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Archive for the ‘3D Printing for Medical Application’ Category


Medical Scientific Discoveries for the 21st Century & Interviews with Scientific Leaders at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078313281 – electronic Table of Contents 

Author, Curator and Editor: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Available on Kindle Store @ Amazon.com since 12/9/2017

List of Contributors & Contributors’ Biographies

Volume Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Preface, all Introductions, all Summaries and Epilogue

Part One:

1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3, 2.3, 2.4, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 2.5, 2.6.1, 2.6.2, 2.6.3, 2.6.4, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Part Two:

5.2, 5.3, 5.6, 6.1.2, 6.1.4, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.3.2, 6.3.4, 6.3.5, 6.3.6, 6.3.8, 6.3.10, 6.4.1, 6.4.2, 6.5.1.2, 6.5.1.3, 6.5.2.2, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 8.7, 8.8, 8.9, 8.9.1, 8.9.3, 8.9.4, 8.9.5, 8.9.6, 8.10.1, 8.10.2, 8.10.3, 8.10.4, 9.2, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.9, 9.10, 9.11, 9.12, 9.13, 9.14, 9.15, 9.16, 10.2, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 10.10, 10.11, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.5, 11.6, 11.7, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 12.7, 12.8, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11, 12.12, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.6, 13.12, 13.13, 14.1, 14.2

Guest Authors:

Pnina Abir-Am, PhD Part Two: 6.1.1

Stephen J Williams, PhDPart Two: 6.2.6, 6.5.2.2, 10.4, 10.9, 13.4

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN:

Part One:

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.7, 2.2.1, 2.3

Part Two:

5.1, 5.4, 5.5, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11, 6.1.3, 6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.5, 6.3.1, 6.3.3, 6.3.7, 6.3.9, 6.4.3, 6.5.1.1, 6.5.2.1, 6.5.2.2, 6.5.3.1, 6.5.4, 6.5.5, 6,5,6, 8.9.2, 8.10.2, 9.1, 9.4, 10.1, 10.3, 11.4, 12.6, 13.5, 13.7, 13.8, 13.9, 13.10, 13.11

Adam Sonnenberg, BSC, MSc(c)Part Two: 13.9

 

electronic Table of Contents

PART ONE:

Physician as Authors, Writers in Medicine and Educator in Public Health

 

Chapter 1: Physicians as Authors

Introduction

1.1  The Young Surgeon and The Retired Pathologist: On Science, Medicine and HealthCare Policy – Best writers Among the WRITERS

1.2 Atul Gawande: Physician and Writer

1.3 Editorial & Publication of Articles in e-Books by  Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence:  Contributions of Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

1.4 Abraham Verghese, MD, Physician and Notable Author

1.5 Eric Topol, M.D.

1.6 Gregory House, MD

1.7 Peter Mueller, MD  Professor of Radiology @MGH & HMS – 2015 Synergy’s Honorary Award Recipient

Summary

Chapter 2: Professional Recognition

Introduction

2.1 Proceedings

2.1.1 Research Presentations

2.1.2 Proceedings of the NYAS

2.1.3 Cold Spring Harbor Conference Meetings

2.1.4 Young Scientist Seminars

2.2 Meet Great Minds

2.2.1 Meet the Laureates

2.2.2 Richard Feynman, Genius and Laureate

2.2.3 Fractals and Heat Energy

2.3 MacArthur Foundation Awards

2.4 Women’s Contributions went beyond Rosie the Riveter

2.4.1 Secret Maoist Chinese Operation Conquered Malaria

2.4.2 Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel

2.5 Impact Factors and Achievement

2.6   RAPsodisiac Medicine

2.6.1 Outstanding-achievements-in-radiology-or-radiotherapy

2.6.2 Outstanding-achievement-in-anesthesiology

2.6.3 Outstanding-achievement-in-pathology

2.6.4 Topics in Pathology – Special Issues from Medscape Pathology

2.7 How to win the Nobel Prize

2.8 Conversations about Medicine

2.9 Current Advances in Medical Technology

2.10 Atul Butte, MD, PhD

Summary

Chapter 3:  Medical and Allied Health Sciences Education

Introduction

3.1 National Outstanding Medical Student Award Winners

3.2 Outstanding Awards in Medical Education

3.3 Promoting Excellence in Physicians and Nurses

3.4 Excellence in mentoring

Summary

Chapter 4: Science Teaching in Math and Technology (STEM)

Introduction

4.1 Science Teaching in Math and Technology

4.2 Television as a Medium for Science Education

4.2.1 Science Discovery TV

4.3 From Turing to Watson

Summary

PART TWO:

Medical Scientific Discoveries Interviews with Scientific Leaders

Chapter 5: Cardiovascular System

Introduction

5.1 Physiologist, Professor Lichtstein, Chair in Heart Studies at The Hebrew University elected Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

5.2 Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cardiac Disorders

5.3 Notable Contributions to Regenerative Cardiology

5.4 For Accomplishments in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Diseases: The Arrigo Recordati International Prize for Scientific Research

5.5 Becoming a Cardiothoracic Surgeon: An Emerging Profile in the Surgery Theater and through Scientific Publications

5.6 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

5.7 CVD Prevention and Evaluation of Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities: Coronary Calcium Score by CT Scan Screening to justify or not the Use of Statin

5.8 2013 as A Year of Revolutionizing Medicine and Top 11 Cardiology Stories

5.9 Bridging the Gap in Medical Innovations – Elazer Edelman @ TEDMED 2013

5.10 Development of a Pancreatobiliary Chemotherapy Eluting Stent for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma PIs: Jeffrey Clark (MGH), Robert Langer (Koch), Elazer Edelman (Harvard:MIT HST Program)

5.11 Publications on Heart Failure by Prof. William Gregory Stevenson, M.D., BWH

Summary

Chapter 6: Genomics

Introduction
6.1 Genetics before the Human Genome Project

6.1.1 Why did Pauling Lose the “Race” to James Watson and Francis Crick? How Crick Describes his Discovery in a Letter to his Son

6.1.2 John Randall’s MRC Research Unit and Rosalind Franklin’s role at Kings College

6.1.3 Interview with the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA: Watson on The Double Helix and his changing view of Rosalind Franklin

6.1.4 The Initiation and Growth of Molecular Biology and Genomics, Part I

6.2 The Human Genome Project: Articles of Note  @ pharmaceuticalintelligence.com by multiple authors

6.2.1 CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: The Birth of BioInformatics & Computational Genomics

6.2.2 What comes after finishing the Euchromatic Sequence of the Human Genome?

6.2.3 Human Genome Project – 10th Anniversary: Interview with Kevin Davies, PhD – The $1000 Genome

6.2.4 University of California Santa Cruz’s Genomics Institute will create a Map of Human Genetic Variations

6.2.5 Exceptional Genomes: The Process to find them

6.2.6 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

6.3 The Impact of Genome Sequencing on Biology and Medicine

6.3.1 Genomics in Medicine – Establishing a Patient-Centric View of Genomic Data

6.3.2 Modification of genes by homologous recombination – Mario Capecchi, Martin Evans, Oliver Smithies

6.3.3 AAAS February 14-18, 2013, Boston: Symposia – The Science of Uncertainty in Genomic Medicine

6.3.4 The Metabolic View of Epigenetic Expression

6.3.5  Pharmacogenomics

6.3.6 Neonatal Pathophysiology

6.3.7 Genetics of Conduction Disease: Atrioventricular (AV) Conduction Disease (block): Gene Mutations – Transcription, Excitability, and Energy Homeostasis

6.3.8 3D mapping of genome in combine FISH and RNAi

6.3.9 Human Variome Project: encyclopedic catalog of sequence variants indexed to the human genome sequence

6.3.10 DNA mutagenesis and DNA repair

6.4 Scientific Leadership Recognition for Contributions to Genomics

6.4.1 Interview with Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak (44 minutes)

6.4.2 DNA Repair Pioneers Win Nobel – Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich, and Aziz Sancar 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the mechanisms of DNA repair

6.4.3  Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

6.5 Contemporary Field Leaders in Genomics

6.5.1 ROBERT LANGER

6.5.1.1 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Fundamental Physics and Life Sciences for a Total of $21 Million – MIT’s Robert Langer gets $3 Million

6.5.1.2 National Medal of Science – 2006 Robert S. Langer

6.5.1.3  Confluence of Chemistry, Physics, and Biology

6.5.2 JENNIFER DOUDNA

6.5.2.1 Jennifer Doudna, cosmology teams named 2015 Breakthrough Prize winners

6.5.2.2 UPDATED – Medical Interpretation of the Genomics Frontier – CRISPR – Cas9: Gene Editing Technology for New Therapeutics

6.5.3 ERIC LANDER

6.5.3.1  2012 Harvey Prize in April 30: at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology to Eric S. Lander @MIT & Eli Yablonovitch @UC, Berkeley

6.5.4 2013 Genomics: The Era Beyond the Sequencing of the Human Genome: Francis Collins, Craig Venter, Eric Lander, et al.

6.5.5 Recognitions for Contributions in Genomics by Dan David Prize Awards

6.5.6   65 Nobel Laureates meet 650 young scientists covering the fields of physiology and medicine, physics, and chemistry, 28 June – 3 July, 2015, Lindau & Mainau Island, Germany

Summary

Chapter 7: The RNAs

Introduction

7.1 RNA polymerase – molecular basis for DNA transcription – Roger Kornberg, MD

7.2  One gene, one protein – Charles Yanofsky

7.3 Turning genetic information into working proteins – James E. Darnell Jr.

7.4 Small but mighty RNAs – Victor Ambros, David Baulcombe, and Gary Ruvkun, Phillip A. Sharp

7.5 Stress-response gene networks – Nina V. Fedoroff

Summary

Chapter 8: Proteomics, Protein-folding, and Cell Regulation
Introduction.

8.1 The Life and Work of Allan Wilson

8.2 Proteomics

8.3 More Complexity in Protein Evolution

8.4 Proteins: An evolutionary record of diversity and adaptation

8.5 Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Leroy Hood

8.6 Ubiquitin researchers win Nobel – Ciechanover, Hershko, and Rose awarded for discovery of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis

8.7 Buffering of genetic modules involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism provides homeostatic regulation

8.8 Dynamic Protein Profiling

8.9 Protein folding

8.9.1 Protein misfolding and prions – Susan L. Lindquist, Stanley B. Prusiner

8.9.2 A Curated Census of Autophagy-Modulating Proteins and Small Molecules Candidate Targets for Cancer Therapy

8.9.3 Voluntary and Involuntary S-Insufficiency

8.9.4 Transthyretin and Lean Body Mass in Stable and Stressed State

8.9.5 The matter of stunting in the Ganges Plains

8.9.6 Proteins, Imaging and Therapeutics

8.10 Protein Folding and Vesicle Cargo

8.10.1 Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) and Molecular Chaperones

8.10.2 Collagen-binding Molecular Chaperone HSP47: Role in Intestinal Fibrosis – colonic epithelial cells and sub epithelial myofibroblasts

8.10.3 Biology, Physiology and Pathophysiology of Heat Shock Proteins

8.10.4 The Role of Exosomes in Metabolic Regulation 


Summary

Chapter 9:  Neuroscience

Introduction

9.1 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 for Cell Transport: James E. Rothman of Yale University; Randy W. Schekman of the University of California, Berkeley; and Dr. Thomas C. Südhof of Stanford University

9.2 Proteins that control neurotransmitter release – Richard H. Scheller

9.3 Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Robert J. Lefkowitz

9.4 MIND AND MEMORY: BIOLOGICAL AND DIGITAL – 2014 Dan David Prize Symposium

9.5 A new way of moving – Michael Sheetz, James Spudich, Ronald Vale

9.6 Role the basal ganglia

9.7 The Neurogenetics of Language – Patricia Kuhl – 2015 George A. Miller Award

9.8 The structure of our visual system

9.9 Outstanding Achievement in Schizophrenia Research

9.10 George A. Miller, a Pioneer in Cognitive Psychology, Is Dead at 92

9.11 – To understand what happens in the brain to cause mental illness

9.12 Brain and Cognition

9.13 – To reduce symptoms of mental illness and retrain the brain

9.14 Behavior

9.15 Notable Papers in Neurosciences

9.16 Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) – an unproved supplement

Summary

Chapter 10: Microbiology & Immunology

Introduction

10.1 Reference Genes in the Human Gut Microbiome: The BGI Catalogue

10.2 Malnutrition in India, high newborn death rate and stunting of children age under five years

10.3 In His Own Words: Leonard Herzenberg, The Immunologist Who Revolutionized Research, Dies at 81

10.4 Heroes in Medical Research: Dr. Robert Ting, Ph.D. and Retrovirus in AIDS and Cancer

10.5 Tang Prize for 2014: Immunity and Cancer

10.6 Halstedian model of cancer progression

10.7 The History of Hematology and Related Sciences

10.8 Pathology Emergence in the 21st Century

10.9 Heroes in Medical Research: Barnett Rosenberg and the Discovery of Cisplatin

10.10  T cell-mediated immune responses & signaling pathways activated by TLRs – Bruce A. Beutler, Jules A. Hoffmann, Ralph M. Steinman

10.11 Roeder – the coactivator OCA-B, the first cell-specific coactivator, discovered by Roeder in 1992, is unique to immune system B cells

Summary

Chapter 11: Endocrine Hormones

Introduction

11.1 Obesity – 2010 Douglas L. ColemanJeffrey M. Friedman

11.2 Lonely Receptors: RXR – Jensen, Chambon, and Evans – Nuclear receptors provoke RNA production in response to steroid hormones

11.3 The Fred Conrad Koch Lifetime Achievement Award—the Society’s highest honor—recognizes the lifetime achievements and exceptional contributions of an individual to the field of endocrinology

11.4 Gerald D Aurbach Award for Outstanding Translational Research

11.5 Roy O. Greep Award for Outstanding Research in Endocrinology – Martin M. Matzuk

11.6 American Physiology Society Awards

11.7 Solomon Berson and Rosalyn Yalow

Summary

Chapter 12. Stem Cells

Introduction

12.1 Mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent – John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka

12.2 Observing the spleen colonies in mice and proving the existence of stem cells – Till and McCulloch

12.3 McEwen Award for Innovation: Irving Weissman, M.D., Stanford School of Medicine, and Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D., Hubrecht Institute

12.4 Developmental biology

12.5  CRISPR/Cas-mediated genome engineering – Rudolf Jaenisch

12.6 Ribozymes and RNA Machines –  Work of Jennifer A. Doudna

12.7 Ralph Brinster, ‘Father of Transgenesis’

12.8 Targeted gene modification

12.9 Stem Cells and Cancer

12.10 ALPSP Awards

12.11 Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators

12.12 Breaking news about genomic engineering, T2DM and cancer treatments

Summary
Chapter 13: 3D Printing and Medical Application

Introduction

13.1 3D Printing

13.2 What is 3D printing?

13.3 The Scientist Who Is Making 3D Printing More Human

13.4 Join These Medical 3D Printing Groups on Twitter and LinkedIn for great up to date news

13.5 Neri Oxman and her Mediated Matter group @MIT Media Lab have developed a technique for 3D-printing Molten Glass

13.6 The ‘chemputer’ that could print out any drug

13.7 3-D-Bioprinting in use to Create Cardiac Living Tissue: Print your Heart out

13.8 LPBI’s Perspective on Medical and Life Sciences Applications – 3D Printing: BioInks, BioMaterials-BioPolymer

13.9 Medical MEMS, Sensors and 3D Printing: Frontier in Process Control of BioMaterials

13.10 NIH and FDA on 3D Printing in Medical Applications: Views for On-demand Drug Printing, in-Situ direct Tissue Repair and Printed Organs for Live Implants

13.11 ‘Pop-up’ fabrication technique trumps 3D printing

13.12 Augmentation of the ONTOLOGY of the 3D Printing Research

13.13 Superresolution Microscopy

Summary

Chapter 14: Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

Introduction

14.1 Insights in Biological and Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

14.2 Breakthrough work in cancer

Summary to Part Two

Volume Summary and Conclusions

EPILOGUE

 

 

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Development of 3D Human Tissue Models Awarded NIH Grants Worth $15M

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

NIH has awarded $15 million for Tissue Chip for Disease Modeling and Efficacy Testing to develop 3D human tissue models. The 3D platforms, also called tissue chips support living cells and human tissues, it mimics the complex biological functions of organs/tissues and at the same time provide a new way to test potential drugs and their effectiveness. The awards will allow scientists to study and understand diseases mechanism and forecast how patients respond and is part of the first phase of a five-year program.  According to NCATS Director, Dr. Christopher P. Austin “these tissue chips to provide more accurate platforms to understand diseases, and to be more predictive of the human response to drugs than current research models, thereby improving the success rate of candidate drugs in human clinical trials”.

The awards will be used to study common and rare diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, influenza A, kidney disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, and hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Award recipients are Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Columbia University, Duke University, Harvard University, Northwestern University, University of California Davis, University of California Irvine, University of Pittsburgh, University of Rochester, University of Washington Seattle and Vanderbilt University.

SOURCE

https://www.mdtmag.com/news/2017/09/nih-grants-15m-development-3d-human-tissue-models

 

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Brain Surgeons Use 3D printing to Practice

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Mechanical thrombectomy is a hopeful new modality of interventional stroke treatment. The countless devices on the market differ with regard to where they apply force on the thrombus, taking a proximal approach such as aspiration devices or a distal approach such as basket-like devices. In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved mechanical thrombectomy – using a wire to pull clots out of the brains of stroke victims. At the end of the wire a trap exists which is like a noose that that captures the clot. Considering that the mechanical thrombectomy is a very risky procedure, interventional radiologists and neurosurgeons need to train extensively before they work on a real person.

Because of the procedure is very risky, a UConn Health radiologist and medical physicist made it easier for surgeons to practice first before the actual procedure. The team made a life size model of the arteries that the wire must pass through using brain scans and a 3D printer. The life size model will allow the surgeon to be more confident when guiding the wire and will give them the basic techniques on how to move the catheter. Holding the life size model of arteries, brings home how small they are even in an adult man. According to Dr. Ketan Bulsara, this life size model will be used a training model to learn mechanical thrombectomy and being able to model the tumor in advance could personalize and advance patient care.

SOURCE

https://www.mdtmag.com/news/2017/09/uconn-healths-new-3-d-printed-model-allows-brain-surgeons-practice

 

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3D-printed body parts could replace cadavers for medical training

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Even though, the 3-D printing based tissue modeling is still in early phases it is considered a promising approach for anatomy training. Models that are produced on a computer screen can be reproduced as tangible objects that students can examine and even dissect. According to a recent report in Medical Science Educator, the latest advancement in 3D printing can revolutionize how anatomy students learn.

For now, human cadavers have been the norm for studying human anatomy but they come with financial and logistical concerns both on storage and disposal. However, with the advancement of custom designed 3D organs, made possible by using 3D printing the need to keep large collection of physical models are reduced. With just a 3D printer, a digital model of the organ needed to study can be reproduced either with resin, thermoplastics, photopolymers and other material. Different materials can be used to allow construction of complex models with hard, soft, opaque and transparent conditions. The printed body parts will look exactly the same as the real thing because they are falsely colored to help students distinguish between the different parts of the anatomy including ligaments, muscles and blood vessels. Medical schools and hospitals around the world would be able to buy just an arm or a foot or the entire body depending on their training need.

Furthermore, to customizing anatomy lessons, 3D printed models can be used for teaching pathology/radiology by comparing CT images of the organs to their 3D-printed counterparts which students can examine and understand. Yet, the methods of 3D printing vary by materials used, resolution accuracy, long term stability, cost, speed and more. The printer cost is still a concern at this point partly because 3D bioprinters cost thousands of dollars nonetheless the cost is dropping due to the introduction of innovative printing materials.

Therefore, in order for 3-D printing to become more widely used, costs must be reduced while resolution must continue to improve. Instructors can potentially print one model per student in a material of their choosing that can be dissected. And no matter how much medical science moves with the times, there would always be the requisite skeleton model in the corner of most anatomy rooms.

SOURCE

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-22/an-3d-body-parts-could-replace-cadavers-for-medical-training/5615210

 

Additional Resources

Medical Science Educator, June 2015, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 183–194| Cite as

Anatomical Models: a Digital Revolution

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40670-015-0115-9/fulltext.html

 

Goodbye to Cadavers?

https://consultqd.clevelandclinic.org/2015/09/goodbye-to-cadavers/

 

3-D Printing: Innovation Allows Customized Airway Stents

https://consultqd.clevelandclinic.org/2014/12/3-d-printing-innovation-allows-customized-airway-stents/

 

Exploring 3-D Printing’s Potential in Renal Surgery

https://consultqd.clevelandclinic.org/2015/06/exploring-3-d-printings-potential-in-renal-surgery/

 

How 3-D Printing Is Revolutionizing Medicine at Cleveland Clinic

https://consultqd.clevelandclinic.org/2015/11/how-3-d-printing-is-revolutionizing-medicine-at-cleveland-clinic/

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First 3D Printed Tibia Replacement

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Current advances have allowed 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Thanks to 3D printing, an Australian man got to keep his leg. The man, Reuben Lichter nearly lost his leg above the knee due to a bacterial infection. Doctors told him that he had osteomyelitis which infected his entire bone. Lichter’s bacterial disease of osteomyelitis affects 2 in every 10,000 people in the United States. He had two choices: an experimental procedure using the 3D printed bone or lose his leg. For Lichter, the choice was easy.

Michael Wagels who served as the lead surgeon performed the world’s first-ever transplant surgery using a 3D printed bone. The scaffold was initially modeled at Queensland University of Technology. Biomedical engineers designed the scaffold to promote bone growth around it and then slowly dissolve over time. To have the body successfully grow around the scaffold, the team introduced tissue and blood vessels from both of Lichter’s legs to the scaffold. The surgery itself happened over five operations at Brisbane’s Princess Alexandra Hospital.

However, the next major challenge for biomedical engineers is how to successfully 3D print organs.

SOURCE

https://interestingengineering.com/australian-man-gets-worlds-first-3d-printed-tibia-replacement

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3-D Printing in Water using Novel Hybrid Nanoparticles

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

3D printing has become an essential tool for fabricating different organic based materials, but printing structures in water has been thought-provoking due to lack of water soluble molecules known as photo initiators. The photo initiator can induce chemical reactions needed to form solid printed material by light.  However, researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have developed a new type of photo initiator for three-dimensional printing in water. This innovative nanoparticle allows the creating of bio-friendly 3D structures.

By 3D printing in water, it also opens up the digital light processing method to medical applications, leading toward a competitive response for patient specific implants and tissues because the photo initiators cause rapid solidification of a liquid material that can create faster reactions when exposed to light. 3D printing in water opens up innovative ways for tailored fabrication of medical devices and for printing hydrogels or bio-scaffolds that are typical used in tissue engineering.

The challenge of 3D printing in water is finding an initiator that is not consumed by irradiation. However, unlike regular photo initiators, the novel hybrid nanoparticles developed by Prof. Magdassi present tunable properties, wide excitation window in the UV and visible range, high light sensitivity, and their ability to split water, and absorb oxygen molecules that typically inhibit the performance of the process. The particles added as photo initiator are semi conductive hybrid nanoparticles and are used to create high resolution 3D objects at sub-microscopic scale.

Therefore, 3-D printing in water could allow personalized fabrication of joint replacements, heart valves, artificial tendons and ligaments etc.

SOURCE

  1. https://phys-org.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/phys.org/news/2017-08-rapid-d-hybrid-nanoparticles.amp
  2. Amol Ashok Pawar et al. Rapid Three-Dimensional Printing in Water Using Semiconductor–Metal Hybrid Nanoparticles as Photoinitiators, Nano Letters (2017)

 

 

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3-D Printed Ovaries Produce Healthy Offspring

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

 

Each year about 120,000 organs are transplanted from one human being to another and most of the time is a living volunteer. But lack of suitable donors, predominantly means the supply of such organs is inadequate. Countless people consequently die waiting for a transplant which has led researchers to study the question of how to build organs from scratch.

One promising approach is to print them, but “bioprinting” remains largely experimental. Nevertheless, bioprinted tissue is before now being sold for drug testing, and the first transplantable tissues are anticipated to be ready for use in a few years’ time. The first 3D printed organ includes bioprosthetic ovaries which are constructed of 3D printed scaffolds that have immature eggs and have been successful in boosting hormone production and restoring fertility was developed by Teresa K. Woodruff, a reproductive scientist and director of the Women’s Health Research Institute at Feinberg School of Medicine, at Northwestern University, in Illinois.

What sets apart these bioprosthetic ovaries is the architecture of the scaffold. The material is made of gelatin made from broken-down collagen that is safe to humans which is self-supporting and can lead to building multiple layers.

The 3-D printed “scaffold” or “skeleton” is implanted into a female and its pores can be used to optimize how follicles, or immature eggs, get wedged within the scaffold. The scaffold supports the survival of the mouse’s immature egg cells and the cells that produce hormones to boost production. The open construction permits room for the egg cells to mature and ovulate, blood vessels to form within the implant enabling the hormones to circulate and trigger lactation after giving birth. The purpose of this scaffold is to recapitulate how an ovary would function.
The scientists’ only objective for developing the bioprosthetic ovaries was to help reestablish fertility and hormone production in women who have suffered adult cancer treatments and now have bigger risks of infertility and hormone-based developmental issues.

 

SOURCES

Printed human body parts could soon be available for transplant
https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21715638-how-build-organs-scratch

 

3D printed ovaries produce healthy offspring giving hope to infertile women

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/05/16/3d-printed-ovaries-produce-healthy-offspring-giving-hope-infertile/

 

Brave new world: 3D-printed ovaries produce healthy offspring

http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-05-27-brave-new-world-3-d-printed-ovaries-produce-healthy-offspring.html

 

3-D-printed scaffolds restore ovary function in infertile mice

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317485.php

 

Our Grandkids May Be Born From 3D-Printed Ovaries

http://gizmodo.com/these-mice-gave-birth-using-3d-printed-ovaries-1795237820

 

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