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Archive for the ‘Biopolymer Blend Open Porous’ Category


Philly Biotech Scene: Biobots and 3D Bioprinting (Now Called Allevi)

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

Biobots now known as Allevi, Inc..  Their new Biobots community has been renamed Allevi Academy.

The goal of BioBots has always been the same: Give laboratories the ability to create living things from scratch. Those things–such as pieces of tissue or bone–could then be studied with the hopes of finding cures and solving diseases.

That vision helped the company’s co-founders, Ricky Solorzano and Danny Cabrera, land on Inc.’s 30 Under 30 list in 2016. And while the original goal has remained, much has changed. In August, Cabrera, the company’s first CEO, left the Philadelphia-based startup. And in November, the company rebranded, changing its name to a more mature but far less memorable name, Allevi.

“People think running a startup is just a straight line, that you go in one direction,” Solorzano, who has since shifted from CTO to CEO, tells Inc. “You really go up, down, sideways, left, right, 45 degrees this way, 90 degrees that way.”

For Solorzano and Cabrera, the split represents the end of an era. The two Miami residents both attended the University of Pennsylvania, where they first discussed the idea of developing an affordable three-dimensional printer that could produce living tissue. They founded the company together in 2014.

The following is based on an interview back in 2016 I did with Biobots founders Danial Cabrera, Ricardo Solorzano, and Sohaib Hashimi.

A year ago (2014), we founded BioBots in a dorm room on top of a noisy college bar with the mission of conquering the largest mystery of our generation – life. Disillusioned with existing tools and technologies for engineering organisms, and inspired by the idea of biology as technology, we launched BioBots with a command: “Build with Life.”

It only took a few weeks for our first apostles to join us. Dr. Dan Huh and his student Yooni at Penn began working with a prototype that would become the first BioBot. With the help and unyielding support of our early clients and partners like Elliot Menschik at DreamIt Health, we began the journey of bringing biofabrication technology to people across the world.

Today hundreds of labs are turning to BioBots for tools that allow them to engineer biology. I am constantly inspired by our partners’ research projects, goals and progress; they consistently remind me that we are accelerating the pace not only of regenerative medicine, but of human evolution.

None of this would be possible without all of our BioBot employees, their families, our friends in the media, investors, and most importantly – our visionary clients, who continue to pour their passion, talents, energy and love into building this company. A year ago we were two guys in a bar. Today, hundreds of supporters have taken up the mantle of biofabricator.

Our vision at BioBots is to make tools that harness life as an engineering discipline and push the human race forward. We look forward to helping you do much more and test the boundary of what we can build with biology.  Thank you for being a part of our journey!

BioBots to Bring Revolutionary 3D Bioprinter to the Masses with $5,000 Beta Program & Eventually Print Whole Organs

“​Life is the oldest and most efficient manufacturing technology that we as people know of. It’s become clear over the past several decades as scientists have engineered life to work for us, that biology is the next frontier for manufacturing. However, there is one thing missing. ​Doing biology today is the equivalent of computer programming 50 years ago – it’s inefficient, it’s slow, and the technology is only available to scientists at well-funded institutions​, out of the hands of the ordinary people that could be leading this new revolution​.” ~ BioBots CEO Danny Cabrera to 3DPrint.com

BioBots is a company launched by Daniel Cabrera, a recent graduate of University of Pennsylvania’s Engineering School, as well as Ricardo Solorzano and Sohaib Hashmi, who are staff research specialists in the Perelman School of Medicine (UPenn). The three got together to create a 3D bioprinter capable of printing in multiple body tissues. While this certainly isn’t the first ever bioprinter created, Cabrera tells us that it is not the same as others on the market today.

“Employing the tool that transformed traditional avenues of manufacturing, we at BioBots are using 3D printers to engineer biology,” Cabrera told 3DPrint.com. “Our 3D bioprinters employ the use of a novel extrusion process that addresses the previous technical hurdles of 3D bioprinting, as well as a biomaterials cartridge system that makes this revolutionary technology accessible to untrained users. Just imagine ​the kind of products that people will build now that they can plug and print living tissues. At BioBots, we are building this future, today.”

The BioBot 3D printer works with both “Blue Light” and UV light. The cell solution, which contains living, growing cells as well as vasculature for nourishment, is extruded from the 3D printer in a similar fashion to how at-home fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printers work. However, different from your typical FFF 3D printer, once a biological material has been extruded, an ultraviolet light (or Blue Light) cures and hardens it. This occurs one layer at a time until the desired object is printed.  The objects printed can be living cell tissue or non-living scaffolds, and Cabrera tells us that over a dozen different cell types have been used with these printers so far. The unique cartridge system that BioBots’ bioprinter uses, enable users to easily switch between the printing of different biological materials, almost as easily as a normal desktop printer can switch between colors.

“We have won several innovation competitions and recently received funding from DreamIt Health, a start-up accelerator program based out of Philadelphia,” said Cabrera. “We are opening a Beta program with the goal of placing printers in the hands of the best experts and working with them to generate publishable data. The idea is to generate interest in this area and inform scientists about the tool we’re developing through published research. We currently have Beta tester relationships in place with Dr. Dan Huh’s lab at Penn, Dr. Kara Spiller’s lab in Drexel, and Dr. Kevin Costa’s lab in Mt. Sinai and are definitely looking to expand.”

The company is also open to accepting many new Beta testers into the program. That program costs a mere $5,000 and supplies the following benefits to the testers:

  • A 3D bioprinter (80um resolution) capable of extruding a variety of hydrogels (collagen, alginate, agarose, polyethylene glycol, hyaluronic acid, etc.)
  • 1 Year service agreement & active development for your bioprinter
  • BioBots software package
  • Access to an online community of collaborators who are working together to solve tough tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and biomaterials problems
  • Having your work showcased at a number of conferences that BioBots has been invited to speak at

For those interested in joining the Beta program, they are asked to email the company for more details.

The team behind BioBots is equally as impressive as the machine itself. Cabrera has recently graduated from UPenn, where he studied computer science and biology, and won first place in the North America International Genetically Engineered Machines competition for his work on automating genetic engineering work flows and making life easier to engineer. The company’s CTO has been working in the field of regenerative medicine for about 4 years, and has authored several papers on building 3D blood vessels. He actually built the first BioBots prototype from his dorm room at UPenn.

While the Beta program is meant as a way in which the company can build up their user base, solidify a community of doctors, engineers, designers, educators and students, and test out their latest version of their BioBots bioprinter, others can pre-order the printer for $25,000. The team isn’t only targeting Ph.D researchers. They want these machines to be used by educators and researchers everywhere. “Our 3D bioprinters enable users to easily print high resolution biological structures – whether you’re a researcher on the frontier of regenerative medicine or a high school biology teacher,” said Cabrera.

While we are still far away from 3D printing working organs, the fact that BioBots offers a 3D printer capable of printing in a vast array of biological materials at a price starting as low as $5,000, means that this technology can reach the hands of virtually any researchers interested in studying the potential that it holds for the future. Other bioprinters from larger companies can cost upwards of $250,000, severely limiting access.  This is wear BioBots may become quite revolutionary.

Cabrera tells us that they are working on curriculum/lesson plans to go along with their printers, so that high school students can learn about bioprinting through the use of these relatively affordable machines.

When I asked Cabrera how long he thinks it will be, before we see fully printed working organs, he told me that it isn’t about the technology not being there, but rather its about researchers being able to come up with ways to use it. His guess is that within the next 10-15 years we may see the first 3D printed working organ.

What do you think? Will the BioBots 3D bioprinter lead the way in allowing researchers to fully investigate and innovate upon this technology? Discuss in theBioBots forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out the videos below, including the first one, showing a demo of the BioBots printer using photocurable PEG.

 Source: https://www.biobots.io/news-article/biobots-to-bring-revolutionary-3d-bioprinter-to-the-masses-with-5000-beta-program-eventually-print-whole-organs/

Biobots offers, on their site at https://www.biobots.io/build-with-life/

  • Wikis: where one can browse through these pages to learn about established biotechnologies, tissue fabrication methods, foundational advances in biology and in our ability to design and engineer living things.
  • Protocols: where one can find information in a “Use the protocols section” to learn more about how to interact with your BioBot 1, different bioinks, and new emerging biofabrication techniques. This is the place to develop and share new methods.
  • BioReports: a collection of experimental logs with methodology used and results obtained from experiments using the BioBot systems

Advantages of the Biobots system

PRECISION

Our team of engineers has worked hard to ensure precision in every aspect of BioBot 1. We use linear rails over less expensive belt systems that slip and require adjustment, guaranteeing a consistent 10 micron precision on each axis.

 

Other Articles on this Open Access Journal on 3D Bioprinting Include:

A Revolution in Medicine: Medical 3D BioPrinting

Audio Podcasts – 3D Medical BioPrinting Technology

Global Technology Conferences on 3D BioPrinting 2015 – 2016

Volume Four: Medical 3D BioPrinting – The Revolution in Medicine

 

 

Read Full Post »


Topical Solution for Combination Oncology Drug Therapy: Patch that delivers Drug, Gene, and Light-based Therapy to Tumor

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Self-assembled RNA-triple-helix hydrogel scaffold for microRNA modulation in the tumour microenvironment

Affiliations

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Harvard-MIT Division for Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
    • João Conde,
    • Nuria Oliva,
    • Mariana Atilano,
    • Hyun Seok Song &
    • Natalie Artzi
  2. School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, UK
    • João Conde
  3. Grup dEnginyeria de Materials, Institut Químic de Sarrià-Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona 08017, Spain
    • Mariana Atilano
  4. Division of Bioconvergence Analysis, Korea Basic Science Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 169-148, Republic of Korea
    • Hyun Seok Song
  5. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA
    • Natalie Artzi
  6. Department of Medicine, Biomedical Engineering Division, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
    • Natalie Artzi

Contributions

J.C. and N.A. conceived the project and designed the experiments. J.C., N.O., H.S.S. and M.A. performed the experiments, collected and analysed the data. J.C. and N.A. co-wrote the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and reviewed the manuscript.

Nature Materials
15,
353–363
(2016)
doi:10.1038/nmat4497
Received
22 April 2015
Accepted
26 October 2015
Published online
07 December 2015

The therapeutic potential of miRNA (miR) in cancer is limited by the lack of efficient delivery vehicles. Here, we show that a self-assembled dual-colour RNA-triple-helix structure comprising two miRNAs—a miR mimic (tumour suppressor miRNA) and an antagomiR (oncomiR inhibitor)—provides outstanding capability to synergistically abrogate tumours. Conjugation of RNA triple helices to dendrimers allows the formation of stable triplex nanoparticles, which form an RNA-triple-helix adhesive scaffold upon interaction with dextran aldehyde, the latter able to chemically interact and adhere to natural tissue amines in the tumour. We also show that the self-assembled RNA-triple-helix conjugates remain functional in vitro and in vivo, and that they lead to nearly 90% levels of tumour shrinkage two weeks post-gel implantation in a triple-negative breast cancer mouse model. Our findings suggest that the RNA-triple-helix hydrogels can be used as an efficient anticancer platform to locally modulate the expression of endogenous miRs in cancer.

SOURCE

http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v15/n3/abs/nmat4497.html#author-information

 

 

Patch that delivers drug, gene, and light-based therapy to tumor sites shows promising results

In mice, device destroyed colorectal tumors and prevented remission after surgery.

Helen Knight | MIT News Office
July 25, 2016

Approximately one in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer in their lifetime, making it the third-most prevalent form of the disease in the U.S. In Europe, it is the second-most common form of cancer.

The most widely used first line of treatment is surgery, but this can result in incomplete removal of the tumor. Cancer cells can be left behind, potentially leading to recurrence and increased risk of metastasis. Indeed, while many patients remain cancer-free for months or even years after surgery, tumors are known to recur in up to 50 percent of cases.

Conventional therapies used to prevent tumors recurring after surgery do not sufficiently differentiate between healthy and cancerous cells, leading to serious side effects.

In a paper published today in the journal Nature Materials, researchers at MIT describe an adhesive patch that can stick to the tumor site, either before or after surgery, to deliver a triple-combination of drug, gene, and photo (light-based) therapy.

Releasing this triple combination therapy locally, at the tumor site, may increase the efficacy of the treatment, according to Natalie Artzi, a principal research scientist at MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) and an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, who led the research.

The general approach to cancer treatment today is the use of systemic, or whole-body, therapies such as chemotherapy drugs. But the lack of specificity of anticancer drugs means they produce undesired side effects when systemically administered.

What’s more, only a small portion of the drug reaches the tumor site itself, meaning the primary tumor is not treated as effectively as it should be.

Indeed, recent research in mice has found that only 0.7 percent of nanoparticles administered systemically actually found their way to the target tumor.

“This means that we are treating both the source of the cancer — the tumor — and the metastases resulting from that source, in a suboptimal manner,” Artzi says. “That is what prompted us to think a little bit differently, to look at how we can leverage advancements in materials science, and in particular nanotechnology, to treat the primary tumor in a local and sustained manner.”

The researchers have developed a triple-therapy hydrogel patch, which can be used to treat tumors locally. This is particularly effective as it can treat not only the tumor itself but any cells left at the site after surgery, preventing the cancer from recurring or metastasizing in the future.

Firstly, the patch contains gold nanorods, which heat up when near-infrared radiation is applied to the local area. This is used to thermally ablate, or destroy, the tumor.

These nanorods are also equipped with a chemotherapy drug, which is released when they are heated, to target the tumor and its surrounding cells.

Finally, gold nanospheres that do not heat up in response to the near-infrared radiation are used to deliver RNA, or gene therapy to the site, in order to silence an important oncogene in colorectal cancer. Oncogenes are genes that can cause healthy cells to transform into tumor cells.

The researchers envision that a clinician could remove the tumor, and then apply the patch to the inner surface of the colon, to ensure that no cells that are likely to cause cancer recurrence remain at the site. As the patch degrades, it will gradually release the various therapies.

The patch can also serve as a neoadjuvant, a therapy designed to shrink tumors prior to their resection, Artzi says.

When the researchers tested the treatment in mice, they found that in 40 percent of cases where the patch was not applied after tumor removal, the cancer returned.

But when the patch was applied after surgery, the treatment resulted in complete remission.

Indeed, even when the tumor was not removed, the triple-combination therapy alone was enough to destroy it.

The technology is an extraordinary and unprecedented synergy of three concurrent modalities of treatment, according to Mauro Ferrari, president and CEO of the Houston Methodist Research Institute, who was not involved in the research.

“What is particularly intriguing is that by delivering the treatment locally, multimodal therapy may be better than systemic therapy, at least in certain clinical situations,” Ferrari says.

Unlike existing colorectal cancer surgery, this treatment can also be applied in a minimally invasive manner. In the next phase of their work, the researchers hope to move to experiments in larger models, in order to use colonoscopy equipment not only for cancer diagnosis but also to inject the patch to the site of a tumor, when detected.

“This administration modality would enable, at least in early-stage cancer patients, the avoidance of open field surgery and colon resection,” Artzi says. “Local application of the triple therapy could thus improve patients’ quality of life and therapeutic outcome.”

Artzi is joined on the paper by João Conde, Nuria Oliva, and Yi Zhang, of IMES. Conde is also at Queen Mary University in London.

SOURCE

http://news.mit.edu/2016/patch-delivers-drug-gene-light-based-therapy-tumor-0725

Other related articles published in thie Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

The Development of siRNA-Based Therapies for Cancer

Author: Ziv Raviv, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/09/the-development-of-sirna-based-therapies-for-cancer/

 

Targeted Liposome Based Delivery System to Present HLA Class I Antigens to Tumor Cells: Two papers

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/20/targeted-liposome-based-delivery-system-to-present-hla-class-i-antigens-to-tumor-cells-two-papers/

 

Blast Crisis in Myeloid Leukemia and the Activation of a microRNA-editing Enzyme called ADAR1

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/10/blast-crisis-in-myeloid-leukemia-and-the-activation-of-a-microrna-editing-enzyme-called-adar1/

 

First challenge to make use of the new NCI Cloud Pilots – Somatic Mutation Challenge – RNA: Best algorithms for detecting all of the abnormal RNA molecules in a cancer cell

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/17/first-challenge-to-make-use-of-the-new-nci-cloud-pilots-somatic-mutation-challenge-rna-best-algorithms-for-detecting-all-of-the-abnormal-rna-molecules-in-a-cancer-cell/

 

miRNA Therapeutic Promise

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/01/mirna-therapeutic-promise/

Read Full Post »


Medical MEMS, BioMEMS and Sensor Applications

Curator and Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Contents for Chapter 11

Medical MEMS, BioMEMS and Sensors Applications

Curators: Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC, LPBI Group, Danut Dragoi, PhD, LPBI Group and William H. Zurn, Alpha IP

FOR

Series E: Patient-centered Medicine

Volume 4:  Medical 3D BioPrinting – The Revolution in Medicine

Editors: Larry H Bernstein, MD FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-e-titles-in-the-strategic-plan-for-2014-1015/volume-four-medical-3d-bioprinting-the-revolution-in-medicine/

Work-in-Progress

ContactLens

Image Source

http://www.memsjournal.com/2010/05/medical-applications-herald-third-wave-of-mems.html

Image is courtesy of Google Images

 

WirelessPressure

Image Source

Stanford Engineering Team Invents Pressure Sensor That Uses Radio Waves | CytoFluidix

Image is courtesy of Google Images

 

Introduction by Dr. Pearlman

 

Chapter 1: Blood Glucose Sensors

1.1       MINIATURIZED GLUCOSE SENSOR – Google

  • Tiny wireless chip and miniaturized glucose sensor
  • Embedded between two layers of soft contact lens material
  • Accurate glucose monitoring for diabetics
  • Using bodily fluids, i.e. tears
  • Prototypes can generate one reading per second
  • Experimenting with LEDs
  • Early warning for the wearer

 

Chapter 2: Blood Chemistry Tests – up to 100 Samples

2.1       NON-INVASIVE BLOOD MONITOR- UCSD

  • Digital tattoo monitors blood below the skin
  • Tattoos are needle-less
    • Sensor-laden transdermal patch
  • Painless for the user Tiny sensors “ink”
  • Can read blood levels of:
    • Sodium, glucose, kidney function
  • Prototypes contain probes
  • Wireless, battery-powered chip
  • Continually test up to a hundred different samples

 

2.3       CELLPHONE-BASED RAPID-DIAGNOSTIC-TEST (RDT) READER – UCLA

  • Lateral flow immuno-chromatographic assays
  • Sense the presence of a target analyte in a sample
  • Device connects to the camera on a cell phone
  • Weighs only 65 grams

 

2.4       IMPLANTABLE BLOOD ANALYZER CHIP – EPFL

  • Implantable device for instantaneous blood analysis
  • Wireless data transmission to a doctor
  • Applications include monitoring general health
  • Tailor drug delivery to a patient’s unique needs
  • Includes five sensors and a radio transmitter
  • Powered via inductive coupling from a battery patch
  • Worn outside the body

 

Chapter 3: Motion Sensors for Head-Impact

3.1       HEAD-IMPACT MONITORING PATCH – STMicro & X2Biosystems

  • Wearable electronic contains MEMS motion sensors
  • Microcontroller, low-power radio transmitter, and power management circuitry
  • Cloud-based system combines athlete concussion history
  • Pre-season neurocognitive function, balance, and coordinate-performance data
  • Creates a baseline for comparison after a suspected injury event

 

Chapter 4: Drug Delivery & Drug Compliance Monitoring Systems

4.1       Smart Pill delivers Therapeutic Agent Load to target – ELECTRONIC PILL – Phillips

  • Electronic pill to treat gastrointestinal cancer
  • An ingestible pill is swallowed by the patient, finds its way to the tumor, dispenses the drugs and passes harmlessly from the body
  • Smart pill contains reservoir for drug supply, fluid pump for drug delivery, pH sensor (for navigation), thermometer, microprocessor, communication

 

4.2       Drug Compliance Monitoring Systems

4.2.1    INGESTIBLE BIOMEDICAL SENSOR – Proteus Digital Health

  • Biomedical sensor that monitors medication adherence
  • Embedded into a pill, the sensor is activated by stomach fluid
  • Transmits a signal through the body to a skin patch
  • Indicates whether a patient has ingested material

 

4.2.2    MICROPUMP DEVICES – Purdue University

  • Device based on skin contact actuation for drug delivery
  • Actuation mechanism only requires body heat
  • Induced actuation can result to a gradient of 100 Pa/oC
  • Sufficient to drive liquid drug through micro-needle arrays
  • Prototypes exhibit low fabrication costs, employment of biocompatible materials and battery-less operation Suitable for single- or multiple-use transdermal drug dispensers

 

4.2.3    IMPLANTABLE MEMS DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM – MIT

  • Device can deliver a vasoconstrictor agent
  • On demand to injured soldiers to prevent hemorrhagic shock
  • Other applications include medical implants
  • For cancer detection and monitoring
  • Implant can provide physicians and patients
  • Real-time information on the efficacy of treatment

 

Chapter 5: Remove Monitoring of Food-related Diseases

5.1       LASER-DRIVEN, HANDHELD SPECTROMETER

  • For analyzing food scanned
  • Information to a cloud-based application
  • Examines the results Data is accumulated from many users
  • Used to develop warning algorithms
  • For Allergies, Bacteria

 

Chapter 6: Skin Protection and Photo-Sensitivity Management

6.1       WEARABLE-UVEXPOSURESENSOR – Gizmag

  • Wristband for monitoring UV exposure
  • Allows user to maximize vitamin D production
  • Reducing the risk of sun
  • Over-exposure and skin cancer
  • LED indicators light up as UV exposure accumulates
  • Flashes once the safe UV limit has been reached

 

6.2       WEARABLE SKIN SENSOR KTH – Chemistry 2011

  • Bio-patch for measuring and collecting vital information through the skin
  • Inexpensive, versatile and comfortable to wear
  • User Data being gathered depends on where it is placed on the body

 

Chapter 7: Ophthalmic Applications

7.1       INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE SENSOR – Sensimed & ST Microelectronics

  • Smart contact lens called Triggerfish
  • Contact lens can measure, monitor, and control
  • Intra-ocular pressure levels for patients
  • Catch early cases of glaucoma
  • MEMS strain gage pressure sensor
  • Mounted on a flexible substrate MEMS

 

7.2       MICRO-MIRRORS ENABLING HANDHELD OPHTHALMIC – OCT News

  • Swept source OCT model for retinal 3D imaging
  • Replaces bulky galvanometer scanners in a handheld OCT probe for primary care physicians
  • Ultrahigh-speed two-axis optical beam steering gimbal-less MEMS mirrors
  • MEMS Actuator with a 2.4 mm bonded mirror and an angular reach of +6°
  • Low power consumption of <100mW including the MEMS actuator driver Retinal 3D Imaging

 

Chapter 8: Hearing Assist Technologies

8.1       MEMS TECHNOLOGY FOR HEARING RESTORATION – University of Utah

  • Eliminates electronics outside the ear
  • Associated with reliability issues and social stigma
  • Accelerometer-based microphone
  • Successfully tested in cadaver ear canals
  • Prototype measures 2.5 x 6.2mm, weighs 25mg

 

Chapter 9: Lab-on-a-Chip

9.1       ORGAN-ON-A-CHIP – Johns Hopkins University

  • Silicon substrate for living human cells
  • Controlled environment
  • Emulate how cells function inside a living human body
  • Replace controversial and costly animal testing
  • Lab-on-a-chip: a cost effective end to animal testing

 

Chapter 10: Intra-Cranial Studies: Pressure Measurement, Monitoring and Adaptation

10.1:   CEREBRAL PRESSURE SENSOR – Fraunhofer Institute

  • Sensor to monitor cerebral pressure that can lead to dementia
  • Pressure changes in the brain can be measured and transmitted
  • Reading device outside the patient’s body
  • Operating at very low power, the sensor module
  • Powered wirelessly by the reading device

 

10.2    WIRELESS, IMPLANTABLE BRAIN SENSOR – National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

  • Fully implantable within the brain
  • Allow natural studies of brain activity
  • Cord-free control of advanced prosthetics

Wireless charging Prototypes transmitted brain activity data

 

Chapter 11: Cardiac and Cardiovascular Monitoring System

11.1    IMPLANTABLE MICRO DEVICE FOR MONITORING AND TREATING ANEURISMS – Electronic Design

  • RF-addressed wireless pressure sensor are powered by inductive coupling
  • Do not need batteries MEMS pressure sensor
  • Wireless antenna are inserted near the heart
  • With a catheter, Blood-pressure readings
  • Are sent to a wireless scanner for monitoring Pressure changes
  • Deflect the transducer’s diaphragm
  • Change the LC circuit’s resonant

 

11.2    CUSTOM- FITTED, IMPLANTABLE DEVICE FOR TREATMENT AND PREDICTION OF CARDIAC DISORDERS – Washington University

  • Working prototypes were developed on inexpensive 3D printers
  • The 3D elastic membrane is made of a soft, flexible, silicon material
  • Precisely shaped to match the outer layer of the heart

 

Chapter 12: microfluidic chips

12.1    MICROFLUIDIC MEMS FOR DIABETES TREATMENT – Micronews

  • Watertight pump mounted on a disposable skin patch
  • Provides continuous insulin infusion
  • Controlled by a dedicated smart phone device
  • Incorporating a BGM (blood- glucose meter)

 

12.2    ACOUSTIC RECEIVER ANTENNA/SENSOR PDMS MEMBRANE – Purdue

POLY-DI-METHYL-SILOXANE (PDMS)

Polydimethylsiloxane called PDMS or dimethicone is a polymer widely used for the fabrication and prototyping of microfluidic chips.

It is a mineral-organic polymer (a structure containing carbon and silicon) of the siloxane family (word derived from silicon, oxygen and alkane). Apart from microfluidics, it is used as a food additive (E900), in shampoos, and as an anti-foaming agent in beverages or in lubricating oils.

For the fabrication of microfluidic devices, PDMS (liquid) mixed with a cross-linking agent is poured into a microstructured mold and heated to obtain a elastomeric replica of the mold (PDMS cross-linked).

 

Why Use PDMS for Microfluidic Device Fabrication?

 

PDMS was chosen to fabricate microfluidic chips primarily for those reasons:

Human alveolar epithelial and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells cultured in a PDMS chip to mimick lung functions

  • It is transparent at optical frequencies (240 nM – 1100 nM), which facilitates the observation of contents in micro-channels visually or through a microscope.
  • It has a low autofluorescence [2]
  • It is considered as bio-compatible (with some restrictions).

The PDMS bonds tightly to glass or another PDMS layer with asimple plasma treatment. This allows the production of multilayers PDMS devices and enables to take advantage of technological possibilities offered by glass substrates, such as the use of metal deposition, oxide deposition or surface functionalisation.

PDMS, during cross-linking, can be coated with a controlled thickness on a substrate using a simple spincoat. This allows the fabrication of multilayer devices and the integration of micro valves.

It is deformable, which allows the integration of microfluidic valves using the deformation of PDMS micro-channels, the easy connection of leak-proof fluidic connections and its use to detect very low forces like biomechanics interactions from cells.

SOURCE

http://www.elveflow.com/microfluidic-tutorials/microfluidic-reviews-and-tutorials/the-poly-di-methyl-siloxane-pdms-and-microfluidics/

 

  • Ferrite RF radiation Acoustic wave Rectifier
  • Buried in PDMS Implantable miniature pressure sensor
  • Powered by an acoustically actuated cantilever
  • No battery required
  • Acoustic waves in the 200-500 hertz range
  • Cause cantilever to vibrate
  • Scavenging energy to power pressure sensor

 

Chapter 13: Peropheral Neuropathy Management

13.1    WIRELESS SHOE INSERT – Mobile Health News

  • WIRELESS SHOE INSERT – Mobile Health News
  • Help diabetics manage peripheral nerve damage
  • Insole collects data of where wearers
  • Putting pressure on their feet
  • Transmits wirelessly to a wristwatch-type display
  • Prevent amputations that often stem from diabetic foot ulcers

 

Chapter 14: Endoscopic Diagnostics Tools

14.1    ENDOSCOPE USING MEMS SCANNING MIRROR

  • For gastrointestinal and urological imaging
  • Alternative to biopsies in cancer detection
  • A laser beam pointed at the mirror is precisely deflected
  • Steered by the scanning mirror to reach a target

 

Chapter 15: MEMS guided Surgical Tools

15.1    MICROMACHINED SURGICAL TOOLS; SILICON MEMS TWEEZERS – ElectrolQ Used for minimally invasive surgical (MIS)

  • Procedures where diagnosis, monitoring, or treatment of diseases are performed
  • Performing with very small incisions MEMS
  • Based microsurgical tools is a key enabling technology for angioplasty, catheterization, endoscopy, laparoscopy, and neurosurgery

 

Summary by Dr. Pearlman

  • Multiple projects by Academia & Industry
  • Multiple MEMS devices for measuring body activities.
  • Many patch type devices attached to the skin
  • Devices attached to the eye
  • Smaller is better, lower footprint, lower power

 

 

 

 

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3D Printing Confirms Physical Model of Brain Folds

Reported by: Irina Robu, PhD

Highly folded brains are not present in most animals but only in some primates, dolphins, elephants and pigs. However, not a lot is understood of how the brain folds. Researchers at Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences collaborating with scientists in Finland and France have shown that while many molecular processes are important in determining cellular events,what ultimately causes the brain to fold in a simple mechanical instability associated with buckling.  Understanding how the brain folds is important because it can unlock the inner workings of the brain and unravel brain-related disorders.

The number, size, shape and position of neuronal cells during brain growth all lead to the expansion of the gray matter,relative to the underlying white matter. This puts the cortex under compression, leading to a mechanical instability that causes it to crease locally. Growth differential between the brain’s outer cortex and the soft tissue underneath explains the variations in the folding patterns, the relative size of the brain, and the relative expansion of the cortex.

A gel model of a fetal brain after being immersed in liquid solvent. The resulting compression led to the formation of folds similar in size and shape to real brains. Credit: Mahadevan Lab/Harvard SEAS Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-d-physical-brain.html#jCp

A gel model of a fetal brain after being immersed in liquid solvent. The resulting compression led to the formation of folds similar in size and shape to real brains. Credit: Mahadevan Lab/Harvard SEAS

Based on this, the team collaborated with neuroanatomists and radiologists in France and tested the theory using data from human fetuses. The team made a three-dimensional, gel model of a smooth fetal brain based on MRI images. The model’s surface was coated with a thin layer of elastomer gel, as an analog of the cortex. To mimic cortical expansion, the gel brain was immersed in a solvent that is absorbed by the outer layer causing it to swell relative to the deeper regions. Within minutes of being immersed in liquid solvent, the resulting compression led to the formation of folds similar in size and shape to real brains.
The research shows that if part of the brain does not grow properly or the geometry is disrupted,  the major folds are not in the right place causing a dysfunction in the brain.
Source

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Low-cost 3-D printer-based organ model production technique reveals complicated interior organ structure

Reported by: Irina Robu, PhD

A low cost human organ model production technique was developed by University of Tsukuba in conjunction with Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd. (DNP) for use with 3D printers that helps reveal intricate interior organ structure.

Professor Jun Mitani of the Faculty of Engineering, Information and Systems at the University of Tsukuba, Professor Nobuhiro Ohkohchi and Lecturer Yukio Oshiro of the Faculty of Medicine collaborated with DNP to produce human organ model that makes internal structures easier to see. The technique will cost as low as 1/3 compared to those for presently presented technology.

It is expected that the penetration of the new technique will lead to the promotion of clinical site applications.

Source
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160108083912.htm

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Materialise Partners with University of Michigan and Tissue Regeneration Services for Clinical Trials of 3D Printed Tracheal Splint

Reported by: Irina Robu, PhD

Dr. Scott Hollister, a biomedical engineering professor at University of Michigan and Dr. Glenn Green, otolaryngologit at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital invented a tracheal splint using 3D printing in 2012. The 3D printed trachea of a baby with tracheobronchomalacia (TBM),keeps the airway open until it can grow into a healty state and stay open on its own.  The splint dissolves and is absorbed in the body and the process can take up to three years. Dr. Hollister and Dr. Green partnered with Materialise and Tissue Regeneration systems to commercialize the device, starting with clinical trial involving involving 30 patients at Mott Children’s Hospital sometime next year.

According to Dr. Green“This agreement is a critical step in our goal to make this treatment readily available for other children who suffer from this debilitating condition.We have continued to evolve and automate the design process for the splints, allowing us to achieve in two days what used to take us up to five days to accomplish. I feel incredibly privileged to be building products that surgeons can use to save lives.”

The bioresorbable splints will be manufactured by Plymouth, Michigan startup Tissue Regeneration Systems, which received its first commercial product clearance from the FDA in 2013 after several years of product development.

Source
http://3dprint.com/109725/materialise-uom-trs-partners/

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3D Printer Breakthrough for Bone Grafts

Reported by: Irina Robu, PhD

Montana State University, Deparment of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and Xtant Medical Holdings created a 3D printer capable of printing resorbable bone grafts.  The grafts produced can be broken down and absorbed into the body. The personalized bone grafts are custom made and the material used for MSU can minimize the material limitations.

The ability to bioprint usable bone and joint material has seen progress from all over the world  and now MSU has contributed their breakthrough research in the medical race to 3D print reconstructive parts for the human body.

Source

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2015/12/02/62909

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Osteo Putty

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

Xtant Medical Announces First Surgical Use Of OsteoSelect® PLUS DBM Putty

http://www.laboratorynetwork.com/doc/xtant-medical-announces-first-surgical-use-of-osteoselect-0001

 

Belgrade, Mt (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Xtant Medical Holdings, Inc. (NYSE MKT:XTNT), a leader in the development of regenerative medicine products and medical devices, today announced the first surgical implantation of OsteoSelect PLUS Demineralized Bone Matrix (DBM) Putty, developed by its wholly owned subsidiary, Bacterin International, Inc.

OsteoSelect PLUS is a next-generation DBM putty, comprised of OsteoSelect DBM Putty and demineralized cortical chips, designed to provide superior handling for surgeon end users during surgery. Dr. Ali Araghi, DO, Director of the Spine Division at The CORE Institute was the first surgeon to utilize OsteoSelect® PLUS DBM Putty in a spinal fusion procedure.

“OsteoSelect PLUS is aligned with Xtant’s commitment to patient safety and superior clinical outcomes,” stated Dan Goldberger, CEO of Xtant. “OsteoSelect PLUS provides a sterile grafting solution to meet the needs of surgeons and expands our offering in the DBM market space.”

OsteoSelect PLUS was developed in response to surgeon demand. Utilizing surgeon input for design allowed Bacterin to create an additional first class, bone graft substitute in the DBM space and strengthen its comprehensive product portfolio.

About Xtant Medical Holdings
Xtant Medical Holdings, Inc. (NYSE MKT:XTNT) develops, manufactures and markets class-leading regenerative medicine products and medical devices for domestic and international markets. Xtant products serve the specialized needs of orthopedic and neurological surgeons, including orthobiologics for the promotion of bone healing, implants and instrumentation for the treatment of spinal disease, tissue grafts for the treatment of orthopedic disorders, and biologics to promote healing following cranial, and foot and ankle surgeries. With core competencies in both biologic and non-biologic surgical technologies, Xtant can leverage its resources to successfully compete in global neurological and orthopedic surgery markets. For further information, please visit http://www.xtantmedical.com.

Important Cautions Regarding Forward-looking Statements
This press release contains certain disclosures that may be deemed forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 that are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements include statements that are predictive in nature, that depend upon or refer to future events or conditions, or that include words such as “continue,” “efforts,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “estimates,” “projects,” “forecasts,” “strategy,” “will,” “goal,” “target,” “prospects,” “potential,” “optimistic,” “confident,” “likely,” “probable” or similar expressions or the negative thereof. Statements of historical fact also may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. We caution that these statements by their nature involve risks and uncertainties, and actual results may differ materially depending on a variety of important factors, including, among others: the Company’s ability to successfully integrate the acquisition of X-spine; the ability of the Company’s sales force to achieve expected results; the Company’s ability to meet its existing and anticipated contractual obligations, including financial covenant and other obligations contained in the Company’s secured lending facility; the Company’s ability to manage cash flow; the Company’s ability to develop, market, sell and distribute desirable applications, products and services and to protect its intellectual property; the ability of the Company’s customers to pay and the timeliness of such payments; the Company’s ability to obtain financing as and when needed; changes in consumer demands and preferences; the Company’s ability to attract and retain management and employees with appropriate skills and expertise; the impact of changes in market, legal and regulatory conditions and in the applicable business environment, including actions of competitors; and other factors. Additional risk factors are listed in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q under the heading “Risk Factors.” The Company undertakes no obligation to release publicly any revisions to any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by law.

© Copyright 2015, GlobeNewswire, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SOURCE: Xtant Medical Holdings, Inc.

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FDA Guidance On Source Animal, Product, Preclinical and Clinical Issues Concerning the Use of Xenotranspantation Products in Humans – Implications for 3D BioPrinting of Regenerative Tissue

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

The FDA has submitted Final Guidance on use xeno-transplanted animal tissue, products, and cells into human and their use in medical procedures. Although the draft guidance was to expand on previous guidelines to prevent the introduction, transmission, and spread of communicable diseases, this updated draft may have implications for use of such tissue in the emerging medical 3D printing field.

This document is to provide guidance on the production, testing and evaluation of products intended for use in xenotransplantation. The guidance includes scientific questions that should be addressed by sponsors during protocol development and during the preparation of submissions to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), e.g., Investigational New Drug Application (IND) and Biologics License Application (BLA). This guidance document finalizes the draft guidance of the same title dated February 2001.

For the purpose of this document, xenotransplantation refers to any procedure that involves the transplantation, implantation, or infusion into a human recipient of either (a) live cells, tissues, or organs from a nonhuman animal source, or (b) human body fluids, cells, tissues or organs that have had ex vivo contact with live nonhuman animal cells, tissues or organs. For the purpose of this document, xenotransplantation products include live cells, tissues or organs used in xenotransplantation. (See Definitions in section I.C.)

This document presents issues that should be considered in addressing the safety of viable materials obtained from animal sources and intended for clinical use in humans. The potential threat to both human and animal welfare from zoonotic or other infectious agents warrants careful characterization of animal sources of cells, tissues, and organs. This document addresses issues such as the characterization of source animals, source animal husbandry practices, characterization of xenotransplantation products, considerations for the xenotransplantation product manufacturing facility, appropriate preclinical models for xenotransplantation protocols, and monitoring of recipients of xenotransplantation products. This document recommends specific practices intended to prevent the introduction and spread of infectious agents of animal origin into the human population. FDA expects that new methods proposed by sponsors to address specific issues will be scientifically rigorous and that sufficient data will be presented to justify their use.

Examples of procedures involving xenotransplantation products include:

  • transplantation of xenogeneic hearts, kidneys, or pancreatic tissue to treat organ failure,
  • implantation of neural cells to ameliorate neurological degenerative diseases,
  • administration of human cells previously cultured ex vivo with live nonhuman animal antigen-presenting or feeder cells, and
  • extracorporeal perfusion of a patient’s blood or blood component perfused through an intact animal organ or isolated cells contained in a device to treat liver failure.

The guidance addresses issues such as:

  1. Clinical Protocol Review
  2. Xenotransplantation Site
  3. Criteria for Patient Selection
  4. Risk/Benefit Assessment
  5. Screening for Infectious Agents
  6. Patient Follow-up
  7. Archiving of Patient Plasma and Tissue Specimens
  8. Health Records and Data Management
  9. Informed Consent
  10. Responsibility of the Sponsor in Informing the Patient of New Scientific Information

A full copy of the PDF can be found below for reference:

fdaguidanceanimalsourcesxenotransplatntation

An example of the need for this guidance in conjunction with 3D printing technology can be understood from the below article (source http://www.geneticliteracyproject.org/2015/09/03/pig-us-xenotransplantation-new-age-chimeric-organs/)

Pig in us: Xenotransplantation and new age of chimeric organs

David Warmflash | September 3, 2015 | Genetic Literacy Project

Imagine stripping out the failing components of an old car — the engine, transmission, exhaust system and all of those parts — leaving just the old body and other structural elements. Replace those old mechanical parts with a brand new electric, hydrogen powered, biofuel, nuclear or whatever kind of engine you want and now you have a brand new car. It has an old frame, but that’s okay. The frame wasn’t causing the problem, and it can live on for years, undamaged.

When challenged to design internal organs, tissue engineers are taking a similar approach, particularly with the most complex organs, like the heart, liver and kidneys. These organs have three dimensional structures that are elaborate, not just at the gross anatomic level, but in microscopic anatomy too. Some day, their complex connective tissue scaffolding, the stroma, might be synthesized from the needed collagen proteins with advanced 3-D printing. But biomedical engineering is not there yet, so right now the best candidate for organ scaffolding comes from one of humanity’s favorite farm animals: the pig.

Chimera alarmists connecting with anti-biotechnology movements might cringe at the thought of building new human organs starting with pig tissue, but if you’re using only the organ scaffolding and building a working organ from there, pig organs may actually be more desirable than those donated by humans.

How big is the anti-chimerite movement?

Unlike anti-GMO and anti-vaccination activists, there really aren’t too many anti-chemerites around. Nevertheless, there is a presence on the web of people who express concern about mixing of humans and non-human animals. Presently, much of their concern is focussed on the growing of human organs inside non-human animals, pigs included. One anti-chemerite has written that it could be a problem for the following reason:

Once a human organ is grown inside a pig, that pig is no longer fully a pig. And without a doubt, that organ will no longer be a fully human organ after it is grown inside the pig. Those receiving those organs will be allowing human-animal hybrid organs to be implanted into them. Most people would be absolutely shocked to learn some of the things that are currently being done in the name of science.

The blog goes on to express alarm about the use of human genes in rice and from there morphs into an off the shelf garden variety anti-GMO tirade, though with an an anti-chemeric current running through it. The concern about making pigs a little bit human and humans a little bit pig becomes a concern about making rice a little bit human. But the concern about fusing tissues and genes of humans and other species does not fit with the trend in modern medicine.

Utilization of pig tissue enters a new age 

pigsinus

A porcine human ear for xenotransplantation. source: The Scientist

For decades, pig, bovine and other non-human tissues have been used in medicine. People are walking around with pig and cow heart valves. Diabetics used to get a lot of insulin from pigs and cows, although today, thanks to genetic engineering, they’re getting human insulin produced by microorganisms modified genetically to make human insulin, which is safer and more effective.

When it comes to building new organs from old ones, however, pig organs could actually be superior for a couple of reasons. For one thing, there’s no availability problem with pigs. Their hearts and other organs also have all of the crucial components of the extracellular matrix that makes up an organ’s scaffolding. But unlike human organs, the pig organs don’t tend to carry or transfer human diseases. That is a major advantage that makes them ideal starting material. Plus there is another advantage: typically, the hearts of human cadavers are damaged, either because heart disease is what killed the human owner or because resuscitation efforts aimed at restarting the heart of a dying person using electrical jolts and powerful drugs.

Rebuilding an old organ into a new one

How then does the process work? Whether starting with a donated human or pig organ, there are several possible methods. But what they all have in common is that only the scaffolding of the original organ is retained. Just like the engine and transmission of the old car, the working tissue is removed, usually using detergents. One promising technique that has been applied to engineer new hearts is being tested by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. Detergents pumped into the aorta attached to a donated heart (donated by a human cadaver, or pig or cow). The pressure keeps the aortic valve closed, so the detergents to into the coronary arteries and through the myocardial (heart muscle) and endocardial (lining over the muscle inside the heart chambers) tissue, which thus gets dissolved over the course of days. What’s left is just the stroma tissue, forming a scaffold. But that scaffold has signaling factors that enable embryonic stem cells, or specially programed adult pleuripotent cells to become all of the needed cells for a new heart.

Eventually, 3-D printing technology may reach the point when no donated scaffolding is needed, but that’s not the case quite yet, plus with a pig scaffolding all of the needed signaling factors are there and they work just as well as those in a human heart scaffold. All of this can lead to a scenario, possibly very soon, in which organs are made using off-the-self scaffolding from pig organs, ready to produce a custom-made heart using stem or other cells donated by new organ’s recipient.

David Warmflash is an astrobiologist, physician, and science writer. Follow @CosmicEvolution to read what he is saying on Twitter.

And a Great Article in The Scientist by Dr. Ed Yong Entitled

Replacement Parts

To cope with a growing shortage of hearts, livers, and lungs suitable for transplant, some scientists are genetically engineering pigs, while others are growing organs in the lab.

By Ed Yong | August 1, 2012

Source: http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/32409/title/Replacement-Parts/

.. where Joseph Vacanti and David Cooper figured that using

“engineered pigs without the a-1,3-galactosyltransferase gene that produces the a-gal residues. In addition, the pigs carry human cell-membrane proteins such as CD55 and CD46 that prevent the host’s complement system from assembling and attacking the foreign cells”

thereby limiting rejection of the xenotransplated tissue.

In addition to issues related to animal virus transmission the issue of optimal scaffolds for organs as well as the advantages which 3D Printing would have in mass production of organs is discussed:

To Vacanti, artificial scaffolds are the future of organ engineering, and the only way in which organs for transplantation could be mass-produced. “You should be able to make them on demand, with low-cost materials and manufacturing technologies,” he says. That is relatively simple for organs like tracheas or bladders, which are just hollow tubes or sacs. Even though it is far more difficult for the lung or liver, which have complicated structures, Vacanti thinks it will be possible to simulate their architecture with computer models, and fabricate them with modern printing technology. (See “3-D Printing,” The Scientist, July 2012.) “They obey very ordered rules, so you can reduce it down to a series of algorithms, which can help you design them,” he says. But Taylor says that even if the architecture is correct, the scaffold would still need to contain the right surface molecules to guide the growth of any added cells. “It seems a bit of an overkill when nature has already done the work for us,” she says.

Other articles of FDA Guidance and 3D Bio Printing on this Open Access Journal Include:

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New FDA Draft Guidance On Homologous Use of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products – Implications for 3D BioPrinting of Regenerative Tissue

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

The FDA recently came out with a Draft Guidance on use of human cells, tissues and cellular and tissue-based products (HCT/P) {defined in 21 CFR 1271.3(d)} and their use in medical procedures. Although the draft guidance was to expand on previous guidelines to prevent the introduction, transmission, and spread of communicable diseases, this updated draft may have implications for use of such tissue in the emerging medical 3D printing field.

A full copy of the PDF can be found here for reference but the following is a summary of points of the guidance.FO508ver – 2015-373 HomologousUseGuidanceFinal102715

In 21 CFR 1271.10, the regulations identify the criteria for regulation solely under section 361 of the PHS Act and 21 CFR Part 1271. An HCT/P is regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act and 21 CFR Part 1271 if it meets all of the following criteria (21 CFR 1271.10(a)):

  • The HCT/P is minimally manipulated;
  • The HCT/P is intended for homologous use only, as reflected by the labeling, advertising, or other indications of the manufacturer’s objective intent;
  • The manufacture of the HCT/P does not involve the combination of the cells or tissues with another article, except for water, crystalloids, or a sterilizing, preserving, or storage agent, provided that the addition of water, crystalloids, or the sterilizing, preserving, or storage agent does not raise new clinical safety concerns with respect to the HCT/P; and
  • Either:
  1. The HCT/P does not have a systemic effect and is not dependent upon the metabolic activity of living cells for its primary function; or
  2. The HCT/P has a systemic effect or is dependent upon the metabolic activity of living cells for its primary function, and:
  3. Is for autologous use;
  4. Is for allogeneic use in a first-degree or second-degree blood relative; or
  5. Is for reproductive use.

If an HCT/P does not meet all of the criteria in 21 CFR 1271.10(a), and the establishment that manufactures the HCT/P does not qualify for any of the exceptions in 21 CFR 1271.15, the HCT/P will be regulated as a drug, device, and/or biological product under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), and/or section 351 of the PHS Act, and applicable regulations, including 21 CFR Part 1271, and pre-market review will be required.

1 Examples of HCT/Ps include, but are not limited to, bone, ligament, skin, dura mater, heart valve, cornea, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells derived from peripheral and cord blood, manipulated autologous chondrocytes, epithelial cells on a synthetic matrix, and semen or other reproductive tissue. The following articles are not considered HCT/Ps: (1) Vascularized human organs for transplantation; (2) Whole blood or blood components or blood derivative products subject to listing under 21 CFR Parts 607 and 207, respectively; (3) Secreted or extracted human products, such as milk, collagen, and cell factors, except that semen is considered an HCT/P; (4) Minimally manipulated bone marrow for homologous use and not combined with another article (except for water, crystalloids, or a sterilizing, preserving, or storage agent, if the addition of the agent does not raise new clinical safety concerns with respect to the bone marrow); (5) Ancillary products used in the manufacture of HCT/P; (6) Cells, tissues, and organs derived from animals other than humans; (7) In vitro diagnostic products as defined in 21 CFR 809.3(a); and (8) Blood vessels recovered with an organ, as defined in 42 CFR 121.2 that are intended for use in organ transplantation and labeled “For use in organ transplantation only.” (21 CFR 1271.3(d))

Contains Nonbinding Recommendations
Draft – Not for Implementation

Section 1271.10(a)(2) (21 CFR 1271.10(a)(2)) provides that one of the criteria for an HCT/P to be regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act is that the “HCT/P is intended for homologous use only, as reflected by the labeling, advertising, or other indications of the manufacturer’s objective intent.” As defined in 21 CFR 1271.3(c), homologous use means the repair, reconstruction, replacement, or supplementation of a recipient’s cells or tissues with an HCT/P that performs the same basic function or functions in the recipient as in the donor. This criterion reflects the Agency’s conclusion that there would be increased safety and effectiveness concerns for HCT/Ps that are intended for a non-homologous use, because there is less basis on which to predict the product’s behavior, whereas HCT/Ps for homologous use can reasonably be expected to function appropriately (assuming all of the other criteria are also met).2 In applying the homologous use criterion, FDA will determine what the intended use of the HCT/P is, as reflected by the the labeling, advertising, and other indications of a manufacturer’s objective intent, and will then apply the homologous use definition.

FDA has received many inquiries from manufacturers about whether their HCT/Ps meet the homologous use criterion in 21 CFR 1271.10(a)(2). Additionally, transplant and healthcare providers often need to know this information about the HCT/Ps that they are considering for use in their patients. This guidance provides examples of different types of HCT/Ps and how the regulation in 21 CFR 1271.10(a)(2) applies to them, and provides general principles that can be applied to HCT/Ps that may be developed in the future. In some of the examples, the HCT/Ps may fail to meet more than one of the four criteria in 21 CFR 1271.10(a).

III. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

  1. What is the definition of homologous use?

Homologous use means the repair, reconstruction, replacement, or supplementation of a recipient’s cells or tissues with an HCT/P that performs the same basic function or functions in the recipient as in the donor (21 CFR 1271.3(c)), including when such cells or tissues are for autologous use. We generally consider an HCT/P to be for homologous use when it is used to repair, reconstruct, replace, or supplement:

  • Recipient cells or tissues that are identical (e.g., skin for skin) to the donor cells or tissues, and perform one or more of the same basic functions in the recipient as the cells or tissues performed in the donor; or,
  • Recipient cells that may not be identical to the donor’s cells, or recipient tissues that may not be identical to the donor’s tissues, but that perform one or more of the same basic functions in the recipient as the cells or tissues performed in the donor.3

2 Proposed Approach to Regulation of Cellular and Tissue-Based Products, FDA Docket. No. 97N-0068 (February. 28, 1997) page 19. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/biologicsbloodvaccines/guidancecomplianceregulatoryinformation/guidances/tissue/ ucm062601.pdf.

3“Establishment Registration and Listing for Manufacturers of Human Cellular and Tissue-Based Products” 63 FR 26744 at 26749 (May 14, 1998).

Contains Nonbinding Recommendations
Draft – Not for Implementation

1-1. A heart valve is transplanted to replace a dysfunctional heart valve. This is homologous use because the donor heart valve performs the same basic function in the donor as in the recipient of ensuring unidirectional blood flow within the heart.

1-2. Pericardium is intended to be used as a wound covering for dura mater defects. This is homologous use because the pericardium is intended to repair or reconstruct the dura mater and serve as a covering in the recipient, which is one of the basic functions it performs in the donor.

Generally, if an HCT/P is intended for use as an unproven treatment for a myriad of

diseases or conditions, the HCT/P is likely not intended for homologous use only.4

  1. What does FDA mean by repair, reconstruction, replacement, or supplementation of a recipient’s cells or tissues?

Repair generally means the physical or mechanical restoration of tissues, including by covering or protecting. For example, FDA generally would consider skin removed from a donor and then transplanted to a recipient in order to cover a burn wound to be a homologous use. Reconstruction generally means surgical reassembling or re-forming. For example, reconstruction generally would include the reestablishment of the physical integrity of a damaged aorta.5 Replacement generally means substitution of a missing tissue or cell, for example, the replacement of a damaged or diseased cornea with a healthy cornea or the replacement of donor hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in a recipient with a disorder affecting the hematopoietic system that is inherited, acquired, or the result of myeloablative treatment. Supplementation generally means to add to, or complete. For example, FDA generally would consider homologous uses to be the implantation of dermal matrix into the facial wrinkles to supplement a recipient’s tissues and the use of bone chips to supplement bony defects. Repair, reconstruction, replacement, and supplementation are not mutually exclusive functions and an HCT/P could perform more than one of these functions for a given intended use.

  1. What does FDA mean by “the same basic function or functions” in the definition of homologous use?

For the purpose of applying the regulatory framework, the same basic function or functions of HCT/Ps are considered to be those basic functions the HCT/P performs in the body of the donor, which, when transplanted, implanted, infused, or transferred, the HCT/P would be expected to perform in the recipient. It is not necessary for the HCT/P in the recipient to perform all of the basic functions it performed in the donor, in order to

4 “Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products; Establishment Registration and Listing” 66 FR 5447 at 5458 (January 19, 2001).

5 “Current Good Tissue Practice for Human Cell, Tissue, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Product Establishments; Inspection and Enforcement” 69 FR 68612 at 68643 (November 24, 2004) states, “HCT/Ps with claims for “reconstruction or repair” can be regulated solely under section 361 of the PHS Act, provided the HCT/P meets all the criteria in § 1271.10, including minimal manipulation and homologous use.”

Contains Nonbinding Recommendations
Draft – Not for Implementation

meet the definition of homologous use. However, to meet the definition of homologous use, any of the basic functions that the HCT/P is expected to perform in the recipient must be a basic function that the HCT/P performed in the donor.

A homologous use for a structural tissue would generally be to perform a structural function in the recipient, for example, to physically support or serve as a barrier or conduit, or connect, cover, or cushion.

A homologous use for a cellular or nonstructural tissue would generally be a metabolic or biochemical function in the recipient, such as, hematopoietic, immune, and endocrine functions.

3-1. The basic functions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HPCs) include to form and to replenish the hematopoietic system. Sources of HPCs include cord blood, peripheral blood, and bone marrow.6

  1. HPCs derived from peripheral blood are intended for transplantation into an individual with a disorder affecting the hematopoietic system that is inherited, acquired, or the result of myeloablative treatment. This is homologous use because the peripheral blood product performs the same basic function of reconstituting the hematopoietic system in the recipient.
  2. HPCs derived from bone marrow are infused into an artery with a balloon catheter for the purpose of limiting ventricular remodeling following acute myocardial infarction. This is not homologous use because limiting ventricular remodeling is not a basic function of bone marrow.
  3. A manufacturer provides HPCs derived from cord blood with a package insert stating that cord blood may be infused intravenously to differentiate into neuronal cells for treatment of cerebral palsy. This is not homologous use because there is insufficient evidence to support that such differentiation is a basic function of these cells in the donor.

3-2. The basic functions of the cornea include protecting the eye by forming its outermost layer and serving as the refracting medium of the eye. A corneal graft is transplanted to restore sight in a patient with corneal blindness. This is homologous use because a corneal graft performs the same basic functions in the donor as in the recipient.

3-3. The basic functions of a vein or artery include serving as a conduit for blood flow throughout the body. A cryopreserved vein or artery is used for arteriovenous access during hemodialysis. This is homologous use because the vein or artery is supplementing the vessel as a conduit for blood flow.

3-4. The basic functions of amniotic membrane include covering, protecting, serving as a selective barrier for the movement of nutrients between the external and in utero

6 Bone marrow meets the definition of an HCT/P only if is it more than minimally manipulated; intended by the manufacturer for a non-homologous use, or combined with certain drugs or devices.

Contains Nonbinding Recommendations
Draft – Not for Implementation

environment, and to retain fluid in utero. Amniotic membrane is used for bone tissue replacement to support bone regeneration following surgery to repair or replace bone defects. This is not a homologous use because bone regeneration is not a basic function of amniotic membrane.

3-5. The basic functions of pericardium include covering, protecting against infection, fixing the heart to the mediastinum, and providing lubrication to allow normal heart movement within chest. Autologous pericardium is used to replace a dysfunctional heart valve in the same patient. This is not homologous use because facilitating unidirectional blood flow is not a basic function of pericardium.

  1. Does my HCT/P have to be used in the same anatomic location to perform the same basic function or functions?

An HCT/P may perform the same basic function or functions even when it is not used in the same anatomic location where it existed in the donor.7 A transplanted HCT/P could replace missing tissue, or repair, reconstruct, or supplement tissue that is missing or damaged, either when placed in the same or different anatomic location, as long as it performs the same basic function(s) in the recipient as in the donor.

4-1. The basic functions of skin include covering, protecting the body from external force, and serving as a water-resistant barrier to pathogens or other damaging agents in the external environment. The dermis is the elastic connective tissue layer of the skin that provides a supportive layer of the integument and protects the body from mechanical stress.

  1. An acellular dermal product is used for supplemental support, protection, reinforcement, or covering for a tendon. This is homologous use because in both anatomic locations, the dermis provides support and protects the soft tissue structure from mechanical stress.
  2. An acellular dermal product is used for tendon replacement or repair. This is not homologous use because serving as a connection between muscle and bone is not a basic function of dermis.

4-2. The basic functions of amniotic membrane include serving as a selective barrier for the movement of nutrients between the external and in utero environment and to retain fluid in utero. An amniotic membrane product is used for wound healing of dermal ulcers and defects. This is not homologous use because wound healing of dermal lesions is not a basic function of amniotic membrane.

4-3. The basic functions of pancreatic islets include regulating glucose homeostasis within the body. Pancreatic islets are transplanted into the liver through the portal vein,

7 “Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products; Establishment Registration and Listing” 66 FR 5447 at 5458 (January 19, 2001).

6

Contains Nonbinding Recommendations
Draft – Not for Implementation

for preservation of endocrine function after pancreatectomy. This is homologous use because the regulation of glucose homeostasis is a basic function of pancreatic islets.

  1. What does FDA mean by “intended for homologous use” in 21 CFR 1271.10(a)(2)?

The regulatory criterion in 21 CFR 1271.10(a)(2) states that the HCT/P is intended for homologous use only, as reflected by the labeling, advertising, or other indications of the manufacturer’s objective intent.

Labeling includes the HCT/P label and any written, printed, or graphic materials that supplement, explain, or are textually related to the product, and which are disseminated by or on behalf of its manufacturer.8 Advertising includes information, other than labeling, that originates from the same source as the product and that is intended to supplement, explain, or be textually related to the product (e.g., print advertising, broadcast advertising, electronic advertising (including the Internet), statements of company representatives).9

An HCT/P is intended for homologous use when its labeling, advertising, or other indications of the manufacturer’s objective intent refer to only homologous uses for the HCT/P. When an HCT/P’s labeling, advertising, or other indications of the manufacturer’s objective intent refer to non-homologous uses, the HCT/P would not meet the homologous use criterion in 21 CFR 1271.10(a)(2).

  1. What does FDA mean by “manufacturer’s objective intent” in 21 CFR 1271.10(a)(2)?

A manufacturer’s objective intent is determined by the expressions of the manufacturer or its representatives, or may be shown by the circumstances surrounding the distribution of the article. A manufacturer’s objective intent may, for example, be shown by labeling claims, advertising matter, or oral or written statements by the manufacturer or its representatives. It may be shown by the circumstances that the HCT/P is, with the knowledge of the manufacturer or its representatives, offered for a purpose for which it is neither labeled nor advertised.

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