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Archive for the ‘Interviews with Scientific Leaders’ Category


Mechanism of Platelet Granule Release and its Role in Thrombus Formation: Lead Contributor to discoveries, Robert Flaumenhaft, MD, PhD, Division of Hemostasis and Thrombosis at BIDMC and Harvard Medical School

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

It is well known that platelets are crucial for stopping bleeding. Platelets prevent excessive posttraumatic blood loss at sites of vascular injury by forming a platelet plug. Upon exposure of the subendothelial extracellular matrix, platelets are recruited to the site of injury and become activated, resulting in firm adhesion and subsequent platelet aggregation. The molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of a hemostatic platelet plug are relatively well understood: upon exposure of the subendothelial matrix, platelets either interact directly with matrix proteins (eg, via glycoprotein VI [GPVI] and α2β1 to collagen) or bind to von Willebrand factor (VWF) that is deposited at the site of injury. Transient interactions between platelet GPIb and VWF support platelet tethering at sites of high shear stress. Firm adhesion and subsequent aggregation is mediated by activated integrin receptors such as αIIbβ3. G-protein–coupled receptors mediate activation signals after being triggered by soluble agonists such as thrombin, thromboxane A2, and adenosine 5′-diphosphate, which reinforce thrombus propagation.

SOURCE

Simon F. De Meyer

http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/129/12/1573?sso-checked=true

To address the role of platelet granule content in maintaining vascular integrity in inflammation, Deppermann et al generated Unc13d−/−/Nbeal2−/− mice.1 Platelets from these mice are unable to secrete their α- or dense-granule content. The authors used these mice in models of lung inflammation, skin inflammation, and brain infarction. Similar to previous studies, intradermal hemorrhage was observed in platelet-depleted wild-type (WT) mice at the site of inflammation. Strikingly, no bleeding was observed in the inflamed skin of Unc13d−/−/Nbeal2−/− mice. Analogous results were observed in lung inflammation. These experiments show that release of α or dense granules is not necessary to maintain vascular integrity at sites of acute inflammation in skin and lung. Much different results were however obtained in the stroke model used by the authors. Indeed, when subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, Unc13d−/−/Nbeal2−/− mice were prone to intracranial bleeding in the infarcted areas. Cerebral hemorrhage in these mice resulted in a significantly increased mortality compared with WT animals. In an elegant approach using platelet transfusion experiments, the authors showed that the observed effects of combined Munc13-4 and Nbeal deficiency were related to the platelet-specific secretion effects and not to potential defects in other cells.

SOURCE

Simon F. De Meyer

http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/129/12/1573?sso-checked=true

 

Procoagulant platelets: generation, function, and therapeutic targeting in thrombosis

Ejaife O. Agbani and Alastair W. Poole

Abstract

Current understanding of how platelets localize coagulation to wound sites has come mainly from studies of a subpopulation of activated platelets. In this review, we summarize data from the last 4 decades that have described these platelets with a range of descriptive titles and attributes. We identify striking overlaps in the reported characteristics of these platelets, which imply a single subpopulation of versatile platelets and thus suggest that their commonality requires unification of their description. We therefore propose the term procoagulant platelet as the unifying terminology. We discuss the agonist requirements and molecular drivers for the dramatic morphological transformation platelets undergo when becoming procoagulant. Finally, we provide perspectives on the biomarker potential of procoagulant platelets for thrombotic events as well as on the possible clinical benefits of inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase enzymes and the water channel Aquaporin-1 for targeting this subpopulation of platelets as antiprocoagulant antithrombotics.

SOURCE

http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/130/20/2171

Robert Flaumenhaft, MD, PhD – A Biography

https://www.bidmc.org/research/research-by-department/medicine/hemostasis-and-thrombosis/flaumenhaft-lab/biography

Most cited
 2009 Jul;23(4):177-89. doi: 10.1016/j.blre.2009.04.001. Epub 2009 May 17.

Platelet alpha-granules: basic biology and clinical correlates.

Abstract

alpha-Granules are essential to normal platelet activity. These unusual secretory granules derive their cargo from both regulated secretory and endocytotic pathways in megakaryocytes. Rare, inheritable defects of alpha-granule formation in mice and man have enabled identification of proteins that mediate cargo trafficking and alpha-granule formation. In platelets, alpha-granules fuse with the plasma membrane upon activation, releasing their cargo and increasing platelet surface area. The mechanisms that control alpha-granule membrane fusion have begun to be elucidated at the molecular level. SNAREs and SNARE accessory proteins that control alpha-granule secretion have been identified. Proteomic studies demonstrate that hundreds of bioactive proteins are released from alpha-granules. This breadth of proteins implies a versatile functionality. While initially known primarily for their participation in thrombosis and hemostasis, the role of alpha-granules in inflammation, atherosclerosis, antimicrobial host defense, wound healing, angiogenesis, and malignancy has become increasingly appreciated as the function of platelets in the pathophysiology of these processes has been defined. This review will consider the formation, release, and physiologic roles of alpha-granules with special emphasis on work performed over the last decade.

 

REFERENCES

 

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    Citations: 

    3 readers on Mendeley
  • Eriksson O, Chiu J, Hogg PJ, Atkinson JP, Liszewski MK, Flaumenhaft R, Furie B. Thiol isomerase ERp57 targets and modulates the lectin pathway of complement activation. J Biol Chem. 2019 Mar 29; 294(13):4878-4888. PMID: 30670593.

    Citations: 

    3 readers on Mendeley

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  • Bekendam RH, Iyu D, Passam F, Stopa JD, De Ceunynck K, Muse O, Bendapudi PK, Garnier CL, Gopal S, Crescence L, Chiu J, Furie B, Panicot-Dubois L, Hogg PJ, Dubois C, Flaumenhaft R. Protein disulfide isomerase regulation by nitric oxide maintains vascular quiescence and controls thrombus formation. J Thromb Haemost. 2018 Nov; 16(11):2322-2335. PMID: 30207066.

    Citations: 

    4 readers on Mendeley

     

  • Higgins SJ, De Ceunynck K, Kellum JA, Chen X, Gu X, Chaudhry SA, Schulman S, Libermann TA, Lu S, Shapiro NI, Christiani DC, Flaumenhaft R, Parikh SM. Tie2 protects the vasculature against thrombus formation in systemic inflammation. J Clin Invest. 2018 Apr 02; 128(4):1471-1484. PMID: 29360642.

    Citations: 5  

    33 readers on Mendeley
  • Sharda A, Flaumenhaft R. The life cycle of platelet granules. F1000Res. 2018; 7:236. PMID: 29560259.
  • De Ceunynck K, Peters CG, Jain A, Higgins SJ, Aisiku O, Fitch-Tewfik JL, Chaudhry SA, Dockendorff C, Parikh SM, Ingber DE, Flaumenhaft R. PAR1 agonists stimulate APC-like endothelial cytoprotection and confer resistance to thromboinflammatory injury. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 01 30; 115(5):E982-E991. PMID: 29343648.

    Citations: 

    19 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Signaling: The Big Picture. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2017 Oct; 37(10):1809-1811. PMID: 28954808.

    Fields:

  • Flaumenhaft R. Advances in vascular thiol isomerase function. Curr Opin Hematol. 2017 Sep; 24(5):439-445. PMID: 28598864.

    Citations: 

    6 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Jain A, Barrile R, van der Meer AD, Mammoto A, Mammoto T, De Ceunynck K, Aisiku O, Otieno MA, Louden CS, Hamilton GA, Flaumenhaft R, Ingber DE. Primary Human Lung Alveolus-on-a-chip Model of Intravascular Thrombosis for Assessment of Therapeutics. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2018 02; 103(2):332-340. PMID: 28516446.

    Citations: 13  

    83 readers on Mendeley

     

  • Flaumenhaft R, De Ceunynck K. Targeting PAR1: Now What? Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2017 08; 38(8):701-716. PMID: 28558960.

    Citations: 6  

    22 readers on Mendeley
    1 reader on CiteULike

     

    Translation:HumansAnimals

  • Stopa JD, Baker KM, Grover SP, Flaumenhaft R, Furie B. Kinetic-based trapping by intervening sequence variants of the active sites of protein-disulfide isomerase identifies platelet protein substrates. J Biol Chem. 2017 06 02; 292(22):9063-9074. PMID: 28364042.

    Citations: 3   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Stressed platelets ASK1 for a MAPK. Blood. 2017 03 02; 129(9):1066-1068. PMID: 28254824.

    Citations: 

    2 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Stopa JD, Neuberg D, Puligandla M, Furie B, Flaumenhaft R, Zwicker JI. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation. JCI Insight. 2017 01 12; 2(1):e89373. PMID: 28097231.

    Citations: 6  

    18 readers on Mendeley

     

  • Schiemer J, Bohm A, Lin L, Merrill-Skoloff G, Flaumenhaft R, Huang JS, Le Breton GC, Chishti AH. Ga13 Switch Region 2 Relieves Talin Autoinhibition to Activate aIIbß3 Integrin. J Biol Chem. 2016 Dec 23; 291(52):26598-26612. PMID: 27803165.

    Citations: 4  

    14 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Young platelets out-of-control. Thromb Haemost. 2016 10 28; 116(5):780. PMID: 27683761.

    Citations: 

    1 reader on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Atefi G, Aisiku O, Shapiro N, Hauser C, Dalle Lucca J, Flaumenhaft R, Tsokos GC. Complement Activation in Trauma Patients Alters Platelet Function. Shock. 2016 09; 46(3 Suppl 1):83-8. PMID: 27355402.

    Citations: 2  

    9 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Bekendam RH, Bendapudi PK, Lin L, Nag PP, Pu J, Kennedy DR, Feldenzer A, Chiu J, Cook KM, Furie B, Huang M, Hogg PJ, Flaumenhaft R. A substrate-driven allosteric switch that enhances PDI catalytic activity. Nat Commun. 2016 08 30; 7:12579.PMID: 27573496.

    Citations: 14  

    37 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. SERCAmnavigating calcium signaling in platelets. Blood. 2016 08 25; 128(8):1034-5. PMID: 27563149.

    Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Furie B. Vascular thiol isomerases. Blood. 2016 08 18; 128(7):893-901. PMID: 27357699.

    Citations: 8  

    28 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Gong L, Proulle V, Fang C, Hong Z, Lin Z, Liu M, Xue G, Yuan C, Lin L, Furie B, Flaumenhaft R, Andreasen P, Furie B, Huang M. A specific plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antagonist derived from inactivated urokinase. J Cell Mol Med. 2016 10; 20(10):1851-60. PMID: 27197780.

    Citations: 1  

    9 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Bekendam RH, Flaumenhaft R. Inhibition of Protein Disulfide Isomerase in Thrombosis. Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2016 Oct; 119 Suppl 3:42-48. PMID: 26919268.

    Citations: 3   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Probing for thiol isomerase activity in thrombi. J Thromb Haemost. 2016 05; 14(5):1067-9. PMID: 26854753.

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    Translation:Humans

  • Jain A, Graveline A, Waterhouse A, Vernet A, Flaumenhaft R, Ingber DE. A shear gradient-activated microfluidic device for automated monitoring of whole blood haemostasis and platelet function. Nat Commun. 2016 Jan 06; 7:10176. PMID: 26733371.

    Citations: 13  

    156 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Schulman S, Bendapudi P, Sharda A, Chen V, Bellido-Martin L, Jasuja R, Furie BC, Flaumenhaft R, Furie B. Extracellular Thiol Isomerases and Their Role in Thrombus Formation. Antioxid Redox Signal. 2016 Jan 01; 24(1):1-15. PMID: 26467859.

    Citations: 10  

    31 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Lin L, Gopal S, Sharda A, Passam F, Bowley SR, Stopa J, Xue G, Yuan C, Furie BC, Flaumenhaft R, Huang M, Furie B. Quercetin-3-rutinoside Inhibits Protein Disulfide Isomerase by Binding to Its b’x Domain. J Biol Chem. 2015 Sep 25; 290(39):23543-52. PMID: 26240139.

    Citations: 11   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. A new story ARC for a-granule formation. Blood. 2015 Jul 09; 126(2):123-4. PMID: 26160182.

    Citations: 

    6 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Koseoglu S, Peters CG, Fitch-Tewfik JL, Aisiku O, Danglot L, Galli T, Flaumenhaft R. VAMP-7 links granule exocytosis to actin reorganization during platelet activation. Blood. 2015 Jul 30; 126(5):651-60. PMID: 25999457.

    Citations: 13  

    38 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Sakurai Y, Fitch-Tewfik JL, Qiu Y, Ahn B, Myers DR, Tran R, Fay ME, Ding L, Spearman PW, Michelson AD, Flaumenhaft R, Lam WA. Platelet geometry sensing spatially regulates a-granule secretion to enable matrix self-deposition. Blood. 2015 Jul 23; 126(4):531-8. PMID: 25964667.

    Citations: 2   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Sharda A, Kim SH, Jasuja R, Gopal S, Flaumenhaft R, Furie BC, Furie B. Defective PDI release from platelets and endothelial cells impairs thrombus formation in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Blood. 2015 Mar 05; 125(10):1633-42. PMID: 25593336.

    Citations: 16   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Aisiku O, Peters CG, De Ceunynck K, Ghosh CC, Dilks JR, Fustolo-Gunnink SF, Huang M, Dockendorff C, Parikh SM, Flaumenhaft R. Parmodulins inhibit thrombus formation without inducing endothelial injury caused by vorapaxar. Blood. 2015 Mar 19; 125(12):1976-85. PMID: 25587041.

    Citations: 11   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Making (anti)sense of factor XI in thrombosis. N Engl J Med. 2015 Jan 15; 372(3):277-8. PMID: 25482334.

    Citations: 1  

    27 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:Humans

  • Flaumenhaft R. Thrombus formation reimagined. Blood. 2014 Sep 11; 124(11):1697-8. PMID: 25214193.

    Citations: 2   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimals

  • Flaumenhaft R, Furie B, Zwicker JI. Therapeutic implications of protein disulfide isomerase inhibition in thrombotic disease. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2015 Jan; 35(1):16-23. PMID: 25104801.

    Citations: 19  

    25 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Furie B, Flaumenhaft R. Thiol isomerases in thrombus formation. Circ Res. 2014 Mar 28; 114(7):1162-73. PMID: 24677236.

    Citations: 23  

    41 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Bioengineering in platelet biology. Thromb Res. 2014 Apr; 133(4):523-4. PMID: 24433610.

    Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Battinelli EM, Markens BA, Kulenthirarajan RA, Machlus KR, Flaumenhaft R, Italiano JE. Anticoagulation inhibits tumor cell-mediated release of platelet angiogenic proteins and diminishes platelet angiogenic response. Blood. 2014 Jan 02; 123(1):101-12. PMID: 24065244.

    Citations: 26   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Koseoglu S, Flaumenhaft R. Advances in platelet granule biology. Curr Opin Hematol. 2013 Sep; 20(5):464-71. PMID: 23839294.

    Citations: 19  

    40 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Fitch-Tewfik JL, Flaumenhaft R. Platelet granule exocytosis: a comparison with chromaffin cells. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2013; 4:77. PMID: 23805129.

    Citations: 9  

    65 readers on Mendeley

     

  • Flaumenhaft R. Protein disulfide isomerase as an antithrombotic target. Trends Cardiovasc Med. 2013 Oct; 23(7):264-8. PMID: 23541171.

    Citations: 10  

    20 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Koseoglu S, Dilks JR, Peters CG, Fitch-Tewfik JL, Fadel NA, Jasuja R, Italiano JE, Haynes CL, Flaumenhaft R. Dynamin-related protein-1 controls fusion pore dynamics during platelet granule exocytosis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2013 Mar; 33(3):481-8. PMID: 23288151.

    Citations: 12  

    36 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. a-granules: a story in the making. Blood. 2012 Dec 13; 120(25):4908-9. PMID: 23243155.

    Citations: 1  

    23 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Monitoring granule traffic in megakaryocytes. Blood. 2012 Nov 08; 120(19):3869-70. PMID: 23144159.

    Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Thon JN, Peters CG, Machlus KR, Aslam R, Rowley J, Macleod H, Devine MT, Fuchs TA, Weyrich AS, Semple JW, Flaumenhaft R, Italiano JE. T granules in human platelets function in TLR9 organization and signaling. J Cell Biol. 2012 Aug 20; 198(4):561-74. PMID: 22908309.

    Citations: 36  

    82 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Peters CG, Michelson AD, Flaumenhaft R. Granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading: differential sorting of a-granules expressing VAMP-7. Blood. 2012 Jul 05; 120(1):199-206. PMID: 22589474.

    Citations: 23   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Jasuja R, Passam FH, Kennedy DR, Kim SH, van Hessem L, Lin L, Bowley SR, Joshi SS, Dilks JR, Furie B, Furie BC, Flaumenhaft R. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibitors constitute a new class of antithrombotic agents. J Clin Invest. 2012 Jun; 122(6):2104-13. PMID: 22565308.

    Citations: 57  

    90 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Ashitate Y, Kim SH, Tanaka E, Henary M, Choi HS, Frangioni JV, Flaumenhaft R. Two-wavelength near-infrared fluorescence for the quantitation of drug antiplatelet effects in large animal model systems. J Vasc Surg. 2012 Jul; 56(1):171-80. PMID: 22503225.

    Citations: 9   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Dockendorff C, Aisiku O, Verplank L, Dilks JR, Smith DA, Gunnink SF, Dowal L, Negri J, Palmer M, Macpherson L, Schreiber SL, Flaumenhaft R. Discovery of 1,3-Diaminobenzenes as Selective Inhibitors of Platelet Activation at the PAR1 Receptor. ACS Med Chem Lett. 2012 Mar 08; 3(3):232-237. PMID: 22408714.

    Citations: 10  

    27 readers on Mendeley

     

  • Flaumenhaft R. Platelets get the message. Blood. 2011 Aug 18; 118(7):1712-3. PMID: 21852441.

    Citations: 1  

    17 readers on Mendeley

     

  • Dowal L, Yang W, Freeman MR, Steen H, Flaumenhaft R. Proteomic analysis of palmitoylated platelet proteins. Blood. 2011 Sep 29; 118(13):e62-73. PMID: 21813449.

    Citations: 34   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Nachtigall MJ, Jessel RH, Flaumenhaft R, Nachtigall R, Yoles I, Naftolin F, Nachtigall LE. The selective estrogen receptor modulator DT56a (Femarelle) does not affect platelet reactivity in normal or thrombophilic postmenopausal women. Menopause. 2011 Mar; 18(3):285-8. PMID: 21037489.

    Citations: 1   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Dowal L, Sim DS, Dilks JR, Blair P, Beaudry S, Denker BM, Koukos G, Kuliopulos A, Flaumenhaft R. Identification of an antithrombotic allosteric modulator that acts through helix 8 of PAR1. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Feb 15; 108(7):2951-6.PMID: 21282664.

    Citations: 25   Fields:

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Liu J, Gao BB, Clermont AC, Blair P, Chilcote TJ, Sinha S, Flaumenhaft R, Feener EP. Hyperglycemia-induced cerebral hematoma expansion is mediated by plasma kallikrein. Nat Med. 2011 Feb; 17(2):206-10. PMID: 21258336.

    Citations: 38  

    68 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:Animals

  • Flaumenhaft R. Filling a void in Gray Platelets. Blood. 2010 Dec 02; 116(23):4738-40. PMID: 21127182.

    Citations: 1   Fields:

  • Flaumenhaft R, Mairuhu AT, Italiano JE. Platelet- and megakaryocyte-derived microparticles. Semin Thromb Hemost. 2010 Nov; 36(8):881-7. PMID: 21049389.

    Citations: 10   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Italiano JE, Mairuhu AT, Flaumenhaft R. Clinical relevance of microparticles from platelets and megakaryocytes. Curr Opin Hematol. 2010 Nov; 17(6):578-84. PMID: 20739880.

    Citations: 56   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Woronowicz K, Dilks JR, Rozenvayn N, Dowal L, Blair PS, Peters CG, Woronowicz L, Flaumenhaft R. The platelet actin cytoskeleton associates with SNAREs and participates in alpha-granule secretion. Biochemistry. 2010 Jun 01; 49(21):4533-42.PMID: 20429610.

    Citations: 17   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Dowal L, Flaumenhaft R. Targeting platelet G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): looking beyond conventional GPCR antagonism. Curr Vasc Pharmacol. 2010 Mar; 8(2):140-54. PMID: 19485898.

    Citations: 8   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Getting in shape with RanBP10. Blood. 2009 Dec 24; 114(27):5412-3. PMID: 20035043.

    Citations: 1   Fields:

  • Tanaka E, Chen FY, Flaumenhaft R, Graham GJ, Laurence RG, Frangioni JV. Real-time assessment of cardiac perfusion, coronary angiography, and acute intravascular thrombi using dual-channel near-infrared fluorescence imaging. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2009 Jul; 138(1):133-40. PMID: 19577070.

    Citations: 24  

    26 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:Animals

  • Blair P, Flaumenhaft R. Platelet alpha-granules: basic biology and clinical correlates. Blood Rev. 2009 Jul; 23(4):177-89. PMID: 19450911.

    Citations: 144  

    352 readers on Mendeley
    2 readers on CiteULike

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Graham GJ, Ren Q, Dilks JR, Blair P, Whiteheart SW, Flaumenhaft R. Endobrevin/VAMP-8-dependent dense granule release mediates thrombus formation in vivo. Blood. 2009 Jul 30; 114(5):1083-90. PMID: 19395672.

    Citations: 34   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Nachtigall M, Lowenstein J, Nachtigall L, Nachtigall R, Nachtigall L. Association of oral but not transdermal estrogen therapy with enhanced platelet reactivity in a subset of postmenopausal women. Menopause. 2009 Mar-Apr; 16(2):407-12. PMID: 18989235.

    Citations: 2   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Dilks JR, Richardson J, Alden E, Patel-Hett SR, Battinelli E, Klement GL, Sola-Visner M, Italiano JE. Megakaryocyte-derived microparticles: direct visualization and distinction from platelet-derived microparticles. Blood. 2009 Jan 29; 113(5):1112-21. PMID: 18802008.

    Citations: 52  

    129 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Dilks JR. Discovery-based strategies for studying platelet function. Mini Rev Med Chem. 2008 Apr; 8(4):350-7.PMID: 18473926.

    Citations: 2   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Dilks JR, Flaumenhaft R. Fluoxetine (Prozac) augments platelet activation mediated through protease-activated receptors. J Thromb Haemost. 2008 Apr; 6(4):705-8. PMID: 18194419.

    Citations: 3   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Rozenvayn N, Feng D, Dvorak AM. SNAP-23 and syntaxin-2 localize to the extracellular surface of the platelet plasma membrane. Blood. 2007 Sep 01; 110(5):1492-501. PMID: 17485553.

    Citations: 5  

    38 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansCellsCT

  • Sim DS, Dilks JR, Flaumenhaft R. Platelets possess and require an active protein palmitoylation pathway for agonist-mediated activation and in vivo thrombus formation. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2007 Jun; 27(6):1478-85. PMID: 17303775.

    Citations: 12  

    24 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Tanaka E, Graham GJ, De Grand AM, Laurence RG, Hoshino K, Hajjar RJ, Frangioni JV. Localization and quantification of platelet-rich thrombi in large blood vessels with near-infrared fluorescence imaging. Circulation. 2007 Jan 02; 115(1):84-93. PMID: 17179017.

    Citations: 15  

    30 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Formation and fate of platelet microparticles. Blood Cells Mol Dis. 2006 Mar-Apr; 36(2):182-7. PMID: 16466949.

    Citations: 32   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Lo EH. Different strokes for rodent folks. Nat Methods. 2006 Feb; 3(2):79-80. PMID: 16432514.

    Citations: 1   Fields:

    Translation:Animals

  • Flaumenhaft R, Sim DS. Protein palmitoylation in signal transduction of hematopoietic cells. Hematology. 2005 Dec; 10(6):511-9.PMID: 16321817.

    Citations: 2   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • O’Connell DJ, Rozenvayn N, Flaumenhaft R. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate regulates activation-induced platelet microparticle formation. Biochemistry. 2005 Apr 26; 44(16):6361-70. PMID: 15835925.

    Citations: 5   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Sim D, Flaumenhaft R, Furie B, Furie B. Interactions of platelets, blood-borne tissue factor, and fibrin during arteriolar thrombus formation in vivo. Microcirculation. 2005 Apr-May; 12(3):301-11. PMID: 15814438.

    Citations: 9   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Dilks JR, Rozenvayn N, Monahan-Earley RA, Feng D, Dvorak AM. The actin cytoskeleton differentially regulates platelet alpha-granule and dense-granule secretion. Blood. 2005 May 15; 105(10):3879-87. PMID: 15671445.

    Citations: 29   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Falati S, Gross PL, Merrill-Skoloff G, Sim D, Flaumenhaft R, Celi A, Furie BC, Furie B. In vivo models of platelet function and thrombosis: study of real-time thrombus formation. Methods Mol Biol. 2004; 272:187-97. PMID: 15226545.

    Citations: 12   Fields:

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Platelet permeabilization. Methods Mol Biol. 2004; 273:365-78. PMID: 15308812.

    Citations: 1   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Sim DS, Merrill-Skoloff G, Furie BC, Furie B, Flaumenhaft R. Initial accumulation of platelets during arterial thrombus formation in vivo is inhibited by elevation of basal cAMP levels. Blood. 2004 Mar 15; 103(6):2127-34. PMID: 14645013.

    Citations: 20   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Sim DS. The platelet as a model for chemical genetics. Chem Biol. 2003 Jun; 10(6):481-6. PMID: 12837380.

    Citations: 2   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R. Molecular basis of platelet granule secretion. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2003 Jul 01; 23(7):1152-60. PMID: 12738684.

    Citations: 30   Fields:

    Translation:Cells

  • Lai KC, Flaumenhaft R. SNARE protein degradation upon platelet activation: calpain cleaves SNAP-23. J Cell Physiol. 2003 Feb; 194(2):206-14. PMID: 12494459.

    Citations: 5   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Celi A, Merrill-Skoloff G, Gross P, Falati S, Sim DS, Flaumenhaft R, Furie BC, Furie B. Thrombus formation: direct real-time observation and digital analysis of thrombus assembly in a living mouse by confocal and widefield intravital microscopy. J Thromb Haemost. 2003 Jan; 1(1):60-8. PMID: 12871540.

    Citations: 25   Fields:

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Rozenvayn N, Flaumenhaft R. Protein kinase C mediates translocation of type II phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase required for platelet alpha-granule secretion. J Biol Chem. 2003 Mar 07; 278(10):8126-34. PMID: 12509423.

    Citations: 8  

    17 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Feng D, Crane K, Rozenvayn N, Dvorak AM, Flaumenhaft R. Subcellular distribution of 3 functional platelet SNARE proteins: human cellubrevin, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 2. Blood. 2002 Jun 01; 99(11):4006-14. PMID: 12010801.

    Citations: 24   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Furie B, Furie BC, Flaumenhaft R. A journey with platelet P-selectin: the molecular basis of granule secretion, signalling and cell adhesion. Thromb Haemost. 2001 Jul; 86(1):214-21. PMID: 11487009.

    Citations: 33   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Rozenvayn N, Flaumenhaft R. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate mediates Ca2+-induced platelet alpha-granule secretion: evidence for type II phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase function. J Biol Chem. 2001 Jun 22; 276(25):22410-9. PMID: 11304526.

    Citations: 6   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Feng D, Flaumenhaft R, Bandeira-Melo C, Weller P, Dvorak A. Ultrastructural localization of vesicle-associated membrane protein(s) to specialized membrane structures in human pericytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, neutrophils, and eosinophils. J Histochem Cytochem. 2001 Mar; 49(3):293-304. PMID: 11181732.

    Citations: 12   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Yang J, Hirata T, Croce K, Merrill-Skoloff G, Tchernychev B, Williams E, Flaumenhaft R, Furie BC, Furie B. Targeted gene disruption demonstrates that P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) is required for P-selectin-mediated but not E-selectin-mediated neutrophil rolling and migration. J Exp Med. 1999 Dec 20; 190(12):1769-82. PMID: 10601352.

    Citations: 70  

    53 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Croce K, Flaumenhaft R, Rivers M, Furie B, Furie BC, Herman IM, Potter DA. Inhibition of calpain blocks platelet secretion, aggregation, and spreading. J Biol Chem. 1999 Dec 17; 274(51):36321-7. PMID: 10593923.

    Citations: 22   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Furie B, Furie BC. Alpha-granule secretion from alpha-toxin permeabilized, MgATP-exposed platelets is induced independently by H+ and Ca2+. J Cell Physiol. 1999 Apr; 179(1):1-10. PMID: 10082126.

    Citations: 4   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Croce K, Chen E, Furie B, Furie BC. Proteins of the exocytotic core complex mediate platelet alpha-granule secretion. Roles of vesicle-associated membrane protein, SNAP-23, and syntaxin 4. J Biol Chem. 1999 Jan 22; 274(4):2492-501. PMID: 9891020.

    Citations: 31   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCells

  • Thorpe CM, Flaumenhaft R, Hurley B, Jacewicz M, Acheson DW, Keusch GT. Shiga toxins do not directly stimulate alpha-granule secretion or enhance aggregation of human platelets. Acta Haematol. 1999; 102(1):51-5. PMID: 10473889.

    Citations: 4   Fields:

    Translation:HumansCellsCT

  • Flaumenhaft R, Abe M, Sato Y, Miyazono K, Harpel J, Heldin CH, Rifkin DB. Role of the latent TGF-beta binding protein in the activation of latent TGF-beta by co-cultures of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. J Cell Biol. 1993 Feb; 120(4):995-1002.PMID: 8432736.

    Citations: 46  

    35 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Kojima S, Abe M, Rifkin DB. Activation of latent transforming growth factor beta. Adv Pharmacol. 1993; 24:51-76. PMID: 8504067.

    Citations: 20   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimals

  • Flaumenhaft R, Rifkin DB. The extracellular regulation of growth factor action. Mol Biol Cell. 1992 Oct; 3(10):1057-65. PMID: 1421565.

    Citations: 32   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Abe M, Mignatti P, Rifkin DB. Basic fibroblast growth factor-induced activation of latent transforming growth factor beta in endothelial cells: regulation of plasminogen activator activity. J Cell Biol. 1992 Aug; 118(4):901-9. PMID: 1380001.

    Citations: 35  

    23 readers on Mendeley

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Rifkin DB. Cell density dependent effects of TGF-beta demonstrated by a plasminogen activator-based assay for TGF-beta. J Cell Physiol. 1992 Jul; 152(1):48-55. PMID: 1618922.

    Citations: 4   Fields:

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Rifkin DB. Extracellular matrix regulation of growth factor and protease activity. Curr Opin Cell Biol. 1991 Oct; 3(5):817-23. PMID: 1931082.

    Citations: 21   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Moscatelli D, Flaumenhaft R, Saksela O. Interaction of basic fibroblast growth factor with extracellular matrix and receptors. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991; 638:177-81. PMID: 1664684.

    Citations: 1   Fields:

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Rifkin DB, Moscatelli D, Flaumenhaft R, Sato Y, Saksela O, Tsuboi R. Mechanisms controlling the extracellular activity of basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991; 614:250-8. PMID: 2024887.

    Citations: 1   Fields:

    Translation:HumansAnimalsCells

  • Rifkin DB, Moscatelli D, Bizik J, Quarto N, Blei F, Dennis P, Flaumenhaft R, Mignatti P. Growth factor control of extracellular proteolysis. Cell Differ Dev. 1990 Dec 02; 32(3):313-8. PMID: 1711916.

    Citations: 15   Fields:

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Moscatelli D, Rifkin DB. Heparin and heparan sulfate increase the radius of diffusion and action of basic fibroblast growth factor. J Cell Biol. 1990 Oct; 111(4):1651-9. PMID: 2170425.

    Citations: 40  

    23 readers on Mendeley

     

    Translation:AnimalsCells

  • Flaumenhaft R, Moscatelli D, Saksela O, Rifkin DB. Role of extracellular matrix in the action of basic fibroblast growth factor: matrix as a source of growth factor for long-term stimulation of plasminogen activator production and DNA synthesis. J Cell Physiol. 1989 Jul; 140(1):75-81. PMID: 2738111.

    Citations: 32   Fields:

    Translation:AnimalsCells

SOURCE

https://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/profiles/display/Person/27465

https://www.bidmc.org/research/research-by-department/medicine/hemostasis-and-thrombosis/flaumenhaft-lab/research-interests

 

 

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Newly Elect President of Technion, Professor Uri Sivan: Key Contributions to Scientific Innovations

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

February 7, 2019
By: Office of the Technion Spokesperson

The Technion Council, headed by Mr. Gideon Frank, has elected Professor Uri Sivan of the Faculty of Physics as the next president of Technion. The Council’s decision was based on the recommendation of the Search Committee for the Technion President and received sweeping support from the Academic Assembly. The appointment is subject to the final approval of the International Board of Governors, which is set to convene in June.

Professor Uri Sivan

Prof. Sivan will commence his term as President of Technion on October 1 2019, and will replace the outgoing President Prof. Peretz Lavie, who will complete his term after a decade in office.

Prof. Sivan, 64, a resident of Haifa, is married and the father of three. He served as a pilot in the Israeli Air Force. He has a BSc in Physics and Mathematics, an MSc and PhD in Physics, all with honors from Tel Aviv University.

In 1991, after three years at IBM’s T. J. Watson Research Center in New York, Prof. Sivan joined the Faculty of Physics at Technion.

SOURCE

https://ats.org/news/professor-uri-sivan-elected-new-president-of-the-technion/

 

Key Contributions to Scientific Innovations

  • His research has covered a wide range of fields including quantum mesoscopic physics and the harnessing of molecular and cellular biology for the self-assembly of miniature electronic devices. Prof. Sivan, along with colleagues Profs. Erez Braun and Yoav Eichen, demonstrated for the first time how to harness molecular recognition by DNA molecules for wiring an electric circuit. This study gained considerable resonance and helped pave the way for a new field in nanotechnology using the self-assembly properties of biological molecules to construct miniature engineering systems.
  • His research has focused on the way water orders next to molecules and the effect of this ordering on inter-molecular interactions in biologically relevant solutions. Within this framework, Prof. Sivan’s group designs and builds unique, ultra-high-resolution atomic force microscopes.
  • His research has led to patents and industrial applications. Recently, an Israeli start-up company was established in the field of single cell analysis for cancer diagnostics, based on the technology developed in Prof. Sivan’s lab.
  •  Prof. Sivan is the founding director of the Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute (RBNI), which he headed between 2005 and 2010.  RBNI has led the scientific revolution in nanotechnology at Technion and has placed the university at the forefront of global research in the field. RBNI made headlines when Prof. Sivan and Dr. Ohad Zohar engraved the entire Hebrew Bible onto a tiny silicon chip. The Nano Bible was written as part of an educational program developed by the Institute to increase young people’s interest in science and especially in nanotechnology. In 2009, President Shimon Peres presented the Nano Bible to Pope Benedict XVI during his official visit to Israel. Today, there are three copies of the chip worldwide: at the Vatican Library, the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C., and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. The establishment of RBNI spearheaded the development of Israel’s national nanotechnology program, and together with centers established in other Israeli universities, has positioned the country as a world leader in nanotechnology.

APPOINTMENTS

Recently, Prof. Sivan was appointed to head the National Advisory Committee in Quantum Science and Technology of the Council for Higher Education’s Planning and Budgeting Committee (PBC). The committee outlined the national quantum academic program, which was adopted and launched last year.

Prof. Sivan has served as a member of the Israeli National Committee for Research and Development (MOLMOP) and the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Batsheva de Rothschild Foundation. He currently serves on the Advisory Committee of the Maof Fellowships Committee for advancing Arab faculty and is a member of the Israeli Wolfson Foundation Advisory Board.

AWARDS

Prof. Sivan is a renowned lecturer in Israel and abroad. He was awarded with numerous prizes including

  • the Mifal Hapais Landau Prize for the Sciences and Research,
  • the Rothschild Foundation Bruno Prize,
  • the Israel Academy of Sciences Bergmann Prize,
  • the Technion’s Hershel Rich Innovation Award, and
  • the Taub Award for Excellence in Research.

 

SOURCE

https://ats.org/news/professor-uri-sivan-elected-new-president-of-the-technion/

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@Amazon.com @pharma_BI BUNDLES for $274 #Patients #Voices #Precision #Medicine #Physiology #Genomics #Therapeutics #3D #BioPrinting: Series E: Volumes 1,2,3,4 by Editors:

Larry H Bernstein @bernstein_h  

Gail Thornton @GailThornt 

Aviva Lev-Ari @AVIVA1950 

 

Series E: Patient-Centered Medicine – LINKS to e-Books & Cover Pages for Volumes 1,2,3,4

 

  • Volume 1: The VOICES of Patients, Hospitals CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures. On Amazon.com  since 10/16/2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076HGB6MZ

  • Volume 2: Medical Scientific Discoveries for the 21st Century & Interviews with Scientific Leaders. On Amazon.com since12/9/2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078313281

 

 

  • Volume 3: Milestones in Physiology: Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics. On Amazon.com since 12/27/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019VH97LU

  • Volume 4: Medical 3D BioPrinting – The Revolution in Medicine, Technologies for Patient-centered Medicine: From R&D in Biologics to New Medical Devices. On Amazon.com  since 12/30/2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078QVDV2W

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Palmaz, Pinchuk, Schatz, Simpson and Yock are the 10th recipients of the Russ Prize for innovations leading to the widespread adoption of PCI at NAE Gala Ceremony, 2/20/2019, WashDC

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

National Academy of Engineering, Ohio University Award 2019 Russ Prize

Five interventional cardiologists awarded biennial $500,000 prize for innovations leading to the widespread adoption of PCI

National Academy of Engineering, Ohio University Award 2019 Russ Prize

January 3, 2019 — Ohio University and the National Academy of Engineering announced the 2019 Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize will be given to Julio Palmaz, Leonard Pinchuk, John Simpson, Richard Schatz and Paul Yock for innovations leading to the widespread adoption of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as angioplasty with stent or coronary angioplasty. The $500,000 biennial prize, which recognizes a bioengineering achievement that significantly improves the human condition, cites PCI for “seminal contributions to coronary angioplasty, enabling minimally invasive treatment of advanced coronary artery disease.”

“The Russ Prize recipients personify engineering creations that advance health and healthcare every day,” said NAE President C. D. Mote, Jr.  “The PCI makes a remarkable contribution to patient well-being, helping millions afflicted with advanced coronary artery disease and significant angina. “

Ohio University alumnus and esteemed engineer Fritz Russ, BSEE ’42, HON ‘75, and his wife, Dolores Russ, established the biennial prize in 1999 with a multimillion dollar gift to Ohio University. They modeled it after the Nobel Prize, with the goal of recognizing bioengineering achievements worldwide that are in widespread use.

“This innovation — truly, sets of innovations — enables the treatment of coronary artery disease without the complexities, cost and risk of open heart surgery. Most of us have a friend or relative who has benefited greatly from angioplasty treatment,” said Russ College Dean Dennis Irwin. “These contributions have truly improved the human condition. Rewarding such innovations was the Russes’ intent.”

Percutaneous coronary intervention, also referred to as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), is a minimally invasive procedure that uses a catheter to place a small structure called a stent to open up blood vessels in the heart that have been narrowed by plaque buildup. PCI improves blood flow, thus decreasing heart-related chest pain, making patients feel better and increasing their ability to be active. Ten of millions of patients have benefited from PCI worldwide, and this procedure has replaced or significantly delayed the need for open heart coronary bypass surgery.

Julio C. Palmaz, inventor of the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved balloon-expandable vascular stent (1990), is Ashbel Smith Professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio and scientific adviser of Vactronix Scientific. The Palmaz stent is on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. In 1994 he and Richard Schatz created a modified coronary stent — two Palmaz stents joined by a single connector — approved by the FDA as the first stent indicated for the treatment of failure of coronary balloon angioplasty. The Palmaz-Schatz stent became the gold standard for every subsequent stent submitted for FDA approval.

Leonard Pinchuk is an inventor and entrepreneur in biomedical engineering, with 128 U.S. patents and 90 publications. He has co-founded 10 companies where his major accomplishments include invention of the Nylon 12 angioplasty balloon, helical wire stent, modular stent-graft, a drug-eluting stent (Taxus), several biomaterials (Bionate and polystyrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene [SIBS]), a novel glaucoma tube (InnFocus MicroShunt), and the next-generation intraocular lens. He is a Distinguished Research Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Miami.

John Simpson has helped revolutionize the field of cardiology through innovations that fundamentally altered how physicians treat cardiovascular disease. In 1981 he created a new catheter system for coronary angioplasty with an independently steerable guidewire in the central lumen of the balloon catheter, patented as the over-the-wire balloon angioplasty catheter. He now focuses his efforts on the treatment of vascular disease through the development of new technologies combined with a new approach to optical imaging.

Read the related article “Requirements for Interventional Echocardiographers”

Richard Schatz is research director of cardiovascular interventions at the Scripps Heart, Lung and Vascular Center, and director of gene and stem cell therapy. He is a recognized international expert in interventional cardiology and has published and lectured extensively. His seminal work in coronary stents spurred a revolution in the treatment of coronary artery disease — over 2 million of them are placed annually worldwide, with an immeasurable impact on relieving mortality and morbidity, improving patients’ lives, and reducing healthcare costs.

Paul Yock is the Martha Meier Weiland Professor of Medicine and founding co-chair of Stanford’s Department of Bioengineering, with courtesy appointments in the Graduate School of Business and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He is also founder and director of the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign. He has authored over 300 peer-reviewed publications, chapters, and editorials and two textbooks, and holds over 50 U.S. patents. Yock is internationally known for his work in inventing, developing and testing new devices, including the Rapid Exchange stenting and balloon angioplasty system, which is now the primary system in use worldwide. He also invented the fundamental approach to intravascular ultrasound imaging and founded Cardiovascular Imaging Systems (CVIS), later acquired by Boston Scientific.

“Ohio University is honored to join the National Academy of Engineering in recognizing these accomplished individuals, who have contributed to a bioengineering advancement that has enabled better health for heart patients across the world,” said Ohio University President M. Duane Nellis. “Their multi-disciplinary collaboration that lead to the development of PCI, a technology that has revolutionized coronary health, truly embraces the vision that Fritz and Dolores Russ had when creating the Russ Prize.”

Palmaz, Pinchuk, Schatz, Simpson and Yock are the 10th recipients of the Russ Prize. They will receive the award at a National Academy of Engineering gala ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 20, 2019

For more information: www.nae.edu

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The Arrow Lecture Series on Ethics and Leadership @Stanford University

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Personal memories from attending the Decision Theory Colloquium @Stanford University, 1985 – 1988

The Colloquium was led by Prof. Kenneth Arrow, Economics, Prof. Amos Tversky, Psychology and Prof. Abernethy, Healthcare System expert at Graduate School of Business.

These years, I worked at SRI, International in Menlo Park, CA. The Monthly meetings were on WEDs at 4PM.

I learned a lot and was most privileged to be inspired by the Colloquium leaders, students, postdocs and to attend Prof. Kenneth Arrow Class on An Economics Approach to Information Theory in Fall 1988.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Decision+Theory+Colloquium+@Stanford+University,+led+by+Prof.+Kenneth+Arrow,+Economics,+Prof.+Amos+Tversky,+Psychology,&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi9tu6N1PLfAhXjYN8KHQ35BFIQsAR6BAgDEAE&biw=811&bih=380

 

Arrow Lectures

The Arrow Lecture Series on Ethics and Leadership honors the late Nobel Laureate Kenneth Arrow, the Joan Kenney Professor of Economics and Professor of Operations Research, Emeritus.

Professor Arrow made many contributions to welfare economics, social choice theory and collective decision-making. He was also a founding member of the Ethics in Society Undergraduate Honors program. Ken passed away in 2017.

Kenneth Arrow, one of the greatest economists of the twentieth century, died last month at the age of ninety-five. He was of the generation of economists whose ideas were formed by the dislocation and turmoil of the Great Depression and World War II, a generation that includes John Nash, Paul Samuelson, Harold Hotelling, and Milton Friedman. Now when so much of economics is straightjacketed by a failure to take account of ethical considerations, Arrow’s work demonstrates that economics is fundamentally a moral science. Whether tackling climate change, international security, healthcare provision, inequality, or racial prejudice, for Ken, economics was first and foremost a means to help improve human well-being. Indeed, his focus on well-being led him to consider the importance of trust and moral codes, as well as government regulations, for market behavior. Homo economicus cannot be out for himself alone. Read more of Debra Satz’s tribute to Ken.


In 2005, Patrick Byrne endowed the Arrow Lecture Series in Ethics and Leadership. Byrne is the founder and CEO of Internet retailer Overstock.com and he holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Stanford.

 

 

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Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director, NIH mourns NIAMS Director, Stephen Katz, M.D., Ph.D.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

December 20, 2018

Mourning the Loss of NIAMS Director Stephen Katz, M.D., Ph.D. – A Leader in Immunology of Skin Diseases

It is with a profoundly heavy heart that I share with you the sad news that we have lost one of our most beloved leaders at NIH. Steve Katz, M.D., Ph.D., the long-time Director of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), died early this morning after suffering a catastrophic stroke. Just yesterday he was working on a presentation for this morning’s Steering Committee, and now he is gone. I am still reeling from this sudden, tragic turn of events. But I want to reflect on who Steve was and what he meant to NIH, the biomedical research enterprise, and to me personally, as a close friend.

Steve was born in New York, grew up in Bethesda, trained in internal medicine and dermatology, and came to NIH in 1974 as a Senior Investigator in the Dermatology Branch at the National Cancer Institute, initiating a highly productive research program in the immunology of skin diseases. Six years later he was Branch Chief. And when a Director for NIAMS was sought in 1995, it was Steve who emerged as the ideal candidate. Over these years he has ably led an Institute that has made major contributions to research across a broad portfolio of disorders that affect millions of Americans. As just one example, it has been my personal privilege to work closely with him on the Accelerated Medicines Partnership (AMP) project that is shedding dramatic new light on the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Steve was also a remarkable nurturer of his staff, always striving to give them the credit for progress.

But I would claim that there is no Institute Director who has done more over the last two decades to help the entire NIH enterprise flourish. When Harold Varmus, Elias Zerhouni, Raynard Kington, Larry Tabak, or I needed someone to wrestle a difficult budget issue to the ground, we called Steve. When we needed someone to provide wise advice on a complex topic (most recently, Big Data), we called Steve. When we wanted someone to mentor to new member of NIH leadership, we called Steve. And he always said yes. His legacy is simply profound.

I am also fortunate to claim Steve as a friend. It was a gift to be in his orbit of wisdom, warmth, and humor. It was a joy to see how he immediately fell in love with a grandchild just a month ago. He was also a fellow musician, and he taught me a song that is now a favorite. There is a verse of this song (B’Shana Ha’ba’a) for which the words now seem particularly appropriate. Here they are in English, though Steve also taught me the Hebrew version:

Men have dreams, men have died
To make a bright tomorrow,
And their vision remains in our hearts.
Now the torch must be passed
With hope and not in sorrow,
And a promise to make a new start.

The torch has been passed. May we strive to live up to the example of dedication and wisdom set by our dear friend Steve, even as we convey our deep condolences to his wife Linda and his children.

With sorrow for our shared loss, but gratitude for Steve’s many gifts to us,

Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D.
Director

SOURCE

https://www.nih.gov/about-nih/who-we-are/nih-director/statements/mourning-loss-niams-director-stephen-katz-md-phd

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Science luminaries speak at Breakthrough Symposium – Livestream available

 

UPDATED on 11/7/2018

Angelika Amon wins 2019 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences

Four other MIT researchers to receive New Horizons Prizes in math and physics; two alumni win Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
October 17, 2018

Angelika Amon, an MIT professor of biology, is one of five scientists who will receive a 2019 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, given for transformative advances toward understanding living systems and extending human life.

Amon, the Kathleen and Curtis Marble Professor in Cancer Research and a member of MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, was honored for her work in determining the consequences of aneuploidy, an abnormal chromosome number that results from mis-segregation of chromosomes during cell division.

The award, announced this morning, comes with a $3 million prize.

“Angelika Amon is an outstanding choice to receive the Breakthrough Prize,” says Tyler Jacks, director of the Koch Institute and the David H. Koch Professor of Biology. “Her work on understanding how cells control the decisions to divide and the effects of imbalances in chromosome number has helped shape how we think about normal development and disease. Angelika is a fearless investigator and a true scientist’s scientist. All of us in the Koch Institute and across MIT are thrilled by this news.”

Two MIT alumni, Charles Kane PhD ’89 and Eugene Mele PhD ’78, both professors at the University of Pennsylvania, will share a Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. Kane and Mele are being recognized for their new ideas about topology and symmetry in physics, leading to the prediction of a new class of materials that conduct electricity only on their surface.

SOURCE

http://news.mit.edu/2018/angelika-amon-breakthrough-prize-life-sciences-1017

 

Complete List of 2019 Winners Breakthrough Prize

 

Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences Breakthrough Prize

  • C. Frank Bennett and Adrian R. Krainer – Ionis Pharmaceuticals and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
    Citation: For the development of an effective antisense oligonucleotide therapy for children with the neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy.
  • Angelika Amon – Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    Citation: For determining the consequences of aneuploidy, an abnormal chromosome number resulting from chromosome mis-segregation.
  • Xiaowei Zhuang – Harvard University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    Citation: For discovering hidden structures in cells by developing super-resolution imaging, a method that transcends the fundamental spatial resolution limit of light microscopy.
  • Zhijian “James” Chen – University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    Citation: For elucidating how DNA triggers immune and autoimmune responses from the interior of a cell through the discovery of the DNA-sensing enzyme cGAS.

Breakthrough Prize In Fundamental Physics

  • Charles Kane and Eugene Mele – University of Pennsylvania
    Citation: For new ideas about topology and symmetry in physics, leading to the prediction of a new class of materials that conduct electricity only on their surface.

Breakthrough Prize In Mathematics

  • Vincent Lafforgue – CNRS (National Center for Scientific Research, France) and Institut Fourier, Université Grenoble Alpes
    Citation: For ground breaking contributions to several areas of mathematics, in particular to the Langlands program in the function field case.

Special Breakthrough Prize In Fundamental Physics

  • Jocelyn Bell Burnell – University of Dundee and University of Oxford
    Citation: For fundamental contributions to the discovery of pulsars, and a lifetime of inspiring leadership in the scientific community.

 

Press Release From: Breakthrough Prize Foundation
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018

Winners of 2019 Breakthrough Prize Will Lead Discussions on Cutting-Edge Research with Inspiring TED-Style Talks

 

WHAT:          The 2019 Breakthrough Prize Symposium, held the day after the Breakthrough

Prize Awards ceremony, will feature both current and former laureates leading TED-style talks on cutting-edge science research initiatives and the significance and future of scientific discovery.

Topics include abnormal chromosomes and their role in cancer and potential use as a therapeutic target; exploring radio bursts and what’s going on in the stars; algebraic geometry and the Langlands Program; and discussing RNA splicing as a target for the next generation of precision medicines.

Dr. Jennifer Doudna, 2015 Breakthrough Prize Laureate and leader in the CRISPR revolution, will present “Recoding Life: The Future of Genome Editing.”

The event will conclude with three cross-disciplinary panel discussions between laureates past and present, about broad philosophical subjects around science and technology.  The topics of this year’s discussions include: ‘Is there (intelligent) life in the Universe?’; ‘What are the limits of science?’; and ‘Is time travel possible?’.

For a detailed schedule of the program, visit https://breakthroughprize2019.berkeley.edu/  

WHEN:        Monday, November 5, 2018

                     Pauley Ballroom, MLK Student Union

UC Berkeley

The presentations will be streamed live via YouTube (see program for URLs) and Facebook Live. 

Breakthrough Prize Laureate Talks

9:30AM – 5:00PM PST

Evening Cross-Disciplinary Panel

5:30PM – 7:00 PM PST

 

SCHEDULE

 

BREAKTHROUGH PRIZE LAUREATE TALKS

 (9:30AM – 5:00PM PST)

10:30 AM – Abnormal Chromosome Number: it’s Role in Cancer and Potential as a Therapeutic

Angelika Amon, 2019 Laureate

10:55 AM – Envisaging the Emergence of Quantum Topological Matter     

Charles Kane, 2019 Laureate

 

11:20 AM – Recoding Life: The Future of Genome Editing              

Jennifer Doudna, 2015 Laureate

11:45 AM – Some Open Problems in Algebraic Geometry and the Langlands Program

Vincent Lafforgue, 2019 Laureate

12:10 PM – RNA Splicing as a Target for the Next Generation of Precision Medicines       

Adrian R. Krainer, 2019 Laureate

1:35 PM – Biomaterials and How They Will Change our Lives        

Robert Langer, 2014 Laureate

2:00 PM – Imaging the Invisible in Living Organisms –– Current State of the Art and Future         

Xiaowei Zhuang, 2019 Laureate

2:25 PM – The Winding Road from Topological Insulators  

Gene Mele, 2019 Laureate

2:50 PM – Inflammation 2030 – Modern Disease Caused by an Old Flame 

James Chen, 2019 Laureate

3:45 PM – Seeking a Computer-free Proof of the 4-Color Theorem

Ian Agol, 2016 Laureate

4:10 PM – Genetic Medicines: Present and Future   

Frank Bennett, 2019 Laureate

5:00 PM – Radio Bursts!  What’s Going on Amongst the Stars?

Jocelyn Bell Burnell, 2018 Laureate

BREAKTHROUGH PRIZE PANEL DISCUSSIONS

(5:30 – 7:00PM PST)

Is there (intelligent) life in the Universe?

Featuring Jocelyn Bell, Astronomy, 2018 Laureate; John Hardy, Neuroscience, 2017 Laureate; and Kim Nasmyth, Molecular Biology, 2018 Laureate

Astronomers have been looking for life beyond Earth for decades, but have so far found nothing. But the recent discovery that almost all stars probably host planets may have changed the game. How likely are we to find primitive life? How hard is it to get from cells to brains? And why have we not seen evidence of civilizations?

What are the limits of science?

Featuring Andrei Linde, Theoretical Physics, Cosmology – 2012 Laureate; Gary Ruvkun, Molecular Biology, Genetics, 2015 Laureate; and  Xiaowei Zhuang, Biophysics, 2019 Laureate

 

Science has shown us a universe more and more distant from our familiar world: at microscopic and cosmic scales, at the dawn of time and remote stages of evolutionary history. But is this process limitless? What are the furthest and smallest physical and biological objects we can see? Can we ever know what happened at the moment of the Big Bang? And how far back can we retrace the origin of life on Earth?

Is time travel possible?

Nima Arkani-Hamed, Theoretical Physics, 2012 Laureate; Daniel Harlow, Theoretical Physics,  2019 Laureate; Daniel Jafferis, Theoretical Physics,  2019 Laureate; and Aron Wall, Theoretical Physics, 2019 Laureate

 

Time travel is a staple of science fiction, but how does mainstream science see it? Is it forbidden by the laws of physics? And if not, could it ever be a practical possibility? And do scientists even agree about what time is?

MEDIA OPPORTUNITIES: All events are free and open to the media, but seating is limited. Please RSVP to Kristen Bothwell /kbothwell@rubenstein.com / 212-843-9227; or Emily Gest / egest@rubenstein.com / 917-690-7823.

The Breakthrough Prize Symposium partners include Stanford University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley.

The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences honors transformative advances toward understanding living systems and extending human life. The Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics honors the world’s best mathematicians who have contributed to major advances in the field. The Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics recognizes major insights into the deepest questions of the Universe.

For more information on the Breakthrough Prize, visit https://breakthroughprize.org.

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SOURCE

http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=53322

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