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Archive for the ‘3D Printing for Medical Application’ Category


3D-Printed Brain Clear the Way to Find Cancer Treatments

Reported by: Irina Robu, PhD

Glioblastomas are aggressive and malignant grade IV brain tumors and can located wherever in the brain and do not regularly spread outside of the brain. Common symptoms patients with glioblastoma experience include headaches, seizures, confusion, memory loss, muscle weakness, visual changes, language deficit, and cognitive changes. Glioblastomas tend to affect older individuals (age 45 to 70) with rare occurrences in children. Treatment methods typically include a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and alternating electric fields therapy.

Scientists at Northwestern University developed a technique to study their fast spreading cancer using a 3D structure made of agglomeration of human brain cells and biomaterials, which can help doctors better understand how the tumor grows and speed up the potential discovery of novel drugs to fight it. A water-based substance serves as a matrix to hold the cells into place. However, inside the living brain, scientists can’t observe how the tumor cells grow or respond the treatment and they have to use mice/rats to understand tumor development. Animal studies are expensive and time consuming, but the 3D printed live tissue allows researchers to study glioblastoma to be studied more directly.

To understand what happens inside the 3D model, the researchers used a laser to scan the sample and create a snapshot of the cellular structure. This combination allows them to assess the effectiveness of a commonly used chemotherapy drug, temozolomide. The drug, temozolomide kills glioblastoma cells in two-dimensional models, but when put into a three-dimensional one, the tumor rebounded which implies that the drug did not work in the long term.

This 3D model may be able to speed up that process to weed out ineffective drugs first, confirming that only the most promising ones move to animal, and eventually human, trials.

SOURCE

A 3D-printed brain could make it easier to find cancer treatments

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How is the 3D Printing Community Responding to COVID-19?

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

 

As the new pandemic COVID-19 takes over the globe, several countries are implementing travel restrictions, social distancing and work from home policies. Healthcare systems are overloaded and fatigued by this new coronavirus (COVID-19). Since COVID-19 is a respiratory illness, patients require specialist respirators to take over the role of the lungs. These respirators are in short supply, however, along with medical personnel, hospital space and other personal safety equipment required to treat patients.

Professional AM providers, makers and designers in the 3D printing community have started to answer to the global crisis by volunteering their respective skills to ease the pressure on supply chains and governments. The additive manufacturing and 3D printing community has numerous members keen to support during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A hospital in Brescia, Italy with 250 Coronavirus patients lacking breathing machines has recently run out of the respiratory valves needed to connect the patients to the machines. In response to the situation, the CEO of Isinnova, Cristian Fracassi used 3D bioprinting to produce 100 respirator valves in 24 hours, which are currently being put to use in the Brescian hospital.

At the same time, Materialise, has released files for a 3D printed hands-free door handle attachment to lessen Coronavirus transmission via one of the most common mediums. Door handles are exposed to a lot of physical contact over the course of a day, especially in public spaces such as offices and hospitals. The 3D printable add-on allows users to carry out the lever action required to pop open most modern doors using their elbows.

Protolabs, a leading on-demand manufacturer with 3D Printing is using rapid production methods to good use during the current Coronavirus outbreak by producing components for #COVID19 test kits and ventilators. California-based Airwolf3D volunteered their own fleet of 3D printers for the manufacturing of respirator valves and custom medical components. The company is also offering remote technical support for medical staff that would like to know more about 3D printing.

Volkswagen has started a task force that will adapt its car-making capacity and manufacturing facilities to the production of hospital ventilators and medical devices. Using their own 125 industrial 3D printers to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, Volkswagen is donating face masks to healthcare providers and local authorities as part of an agreement made with German Health Minister.

Stratasys has organized its global 3D printing resources to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic by printing full-face shields to provide protection to healthcare workers. The company showed that the strength of 3D bioprinting can be adapted on the fly to address shortages of parts related to shields, masks, and ventilators, among other things.
Doctors, hospital technicians and 3D-printing specialists are also using Google Docs, WhatsApp groups and online databases to trade tips for building, fixing and modifying machines like ventilators to help treat the rising number of patients with COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

The efforts come as supply shortages loom in one of the biggest challenges for health care systems around the world.

SOURCE

3D Printing Community responds to COVID-19 and Coronavirus resources

 

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 A Revolution in Medicine: Medical 3D BioPrinting

Curated by : Irina Robu, PhD

Imagine a scenario, where years from now, one of your organs stop working properly. What would you do?  The current option is to wait in line for a transplant, hoping that the donor is a match. But what if you can get an organ ready for you with no chance of rejection? Even though it may sound like science fiction at the current moment, organ 3D bioprinting can revolutionize medicine and health care.

I have always found the field of tissue engineering and 3D bioprinting fascinating. What interests me about 3D bioprinting is that it has the capacity to be a game changer, because it would make organs widely available to those who need them and it would eliminate the need for a living or deceased donor.  Moreover, it would be beneficial for pediatric patients who suffer specific problems that the current bio-prosthetic options might not address. It would minimize the risk of rejection as well as the components would be customized to size.

There have been advancements in the field of 3D bioprinting and one such advancement is using a 3D printed cranium by neurosurgeons at the University Medical Centre Utrecht. The patient was a young woman who suffered from a chronic bone disorder. The 3D reconstruction of her skull would minimize the brain damage that might have occurred if doctors used a durable plastic cranium.

So, what exactly is bioprinting? 3D bioprinting is an additive manufacturing procedure where biomaterials, such as cells and growth factors, are combined to generate tissue-like structures that duplicate natural tissues. At its core, bioprinting works in a similar way to conventional 3D printing. A digital model becomes a physical 3D object layer-by-layer.  However, in the case of bioprinting, a living cell suspension is used instead of a thermoplastic.

The procedure mostly involves preparation, printing, maturation and application and can be summarized in three steps:

  1. Pre-bioprinting step which includes creating a digital model obtained by using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans which are then fed to the printer.
  2. Bioprinting step where the actual printing process takes place, where the bioink is placed in a printer cartridge and deposition occurs based on the digital model.
  3. Post-bioprinting step is the mechanical and chemical stimulation of printed parts in order to create stable biostructures which can ultimately be implanted.

3D bioprinting allows suitable microarchitectures that provide mechanical stability and promote cell ingrowth to be produced while preventing any homogeneity issues that occur after conventional cell seeding, such as cell placement. Immediate vascularization of implanted scaffolds is critical, because it provides an influx of nutrients and outflow of by-products preventing necrosis. The benefits of homogeneous seeded scaffolds are that it allows them to integrate faster into the host tissue, uniform cell growth in vivo and lower risk of rejection.

However, in order to address the limitations of the commercially available technology for producing tissue implants, researchers are working to develop a 3D bioprinter that can fit into a laminar flow hood, ultra-low cost and customizable for different organs. Bioprinting can be applied in a clinical setting where the ultimate goal is to implant 3D bioprinted structures into the patients, it is necessary to maintain sterile printing solutions and ensure accuracy in complex tissues, needed for cell-to-cell distances and correct output.

The final aim of bioprinting is to promote an alternative to autologous and allogeneic tissue implants, which will replace animal testing for the study of disease and development of treatments.  We know that for now a short-term goal for 3D bioprinting is to create alternatives to animal testing and to increase the speed of drug testing. The long-term goal is to change the status quo, to develop a personalized organ made from patient’s own cells. However, some ethical challenges still exist regarding the ownership of the organ.

A powerful starting point is the creation of tissue components for heart, liver, pancreas, and other vital organs.  Moreover, each small progress in 3D bioprinting will allow 3D bioprinting to make organs widely available to those who need them, instead of waiting years for a transplant to become available.

I invite you to read a biomedical e-book that I had the pleasure to author along with several other scientists, called Medical 3D BioPrinting – The Revolution in Medicine Technologies for Patient-centered Medicine: From R&D in Biologics to New Medical Devices (Series E: Patient-Centered Medicine Book 4).

 

 

 

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Reporter: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

LPBI Update

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Newsletter #1 – February 2020

Welcome to the premier issue of LPBI Group News, where readers can find relevant news and updates about science, business and medical innovation. This newsletter is distributed as a service for our readers.

The Conference Forum Highlights Immuno-Oncology 360° in New York

The Conference Forum is hosting Immuno-Oncology 360°, which reports on current data and developments of immuno-oncology in the science and business communities. The summit takes place on February 26-28 at the Crowne Plaza Times Square in New York.

Please visit www.io360summit.com to register and use code LPBI20 for a 20% discount. 

Ahead of the conference, Immuno-Oncology 360° has created a series celebrating their women speakers in the work they are doing to fight cancer. To read the series, visit: https://theconferenceforum.org/conferences/immuno-oncology-360/io360%cb%9a-leadership-interviews/

This information is published in conjunction with the Immuno-Oncology 360° Summit.

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Venture Summit Attracts Top Innovators in Silicon Valley

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group is one of the sponsors of Venture Summit | West, “Where Innovation Meets Capital.”

The meeting will be held on March 23-24 at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Silicon Valley.

 

Special offer:  Register Now & Save $450 off (Use discount code “LPBI-VIP”)

For more information, please visit: https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/12/17/venture-summit-west-where-innovation-meets-capital-march-23rd-24th-2020-santa-clara-convention-center-silicon-valley/

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e-Proceedings of 15th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference at Harvard Medical School

The 15th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference at Harvard Medical School, Boston last year [November 13-14, 2019], entitled  The Paradigm Evolves, explored the science, business and policy issues facing personalized medicine. In today’s world, scientists need to understand how molecular diagnostics augmented by artificial intelligence, data analytics and digital health empowers physicians and patients in their health care decisions.

Please visit for LPBI Group coverage of the meeting, including social media activities at the conference:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/19/15th-annual-personalized-medicine-conference-at-harvard-medical-school-the-paradigm-evolves-november-13-14-2019-%e2%80%a2-harvard-medical-school-boston-ma/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/11/15/tweets-and-retweets-by-aviva1950-and-by-pharma_bi-for-15th-annual-personalized-medicine-conference-at-harvard-medical-school-the-paradigm-evolves-november-13-14-2019-%e2%80%a2/

  •   3D Medical BioPrinting Technology Featured in Podcast

LPBI Group leaders, Aviva Lev-Ari, Ph.D., R.N., Stephen Williams, Ph.D., and Irina Robu, Ph.D., spoke with Partners in Health and Biz, a half-hour audio podcast that reaches 40,000 listeners, about the topic of 3D Medical BioPrinting Technology: A Revolution in Medicine.

Please click on this link to hear the podcast. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laozyrfi29c.

The topic is also the title of a recently offered e-book by the LPBI Group on 3D BioPrinting, available on Amazon/Kindle Direct [https://www.amazon.com/Medical-BioPrinting-Technologies-Patient-centered-Patient-Centered-ebook/dp/B078QVDV2W]. 

The 3D BioPrinting technology is being used to develop advanced medical practices that will help with previously difficult processes, such as delivering drugs via micro-robots, targeting specific cancer cells and even assisting in difficult eye operations.

The table of contents in this book includes: Chapter 1: 3D Bioprinting: Latest Innovations in a Forty year-old Technology. Chapter 2: LPBI Initiative on 3D BioPrinting, Chapter 3: Cardiovascular BioPrinting, Chapter 4: Medical and Surgical Repairs – Advances in R&D Research, Chapter 5: Organ on a Chip, Chapter 6: FDA Regulatory Technology Issues, Chapter 7: DNA Origami, Chapter 8: Aptamers and 3D Scaffold Binding, Chapter 9: Advances and Future Prospects, Chapter 10: BioInks and MEMS, Chapter 11: BioMedical MEMS, Chapter 12: 3D Solid Organ Printing and Chapter 13: Medical 3D Printing: Sources and Trade Groups – List of Secondary Material. 

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New e-Book: Latest in Genomics Methodologies for Therapeutics: Gene Editing, NGS & BioInformatics, Simulations and the Genome Ontology

LPBI Group’s latest e-book entitled, Latest in Genomics Methodologies for Therapeutics: Gene Editing, NGS & BioInformatics, Simulations and the Genome Ontology, offers the reader content curation with embedded videos and audio podcasts, real-time conference e-Proceedings by LPBI’s scientists and professors and archived tweets of quotes from speakers at leading biotechnology conferences.

Please click on this link on Amazon/Kindle Direct: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08385KF87

 

The book integrates in a single volume four distinct perspectives: basic science, technologies and methodologies, clinical aspects and business and legal aspects of genomics research. “The materials in this book represents the scientific frontier in Biological Sciences and Medicine related to the genomics aspects of disease onset,” said Aviva Lev-Ari, Ph.D., R.N., and founder of LPBI Group.

The book addresses:

  • aspects of life: the Cell, the Organ, the Human Body and Human Populations;
  • methodologies of genomic data analysis: Next Generation Sequencing, Gene Editing, AI, Single Cell Genomics, Evolution Biology Genomics, Simulation Modeling in Genomics, Genotypes and Phenotypes Modeling, measurement of Epigenomics effects on disease, and developments in Pharmaco-Genomics.

Additionally, artificial Intelligence in medicine is covered in Part 3 of the e-Book, which represents the frontier in this emerging field, with topics, such as the science, technologies and methodologies, clinical aspects, business and legal implications as well as the latest machine learning algorithms harnessed for medical diagnosis.

This e-book is significant because it:

  • contains 326 articles on topics, such as gene editing, bioinformatics and genome ontology;
  • incorporates 74 e-Proceedings created in real time by the Book’s authors and editors
  • includes four collections of Tweets representing quotes from speakers at global leading conferences on Genomics
  • has 13 locations of Videos and Audio Podcasts that serve to enrich the e-Reader’s experience.

We welcome your comments and suggestions. Please send them to Aviva Lev-Ari at avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu.

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Audio Podcasts

Reporter: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

UPDATED on 1/11/2020

In May 2019, Aviva Lev-Ari, Ph.D., R.N., Stephen Williams, Ph.D., and Irina Robu, Ph.D., spoke with Partners in Health and Biz, an half-hour audio podcast that reaches 40,000 listeners, about the topic of 3D Medical BioPrinting Technology: A Revolution in Medicine. The topic is also the title of a recently offered e-book by the LPBI Group on 3D BioPrinting, available on Amazon/Kindle Direct [https://www.amazon.com/Medical-BioPrinting-Technologies-Patient-centered-Patient-Centered-ebook/dp/B078QVDV2W]. https://www.spreaker.com/user/pihandbiz/bioprinting-2019-final

The 3D BioPrinting technology is being used to develop advanced medical practices that will help with previously difficult processes, such as delivering drugs via micro-robots, targeting specific cancer cells and even assisting in difficult eye operations. 

The table of contents in this book includes: Chapter 1: 3D Bioprinting: Latest Innovations in a Forty year-old Technology. Chapter 2: LPBI Initiative on 3D BioPrinting, Chapter 3: Cardiovascular BioPrinting, Chapter 4: Medical and Surgical Repairs – Advances in R&D Research, Chapter 5: Organ on a Chip, Chapter 6: FDA Regulatory Technology Issues, Chapter 7: DNA Origami, Chapter 8: Aptamers and 3D Scaffold Binding, Chapter 9: Advances and Future Prospects, Chapter 10: BioInks and MEMS, Chapter 11: BioMedical MEMS, Chapter 12: 3D Solid Organ Printing and Chapter 13: Medical 3D Printing: Sources and Trade Groups – List of Secondary Material. 

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3D Printing Used as New Tool for Radiologists

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

3D printing is a technique that has gained immense popularity for its ability to create 3D structures in art, jewelry, engineering, medicine. In this case, radiologists use 3D printing to transform a 2D scan into 3D visualization of a patient’s anatomy. Radiologists use their unique skills to visualize the anatomy of the organs of interest which give them a large advantage in communicating with patients as well as surgical teams.
The 3D printed anatomical models have proved valuable in providing a better understanding of complex anatomies and being used as a tangible aid for pre-surgical planning. It gives the patient a clear understanding of what is happening and it provides a great value when it comes to patient specific care. However, 3D modelling is essential at the beginning but it can also be a useful tool for surgeons. The list of medical 3D printing benefits is infinite. Just recently, a scientific team at University of Minnesota constructed their own patient specific 3D organ model based on MRI scans and prostate tissue samples of patients. The organs allow surgeons to plan and rehearse surgery.
In addition to researchers at University of Minnesota, Siemens Health engineers also created a platform to make medical apps that can be accessible throughout hospitals. In addition, Siemens Health partnered up with Materialise to make 3D printing software an integral part of the radiology workflow.
Hence, using 3D bioprinting is a desirable path to follow for radiologist. Not only they get to interpret anatomy, but now they can use 3D bioprinting as a state of the art tool that empower them to provide immense value to an audience that stretches from patient to practitioner.

SOURCE

https://www.bioportfolio.com/news/article/4177601/3D-Printing-Used-as-New-Tool-for-Radiologists.html

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Cancer Genomics: Multiomic Analysis of Single Cells and Tumor Heterogeneity

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

 

scTrio-seq identifies colon cancer lineages

Single-cell multiomics sequencing and analyses of human colorectal cancer. Shuhui Bian et al. Science  30 Nov 2018:Vol. 362, Issue 6418, pp. 1060-1063

To better design treatments for cancer, it is important to understand the heterogeneity in tumors and how this contributes to metastasis. To examine this process, Bian et al. used a single-cell triple omics sequencing (scTrio-seq) technique to examine the mutations, transcriptome, and methylome within colorectal cancer tumors and metastases from 10 individual patients. The analysis provided insights into tumor evolution, linked DNA methylation to genetic lineages, and showed that DNA methylation levels are consistent within lineages but can differ substantially among clones.

Science, this issue p. 1060

Abstract

Although genomic instability, epigenetic abnormality, and gene expression dysregulation are hallmarks of colorectal cancer, these features have not been simultaneously analyzed at single-cell resolution. Using optimized single-cell multiomics sequencing together with multiregional sampling of the primary tumor and lymphatic and distant metastases, we developed insights beyond intratumoral heterogeneity. Genome-wide DNA methylation levels were relatively consistent within a single genetic sublineage. The genome-wide DNA demethylation patterns of cancer cells were consistent in all 10 patients whose DNA we sequenced. The cancer cells’ DNA demethylation degrees clearly correlated with the densities of the heterochromatin-associated histone modification H3K9me3 of normal tissue and those of repetitive element long interspersed nuclear element 1. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of reconstructing genetic lineages and tracing their epigenomic and transcriptomic dynamics with single-cell multiomics sequencing.

Fig. 1 Reconstruction of genetic lineages with scTrio-seq2.

Global SCNA patterns (250-kb resolution) of CRC01. Each row represents an individual cell. The subclonal SCNAs used for identifying genetic sublineages were marked and indexed; for details, see fig. S6B. On the top of the heatmap, the amplification or deletion frequency of each genomic bin (250 kb) of the non-hypermutated CRC samples from the TCGA Project and patient CRC01’s cancer cells are shown.

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Fig. 1 Reconstruction of genetic lineages with scTrio-seq2.

Global SCNA patterns (250-kb resolution) of CRC01. Each row represents an individual cell. The subclonal SCNAs used for identifying genetic sublineages were marked and indexed; for details, see fig. S6B. On the top of the heatmap, the amplification or deletion frequency of each genomic bin (250 kb) of the non-hypermutated CRC samples

 

 

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