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Archive for the ‘BioTechnology – Venture Creation’ Category


BioGENEius GenePool Competition – the “nature and nurture” SHARK TANK®

at Bio International Convention, June 19-22, 2017 | San Diego, CA

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

http://www.convention.bio.org/2017/

 

AGENDA

BIO 2017 Schedule

Arrive Sunday and Stay Until Friday!

Take full advantage of BIO 2017! Partnering and Education kick off on Monday afternoon, and the BIO Exhibition opens Tuesday morning following our first keynote.

2017 view in mybio button

*Schedule as of June 13, 2017 and subject to change.

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VC Investment in BioTech MegaHubs and Top R&D Spenders among Big Pharma

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

UPDATED on 4/26/2017

The top 10 pharma R&D budgets in 2016

The Top 10 Pharma R&D Budgets in 2016

Read More:

SOURCE

http://www.fiercebiotech.com/special-report/top-10-pharma-r-d-budgets-2016?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal&mrkid=993697&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiT1RSbE9ESTRNR1pqWTJFNCIsInQiOiJFcUx4MFhxSFVGbVZhUkRGdUdRMTJMUGxFSEkrR0VTMEdXbjRvZkxmdXM4em4wRkg5QXZIOWJJWTgwNHR1a1dVbTRIUFwvNWRIXC9ZTkF5dHlpUUZ4bG1lS2c2NkszQk9oeGtRczhLcnYyalRSZEFjOEl6U3dUY2VaakxUbDdkNGNwIn0%3D

Book traversal links for The top 10 pharma R&D budgets in 2016

 

 

 

Table SOURCE: Thomson Reuters abd ENDPOINTS

According to both sources:

  • $3.5 billion for Silicon Valley plus the Bay Area and
  • $2.8 billion for New England.

Broken down by city, $6.1 billion went to

  • Boston ($2.7 billion),
  • San Jose ($2.5 billion) and
  • San Francisco/Berkeley ($1 billion).
  • San Diego ($725 million),
  • New York ($454 million) and
  • the Great Lakes area ($412 million)

SOURCE

Where the money is: Biotech’s megahubs command VC’s billions by john carrollJune 30, 2016 10:41 AM EDT, Updated: November 17, 2016 07:32 PM

The top 15 spenders in the global drug R&D business: 2017

by john carroll

April 24, 2017 05:22 AM EDT, Updated: 05:27 AM

The top five in the business saw their collective spending jump by more than $5 billion, from 2015 to 2016, based on the annual numbers filed largely — though not entirely — with the SEC and gathered by Endpoints News. Two of those companies,

  • Roche and the new number 2, a hard charging
  • Merck, accounted for the lion’s share of the increase. (To be sure, some onetime non-R&D spending, such as Merck’s patent settlement with Bristol-Myers on Keytruda, figured in. But so did bread and butter spending.)
  • Gilead also saw a significant increase in research costs, with
  • Eli Lilly — now off course following two bad setbacks for solanezumab and baricitinib — and the ever aggressive
  • Celgene joining the action as they pressed the accelerator on new drug programs.

Curiously, the added spending coincided with a bad drop in new drug approvals in 2016. But they don’t correlate, and we’ve already seen that turnaround under way as regulators get busy with a brand new year — and soon a brand new FDA commissioner.

SOURCE

https://endpts.com/special/top-research-budgets-in-pharma-and-biotech/

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LIVE Day 1 – 2017 MassBio Annual Meeting  March 30, 2017 8:00 AM, Royal Sonesta Boston

Real Time Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

#MassBioAM17 #PatientDriven @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

Day 1

Breakfast and Registration

8:00 am 9:00 am

Welcome Remarks & MassBio Board Elections

Plenary
9:00 am 9:30 am
Robert Coughlin, CEO, MassBio
  • 63,000 emp
  • 1600 drugs in the pipeline
  • 3 million cures in the near future
  • Life Sciences Challenges
  • Negative impact on Biotech Industry: Policies from the New Administration: Repeal & Replace ACA, Travel Ban, Health coverage, cost and access
  • proposed cuts to NIH, devestation to Institutions in MA
  • Drug costs and Price Transparencies
  • MassBio — opposed these policies from Washington
  • MassBio will continue to lead like with ACA
  • MassBio will continue to embrace Value-based Contracting and will continue to suppost generics which will lower drug costs
  • MA is HQS of Biotech, partnered with NEHA, biopharma and BlueCross BlueShield
  • ENsuring Patient access and drug affordability
  • MA Health Insurance (BlueCross BlueShield) partners with Biotech and Pharma to identify strategy to reduce cost and Monitor Value-based Contracting
  • Vibrant Healthcare Sector and Innovative Biotech
  • Saving Lives is the goal
  • List of Sponsors is Long: Catalent, Corealis, fisherscientific, Amgen, Biogen, Nutter, SHire, Radius, Snow, Uniqure, MA Life Sciences Center
  • Charlie Brown in the afternoon, committed to the goals of MassBio
Abbie Celniker, Chair, MassBio Board of Directors
  • MassBio works as a collective advocacy agency of multiple stakeholders
  • Work together as Partners
  • Engagement, Involvement
  • Community experiencing growth and maturation, average income $140,000 commercial Lab work spaces
  • Diversity workforce, immigrants, spectrum of cultures, gender and training
  • Survey: Female Mangers represent commitment, credentialing, 50% of companies surveyed SVP less hopeful than above and below
  • Culture and Values alignment for employ retention, primarily Women

Opening Keynote

Plenary
9:30 am 10:15 am
Dan Schorr, Founder, Chief Icecream Officer, VICE CREAM

Coffee Break

10:15 am 10:30 am

Challenges the Future Generation of the Industry Faces

Better Business
10:30 am 11:30 am
MODERATOR:
Johannes Fruehauf, Co-founder, LabCentral
  1. Postdoc at Harvard, transition from Academic environment to commercial, not awareness of Biotech industry, in Germany went through Medical School and was aware of Big 200 years old Pharma companies
  2. CROs in Boston, Automated Labs, workflow outsourced if alck of funding
PANELISTS:
  • Will Adams, CSO, President, Founder, Riparian Pharmaceuticals – CVD drug development
  1. human genetics, differential biology, therapeutics for CVD
  2. Lab at HMS research on Vasculture, one important pathway
  3. NIH – $500,000
  4. Using CROs
  • Chris Colbert, Director of Programming, Harvard Innovation Lab – seminars open to the Public
  1. Harvard Entrepreneur activity for students and Alunmi, started EdTech in 2014, defining problems and solutions
  2. Education vs outcomes – capacity to start a business
  3. complementary to Education, resources to become entrepreneur
  4. individuals are driving the process
  5. AI
  • Tim Wang, Co-founder, KSQ Therapeutics
  1. at MIT, now with VC at KSQ, 30-40 emp, hires are computentional biology, cancer biology from pulls of Boston-based Postdocs,
  2. involvement in wriitng a business plan and funding
  3. being active and interdisciplinary

Aging

Trends in Science
10:30 am 11:30 am

Evolution of Analytics in Life Sciences: The Past, the Present and Future of Analytics

Convergence
10:30 am 11:30 am

The MassBio Annual Awards Luncheon

11:45 am 1:15 pm
11:55 – 12:00 Patient Story
12:00 – 12:30PM 2016 Joshua Boger Innovative School of the Year Award – Presented to Hingham High School
12:30 – 1PM 2016 Henri A. Termeer Innovation Leadership Award
Presented to David Meeker, Executive VP and Head of Sanofi Genzyme
  • Sources of inspirations Henri A. Termeer the founder of Genzyme
  • Consumer of HealthCare for 62 years is critical: Trust and Access for vulnerable patient when they are ill
  • Return on Investment in Drugs, incentives to develop vs generics, BioSimilars, Price will drop
  • Societal contract: Recognizing the value and the Pharma Industry needs to increase self regulating
  • If Gov’t will regulate PRICE of drug, innovations will decrease
  • Thank you for the award
1:00 – 1:15 2017 MassBio Leading Impact Award introduced by EDAC Chair Mark Bamforth – Lab Space
Presented to Pfizer, Accepted by Morrie Birnbaum, SVP & CSO, Internal Medicine
  • 2100 emp in MA
  • single building in Kendall Square
  • Andover facility
  • three R&D units: Drug Discovery

Pfizer, Accepted by Morrie Birnbaum, SVP & CSO, Internal Medicine

  • 2014 – Kendall Square site: Becoming Premier Pfizer’s Research Center, close to Science, Scientists and Patients
  • Recognition that working with Foundations and Academic centers Not able to do it alone
  • Close relations with MassBio
  • Thanks to MassBio

Remarks from Governor Charlie Baker

Plenary
1:15 pm 1:30 pm
  • Patient Driven – Governor Charlie Baker
  • MA #1 in STEM occupations
  • Knowledge ecosystem at Kendall Square
  • Smart Fibers HQS: MIT and MA players joint investment
  • Robotics Competition in MA
  • BioPharmaceutical Competision: WPI, MIT State of MA, ULowell – joint investment
  • IBM Watson in MA, MA Life Sciences Center
  • Discovery and inquiry – MA is a place people look from where solutions will come
  • Four big element: Grant from MA Life Sciences Center gave Lab equipment to Brimfield High School
  • Collaborate with Academia for apprenticeship
  • Partnership: Draper Lab and Mass Eye and Ear: develop drug eluting device with drug for Macular Degeneration to replace the needle in an injection into the eye
  • Invest in workforce – human training skills for the technology sector
  • Public Transportation Investment: Replace from mechanical to digital in 2022 all switches of the T system – Double capacity on Red Line, manufactured in Springfield, MA
  • Affordable Housing Units: MA State Housing Dept largest owner of Housing in MA in area near Public Transportation
  • MassBio – Part of the MA economy with less problems that other industries

Cancer Moonshot and other Cancer related issues

Plenary
1:30 pm 2:30 pm
MODERATOR: John Hallinan, CBO, MassBio
PANELISTS:
  • Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
  1. Was part of Cancer Moonshot – 10 key directions
  2. Fund $1.8 Billion, fund needs be approved each year
  3. Funds for 12 implimentation Teams – Applications for 10 key directions: How a Tumor evolve and resist treatment
  4. Create an initiative of Data Sharing acquired from Patients
  5. understanding mutation unique
  6. cancer immunotherapy: fight tumor, stimulate immune system CHeck-Point blockers – only 20% of patients are responsive
  7. Big data to identify new drug targets so more patients will respond
  8. Tsunami in BioMedical Research regarding NIH to face $1.2 Billion cut (equal indirect cost)  – Patients are best advocates –
  9. MA figured out how to do collaboration among stackholders
  10. Several Cancers will become Chronic diseases not quite Cure in 5-10 years
  11. Prevention and early detection: Vaccination, HPV (only 14% girls get vaccine for Cervical, anal and throat) in Japan 0% of HPV.
  12. environment that surrounding the tumor, immune cells suppressing the immune system
  • Mathew Meyerson, Prof. of Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Broad Institute
  1. 3-D cancer genomics sequencing for every cell, new therapies interaction of Cancer and the environment, computing and Internet use for Patient direct involvement in Research – enrollment
  2. Child Cancers
  3. Prevention: Vaccination, HPV, HEP B
  4. HIV a cocktail of drugs, kill a cancer from many angles
  5. access to clinical trial: Connect Clinical Trials information with Doctors
  6. Electronic cigarets and Lung cancer – connection needs to be researched
  • Chandra Ramanathan, Head East Coast Innovation Center, Bayer US
  1. Bayer Partnership with Broad Institute
  2. Immunotherapy Combination of Biomarkers
  3. Sharing Data from Clinical Trials
  • Seema Singh Bhan, Head, Public Policy, Foundation Medicine
  1. Technology to
  2. harness Big data
  3. Momentum via NCI, Cancer Moonshot
  4. Foundation Medicine: Collaboration: Pharma, Goventment, FDA, Academic Institution 0 Liquid Biopsy assays developed and go through the Regulatory system
  5. Patient-Doctor – List of Clinical Trials available for Patients

2:30 – 3:15 Breakout Sessions

  • 2:30 pm 3:15 pm
  • CRISPR and What’s Next

    Trends in Science
    2:30 pm 3:30 pm
MODERATOR:
Scott Gillis, CEO, Onsite Therapeutics, Inc.
  1. implantation of gene edited cells in Human in China
  2. Bio Ethics
  • Jim Burns, President & CEO, Casebia Therapeutics, ex-Sanofi-Genzym
  1. How to deliver tissue specific in vivo
  2. Hymophylia
  3. Immunodefficiency
  4. 30 emp – 60 emp year end
  5. Incubate ideas
  6. Joint venture CRISPR Therapeutics and Casebia
  7. guidelines from the National Academy

 

  • George M. Church, Harvard Prof. of Genetics – now speaks for Genesis
  1. In one year Clinical trial of porcine organ lab made – organ transplant
  2. build new tool set write not read
  • Mattew Stanton, VP, Head of Chemistry, Moderna Therapeutics, ex-Merck
    1. mRNA, 500 emp, Kendall Sq. immun-ooncology, nanoparticle delivery ZIKA Vaccine,
    2. electroporation – delivery
    3. NANO PARTICLE DELIVERY in vivo
    4. original work on siRNA and mRNA – helps the state of today
  • Bill Lundberg, Stanford, MD – MIT, PhD, CSO of CRISPR Therateutics, ex-Genzyme
  1. liver delivery requires dirrrect delivery vs another organ take cells ex-vivo transfact and implant back
  2. UPenn – edited T-cells to human will be first in the US
  3. Somatic cell edition not germline, inheritence

 

 

3D Printing and BioEngineering

 

Convergence

2:30 pm 3:30 pm

Afternoon Break

3:30 pm 3:45 pm

Patient Story

3:45 pm 3:50 pm

Biotech in the Era of Real World Evidence/Drug Value Panel

Plenary
3:50 pm 4:30 pm
MODERATOR:
Leora Schiff, COnsulting COmpanyEvidence sought by Payers to define Value
  1. Industry has changed, R&D to commercialization
  2. Value and Evidence – why it matters in Biotech Industry
PANELISTS:
  • Joshua Cohen, Research Associate Prof. Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development, Value assessment
  1. Value – what people care: Survival
  2. What makes sense
  • Gigi Hirsh, Executive Director, Center Biotech Innovations, MIT and Program Director, NEWDIGS (New Paradigms)
  1. Product life Cycles
  2. Value as defined availability dat on WOrldwide samples
  3. Regulatory – 70 years of data, now diverse data sources
  4. Standard for data not available
  5. Structured methodology on a Product Plan for the Product Life Cycle
  • C. David Nicholson, Chief R&D Officer, Allergan
  1. How to convince Regulator of Value
  2. Drugs goes to Formulary based on Value in need to be demonstrated
  3. In the UK, Drug Prices are set by a centralized organization for the Universal HealthCare system in the UK
  4. Me to drugs are dead, ONLY new drugs with Value survive
  5. Budget for drugs – in the US it is Total HealthCare cost vs UK with a universal HC system,
  • Bill Sibnold, Global Franchise Head, MS Oncology and Immunology, Sanofi Genzyme
  1. How to create a system to thrive,
  2. How access to a product is defined From R&D to commercialization
  3. Products are coming to market with data for standard of care comparison

Patient Story

4:30 pm 4:35 pm

Networking Reception

4:35 pm 6:00 pm

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Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland – A World-Class Clinic for Spinal Cord Injuries

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

The Swiss Paraplegic Centre (SPC, www.paraplegie.ch) in Nottwil, Switzerland, is a privately owned, leading acute care and specialist hospital employing more than 1,500 health professionals in 80 different occupations that focuses on world-class primary care and comprehensive rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries. In addition to the SPC’s extensive range of medical and therapeutic care, treatment and services, the hospital offers advisory services, as well as research in the areas of paraplegia [paralysis of the legs and lower body, typically caused by spinal injury or disease], tetraplegia [also known as quadriplegia, paralysis caused by illness or injury that results in the partial or total loss of use of all four limbs and torso], prevention and related conditions. With 150 beds, the SPC provides modern facilities for rehabilitation and therapy, diagnostics, surgery, ongoing care, orthopedic technology, as well as social services and 24-hour emergency care.

In its 26-year history, the SPC has provided treatment and care to more than 20,000 in-patients. That number continues to grow exponentially due to the reputation of the SPC. In fact, the SPC’s staff performs their duties with effectiveness, expediency and cost-efficiency measures, requiring highly developed process-led medicine, centered around the needs of the patient.

The areas of medical specialty and centers of excellence include the Swiss Paraplegic Centre (SPC), the Swiss Spinal Column and Spinal Cord Centre (SWRZ), the Centre for Pain Medicine (ZSM) and the Swiss Olympic Medical Center (SOMC). These centers respectively offer patients cutting-edge medical treatment based on the most advanced research in areas covering treatment and rehabilitation cases of acute paraplegia, vertebral and spinal cord surgery, as well as services relating to pain management, sports medicine and preventive health checks.

Alongside the core focus on paraplegiology, the SPC is also equipped with the necessary medical facilities, allowing for the lifelong care of paraplegic patients. The SPC provides individually-tailored, comprehensive treatment in three phases (acute, reactivation and integration) using highly skilled staff and state-of-the-art equipment. The aim is always to re-establish a patient’s personal functionality, self-image and lifestyle to the fullest possible extent, with a holistic approach to treatment that includes mental, physical and psycho-social aspects, such as career, family and leisure activities.

Specialist services available at the SPC include amongst others orthopedics, neuro-urology, pain medicine, sports medicine, prevention, clinical research, emergency medicine, vehicle conversion and rehabilitation techniques. Medico-therapeutic treatments, such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and training therapy are available, alongside advice and counseling services, such as professional reintegration.

The SPC is the largest of Switzerland’s four special hospitals for paraplegics and tetraplegics located in Nottwil/Lucerne, a town in central Switzerland on the shores of Lake Sempach. The other three facilities are in Basel, Sion and Zurich. Nowadays, the SPC consistently treats more than 60 percent of people with spinal cord injury in Switzerland and is fully occupied year-round. 

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland.  Interior and exterior photographs of the hospital.

 

Below is my interview with Hospital Director Dr. Med. Hans Peter Gmünder, M.D., which occurred in March, 2017.

 As a privately owned clinic with a specialty in the rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, how do you keep the spirit of research and innovation alive?

Dr. Med. (medicinae) Gmünder: The goal of the Swiss Paraplegic Foundation, an umbrella organization that encompasses the Swiss Paraplegic Centre, is to create a unique network of services for people with spinal cord injury, from primary care through to the end of their lives. Its aim is to provide comprehensive rehabilitation and to reintegrate those affected into family life, society and the working environment.

We want to maintain our pioneering and leading role in the fields of acute medicine, rehabilitation and lifelong assistance to people with spinal cord injuries. By providing a comprehensive network of services featuring solidarity, medical care, integration and lifelong assistance, as well as research all in one place, we are unique in Switzerland and in other countries around the world.

People with spinal cord injury rely upon our network of services, which are at their disposal throughout their lives. The challenge facing us is to continually adapt these services to reflect current research and treatment to comply with our mission of delivering high-quality services. The trust which has been placed in us obliges us to continue our success story.

We have our own research department, closely linked to the Swiss Paraplegic Centre, and dedicated employees who draw upon their wide-ranging professional networks to stay on top of the latest international research.

We have a few examples that we’d like to share with you.

  • In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) published its first international health report on the topic of spinal cord injury, “International Perspectives on Spinal Cord Injury.” It was developed in collaboration with Swiss Paraplegic Research in Nottwil and a team of international experts.
  • In the summer of 2014, the Swiss Paraplegic Centre became the first rehabilitation center in Switzerland to implement exoskeletons [external covering for the body that provides both support and protection] in the rehabilitation and training of patients with spinal cord injury. Our experiences are included in an international study, and will contribute to the development of useful mobility aids for people with spinal cord injuries.

At the end of October 2016, an estimated 9,000 visitors came to Nottwil for two days of celebrations to mark five anniversaries — the Swiss Paraplegic Foundation turned 40, the Swiss Paraplegics Association was 35, the Swiss Paraplegic Centre celebrated 25 years, Swiss Paraplegic Research reached 15 years, and it was the 80th birthday of the founder and honorary president, Dr. Med. Guido A. Zäch, M.D.

What draws patients to the Swiss Paraplegic Centre?

Dr. Gmünder: We support people with spinal cord injuries throughout their lives. It is the unique, holistic approach to acute medicine, rehabilitation and lifelong medical, professional and social assistance that draws patients from Switzerland and many other countries to our clinic in Nottwil.

For example, in cases where we have individuals involved in serious accidents, the comprehensive rehabilitation of a patient with spinal cord injury begins at the scene of the accident. The aim of comprehensive assistance follows in three stages – acute, reactivation and integration phase – through the appropriate, individual deployment of specialist personnel and instruments. We rescue the individual at the scene of the accident and provide the right acute therapy. What follows is an initial rehabilitation through specialists in diagnosis, surgery, therapy and care, and then comes lifelong support and care with the aid of specialists.

Following the disproportionately high percentage of people with tetraplegia admitted to the Centre for initial rehabilitation in 2014, our specialist clinic reported a higher proportion of people with paraplegia in 2015. Spinal cord injuries resulted from an accident in around half of all initial rehabilitation cases: falls led to the spinal cord injury in the case of 43 percent of people affected, sports accidents with 35 percent and road traffic accidents in 18 percent. In fact, 52,482 nursing days were clocked for a total of 1,085 in-patients who were discharged from the clinic after initial rehabilitation or follow-up treatment in 2015.

In fact, some of our patient success stories mentioned on our web site involve these individuals:

“I was a cheesemaker for 33 years with my own dairy; gardening was my second love. That was before I had my accident helping out on my son’s farm. I need a new hobby now that I will enjoy, that will fill my time and give me something to do when I get back home. Making art out of lime wood could appeal to me. While it is difficult for me to make the small cuts in the wood as I lack strength in my hand, patience will reap rewards. My most important objective? To be able to stand on my own feet and take a few steps again. I should have achieved that by the time I am discharged from the clinic in five months.” — Josef Kobler (58), tetraplegic following an accident.

“Since being diagnosed with a spinal cord injury, I come back to Nottwil a lot. For instance, to go the Wheelchair Mechanics Department to have the settings of my new wheelchair optimized. It replaces my legs and must fit my body perfectly. However, in most cases I attend the Centre for Pain Medicine of the SPC as an outpatient in order to have the extremely severe pains and muscle cramps, which I suffer from every day, alleviated. They became so severe that I had a pain pump with medication implanted at the SPC. It is apparent now that unfortunately the effect isn’t permanent. We are now giving electrostimulation a try. This involves applying electrodes to the vertebral canal. If I could finally get my pain under control, I would be able to return to work and set up my own business. That is my biggest wish. I have had an idea about what I could do.” — Hervé Brohon (41), paraplegic following an accident.

“I have always been passionate about cooking and have enjoyed treating my family and guests to my dishes and to the aperitifs that I have created myself. I absolutely want to be able to do that again. As independently as possible, of course. That is my objective. I have availed of the opportunity on a few occasions to try out the obstacle-free practice apartment and kitchen at the SPC. If I am able to go home in four weeks, my kitchen will also be adapted to be wheelchair-friendly. Whether I am cooking for two, four or six people is a much bigger consideration as a wheelchair user. I now have to consciously allow for time and effort. However, one thing is certain: I can’t wait to welcome my first guests.” — Isa Bapst (73), paraplegic following an accident.

How is the Swiss Paraplegic Centre transforming health care?

Dr. Gmünder: The Swiss Paraplegic Centre offers an integrated healthcare structure, including a wide range of medical specialists covering every aspect of medical care for those with spinal cord injuries.

In selected core disciplines for the care of people with spinal cord injuries, we also treat a large number of patients without spinal cord injuries. This relates primarily to pain medicine, spine- and spinal cord surgery and respiratory medicine.

In fact, the Swiss Paraplegic Foundation, our umbrella organization, has been an unbelievable success story, operating a network of services to benefit people with spinal cord injury.

Our Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Dr. Sc. Techn. (scientiae technicarum) Daniel Joggi, knows what it’s like to become totally dependent as he has been in a wheelchair for the past four decades.

Dr. Joggi tells his story: “I have been a wheelchair user ever since I had a skiing accident 39 years ago. I know what it is like to become totally dependent from one second to the next. How doggedly you have to battle to recover as much of your mobility as possible and, more especially, to be able to live a self-determined life again after a long process of resilience. The inner resolve it takes to plot a new course in life, to have relationships with others from a different perspective and to acquire new job skills. Therefore, I am eternally grateful along with all the other people in Switzerland with paraplegia and tetraplegia for the help, support and great solidarity that allow the Foundation to deliver all the services which are so immensely valuable to us.”

At the Swiss Paraplegic Centre, a 24-hour emergency department is staffed to handle any emergency. Please provide your thoughts on this critical component of diagnosis and care for newly diagnosed patients.

Dr. Gmünder: Yes, our Centre is recognized by the Swiss Union of Surgical Societies as a specialist clinic for first-aid treatment of paraplegics.

Statistics and experience clearly show that in 80 out of 100 cases, the damage to the spine and the spinal cord is not definite immediately after an accident. In the first six hours, there are real chances to mitigate or even avoid an imminent cross-paralysis. After that it is usually too late.

In addition to transferring an individual directly to the SPC, appropriate acute care is another important criterion for the success of the individual affected by spinal cord issues. That means that individuals are in the right place for the subsequent, comprehensive rehabilitation.

The benefits for our patients are:

  • Emergency service around the clock by specialists trained to minimize damage to the spinal cord and spine;
  • Admission and treatment of all patients with paraplegia from all over Switzerland;
  • Specific knowledge and practical experience in comprehensive rehabilitation of paraplegics;
  • Comprehensive range of medical and therapeutic services under one roof;
  • Modern equipment for precise, careful diagnostics and operations;
  • Consultancy and network for external experts in areas not covered by the SPC;
  • Interdisciplinary work in well-established teams; and
  • Central location proximity and quick access from all parts of the country.

What is your connection to the Swiss Paraplegic Research and its mission of getting “strategy into research” and “research into practice?”

Dr. Gmünder: The Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPR), connected to the Swiss Paraplegic Centre, is part of the Swiss Paraplegic Foundation (SPF) and is an integral part of the Nottwil campus.

It is the mission of Swiss Paraplegic Research to sustainably improve the situation of people with paraplegia or tetraplegia through clinical and interdisciplinary research in the long-term. The areas that are aimed to be improved are functioning, social integration, equality of opportunity, health, self-determination and quality of life.

Our Swiss Paraplegic Research has been supported by the Federal Government of Switzerland and by the Canton of Lucerne for eight years as a non-university research institution. We are proud of this accomplishment.

Our main research domains are in the areas of aging, neuro-rehabilitation, musculo-skeletal health, preserving and improving function of upper limbs, pain, pressure sores, respiration, urology and orthopedics.

The goal of Swiss Paraplegic Research is to promote the study of health from a holistic point of view, by focusing on the ‘lived experience’ of persons with health conditions and their interaction with society. We are, therefore, establishing a research network for rehabilitation research from a comprehensive perspective on a national and international level. This network will make it possible to practically apply the latest research findings to provide the best possible care and reintegration for people with paraplegia or tetraplegia.

This year, we received the approval of 18 new research projects and we had a total of 36 studies in progress under review, undertaken by and with the involvement of the Clinical Trial Unit (CTU), the department for clinical research at the Centre. For example, the successful implementation of a multi-center study on the use of walking robots (exoskeleton) merits special mention. Research was carried out in that study into the wide range of effects of maintaining movement for people with spinal cord injury.

The CTU will continue to carry out research in Rehabilitation Engineering in a cooperation with Burgdorf University of Applied Science and the research group headed by Professor Kenneth Hunt. The “Life and Care” symposium on breathing and respiration organized by the CTU provided a platform for an international knowledge exchange with national and international experts. This is crucial for further scientific development in respiratory medicine. In 2015, the CTU also launched the CTU Central Switzerland, in association with Lucerne Cantonal Hospital and the University of Lucerne. It supports clinics which are actively engaged in research with specific services, thereby enhancing Switzerland’s standing as a center of research.

How does the Swiss Paraplegic Foundation support your vision?

Dr. Gmünder: The Swiss Paraplegic Group includes the Swiss Paraplegic Foundation, which was established in 1975, two partner organizations — the Benefactors’ Association and the Swiss Paraplegics Association, and six companies owned by the Foundation. Those six companies are the Swiss Paraplegic Centre, the Swiss Paraplegic Research, Orthotec AG, ParaHelp AG, Sirmed Swiss Institute of Emergency Medicine AG, Seminarhotel Sempachersee AG.

The Swiss Paraplegic Foundation, founded by Dr. Med. Guido A. Zäch in 1975, is a solidarity network for people with spinal cord injuries, unrivaled anywhere in the world. Its work is based on the vision of medical care and comprehensive rehabilitation for people with paraplegia and tetraplegia, with a view towards enabling them to lead their lives with self-determination and with as much independence as possible, supported by the latest advances in science and technology.

The unique network of services of the Foundation is a strategic mix of Solidarity, Research, Medicine and Integration and Lifelong Assistance. Let me elaborate on these services.

  • Solidarity
    • The Foundation provides a comprehensive range of services for every area of a person’s life who has a spinal cord injury. The Nottwil campus serves to be a center of excellence for integration, assistance and lifelong learning for our patients.
    • The Foundation ensures that its benefactors and donors are aware of our list of services and can support us longer term.
    • The Foundation establishes a national and international network that will guarantee better basic conditions for people with spinal cord injury.
    • The Foundation encourages training of specialized personnel in the field of spinal cord injury.
  • Research
    • The Foundation contributes to the sustainable improvement of health, social integration, equal opportunities and self-determination of people with spinal cord injury by carrying out rehabilitation research.
    • The Foundation works closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) and encourages exchanges with universities and institutions locally and globally for the latest scientific findings and conducts academic training at the University of Lucerne.
    • The Foundation develops high-quality care standards for its patients.
  • Medicine
    • The Foundation offers all medical services needed for professional acute care and rehabilitation of people with spinal cord injury and encourages patients to become involved in their therapy and to take responsibility for their lives.
    • The Foundation strengthens relationships with partners in specific disciplines and local institutions to benefit people with spinal cord injury.
    • The Foundation is a member of committees with political influence to ensure that its patients receive highly specialized medical care.
  • Integration and Lifelong Assistance
    • The Foundation establishes a network throughout Switzerland to help people with spinal cord injury.
    • The Foundation offers comprehensive services to meet people’s needs to improve their integration into society.
    • The Foundation encourages people with spinal cord injury to lead an independent life and educate family and friends so they can provide the necessary support.

Moreover, in cases of hardship, the Foundation makes contributions towards the cost of walking aids, equipment and amenities for people with paraplegia and tetraplegia. It also takes on uncovered hospital and care costs.

 Current market research shows that the Swiss Paraplegic Foundation ranks among the three most highly rated aid organizations in Switzerland. Can you please elaborate on why?

Dr. Gmünder: That is true. The Foundation is highly rated in terms of goodwill, innovation, competence and effectiveness. In addition, it is regarded as undoubtedly the most competent organization representing people with disabilities in Switzerland, according to several market research surveys.

So that we can continue to meet the demand for our patients, families and other visitors, plans are under way to upgrade our clinic and hotel on our premises.

We generally have interest from visitors to visit our Centre. Our guided tours and events enabled the general public to see how the foundation concept is put into practice, day in, day out. In Nottwil, 160 guides provided more than 11,000 visitors with a glimpse into the operations at our specialist clinic.

Additionally, we organized more than 5,000 scientific meetings attended by more than 170,000 people in 2015. And our wheelchair athletes take part in two major competitions, the IPC Athletics Grand Prix and the UCI Para-cycling World Championships, at our Nottwil site. It is our hope to continue to motivate individuals with spinal cord injuries to be involved in healthy exercise.

Since you became Hospital Director, how have you changed the way that you deliver health care or interact with patients?

Dr. Gmünder: It is important to me that the patients and their needs are the focus of our efforts. As such, one of my main tasks is to align our processes with our patients.

Here are some examples:

We started construction with a newly expanded Intensive Care Medicine, Pain Medicine and Surgical Medicine department last year to provide patients with an expanded variety of cross-linked treatments.

Certified as a nationwide trauma center, our Swiss Spinal Column and Spinal Cord Centre has become increasingly recognized throughout the country with large numbers of non-paralyzed patients, who have severe spinal cord injury, being referred to our facility. It is under the medical leadership of the Head of Department Dr. Med. Martin Baur, M.D. This highly specialized acute care facility recently received certification as a specialist center for traumatology within the Central Swiss Trauma Network.

We believe in developing the next generation of professionals and our Department of Anesthesia was recognized as a center of further training; the first two junior doctors have been appointed and postgraduate courses in anesthesia nursing are already available.

Our Swiss Weaning Centre, where individuals learn to breathe without a machine, has brought specialists from Intensive Care Medicine, Speech Therapy, RespiCare and Spinal Cord Medicine even closer together in a new process structure for respiratory medicine. At the same time, the Swiss Weaning Centre reported increased referrals from university hospitals and private clinics, as well as numerous successes with patients who had proved to be difficult to wean from respiratory equipment.

Our Centre for Pain Medicine, one of the largest pain facilities in the country, reported a further increase in inpatient treatments. Epiduroscopy, which was introduced in 2014, has proved to be a success. It is a percutaneous, minimally invasive procedure which is used in the diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes near the spinal cord.

We reached a milestone in tetra hand surgery. The team of our doctors has been consulting at two other spinal cord injury centers and have used these occasions to show doctors around the country what possibilities there are for improved hand and grip functions, leading to an enhanced quality of life.

In what ways do you rehabilitate the whole patient? Why is this important early on in treatment?

Dr. Gmünder: In accordance with our vision, we are not just focusing on physical rehabilitation but on the entire person in their social environment (leisure, work, housing, mobility). Due to our broad organizational structure, we have many resources at our disposal. The rate of reintegration for people who did their primary rehabilitation at the Swiss Paraplegic Centre is almost 65 percent – one of the highest in the world.

Because we work to address diagnosis, treatment and management of traumatic spinal cord injuries with our patients, we take great care in working with patients on their medical disabilities, physical disabilities, psychological disabilities, vocational disabilities, social aspects and any health complications. That means that we not only treat patient’s medically, but also we treat them through therapy and complementary medicine, such as art therapy, sports and water therapy and homeopathic medicine.

At the SPC, we nurture a culture which is characterized by common values and shared objectives, namely commitment, leadership, a humane approach, cooperation and openness and fairness in our dealing with one another and with our patients.

As you follow patients throughout their rehabilitation and treatment, what are you most proud of at the Centre? 

Dr. Gmünder: Research has shown that early referral of a patient with a traumatic spinal injury lessens the complications, shortens the length of time in the hospital and is, therefore, more cost-effective.

We are confronted by individuals every day whose abilities have been limited by disease, trauma, congenital disorders or pain – and we are focused on enabling them to achieve their maximum functional abilities. Our patients have a better outcome and quality of life, patient-focused treatment, ongoing case management, and lifelong care.

It’s important to emphasize that our comprehensive rehabilitation of individuals with spinal cord injuries begins on the first day after the accident or trauma. On one hand, the medical treatments with paraplegia or tetraplegia are performed by a multidisciplinary medical team. And on the other hand, it is our goal to give those individuals their personality and life structure as quickly – and as best – as possible. An individual’s medical condition affects their psychological, physical and social aspects of life.

We focus on individualized treatment for the greatest possible independence for our patients. When patients are satisfied with our work and its results, they can resume a self-determined life. That is our greatest joy.

Hans Peter Gmuender

Image SOURCE: Photograph of Hospital Director Hans Peter Gmünder, M.D., courtesy of Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, Switzerland.

Hans Peter Gmünder, M.D.
Hospital Director

Hans Peter Gmünder, M.D., assumed the role of Hospital Director of the Swiss Paraplegic Centre in 2011.  He is a German-Belgian double citizen.

Previously, Dr. Gmünder was Chief Physician and Medical Director of the Rehaklinik Bellikon, a rehabilitation and specialist clinic for traumatic acute rehabilitation, sports medicine, professional integration and medical expertise for 10 years in the canton of Aargau, Switzerland. He began his career at the Swiss Paraplegic Centre in the 1990s as Assistant and Senior Physician, and later as Chief Physician and Deputy Chief Physician.

He completed a B.S. degree in Business Administration at SRH FernHochschule Riedlingen in 2010 and an M.D. degree at Freie Universität Berlin in 1987.

He is married to Sabeth and is the father of two children.

 

Editor’s note:

We would like to thank Claudia Merkel, head of public relations, Swiss Paraplegic Centre,  for the help and support she provided during this interview.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

The Swiss Paraplegic Centre (http:// www.paraplegie.ch), Nottwil, Switzerland.

Choosing the right rehabilitation facility is one of the most important decisions a survivor of a brain or spinal cord injury will make as the type and quality of care will have a significant impact on the patient’s long-term outcome. The top 10 rehabilitation centers in the United States are (http://www.brainandspinalcord.org/2016/04/15/top-ten-rehabilitation-hospitals-usa/):

  1. Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago
  2. TIRR Memorial Hermann
  3. Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation
  4. University of Washington Medical Center
  5. Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital
  6. Mayo Clinic
  7. Craig Hospital
  8. Shepard Center
  9. Rusk Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Medical Center
  10. Moss Rehab

The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (https://www.sralab.org/new-ric), located in Chicago, Illinois, has been ranked as the number one rehabilitation hospital in the United States for the past 24 years by U.S. News and World Report. It is a 182-bed research facility that focuses solely on rehabilitation in many areas, including spinal cord, brain, nerve, muscle and bone, cancer and pediatric. For example, the rehabilitation course for patients with spinal cord injury requires precise medical and nursing expertise, respiratory and pulmonary care and sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic equipment. For several years, the hospital has dedicated investments in talent, space and equipment that attract a high volume of patients with challenging conditions. The high volume, diversity of condition and greater complexity enables them to expand their experience in helping patients recover from spinal cord injury. Primary goals for patients include the emergence of meaningful motor function, sensation, coordination and endurance, resolution of respiratory and vascular instability, and overall continued medical recovery from the injury or disease.

The Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Boston (http://spauldingrehab.org/about/facts-statistics) is ranked number five in the country by U.S. News and World Report and number one in New England.  As a unique center of treatment excellence and a leading physical medicine and rehabilitation research institution, Spaulding Boston is comprised of major departments in all areas of medicine requiring rehabilitation. They are a nationally recognized leader in innovation, research and education.  The facility also has been the source of significant treatment innovations with dramatic implications for a range of conditions, including amputation and limb deficiencies, brain injury, cardiac rehabilitation, pulmonary rehabilitation and spinal cord injuries, to name a few. http://spauldingrehab.org/conditions-and-treatments/list.

Whether individuals are adjusting to a life-altering illness or recovering from a back injury, they will find the care they need within the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network.  Rehabilitation specialists have the training, experience, resources and dedication to help individuals:

  • Regain function after a devastating illness or injury,
  • Develop skills to be active and independent when living with chronic illness and/or disability,
  • Recover from surgery, work and sports injuries, and
  • Grow to the fullest physical, emotional, cognitive and social potential. http://spauldingrehab.org/conditions-and-treatments/

The ACGME accredited Harvard Medical School/ Spaulding/ VA Boston Fellowship Program in  Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Medicine is a 12-month training program that offers advanced clinical training in SCI, a strong didactic component, and opportunities for research with protected elective time.  The curriculum is designed to provide exposure to the full spectrum of SCI care and includes rotations at VA Boston, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, and Brigham & Woman’s Hospital. Requirements include prior completion of an approved residency program in a specialty such as physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology, internal medicine, family practice, surgery, or other specialties relevant to spinal cord injury.  http://spauldingrehab.org/education-and-training/spinal-cord-fellowship.

Specifically, the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network is at the forefront of innovative treatment for major disabling conditions, including spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), other traumatic injuries, stroke, and neuromuscular disorders such as multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and Parkinson’s disease. At Spaulding, the treatment goals go far beyond immediate rehabilitation to address long-term health and function, as well as giving patients encouragement and hope as they return to their lives in the community.

The hub of their spinal cord injury program is the Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) Rehabilitation Program, led by experts at Spaulding Boston, a Center of Excellence in spinal cord injury rehabilitation. With the guidance of their  physicians and other rehabilitation specialists and access to some of the most advanced technologies available today, their patients have the resources to strive for their highest level of neurorecovery – and to develop successful, enriching strategies for independent living.

When potentially life-altering spinal cord injury occurs, the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network clinicians are dedicated to pioneering improved therapies that can make all the difference to a patient’s immediate and long-term recovery. Their goal is to support a patient’s return to an active, productive and fulfilling life.

Whether the spinal cord injury is due to traumatic injury or illness, their team of experts will develop a treatment plan in collaboration with the patient and family. Depending on the severity of the injury, their teams work on improving function in: walking, balance and mobility; speech, swallowing and breathing; thinking (cognition), behavior and safety; dressing, bathing and other activities of daily living; incontinence, bowel and bladder function.

Their commitment is to offer a full spectrum of rehabilitation services for adults and children with spinal cord injury:

  • Intensive, hospital-level rehabilitation with goal-directed therapy 3 – 5 hours a day, at least 5 days a week for inpatients.
  • Long-term care and rehabilitation for patients with complicating conditions.
  • Cutting-edge spinal cord injury technologies and therapeutic techniques.
  • Emphasis on family participation throughout the course of care. with an inpatient comprehensive training and education series.
  • Seamless transition to multi-disciplinary outpatient rehabilitation.
  • Coordination of care with Spaulding’s outpatient centers.
  • Vocational training, participation in research, support groups.

Spaulding Rehabilitation Network is the official teaching partner of the Harvard Medical School Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R). The Spaulding network’s facilities are members of Partners HealthCare, founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The knowledge and expertise of this entire healthcare system is available to patients and caregivers. Their continuum of superb healthcare ensures that patients will find the care they need throughout their journey and the strength they need to live their life to the fullest.

Other related articles 

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Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

2016

Use of Sensors, Data and Devices to improve Health, San Francisco, April 5-6, 2016: Wearable Tech + Digital Health Conferences

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/25/use-of-sensors-data-and-devices-to-improve-health-san-francisco-april-5-6-2016-wearable-tech-digital-health-conferences/

2015

New Spinal Cord Repair Strategy using 3D Cell Growth

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/10/31/new-spinal-cord-repair-strategy-using-3d-cell-growth/

Unsupervised, Mobile and Wireless Brain–Computer Interfaces on the Horizon

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/21/unsupervised-mobile-and-wireless-brain-computer-interfaces-on-the-horizon/

Diffuse optics detects spinal cord ischemia – Optics.org

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/05/07/diffuse-optics-detects-spinal-cord-ischemia-optics-org/

Essential for Rehabilitation

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/12/03/essential-for-rehabilitation/

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Chan-Zuckerberg (CZ) Biohub Selects Researchers to Receive $50 Million to Fight Disease & consortium aimed at immunotherapy research

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

02/10/2017 – 4:33pm

 

Selecting the Candidates

It wasn’t easy to narrow down the applicant pool, according to Quake.

“Over 750 people submitted a three-page application proposing risky but innovative ideas. In return, we’d provide them with the funding to work on their ideas in an unrestricted capacity,” said Quake regarding the application process.

A panel comprised of 60 prominent engineers and scientists sifted through the applications that came from the three universities. Submissions came from a diverse array of departments, including computer science, engineering and mathematics before settling on the final 47 participants.

“It’s a phenomenal gathering of talent working on issues like using computer science to help understand human health through the use of wearables,” added Quake.

One notable member of this program is Jure Leskovec, Ph.D., who is a computer scientist at Stanford and the chief scientist at Pinterest. His work at the biohub will focus on using data to help biologists comprehend the interactions between the genes and proteins exposed to drugs or disease, according to Nature.

Other investigators include Ada Poon, Ph.D., hailing from Stanford who is studying new techniques for miniaturing bioelectronics devices, and Markita Landry, Ph.D., who is working on nanosensor technology and near infrared imaging platforms designed to visualize neurotransmitters in the brain.

The CZ Biohub will institute policies that enable quick dissemination of research papers through pre-print servers. This will help inform other researchers of their work and expedite the discovery process.

Next Steps

Investigators will gain a five-year appointment and up to $1.5 million in funding to kick start their research projects.

There are other research institutes forming in Silicon Valley, but with slightly different approaches. Sean Parker, the entrepreneur behind notorious music-sharing service Napster, launched a consortium aimed at immunotherapy research as well as a separate operation geared towards allergy research.

However, Quake said the Biohub concept appeals to a lot of researchers.

“There’s only a small number of faculty positions available each year and not everyone wants to teach, so we want the Biohub to be an alternate career path for researchers who love science,” he said.

http://www.rdmag.com/article/2017/02/chan-zuckerberg-biohub-selects-researchers-receive-50-million-fight-disease?et_cid=5825577&et_rid=461755519&type=cta&et_cid=5825577&et_rid=461755519&linkid=content

 

RELATED READS

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Institutional Capital Raised by Female Founders in 2016 – A Global Perspective vs the US Economy: Globally 1,272 in the United States 600

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

2016 REVIEW OF FEMALE FOUNDERS RAISING INSTITUTIONAL CAPITAL

– See more at:

http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

 

The Data Reflects Several Key Trends
Key Takeaways

Raising a Series A led by an institutional VC remains difficult, but female founders in NYC continued to be the most successful (compared to those in other cities) in 2016.
At 17%, the percentage of total A rounds led by female CEOs in 2016 represents the highest total percentage since Female Founders Fund started tracking the data in 2013.
In addition, New York saw a record number of Series B and C rounds led by female founders in 2016.
Female Founders Fund remains the most active institutional VC firm investing in early-stage female-led companies.
Funds that have traditionally been uninterested in e-commerce have renewed interest in the e-commerce sector following the Dollar Shave Club and Jet.com acquisitions by large strategic investors.

2016 Series A Rounds — NYC — Female CEO
Rockets of Awesome — $12.5 million — December — Rachel Blumenthal
Ellevest — $9.0 million — September — Sallie Krawcheck
CoheroHealth — $9.0 million — November — Melissa Manice
Away — $8.5 million — September — Steph Korey
Primary– $8.0 million — June — Galyn Bernard
goTenna — $7.5 million — March — Daniela Perdomo
LOLA — $7.0 million — December — Alex Friedman and Jordana Kier
Uncharted Play — $7.0 million — September — Jessica Matthews
Thrive Global — $7.0 million — August — Arianna Huffington
Everplans — $6.4 million — June — Abby Schneiderman
pymetrics — $6.1 million — February — Frida Polli
Sakara Life — $4.8 million — January — Whitney Tingle, Danielle DuBoise
Shoppable — $3.5 million — August — Heather Marie
MMLaFleur — Sarah LaFleur

2016 Series A Rounds — Bay Area — Female CEO

Cortexyme — $15.0 million — January — Casey Lynch
FOVE — $11.0 million — March — Yuka Kojima
Front — $10.0 million — May — Mathilde Collin
REBBL — $10.0 million — December — Sheryl O’Loughlin
Nima — $9.2 million — May — Shireen Yates
Rocksbox — $8.7 million — March — Meaghan Rose
LaunchDarkly — $8.7 million — December — Edith Harbaugh
Modsy — $8.0 million — February — Shanna Tellerman
ThirdLove — $8.0 million — February — Heidi Zak
Node — $7.5 million — June — Falon Fatemi
Shippo — $7.0 million — September — Laura Behrens Wu
Mobilize — $6.5 million — September — Sharon Savariego
Neurotrack — $6.5 million — January — Elli Kaplan
Sourcery — $5.0 million — September — Na’ama Moran
Luka — $4.4 million — April — Eugenia Kuyda
SupportPay — $4.1 million — December — Sheri Atwood
Zybooks — $4.0 million — February — Smita Bakshi
Schoola — $3.6 million — May — Stacey Boyd

– See more at:

http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

 

 

Series A Rounds in 2016

Our 2016 analysis began with an overall review of Series A rounds globally, nationally and regionally.

2017 Research Graph 1

Series A Rounds Raised Globally, Nationally and Regionally in 2016

Series A Rounds in 2016:

 

 

 

2016 Series A Rounds in 2016:

Globally: 1,272
United States: 600
Bay Area: 187
NYC: 84
Boston: 31
Los Angeles: 38
Seattle: 26
Austin: 7
Washington D.C.: 17

2015 Series A Rounds in 2015:

Globally: 1,164

United States: 664

Bay Area: 205

NYC: 96

Boston: 50

Los Angeles: 40

Seattle: 25

Austin: 22

Washington D.C.: 17

– See more at:

http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

The total number of Series A rounds in the U.S. decreased by 10% in 2016. Of the seven regions that we track in the U.S., Seattle is the only region that experienced an increase in the number of Series A raises in 2016, at 4%.

While overall Series A activity declined slightly in Los Angeles, there were two large Series A raises for female-led businesses — (i) HopSkipDrive, led by CEO Joanna McFarland, which raised $10.2 million in January 2016 from Upfront Ventures and FirstMark Capital; and (ii) Hutch, led by CEO Beatrice Fischel-Bock, which raised $5 million in July 2016 from Founders Fund. Los Angeles remains among the most female entrepreneur-friendly cities in the U.S.

 

VC’s investing in female-led companies in 2016.

Female Founders Fund remained the most active investor, participating in 3 of the 14 — or 21% — of all female-led A rounds in NYC. – See more at: http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

– See more at:

http://femalefoundersfund.com/2016-review-of-female-founders-raising-institutional-capital/#sthash.Pcuj7rVB.dpuf

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On Investment Platforms for Private Funds and Investment Platforms for Private Placements – SEC Update

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

SEC Update

In the last few years, we have seen a number of important developments in the securities laws related to finders and broker-dealer registration requirements. Below we provide an overview of the broker-dealer registration requirement as it relates to finders who assist in matching issuers with investors or buyers and the latest developments in this area.

Overview

The distinction between being classified as a finder and a broker-dealer can have significant consequences. An unregistered broker-dealer may face sanctions from the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and it may be unable to enforce payment for its services. In addition, transactions involving an unregistered broker-dealer may create a right of rescission in favor of the investors, allowing the investors the right to require the issuer to return the money invested. One example of the consequences of an unregistered broker-dealer occurred in the Ranieri Partners SEC enforcement action. In that action the SEC brought charges against a private-equity firm, its managing director, and a consultant because of the consultant’s failure to register as a broker-dealer. The SEC’s order found that the private equity firm paid transaction-based fees to a consultant, who was not registered as a broker-dealer, for soliciting investors for private fund investments.1

The federal securities laws do not specifically define the term “finder” or outline what finders can do. Instead, finders must avoid being deemed a broker or dealer under the federal securities laws unless they register as such with the SEC and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). A broker is defined as “any person engaged in the business of effecting transactions in securities for the accounts of others.”2 A dealer is defined as a person that is “engaged in the business of buying and selling securities … for such person’s own account,” but excludes a person that buys and sells securities for its own account, but not as part of a regular business.3Because the broker definition is the one that finders have the most trouble with, this discussion is focused on what activities may cause a finder to fall within the definition of a broker required to register with the SEC and FINRA.

  • M&A Brokers
  • FINRA Guidance
  • Investment Platforms for Private Placements
  • Investment Platforms for Private Funds
  • Crowdfunding
  • Potential Regulatory Action
Conclusion

A determination of whether an intermediary is acting as a finder or an unregistered broker-dealer is a very fact-specific analysis and can often be very complex. Unfortunately for unwary entrepreneurs, company executives, and equity fund sponsors, frequently a third party assisting with capital-raising will be acting as a broker-dealer, not a finder, and therefore should not be engaged unless properly registered. It is likely that we will see further clarification or new rules from regulators in the future; regardless, it is important to always carefully consider the involvement of finders or broker-dealers in any capital-raising endeavor.

If you have any questions regarding the use of finders, or capital raising in general, please contact the Venable lawyer with whom you work, one of the authors of this article, or a member of our Corporate Finance and Securities Group.

SOURCE
https://www.venable.com/finders-and-unregistered-broker-dealers-12-04-2015/?utm_source=Mondaq&utm_medium=syndication&utm_campaign=View-Original

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