloecker, Eric Wickstrom, Shesh N Rai and Balaji Panchapakesan. Static micro-array isolation, dynamic time series classification, capture and enumeration of spiked breast cancer cells in blood: the nanotube–CTC chip. 29 Sept 2016. Nanotechnology. Vol 27, No.44. IOP Publishing Ltd

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0957-4484/27/44/44LT03/meta

5.Seyfried, T. N., & Huysentruyt, L. C. (2013). On the Origin of Cancer Metastasis. Critical Reviews in Oncogenesis18(1-2), 43–73.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3597235/

6.Deeb, A., Haque, S.-U., & Olowoure, O. (2015). Pulmonary metastases in pancreatic cancer, is there a survival influence? Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology6(3), E48–E51. http://doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2078-6891.2014.114

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397254/

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Liquid Biopsy Chip detects an array of metastatic cancer cell markers in blood – R&D @Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Reporters: Tilda Barliya, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/28/liquid-biopsy-chip-detects-an-array-of-metastatic-cancer-cell-markers-in-blood-rd-worcester-polytechnic-institute-micro-and-nanotechnology-lab/

 

Trovagene’s ctDNA Liquid Biopsy urine and blood tests to be used in Monitoring and Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer

Reporters: David Orchard-Webb, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/06/trovagenes-ctdna-liquide-biopsy-urine-and-blood-tests-to-be-used-in-monitoring-and-early-detection-of-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/06/liquid-biopsy-assay-may-predict-drug-resistance/


New insights in cancer, cancer immunogenesis and circulating cancer cells

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/15/new-insights-in-cancer-cancer-immunogenesis-and-circulating-cancer-cells/

 

Prognostic biomarker for NSCLC and Cancer Metastasis

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curato

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/24/prognostic-biomarker-for-nsclc-and-cancer-metastasis/

 

Monitoring AML with “cell specific” blood test

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/23/monitoring-aml-with-cell-specific-blood-test/

 

Diagnostic Revelations

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/02/diagnostic-revelations/

 

Circulating Biomarkers World Congress, March 23-24, 2015, Boston: Exosomes, Microvesicles, Circulating DNA, Circulating RNA, Circulating Tumor Cells, Sample Preparation

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/03/circulating-biomarkers-world-congress-march-23-24-2015-boston-exosomes-microvesicles-circulating-dna-circulating-rna-circulating-tumor-cells-sample-preparation/

 

 

 

Read Full Post »


LIVE 11/16 1:15PM – 2:45PM – The 12th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business intelligence (LPBI) Group

Covering in Real Time using Social Media this Event on

Personalized Medicine

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Founder LPBI Group & Editor-in-Chief

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

Streaming LIVE @ HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL,

Joseph B. Martin Conference Center

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

November 16

#PMConf

1:15 p.m. — Update: Kraft Precision Medicine Accelerator & Trials Challenge Award

An update on the activities of the Kraft Precision Medicine Accelerator and interviews with the winners of Harvard Business School’s “Precision Trials Challenge,” sponsored by the Kraft Precision Medicine Accelerator.

  • Presenter: Richard Hamermesh, D.B.A., Faculty Co-Chair, Kraft Precision Medicine Accelerator, Harvard Business School
  • Winner: MatchMiner
    • Team Lead: Ethan Cerami, Ph.D., Director, Knowledge Systems Group, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
  1. 17,000 patients now are genome sequenced
  2. Rational clinical trial design
  3. enroll patient n trial
  4. clinical decision support
  5. Trial-Centric Matching vs Patient Centric Matching
  6. Open Source PLATFORM
  7. Clinical Trial Markup Language (CTML)
  8. MatchMiner, Knowledge System, The Hyve

 

 

 

  • Runner Up: No Patients Left Behind
    • Team Lead: Gavin MacBeath, Ph.D., Co-Founder and Senior Vice President, Merrimack Pharmaceuticals
  1. Company brings Drug and biomarker assay match – for patient assignment to Trial
  2. Protein based not genomic based test

 

  • Runner Up: iCare for Cancer Patients
    • Team Lead: Leylah Drusbosky, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Florida, Scientific Director, iCare for Cancer Patients
  1. iCare for Cancer Patients
  2. Protein Network Map: Drug interaction and Genomic aberrations
  3. Functional interactions
  4. Predictive SImulation Technology

Computational Biology Model: Proliferation, SUrvival apoptosis

VIrtual Cancer Clinical Trial Simulator – Bring new drugs to the RIGHT patient population: DIsease onhibition score

1:45 p.m. — Keynote Speaker
“Reforming Clinical Trials: How Alternative Trial Designs May Reshape Regulatory Review”

Traditional clinical trial designs are often too cumbersome and expensive to study the efficacy of personalized medicine products and services in sub-populations of patients. Yet there is no consensus on which methods have the most promise to speed trials and lower costs. During her keynote address, Dr. Woodcock will explore which of the latest progressive designs she believes are best suited to demonstrate the efficacy of personalized medicine based on past successes and proposed reforms.

  • Introduction: Steve BMS
  • Keynote: Janet Woodcock, M.D., Director, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
  1. Not just the trial, but the Development Program
  2. knowledge that underpins the program vs Novel Trial Design
  3. +50%  of Trials FAIL at Phase 3 – simulate  best and worse scenarios
  4. Cut off points – affect the result of the Human Trial
  5. Outcome measures for disease have never or rarely, been tested
  6. Murphy’s law operate
  7. robust vs fragile design
  8. DEsign – conduct a seamless, adaptive development program
  9. Trade off – for benefits vs burden of Disease – Functionality vs Longevity – give up life for better functionality when aive
  10. More patient enroll or tril goes longer, treatment gets better and Endpoints needs to be revised
  11. heterogenious progression, fast progression
  12. DIsease heterogeniety — REDUCTION by beter Patient selection – more homogenious to reach similar progression
  13. Natural History: rare diseas vs heterogeneous
  14. Progression not known because longitudinal studies are limited or study is not representative
  15. projection of results of trial may be difict: Pharmacodynamic Markers (efficacy) dificult to reproduce
  16. Trial Design: Phase 1,2,3
  17. Alternatives: “Extended Phase 1 COhort” –>> Approval
  18. Endpoint (cancer): Response rate, Progression Free Survival (PFS) Time
  19. Mechanistics hypothesis, natural history data on non responding patients
  20. N-of -1 looking at disease trajectory
  21. Oncology: “basket” trials with biomarker defined targets across histologic diagnoses : NCI “MATCH” trial
  22. Emergencies: EBOLA trial
  23. DOse-finding can be randomized, adaptive,, include placedbo arm
  24. Serious, Rare or Uncommon DIsease wiht Existing Standard of Care (SOC) vs Placebo
  25. Common Diseaase with SOC
  26. Biomarkers: Predictive of Response: Magnitude of the response not Yes or No — Highest Biomarket Cutoff
  27. RWE – Rare WOrld Evidence
  28. Knowledge tht UNDERLIE – biological knowledge
  29. CUrative therappy with PM – promise is there

2:15 p.m. — Fireside Chat

  • Moderator: Alexander Vadas, Ph.D., Managing Director and Partner, L.E.K. Consulting
  1. Companion Diagnostics
  • Peer M. Schatz, M.B.A., CEO, QIAGEN (15 years around)
  1. PM and experience
  2. Value chain of PM does not work – Diagnostics is 2% of the HealthCare expenses. Reimbursement by COst of Production
  3. 30x smaller then Pharmaceuticals
  4. Standards to evaluate the value of diagnostics
  5. Biomarkers – 60,000 distinctive tests
  6. Benefits of Diagnostics not recognized
  7. HealthCare 2% spent on DIagnostics and Monitoring
  8. Value of information of Molecualr DIagnostics
  9. Lower quality evidence
  10. Reward value of diagnostics – Patients
  11. For LABs  diagnostics is a profit looser
  12. Molecular Diagnostics – new, PM is known in 1999 – AMP launched its Journal
  13. Value based Medicine, systems of rewards is to blame
  14. Reimbursement – Diagnostics and regulatory
  15. 30 Pharma Partnerships
  16. Industry organization
  17. Biopsy to Microbiome
  18. 70% of Cancer care is done at COmmunity Hospitals
  19. Human genomics data doubles annoually
  20. Data needs, 34% in accordance, 70% accordance with diagnosis – CONCORDANCE POOR CROSS GENOMICS OR AXON LABS
  21. PM recognize the value of information DIagnosis, improvemnet in Patient Diagnosis

Reply to interview by Alexander Vadas, Ph.D., Managing Director and Partner, L.E.K. Consulting

  • Education of Pathologists in Genomic Pathology
  • Approval of Companion Diagnostics in China requires infrastructure in regulatory interface with each Country
  • Seamless interaction with Pharma
  • If tests in Pathology are too expensive, LABS will not be able to be profitable
  • NGS – Variance – vs a frontline test Designed for Reimbursability and profitaility

2:45 p.m. — Networking Break

 

 

#PMConf

SOURCE

http://www.personalizedmedicinecoalition.org/Conference/November_16_Program

Read Full Post »


A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care — Richmond University Medical Center, New York’s Leader in Health Care and Medical Education 

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

Richmond University Medical Center (www.RUMSCI.org), an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and the Icahn School of Medicine, is a 470+ bed health care facility and teaching institution in Staten Island, New York. The hospital is a leader in the areas of acute, medical and surgical care, including emergency care, surgery, minimally invasive laparoscopic and robotic surgery, gastroenterology, cardiology, pediatrics, podiatry, endocrinology, urology, oncology, orthopedics, neonatal intensive care and maternal health. RUMC earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for quality and patient safety.

RUMC is a designated Level 1 Trauma Center, a Level 2 Pediatric Trauma Center, a Level 3 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), which is the highest level attainable, and a designated Stroke Center, receiving top national recognition from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.  Their state-of-the-art Cardiac Catheterization Lab has Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) capabilities, for elective and emergent procedures in coronary angioplasty that treats obstructive coronary artery disease, including unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction (MI), and multi-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD).

RUMC maintains a Wound Care/Hyperbaric Center and a Sleep Disorder Center on-site at its main campus.  The facility also offers behavioral health services, encompassing both inpatient and outpatient services for children, adolescents and adults, including emergent inpatient and mobile outreach units.  RUMC is the only facility that offers inpatient psychiatric services for adolescents in the community.

In April 2016, RUMC announced its intent to merge with Staten Island Mental Health Society in order to expand its footprint in Staten Island and integrate behavioral health services alongside primary care. As part of New York’s Medicaid reforms, funding is available to incentivize providers to integrate treatment for addiction, mental health issues and developmental disabilities with medical services.

With over 2,500 employees, RUMC is one of the largest employers on Staten Island, New York.

rumcexteriorrumcexterior2rumcinterior

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, New York. Interior and exterior photographs of the hospital.

 

Below is my interview with President and Chief Executive Officer Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, which occurred in September, 2016.

What has been your greatest achievement?

Dr. Messina: Professionally, my greatest achievement is my current responsibility – to be President and Chief Executive Officer of one of the greatest hospitals with a strong, solid foundation and rich history. I was born in this hospital and raised on Staten Island, so to me, there is no greater gift than to be part of a transformative organization and have the ability to advance the quality of health care on Staten Island.

My parents taught me the value of responsibility and motivation and instilled in me the drive and tenacity to be the best person I could be – for my employees and for my family. I am a highly competitive person, who is goal-oriented, hands-on and inspired by teamwork. I rarely sit behind my desk as I believe my place is alongside my team in making things happen.

As a personal goal, I recently climbed the 20,000-foot Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. It was the experience of a lifetime. I could not have completed this challenge without the support of the guides and porters who helped me and my group along the way. For me, it was a challenge in proving to myself that I could be out of my comfort zone. My group and I hiked hours and hours each day, dodging rocks and scrambling along rock walls with the goal of reaching the summit. In many ways, it takes a village to climb the mountain, relying on each other in the group to get you to the next level.

In many ways, that is how I see my professional day at the hospital, working with a strong team of dedicated medical staff and employees who are focused on one goal, which is to continue our hard work, continue to improve care and continue to move forward to advance life and health care.

The mission of Richmond University Medical Center, an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine, serves the ethnically diverse community of Staten Island, New York, by providing patients with a range of services.

How has your collaboration with the Mount Sinai network helped to expand health care delivery and services for patients of Staten Island, New York?

Dr. Messina: Being able to serve our patients year after year continues to be a top priority, so we are constantly improving upon our rich history of 100 years of exceptional patient-focused care given by our medical and surgical health care professionals as well as innovative technologies and programs created by our award-winning hospital team. We have committed medical specialists, passionate employee staff, exceptional Board of Trustees, supportive elected government officials – all who in their own way contributes to providing the highest level of patient care to the more than 500,000 residents of Staten Island, New York.

As a member of the Mount Sinai Health network, we have found ways to work collaboratively with our academic partner to ensure that our patients’ health care needs not only are fully met but also exceeded. This alliance will facilitate the development of a new, Comprehensive Breast and Women’s Healthcare Center. We have leveraged our Breast and Women’s Health Center with our RUMC general surgeons in conjunction with breast imaging, fellowship-trained physicians from Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine. The physicians who are granted this renowned fellowship interact with our patients and become an active participant in multidisciplinary breast conferences and resident and medical student education. For patients, this means that they have access to the best minds and latest research, therapies and treatment regimens throughout our network.

What makes Richmond University Medical Center and its specialty areas stand out from other hospitals?

Dr. Messina: We bring the highest level of advanced medicine to our patients. For more than 100 years, we have built a rich history of delivering patient-focused care that is unique. Our organization is recognized as a family organization with strong community spirit and family values. We are proud to be a high-technology/high-touch organization of caring professionals that go above and beyond the standard of health care. Our strengths lie in the areas of acute, medical and surgical care, including emergency care, surgery, minimally invasive laparoscopic and robotic surgery, gastroenterology, cardiology, pediatrics, podiatry, endocrinology, urology, oncology, orthopedics, neonatal intensive care and maternal health.

Each year, we embark upon a comprehensive, robust strategic planning process that involves our senior leadership team, clinical chairs, Board of Trustees as well as our medical and surgical staff and hospital employees that looks out three to five years in the future to determine what is best for the patient. We are each committed in our own way to quality patient care and building an even stronger organization.

Some of our achievements are noteworthy:

  • As a New York City Department of Emergency Services designated Level 1 Trauma Center and Level 2 Pediatric Trauma Center, the only Trauma Center dually verified in New York City, we rely on sophisticated equipment so our medical and surgical specialists are prepared to treat severe conditions within minutes.
  • Our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a designated Level 3 facility, the highest level attainable. The unit delivers 3,000 babies annually and it was recognized as having the lowest mortality rate in the metropolitan area and a survival rate of 99 percent, that exceeds national benchmarks. Our specialists in our pediatric ambulatory services department treat over 10,000 patients annually and our children’s urgent care area records over 23,000 visits annually.
  • Our state-of-the-art, 38,000-square-foot Emergency Department (ED), which will be replaced by an expanded facility and projected to open in 2018, will provide for more focused care, operational efficiency and flexibility for our staff and patient. We also will be better integrated and connected to the entire hospital campus.

Originally designed to serve 22,000 patients each year, the ED is expected to accommodate an increased volume of patients, which is estimated at 70,000 and give our medical specialists the tools they need to provide the best in care for this volume of patients. In a new patient and family-centered space with 49 treatment positions, the new ED will be connected to the existing hospital, close to surgical services, the radiology department and lab services.

Equally as important, the hospital has been strong in the face of natural disasters, especially Hurricane Sandy which occurred a few years ago, and the new ED is being designed with storm resilient and redundant design to minimize impact from severe weather conditions.

In fact, the New York City Council and the Staten Island Borough President have set aside a combined $13.5 million for this $60+ million project and believe in the transformative impact that it will have on emergency care on Staten Island. These local officials believe that Staten Island residents deserve quality, readily accessible health care.

  • Heroin addiction is an epidemic on Staten Island, so we have a number of programs in place at RUMC’s Silberstein Center to provide outpatient treatment, rehabilitation and clinics, along with group therapy sessions, Alcoholics Anonymous meetings and individual therapy sessions.
  • Our new primary care/walk-in facility in the heart of Staten Island borough is operational and there are no appointments required. Patients can visit with one of three physicians or a nurse practitioner. This off-site facility is not located in the hospital complex and is an expansion of our services outside of the hospital walls.
  • We also maintain a Wound Care Center, Pain Management Center and a Sleep Disorder Center at our facility. In fact, we are the only local facility that offers inpatient psychiatric services for adolescents and we are expanding our capacity to meet the needs of the community.

 

RUMC has been awarded a top designation jointly by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association. What does that mean to the hospital?

Dr. Messina: This designation makes us proud as the recipient of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Quality Achievement Award for six consecutive years and its first Elite Plus recognition. This means that we have achieved 85 percent or higher adherence in indicators for two or more consecutive 12-month periods to improve quality of patient care and outcomes for stroke patients.

Our cardiac catheterization lab with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) capabilities – the newest facility of its kind on Staten Island — now treats semi-urgent and elective coronary procedures.

For patients, this means that we have a commitment to ensure that stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence. With a stroke, when time is lost, brain is lost, and this award demonstrates our commitment to ensuring patients receive care based on evidenced-based guidelines. We are dedicated to continually improving the quality of stroke care and this recognition helps us achieve that goal.

Studies have shown that hospitals that consistently follow these quality improvement measures can reduce length of stay and 30-day readmission rates and reduce disparities in care. To qualify for the Elite Plus recognition, we met quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. If given intravenously in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. We earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period.

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number five cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

The values of Richmond University Medical Center are summarized in the acronym, WE CARE (Welcoming Energized Compassion Advocacy Respect Excellence). How is this part of your day-to-day life?

Dr. Messina: For more than 100 years, Richmond University Medical Center has

been building a rich history of exceptional patient-focused care for the residents of Staten Island. Each year, we carry that tradition forward by our medically innovative and patient-focused care and services we offer. It is the passion, creativity and caring of everyone who is part of our ‘hospital team’ that moves the organization to new heights.

The chart below summarizes our credo, the values that guide us every day and help us focus on the care and well-being of the people who come through our doors.

We are welcoming and gracious toward each other, and toward all who come to receive our services.

Personnel are energized for quality, creativity, commitment and teamwork.

Compassion is the way we share deep concern and care toward each person.

Advocacy is our activity that promotes the rights and responsibilities of patients, families and staff, in the hospital setting and in the community.

We show respect by recognizing the basic dignity of every person in all our interactions and in the formulation of policies and procedures.

Excellence is our way of demonstrating that we can always be more and always be better.

 

The Richmond University Medical Center Board is comprised of distinguished leaders of the Staten Island community who are committed to the success of the hospital and to the health of Staten Islanders.

How is this local approach revolutionizing health care for the Staten Island community?

Dr. Messina: The members of our distinguished Board of Trustees, who represent a cross-section of business professionals and community leaders, continue our goal of meeting the needs of our patients and our hospital.

Our Board remains committed to providing solutions for our patients to challenging healthcare issues they face every day and to making a difference in the lives of patients by providing the latest thinking and technology solutions. Our Board Chairperson Kathryn K. Rooney, Esq., and Vice Chairperson Ronald A. Purpora, as well as the other Board members, and even our elected government officials, have a strong connection to Staten Island and we believe it truly ‘takes a village’ to make this organization flourish.

Each year, our Board of Trustees is presented with new opportunities and possibilities for growth and development. That is why their top priority for this past year was approving the construction of a state-of-the-art Emergency Department (ED) as this undertaking will serve both the patients and staff equally. In order to serve the residents of Staten Island properly, the new ED will accommodate an increased number of patients and our medical staff will receive the tools and technology to provide the best in care for our patients.

This past year, we were provided with a $1.5 million gift from the Staten Island Foundation that will go toward the hospital’s capital campaign to construct the new $60 million Emergency Department. We decided to name the RUMC’s Allan Weissglass Pavilion Center for Ambulatory Care, in honor of our long-time community and business leader, who is a founding Board member and Board of Trustees member. Allan Weissglass devoted his time, energy and talent to the success of this hospital over many years.

We are positioning our organization for the future and we continuously build on our strengths, being responsive to the needs of the community. In the past, we saw the patient was the only ‘customer’ of the hospital. Today, that perception is evolving and our ‘customers’ are many.  With the help and support of donors, local foundations, volunteers, staff, and the community, local government officials, we are building a bright future for Richmond University Medical Center.

What is RUMC’s commitment to graduate medical education?

Dr. Messina: Our six Graduate Medical Education (GME) programs in Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Diagnostic Radiology and Podiatry, signify our commitment to teaching as a cornerstone of our philosophy. Our medical staff are seen as role models for our medical residents and provide quality training, medical education and research capabilities. Our existing medical staff functions as supervising physicians and gives medical residents exposure to specific responsibilities and patient care, as well as scholarly opportunities. One interesting fact is that the doctors we train come back to help treat our patients by using their knowledge and experience to work in our community.

You mentioned that ‘outreach in the community’ as a key factor in the success of the hospital’s mission to enhance the quality of life for residents of Staten Island. What types of activities are under way?

Dr. Messina: Our lifesaving work takes many forms. We are constantly finding new and different ways to engage with our community – to raise awareness and educate on a number of diseases and conditions, and, hopefully move toward better health care. We believe that our patients need to see us outside of a clinical environment, which strengthens our relationship.

For example, over the past year:

  • We sponsored an annual health and wellness expo with the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation that was attended by over 2,000 people to equip the community with knowledge about their health and the local health services available to them.
  • We pioneered an organ donor enrollment day by welcoming 59 visitors and guests who can potentially donate their organs to save lives.
  • We partnered with the New York City Department of Transportation and our own Trauma team to demonstrate and educate the community on car seat safety.
  • Our Dermatologist team took part in the Borough President’s “Back to the Beach” festival by performing skin screenings and distributing sunscreen and information on skin cancer.
  • Our Obstetrics and Gynecology team hosted a baby expo to talk with new mothers and mothers-to-be about services available at the hospital.
  • Our Diabetologist team partnered with the YMCA on a 16-week partnership to curb the diabetes epidemic on Staten Island through information talks and health screenings.
  • We were even present at last year’s Staten Island Yankees home opening baseball game to throw out the first pitch and conduct a blood drive while distributing wellness information.

 

Since roughly one third of the residents on Staten Island are enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare, what steps are you taking to improve the delivery of treatment for them?

Dr. Messina: We started several initiatives last year that were funded by the federal and state governments to look at the way care is delivered to patients who are enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid. So far, we’ve reduced costs by $3.75 million and realized $1.8 million in shared savings that are re-invested in key hospital programs.

As you know, Medicare and Medicaid are two different government-run programs that were created in 1965 in response to the inability of older and low-income Americans to buy private health insurance. They were part of our government’s social commitment to meeting individual health care needs. Medicare is a federal program that provides health coverage if you are 65 or older or have a severe disability, no matter your income, while Medicaid is a state and federal program that provides health coverage if you have a very low income.

We’ve set up our own Richmond Quality Accountable Care Organization (ACO), that comprises 30 providers serving 7,500 Medicare patients. This innovative program is accountable for the quality, cost and overall care provided to people on Medicare and who are enrolled in the traditional fee-for-service program.  One program that is ongoing is one that we’ve partnered with the Visiting Nurse Service of Staten Island to prevent hospital readmissions and to identify hospitalized patients who would benefit from a higher level of care and home care services.

Another program that is under way for our Medicaid patients is teaching our staff to prevent hospital readmissions by creating an accurate list of medications that a patient takes and comparing that list against physician’s admission, transfer and discharge orders to ensure that the correct medication plan is in place.

We believe that we are transforming the underlying systems with a focus on delivering quality care and hopefully better outcomes for patients.

RUMC recently announced a merger with Staten Island Mental Health Society (SIMHS) to integrate SIMHS’ broad range of behavioral health programs into the hospital’s existing medical and behavioral program throughout Staten Island. What does this merger bring to the community?

Dr. Messina: We believe that the proposed merger between RUMC and the Staten Island Mental Health Society (SIMHS) will provide a strengthened, comprehensive network of behavioral health services across Staten Island.

This partnership will bring together two Staten Island institutions, with a combined 230 years of service to the borough, and create one strong and vibrant organization dedicated to meeting the health needs of the diverse community.

Merging the range of community-based behavioral health services provided by SIMHS with the solid foundation of primary care services provided by RUMC will create a seamless range of behavioral and medical services for our residents. We are in the unique position to transform and enhance the services of these two vital health care providers. The SIMHS will keep its name and become a division of the hospital. The merger is expected to close during calendar year 2017.

 rumcdanmessina

Image SOURCE: Photograph of President and Chief Executive Officer Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, courtesy of Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, New York.

Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA
President & Chief Executive Officer

Daniel Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, became President and Chief Executive Officer of Richmond University Medical Center (RUMC) – an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine – in April 2014.

Dr. Messina, a life-long resident of Staten Island, is a seasoned executive with nearly 30 years of healthcare leadership expertise. For the previous 13 years, he served as the System Chief Operating Officer of CentraState Healthcare System in Freehold, New Jersey, where his responsibilities included all System Operations for the Medical Center, Assisted Living Facility, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center and Continuing Care Retirement Community. While in this role, Dr. Messina developed additional growth strategies that include a new Cancer Center, a Proton Therapy Center, Radio-Surgery, a new Infusion Center and programs in Robotics, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Bariatric and Neurosurgery. Other accomplishments include a new state-of-the-art 26-bed Critical Care Unit, a 49-bed Emergency Department, and the development of an 180,000 sq. ft. Ambulatory Campus and Wellness Center anchored by a 35,000 sq. ft. Medical Fitness Center. Additionally, Dr. Messina developed the Linda E. Cardinale MS Center – one of the largest and most comprehensive MS Centers in the tristate area – leading to a fundraising event that has generated over $2 million.

Dr. Messina received his B.S. in Health Science/Respiratory Therapy from Long Island University Brooklyn, and earned his M.P.A. in Healthcare Administration from LIU Post. He obtained his Ph.D. in Health Sciences and Leadership at Seton Hall University where he currently serves as an adjunct professor in the School of Health and Allied Sciences. He is active in the American College of Health Care Executives, is board certified in healthcare management as an ACHE Fellow, and recently completed a three-year term as Regent for New Jersey.

Dr. Messina serves as trustee on the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the New Jersey Metro Chapter, and the Alumni Board of Trustees at Seton Hall University. He is a Board member of the VNA Health Group of New Jersey and a member of the Policy Development Committee of the New Jersey Hospital Association. Dr. Messina has been honored by various organizations for his service to the community, including Seton Hall University with the “Many Are One” award, the American College of Healthcare Executives with Senior, Early and Distinguished Service Awards, New Jersey Women Against MS, CentraState Auxiliary, and the Staten Island CYO.

Editor’s note:

We would like to thank William Smith, director of Public Relations, Richmond University Medical Center, for the help and support he provided during this interview.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

 

Richmond University Medical Center (http://rumcsi.org/Main/Home.aspx)

Other related articles:

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/annualreport.aspx

Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_University_Medical_Center

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/rumcinthenews/si-live-5202016-170.aspx

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/rumcinthenews/merger-agreement-4132016-159.aspx

Retrieved from http://blog.silive.com/gracelyns_chronicles/2016/06/rumc_receives_presitigious_bab.html

Retrieved from https://www.statnews.com/2016/10/17/vivan-lee-hospitals-utah/

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

Risk Factor for Health Systems: High Turnover of Hospital CEOs and Visionary’s Role of Hospitals In 10 Years

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/08/risk-factor-for-health-systems-high-turnover-of-hospital-ceos-and-visionarys-role-of-hospitals-in-10-years/

Healthcare conglomeration to access Big Data and lower costs

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/13/healthcare-conglomeration-to-access-big-data-and-lower-costs/

A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/22/a-new-standard-in-health-care-farrer-park-hospital-singapores-first-fully-integrated-healthcarehospitality-complex/

2013

Helping Physicians identify Gene-Drug Interactions for Treatment Decisions: New ‘CLIPMERGE’ program – Personalized Medicine @ The Mount Sinai Medical Center

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/15/helping-physicians-identify-gene-drug-interactions-for-treatment-decisions-new-clipmerge-program-personalized-medicine-the-mount-sinai-medical-center/

Nation’s Biobanks: Academic institutions, Research institutes and Hospitals – vary by Collections Size, Types of Specimens and Applications: Regulations are Needed

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/26/nations-biobanks-academic-institutions-research-institutes-and-hospitals-vary-by-collections-size-types-of-specimens-and-applications-regulations-are-needed/

Read Full Post »


Global Technology Conferences on 3D BioPrinting 2015 – 2016

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Agenda for 4D Printing & Meta Materials Conference, 10/6/2015 at AMOLF in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

3D-Printing in the Life Sciences Conference, July 8-9, 2015, Boston, MA – Organ-on-a-Chip World Congress

Future of 3D Printing in Medicine: The Role of Bioactive Materials @ the NJ Symposium for Biomaterials Science on November 9, 2015 — Heldrich Hotel, New Brunswick, NJ

LIVE 11/4/2015 9AM @The 15th Annual EmTech MIT – MIT Media Lab: Top 10 Breakthrough Technologies & 2015 Innovators Under 35

  • Event covered in REAL TIME by LPBI Group, Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN Live streaming

3D Printing in Fashion Design – 2016 Exhibit at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, #techstyle March 6, 2016 – July 10, 2016 Henry and Lois Foster Gallery (Gallery 158)

Mid Atlantic LRIG 22nd Annual Technology Showcase: Agenda on 3D Bioprinting on Wednesday, May 11, 2016; Somerset NJ

Friday, April 4 8:30 am- 9:30 am Science Track: Mobile Technology and 3D Printing: Technologies Gaining Traction in Biotech and Pharma – MassBio Annual Meeting 2014, Royal Sonesta Hotel, Cambridge, MA

  • Event covered in REAL TIME by LPBI Group, Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN Live streaming

Third Annual BioPrinting and 3D Printing in the Life Sciences, 21-22 July 2016 at Academia, Singapore General Hospital Campus

 

 

Read Full Post »


Presentation Series by M3DP Team @LPBI Group on Medical Applications of 3D BioPrinting, 8/2015 – 12/2015 and 1/2016 – 3/2016

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

8/2015 – 12/2015: Medical Applications of 3D BioPrinting

 

1. Medical 3D Printing Applications & Technologies, Tools & Processing

8/13/2015 presentation

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

2. Medical 3D Printing & Programmable Sensors

8/20/2015 presentation 

Steve Lerner

3. Medical 3D Printing: Thought Leadership for Products and Services

8/27/2015 presentation

Dr. Pearlman, MD, PhD

4. Medical 3D Printing and BioInks

9/3/2015 presentation

Stephen J Williams, PhD

5. Medical 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

9/24/2015 presentation

Irina Robu, PhD

6. Medical 3D Printing and MEMS

01/8/2015 presentation

Bill Zurn

7. Medical 3D Printing and Tissue Engineering in Israel

10/15/2015 presentation

Tilda Barliya, PhD

8. Cell Selection using Intracellular Targets

10/15/2015 presentation

Rosalind Codrington, PhD

9. Glycoprotein and 3D BioPrinting

10/15/2015 presentation

Evelina Cohn, PhD

10. Gene Therapy: CRISPR and 3D BioPrinting

10/15/2015 presentation

Stephen J Williams, PhD and Dharmendra Goswami, PhD

11. Medical 3D Printing and Metals in use in Medical Devices

10/22/2015 presentation

Danut Dragoi, PhD

12. Medical 3D Printing and Dental Industry Sector

10/29/2015 presentation

Gerard Loiseau, ESQ

13. Medical 3D Printing and Cytokines

11/5/2015 presentation

Raphael Nir, PhD

14. Immunology, Magnetic Beads and 3D BioPrinting

12/17/2015 presentation

Rosalind Codrington, PhD

 

1/2016 – 3/2016 BioMEMS – January to March 2016

 

1/14/16 9:30 Dr. Evelina Cohn “Promising molecules for cell detection in environmental and clinical samples:DNA/peptide co-assembly”

 

1/21/16 9:30 Aviva & Gerard Oligonucleotide chips
1/28/16 9:30 Bill Zurn Medical MEMS
2/4/16 9:30 Dr. Stu Cantor 6 Bio-MEMS in medical implants and surgery
6.1 Implantable microelectrodes
6.2 Microtools for surgery
6.3 Drug delivery
2/11/16 No Meeting
2/18/16 9:30 Dr. Williams BioMems cell signaling PCR, micro arrays and beyond
 2/25/16 10:30 Dr. Danut Dragoi BioMEMS based  Optical Sensors
3/3/16 9:30 Dr. Codrington ‘Early identification of biomarkers for the delivery of personalised

therapy’

 

Read Full Post »


3D Medical BioPrinting Technology Reporting by Irina Robu, PhD – a forthcoming Article in

Medical 3D BioPrinting – The Revolution in Medicine

Technologies for Patient-centered Medicine:

From R&D in Biologics to New Medical Devices @M3DP, LPBI Group

Editors

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

and

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-e-titles-in-the-strategic-plan-for-2014-1015/volume-four-medical-3d-bioprinting-the-revolution-in-medicine/

final series E covers volumes 1_4-vol4

 

Irina Robu, PhD: List of Posts on 3D BioPrinting in the Open Access Online Scientific Journal

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN 

 

Google Glass Meets Organs-on-Chips

 

Stratasys Part of New CYBER Team for 3D Printed Orthotic Devices Targeting Veterans

 

World’s First 3D-printed ‘Sneezeometer’ Will Help Asthma Patients

 

New Scaffold-Free 3D Bioprinting Method Available to Researchers

 

3D Printing Confirms Physical Model of Brain Folds

 

Materialise 3D Software Leads to Successful Jaw Replacement Surgery

 

Aprecia Pharmaceuticals Set to Advance 3D Printed Drug Pipeline

 

3D “Squeeze” Helps Adult Cells Become Stem Cells

 

Platform Technologies for Directly Reconstructing 3D Living Biomaterials

 

Low-cost 3-D printer-based organ model production technique

 

Levitating Cells with Nanoparticles

 

Materialise Partners with University of Michigan and Tissue Regeneration Services for Clinical Trials of 3D Printed Tracheal Splint

 

3D Printer Breakthrough for Bone Grafts

 

3D BioPrinted Carbon Nanotubes used to Stimulate Bone Regrowth

 

3D prints bacteria to create organically reactive material

 

New Spinal Cord Repair Strategy using 3D Cell Growth

 

3D printed microfibers used to reinforce hydrogels

 

3D-printed organ research enhanced with programmable DNA “smart glue”

 

Liver on the chip devices with the capacity to replace animal experiments

 

Mini-kidney organoids re-create disease in lab dishes

 

New technology for printing new tissues with living cellular bioink kits

 

Silk Biomaterials Produced from 3D Bone Marrow Generate Platelets

 

BioP3 technology could be an alternative to bioprinting organs

 

Chemical Giant BASF Teams With Poietis on 4D Bioprinted Skin Project

 

Global 3D Bioprinting Market: Industry Size, Share and Segments Analysis to 2015 – 2021

 

How to Feed Engineered Organs using a 3D Printed Sugar Network

 

Newly discovered cells regenerate liver tissue without forming tumors

 

Organs-on-Chips: An Alternative to 3D Bioprinting?

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »