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Archive for the ‘Cardiac and Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures’ Category


Tommy King Memorial Cardiovascular Symposium

Saturday CEUs in Boston, May 20

St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

Boston, MA

May 20

7:30am – 3pm

PROGRAM SCHEDULE & SESSIONS

07:30am | Registration & Continental Breakfast

08:00am | Hemodynamics; Faisal Khan, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

09:00am | Radiation Protection; Satish Nair, PhD, F.X. Masse Associates

10:00am | Break & Exhibits

10:15am | Structural Heart – TAVR Updates and Watchman

Joseph Carrozza, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

11:15am | Road to the Cath Lab — Triggers for STEMI Activation 

Lawrence Garcia, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

12:15pm | Lunch

01:00pm | HF Program including Cardiomems

Lana Tsao, MD & Jaclyn Mayer, NP, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

02:00pm | Cath Lab Pharmacology

Mirembe Reed, Pharm.D, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

Register now »

SOURCE

From: <acvp@getresponse.com> on behalf of “Kurt, ACVP” <kurt@acp-online.org>

Reply-To: <kurt@acp-online.org>

Date: Monday, April 24, 2017 at 2:26 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: cardiovascular symposium in Boston, May 20

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ACC 2017, 3/30/2017 – Poor Outcomes for Bioresorbable Stents in Small Coronary Arteries

 

WATCH VIDEO:

Bioresorbable Stent Comparable to Xience at Two Years, With Concerns

 

Stephen Ellis, M.D., professor of medicine and director of interventional cardiology at Cleveland Clinic, discusses the two year outcomes of the ABSORB III trial of Absorb vs. Xience. The late-breaking trial was presented at ACC 2017. Read the article on the ABSORB III results.  Watch a VIDEO with Gregg Stone, M.D., “Poor Outcomes for Bioresorbable Stents in Small Coronary Arteries.”

 

SOURCE

https://www.dicardiology.com/videos/video-bioresorbable-stent-comparable-xience-two-years-concerns

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Cheetah Medical Introduces New Algorithm for Fluid Management

Reporter: Lawrence J Mulligan, PhD

 

Cheetah Medical Advances the Science of Fluid Management

Cheetah Medical is the pioneer and leading global provider of 100% noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring technologies that are designed for use in critical care, OR and emergency department settings. The CHEETAH NICOM™ and STARLING™ SV technologies use a proprietary algorithm to calculate parameters related to the volume of blood and the functioning of patients’ circulatory systems. Medical professionals use this information to assess patients’ unique volume requirements, guide volume management decisions and maintain adequate organ perfusion. Cheetah Medical technologies are designed to enable more confident, informed therapy decisions that support clinical goals of improving patient outcomes and driving economic efficiencies.

NEWTON, Mass. –(BUSINESS WIRE)– Cheetah Medical announced today that its eighth abstract on fluid management will be presented at Society of Critical Care Medicine meeting in January. Building on previous work, this abstract demonstrates a strong association between large volume fluid administration in septic shock and increased risk of death in more than 23,000 patients.

Each year, millions of patients require hemodynamic monitoring to ensure optimal volume and perfusion management. While intravenous fluid is typical first-line therapy for many critical care situations, volume management has been a challenge for the healthcare community. It is often difficult for a clinician to know the right amount of fluid to administer to patients, and there are serious complications associated with both under and over resuscitation.

“Ever since we’ve been using intravenous fluid, clinicians have been asking, ‘What is the right amount?’” said Doug Hansell, MD and Cheetah’s Chief Physician Executive. “Today, with non-invasive Cheetah technology, we have new tools to answer this question, and we are learning that getting this question right is more important than ever.”

Cheetah Medical has been working with leading researchers using a large U.S. dataset to better understand the risks and benefits of fluid administration. During the past two years, researchers have now released eight clinical abstracts on the importance of fluid management.

  • FLUID ADMINISTRATION IN SEPSIS AND SEPTIC SHOCK – PATTERNS AND OUTCOMES: Sepsis and septic shock is a huge national priority, as it is the most expensive condition to treat, at $24 billion per year (AHRQ). This study identified a strong association between large fluid administration (more than five liters) and excess mortality in septic shock patients. As expected, sicker patients received more fluid. However, even after accounting for the severity of illness, these patients had an increased risk of dying. (Society of Critical Care Medicine Annual Conference, January 2017)
  • FLUID ADMINISTRATION IN OPEN AND LAPAROSCOPIC ABDOMINAL SURGERY: The study looked at the relationship between intraoperative fluid therapy and complications following abdominal surgery.Based on data from 18,633 patients, an increase in complications was found with day-of-surgery fluid use above five liters for open abdominal procedures. The study recommended individualized fluid therapy to reduce potentially negative effects from over/under resuscitation with intravenous fluids. (American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] 2016 Annual Meeting)
  • FLUID PRESCRIPTIONS IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS WITH RENAL FAILURE: The implication of volume resuscitation and potential complications among patients with acute kidney injuries (AKIs) has been widely debated. This study examined the relationship between fluid administration and outcomesamong 62,695 AKI patients. It found the potential for both under and over resuscitation in those who received treatments with vasopressors. A better understanding of individual fluid needs was seen for patients requiring pressor and mechanical ventilation support. (European Society of Intensive Care Medicine [ESICM] Annual Congress, 2016)
  • EFFECTS OF FLUIDS ADMINISTRATION IN PATIENTS WITH SEPTIC SHOCK WITH OR WITHOUT HEART FAILURE (HF): The study examined the relationship between indications of fluid overload in sepsis patients (with or without diastolic HF) and outcomes. For 29,098 patients, mortality was the highest among those who received the highest volumes of fluid. It also noted that patients with diagnosed diastolic HF received less fluids and exhibited a significantly lower mortality than predicted. These lower mortality rates could be a result of a more conservative fluid treatment strategy applied in patients known to be at risk for fluid overload. (American Thoracic Society [ATS] 2016 International Conference)
  • WIDE PRACTICE VARIABILITY IN FLUID RESUSCITATION OF CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS WITH ARDS: The study looked at how variable fluid resuscitation testing and treatments impacted the outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). An analysis of 1,052 patients highlighted a highly variable fluid resuscitation. The findings suggest a widespread variability in provider decision-making regarding fluid resuscitation, which may be detrimental to quality and costs, lowering the overall value of care. (American Thoracic Society [ATS] 2016 International Conference)
  • POTENTIAL HARM ASSOCIATED WITH SEVERITY-ADJUSTED TREATMENT VARIABILITY IN FLUID RESUSCITATION OF CRITICALLY ILL SEPTIC PATIENTS: The study set out to determine treatment variability for patients with severe sepsis and how it may impact mortality. Retrospectively analyzing 77,032 patients, a high degree of treatment variability was found for fluid resuscitation, with a range of 250 ml to more than 7L of fluid administered. For patients who received less fluid, there was no increased risk of mortality. In those who received the most fluid, there was a strong association with worse hospital mortality. (American Thoracic Society [ATS] 2016 International Conference)
  • ASSOCIATION OF FLUIDS AND OUTCOMES IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT PATIENTS HOSPITALIZED WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA (CAP): Analyzing 192,806 CAP patients, the study looked at the correlation between fluid-volume overload, hospital mortality and ventilator-free days (VFDs). A significant association was found between the amount of fluid administered on day one, increased mortality and decreased VFDs. The study may have also identified a subset of CAP patients who could benefit from a more restrictive fluid strategy. (36thInternational Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine)
  • FLUID ADMINISTRATION IN COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED SEPSISEXAMINATION OF A LARGE ADMINISTRATIVE DATABASE: The study looked at variation in fluid administration practices and compliance with “Surviving Sepsis” guidelines, which recommend a minimum initial fluid administration of 30cc/kg in sepsis-induced tissue hypoperfusion patients. It found that a substantial proportion of patients (47.4 %) with community-acquired sepsis received less than the recommended guidelines within the first 24 hours. (Society of Critical Care Medicine Annual Conference, 2016)

“We are very proud to have supported this work – we are advancing the science of fluid management and helping to improve our understanding of how better fluid management may improve patient outcomes,” said Chris Hutchison, CEO of Cheetah Medical.

 

SOURCE

https://www.cheetah-medical.com/cheetah-medical-advances-science-fluid-management/

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access On-line Scientific Journal includes the following:

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Edwards Lifesciences closes $690m a buy of Valtech Cardio and most of the heart valve repair technologies it’s developing

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Valtech’s  Cardioband device is designed to reshape the mitral valve using specially designed anchors, aka 

transcatheter structural heart disease technologies.

Valtech won CE Mark approval in the European Union for Cardioband in September 2015 but the device is not approved for the U.S. market.

Israel-based Valtech was the target of a previous takeover attempt by HeartWare International that was spiked early this year after a proxy war. (HeartWare itself was acquired by Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) for $1.1 billion in August.)

 

Deal Terms:

The deal, announced in November 2016, calls for $340 million in up-front cash and another $350 million in milestones over 10 years. It does not include Valtech Cardio’s trans-septal mitral valve replacement program; that business is slated to be spun out on its own before the buyout’s closing, expected in early 2017, but Edwards said last year that it’s due to keep an option to buy.

SOURCE

http://www.massdevice.com/edwards-lifesciences-closes-690m-valtech-cardio-buy/?utm_source=newsletter-170124&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter-170124&spMailingID=10291384&spUserID=MTU0MTAzNDg3OTA5S0&spJobID=1081981757&spReportId=MTA4MTk4MTc1NwS2

Edwards Lifesciences closes $690m Valtech Cardio buy

JANUARY 24, 2017 BY

EDWARDS LIFESCIENCES COMPLETES ACQUISITION OF VALTECH CARDIO
IRVINE, Calif., Jan. 23, 2017 – Edwards Lifesciences Corporation (NYSE: EW), the global leader in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical care monitoring, today announced that it has closed its acquisition of Valtech Cardio Ltd., a privately held company based in Israel and developer of the Cardioband System for transcatheter repair of the mitral and tricuspid valves. Edwards announced in November that it had signed an agreement to acquire Valtech.
Under the terms of the merger agreement, Edwards paid $340 million in stock and cash for Valtech at closing, subject to typical adjustments. In addition, there is the potential for up to $350 million in pre-specified milestone-driven payments over the next 10 years. Edwards’ financial guidance provided at its Investor Conference in December incorporated the expected financial impact of the transaction in 2017.
“We look forward to the Valtech team joining Edwards. We believe their knowledge, experience and the Cardioband technology are valuable additions to Edwards,” said Michael A. Mussallem, Edwards’ chairman and CEO. “This therapy has the potential to be a breakthrough structural heart therapy to help many patients in desperate need, and we look forward to gaining valuable insights from its commercial use in Europe.”
The Cardioband System is not approved for sale in the United States. The mitral application of the Cardioband System has received CE Mark in Europe.
About Edwards Lifesciences

Edwards Lifesciences, based in Irvine, Calif., is the global leader in patient-focused medical innovations for structural heart disease, as well as critical care and surgical monitoring. Driven by a passion to help patients, the company collaborates with the world’s leading clinicians and researchers to address unmet healthcare needs, working to improve patient outcomes and enhance lives. For more information, visit http://www.edwards.com and follow us on Twitter @EdwardsLifesci.
SOURCE

 

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University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland – A Prominent Center of Pediatric Research and Medicine

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich —  http://www.kispi.uzh.ch), in Switzerland, is the largest specialized, child and adolescent hospital in the country and one of the leading research centers for pediatric and youth medicine in Europe. The hospital, which has about 220 beds, numerous outpatient clinics, a day clinic, an interdisciplinary emergency room, and a specialized rehabilitation center, is a non-profit private institution that offers a comprehensive range of more than 40 medical sub-specializations, including heart conditions, bone marrow transplantation and burns. There are approximately 2,200 physicians, nurses, and other allied health care and administrative personnel employed at the hospital.

Just as important, the hospital houses the Children’s Research Center (CRC), the first research center in Switzerland that is solely dedicated to pediatric research, and is on par with the largest children’s clinics in the world. The research center provides a strong link between research and clinical experience to ensure that the latest scientific findings are made available to patients and implemented in life-saving therapies. By developing highly precise early diagnoses, innovative therapeutic approaches and effective new drugs, the researchers aim to provide a breakthrough in prevention, treatment and cure of common and, especially, rare diseases in children.

Several significant milestones have been reached over the past year. One important project under way is approval by the hospital management board and Zurich city council to construct a new building, projected to be completed in 2021. The new Children’s Hospital will constitute two main buildings; one building will house the hospital with around 200 beds, and the other building will house university research and teaching facilities.

In the ongoing quest for growing demands for quality, safety and efficiency that better serve patients and their families, the hospital management established a new role of Chief Operating Officer. This new position is responsible for the daily operation of the hospital, focusing on safety and clinical results, building a service culture and producing strong financial results. Greater emphasis on clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction and partnering with physicians, nurses, and other medical and administrative staff is all part of developing a thriving and lasting hospital culture.

Recently, the hospital’s Neurodermatitis Unit in cooperation with Christine Kuehne – Center for Allergy Research and Education (CK-Care), one of Europe’s largest private initiatives in the field of allergology, has won the “Interprofessionality Award” from the Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences.  This award highlights best practices among doctors, nurses and medical staff in organizations who work together to diagnose and treat the health and well-being of patients, especially children with atopic dermatitis and their families.

At the northern end of Lake Zurich and between the mountain summit of the Uetliberg and Zurichberg, Children’s Hospital is located in the center of the residential district of Hottingen.

 

childrens-hospital4childrens-hospital3childrens-hospital2childrens-hospital1

Image SOURCE: Photograph courtesy of Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland. Interior and exterior photographs of the hospital.

 

Below is my interview with Hospital Director and Chief Executive Officer Markus Malagoli, Ph.D., which occurred in December, 2016.

How do you keep the spirit of innovation alive? 

Dr. Malagoli: Innovation in an organization, such as the University Children’s Hospital, correlates to a large extent on the power to attract the best and most innovative medical team and administrative people. It is our hope that by providing our employees with the time and financial resources to undertake needed research projects, they will be opened to further academic perspectives. At first sight, this may seem to be an expensive opportunity. However, in the long run, we have significant research under way in key areas which benefits children ultimately. It also gives our hospital the competitive edge in providing quality care and helps us recruit the best physicians, nurses, therapists, social workers and administrative staff.

The Children’s Hospital Zurich is nationally and internationally positioned as highly specialized in the following areas:

  • Cardiology and cardiac surgery: pediatric cardiac center,
  • Neonatal and malformation surgery as well as fetal surgery,
  • Neurology and neurosurgery as well as neurorehabilitation,
  • Oncology, hematology and immunology as well as oncology and stem cell transplants,
  • Metabolic disorders and endocrinology as well as newborn screening, and
  • Combustion surgery and plastic reconstructive surgery.

We provide patients with our special medical expertise, as well as an expanded  knowledge and new insights into the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of diseases, accidents or deformities. We have more than 40 medical disciplines that cover the entire spectrum of pediatrics as well as child and youth surgery.

As an example, for many years, we have treated all congenital and acquired heart disease in children. Since 2004, specialized heart surgery and post-operative care in our cardiac intensive care unit have been carried out exclusively in our child-friendly hospital. A separate heart operation area was set up for this purpose. The children’s heart center also has a modern cardiac catheter laboratory for children and adolescents with all diagnostic and catheter-interventional therapeutic options. Heart-specific non-invasive diagnostic possibilities using MRI are available as well as a large cardiology clinic with approximately 4,500 outpatient consultations per year. In April 2013, a special ward only for cardiac patients was opened and our nursing staff is highly specialized in the care of children with heart problems.

In addition to the advanced medical diagnostics and treatment of children, we also believe in the importance of caring and supporting families of sick children with a focus on their psychosocial well-being. For this purpose, a team of specialized nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers are available. Occasionally, the children and their families need rehabilitation and we work with a team of specialists to plan and organize the best in-house or out-patient rehabilitation for the children and their families.

We also provide therapeutic, rehabilitation and social services that encompass nutritional advice, art and expression therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy, psychomotor therapy, a helpline for rare diseases, pastoral care, social counseling, and even hospital clowns. Our hospital teams work together to provide our patients with the best care so they are on the road to recovery in the fastest possible way.

What draws patients to Children’s Hospital?

Dr. Malagoli: Our hospital depends heavily on complex, interdisciplinary cases. For many diagnosis and treatments, our hospital is the last resort for children and adolescents in Switzerland and even across other countries. Our team is fully committed to the welfare of the patients they treat in order to deal with complex medical cases, such as diseases and disorders of the musculo-skeletal system and connective tissue, nervous system, respiratory system, digestive system, and ear, nose and throat, for example.

Most of our patients come from Switzerland and other cantons within the country, yet other patients come from as far away as Russia and the Middle East. Our hospital sees about 80,000 patients each year in the outpatient clinic for conditions, such as allergic pulmonary diseases, endocrinology and diabetology, hepatology, and gastroenterology; about 7,000 patients a year are seen for surgery; and about 37,000 patients a year are treated in the emergency ward.

We believe that parents are not visitors; they belong to the sick child’s healing, growth, and development. This guiding principle is a challenge for us, because we care not only for sick children, but also for their families, who may need personal or financial resources. Many of our services for parents, for example, are not paid by the Swiss health insurance and we depend strongly on funds from private institutions. We want to convey the feeling of security to children and adolescents of all ages and we involve the family in the recovery process.

What are the hospital’s strengths?

Dr. Malagoli: A special strength of our hospital is the interdisciplinary thinking of our teams. In addition to the interdisciplinary emergency and intensive care units, there are several internal institutionalized meetings, such as the uro-nephro-radiological conference on Mondays, the oncological conference and the gastroenterological meeting on Tuesdays,  and the pneumological case discussion on Wednesdays, where complex cases are discussed among our doctors. Foreign doctors are welcome to these meetings, and cases are also discussed at the appropriate external medical conferences.

Can you discuss some of the research projects under way at the Children’s Research Center (CRC)?

Dr. Malagoli: Our Children’s Research Center, the first research center in Switzerland focused on pediatric research, works closely with our hospital team. From basic research to clinical application, the hospital’s tasks in research and teaching is at the core of the Children’s Research Center for many young and established researchers and, ultimately, also for patients.

Our research projects focus on:

  • Behavior of the nervous, metabolic, cardiovascular and immune system in all stages of growth and development of the child’s condition,
  • Etiology (causes of disease) and treatment of genetic diseases,
  • Tissue engineering of the skin and skin care research: from a few cells of a child,  complex two-layered skin is produced in the laboratory for life-saving measures after severe burns and treatment of congenital anomalies of the skin,
  • Potential treatment approaches of the most severe infectious diseases, and
  • Cancer diseases of children and adolescents.

You are making great strides in diagnostic work in the areas of Hematology, Immumology, Infectiology and Oncology. Would you elaborate on this particular work that is taking place at the hospital?

Dr. Malagoli: The Department of Image Diagnostics handles radiological and ultrasonographic examinations, and the numerous specialist labs offer a complete  range of laboratory diagnostics.

The laboratory center makes an important contribution to the clarification and treatment of disorders of immune defense, blood and cancer, as well as infections of all kinds and severity. Our highly specialized laboratories offer a large number of analyzes which are necessary in the assessment of normal and pathological cell functions and take into account the specifics and requirements of growth and development in children and infants.

The lab center also participates in various clinical trials and research projects. This allows on-going validation and finally introducing the latest test methods.

The laboratory has been certified as ISO 9001 by the Swiss Government since 2002 and has met the quality management system requirements on meeting patient expectations and delivering customer satisfaction. The interdisciplinary cooperation and careful communication of the laboratory results are at the center of our activities. Within the scope of our quality assurance measures, we conduct internal quality controls on a regular basis and participate in external tests. Among other things, the work of the laboratory center is supervised by the cantonal medicine committee and Swissmedic organization.

Additionally, the Metabolism Laboratory  offers a wide variety of biochemical and molecular diagnostic analysis, including those for the following areas:

  • Disorders in glycogen and fructose metabolism,
  • Lysosomal disorders,
  • Disorders of biotin and vitamin B12 metabolism,
  • Urea cycle disorders and Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD),
  • Congenital disorders of protein glycosylation, and
  • Hereditary disorders of connective tissue, such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Marfan Syndrome.

Screening for newborn conditions is equally important. The Newborn Screening Laboratory examines all newborn children in Switzerland for congenital metabolic and hormonal diseases. Untreated, the diseases detected in the screening lead in most cases to serious damage to different organs, but especially to the development of the brain. Thanks to the newborn screening, the metabolic and hormonal diseases that are being sought can be investigated by means of modern methods shortly after birth. For this, only a few drops of blood are necessary, which are taken from the heel on the third or fourth day after birth. On a filter paper strip, these blood drops are sent to the laboratory of the Children’s Hospital Zurich, where they are examined for the following diseases:

  • Phenylketonuria (PKU),
  • Hypothyroidism,
  • MCAD deficiency,
  • Adrenogenital Syndrome (AGS),
  • Galactosemia,
  • Biotinide deficiency,
  • Cystic Fibrosis (CF),
  • Glutaraziduria Type 1 (GA-1), and
  • Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD).

Ongoing physician medical education and executive training is important for the overall well-being of the hospital. Would you describe the program and the courses?

Dr. Malagoli:  We place a high priority on medical education and training with a focus on children, youth, and their families. The various departments of the hospital offer regular specialist training courses for interested physicians at regular intervals. Training is available in the following areas:

  • Anesthesiology,
  • Surgery,
  • Developmental Pediatrics,
  • Cardiology,
  • Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry,
  • Neuropediatrics,
  • Oncology,
  • Pediatrics, and
  • Rehabilitation.

As a training hospital, we have built an extensive network or relationships with physicians in Switzerland as well as other parts of the world, who take part in our ongoing medical education opportunities that focus on specialized pediatrics and  pediatric surgery. Also, newly trained, young physicians who are in private practice or affiliated with other children’s hospitals often take part in our courses.

We also offer our hospital management and leaders from other organizations professional development in the areas of leadership or specialized competence training. We believe that all executives in leadership or management roles contribute significantly to our success and to a positive working climate. That is why we have developed crucial training in specific, work-related courses, including planning and communications skills, professional competence, and entrepreneurial development.

How is Children’s Hospital transforming health care? 

Dr. Malagoli: The close cooperation between doctors, nurses, therapists and social workers is a key success factor in transforming health care. We strive for comprehensive child care that does not only focus on somatic issues but also on psychological support for patients and their families and social re-integration. However, it becomes more and more difficult to finance all the necessary support services.

Many supportive services, for example, for parents and families of sick children are not paid by health insurance in Switzerland and we do not receive financial support from the Swiss Government. Since 2012, we have the Swiss Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) guidelines, a new tariff system for inpatient hospital services, that regulates costs for treatment in hospitals all over the country and those costs do not consider the amount of extra services we provide for parents and families as a children’s hospital. Those DRG principles mostly are for hospitals who treat adult patients.

Since you stepped into your role as CEO, how have you changed the way that you deliver health care?

Dr. Malagoli: I have definitely not reinvented health care! Giving my staff the space for individual development and the chance to realize their ideas is probably my main contribution to our success. Working with children is for many people motivating and enriching. We benefit from that, too. Moreover, we have managed to build up a culture of confidence and mutual respect – we call it the “Kispi-spirit”. “Kispi” as abbreviation of “Kinderspital.” Please visit our special recruiting site, which is www.kispi-spirit.ch.

I can think of a few examples where our doctors and medical teams have made a difference in the lives of our patients. Two of our physicians – PD (Privatdozent, a private university teacher) Dr. med. Alexander Moller and Dr. med. Florian Singer, Ph.D. – are involved in the development of new pulmonary functions tests which allow us to diagnose chronic lung diseases at an early stage in young children.

  • Often times, newly born babies have a lung disease but do not show any specific symptoms, such as coughing. One of these new tests measures lung function based on inhaling and exhaling pure oxygen, rather than using the standard spirometry test used in children and adults to assess how well an infant’s lungs work by measuring how much air they inhale, how much they exhale and how quickly they exhale. The new test is currently part of a clinical routine in children with cystic fibrosis as well as in clinical trials in Europe. The test is so successful that the European Respiratory Society presented Dr. med. Singer, Ph.D., with the ‘Pediatric Research Award’ in 2015.
  • Another significant research question among the pediatric pulmonary disease community is how asthma can be diagnosed reliably and at an earlier stage. PD Dr. med. Moller, chief physician of Pneumology at the hospital, has high hopes in a new way to measure exhaled air via mass spectrometry. If it succeeds, it will be able to evaluate changes in the lungs of asthmatics or help with more specific diagnoses of pneumonia.

In what ways have you built greater transparency, accountability and quality improvement for the benefit of patients?

Dr. Malagoli: Apart from the quality measures which are prescribed by Swiss law, we have decided not to strive for quality certifications and accreditations. We focus on outcome quality, record our results in quality registers and compare our outcome internationally with the best in class.

Our team of approximately 2,200 specialized physicians largely comes from Switzerland, although we have attracted a number of doctors from countries such as Germany, Portugal, Italy, Austria, and even Serbia, Turkey, Macedonia, Slovakia, and Croatia.

We recently conducted an employee satisfaction survey, which showed about 88 percent of employees were very satisfied or satisfied with their working conditions at the hospital and the job we are doing with patients and their families. This ranking is particularly gratifying for us as a service provider for the children and families we serve.

How does your volunteer program help families better deal with hospitalized children?

Dr. Malagoli: We have an enormous commitment from volunteers to care for hospitalized children and we are grateful to them. We offer our patients and their families child care, dog therapy, and even parenting by the Aladdin Foundation, a volunteer visiting service for hospitalized children to relieve parents and relatives and help young patients stay in hospital to recover quickly. The volunteers visit the child in the absence of the parents and are fully briefed on the child’s condition and care plan. The handling of care request usually takes no more than 24 hours and is free of charge. The assignments range from one-off visits to daily care for several weeks.

malagoli_m_905

Image SOURCE: Photograph of Hospital Director and Chief Executive Officer Markus Malagoli, Ph.D., courtesy of Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland.  

Markus Malagoli, Ph.D.
Director and Chief Executive Officer

Markus Malagoli, Ph.D., has been Hospital Director and Chief Executive Officer of the University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), since 2007.

Prior to his current role, Dr. Malagoli served as Chairman of Hospital Management and Head of Geriatrics of the Schaffhausen-Akutspital, the only public hospital in the Canton of Schaffhausen, from 2003 through 2007, where he was responsible for 10 departments, including surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, rheumatology/rehabilitation, throat and nose, eyes, radiology, anesthesia, hospital pharmacy and administration. The hospital employs approximately 1,000 physicians, nursing staff, other medical personal, as well as administration and operational services employees. On average, around 9,000 individuals are treated in the hospital yearly. Previously, he was Administrative Director at the Hospital from 1996 through 2003.

Dr. Malagoli began his career at Ciba-Geigy in 1985, spending 11 years in the company. He worked in Business Accounting in Basel, and a few years later, became Head of the Production Information System department in Basel. He then was transferred to Ciba-Geigy in South Africa as Controller/Treasurer and returned to Basel as Project Manager for the SAP Migration Project in Accounting.

Dr. Malagoli received his B.A. degree in Finance and Accounting and a Ph.D. in Business Administration at the University of St. Gallen.

He is a member of the Supervisory Board of Schaffhausen-Akutspital and President of the Ungarbühl in Schaffhausen, a dormitory for individuals with developmental impairments.

Editor’s note:

We would like to thank Manuela Frey, communications manager, University Children’s Hospital Zurich, for the help and support she provided during this interview.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich —  http://www.kispi.uzh.ch)

Other related articles

Retrieved from http://www.swisshealth.ch/en/patienten/spitaeler/Kispi.php

Retrieved from http://hospitals.webometrics.info/en/europe/switzerland%20

Retrieved from http://www.gruner.ch/en/projects/university-childrens-hospital-zurich

Retrieved from http://www.ebmt-swiss-ng.org/university-childrens-hospital-zurich.html

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2013

Risk Factor for Health Systems: High Turnover of Hospital CEOs and Visionary’s Role of Hospitals In 10 Years

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/08/risk-factor-for-health-systems-high-turnover-of-hospital-ceos-and-visionarys-role-of-hospitals-in-10-years/

Nation’s Biobanks: Academic institutions, Research institutes and Hospitals – vary by Collections Size, Types of Specimens and Applications: Regulations are Needed

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/26/nations-biobanks-academic-institutions-research-institutes-and-hospitals-vary-by-collections-size-types-of-specimens-and-applications-regulations-are-needed/

 

 

 

 

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First U.S. TAVR Patients Treated With Temporary Pacing Lead (Tempo Lead)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

BioTrace Medical, Inc., a venture backed company based in San Carlos, Calif., is dedicated to reinventing temporary pacing to improve patient outcomes and reduce hospital costs.

For more information: www.biotracemedical.com

 

FDA Clears Temporary Pacing Technology for Transcatheter Aortic Valve and EP Procedures

The BioTrace Medical Tempo temporary pacing lead is designed to reduce complications and hospital length of stay

The Tempo Lead represents the first major advance in temporary pacing since the technology was introduced decades ago,” said Susheel Kodali, M.D., director of the Heart Valve Program at the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy at Columbia University Medical Center in New York. “As a critical component of every TAVR procedure, temporary leads are integral to successful clinical outcomes for patients. I am excited about the potential of this technology and look forward to using it in my practice.”

Results of the first-in-human study of the technology will be presented at the annual Transcatheter Cardiac Therapeutics (TCT) conference in Washington, D.C. on Sunday, Oct. 30, at 10:59 a.m. eastern time in Room 209, Level 2.

“FDA clearance is an exciting milestone for BioTrace,” said Laura Dietch, CEO of BioTrace Medical. “We are pleased to bring this important innovation to the significant and growing number of patients needing better temporary pacing options to minimize risks and life-threatening complications. We look forward to launching in select U.S. centers in the coming weeks.”

For more information: www.biotracemedical.com

SOURCE

http://www.dicardiology.com/product/fda-clears-temporary-pacing-technology-transcatheter-aortic-valve-and-ep-procedures

December 19, 2016 — BioTrace Medical Inc. announced the first commercial use of the company’s Tempo Temporary Pacing Lead since U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance in October.

The first cases involved patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures and were performed by James Harkness, M.D., interventional cardiologist, and Brian K. Whisenant, M.D., medical director of the Structural Heart Disease Program at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Susheel Kodali, M.D., director of the Heart Valve Program at Columbia University Medical Center/New York Presbyterian Hospital.

BioTrace Medical’s Tempo Lead is for use in procedures in which

  • Temporary pacing is indicated, including
  • TAVR and
  • Electrophysiology (EP) procedures.

The lead is designed for secure and stable cardiac pacing with the goal of reducing complications and allowing patients to ambulate sooner after procedures.

“The Tempo Lead is designed to alleviate the risks associated with lead dislodgement and inconsistent pacing, providing a safer option for patients.”

Temporary leads are used in more than 350,000 procedures each year, a number that is growing rapidly as the population ages and TAVR becomes increasingly common. The temporary pacing lead, a small catheter with two electrodes, is placed in the right ventricle of the heart through a vein in the groin or neck. The lead is then connected to an external pacemaker allowing a physician to monitor and control a patient’s heart rate for several days.

SOURCE

http://www.dicardiology.com/content/first-us-tavr-patients-treated-temporary-pacing-lead?eid=333021707&bid=1620839

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2017 World Medical Innovation Forum: Cardiovascular, May 1-3, 2017, Partners HealthCare, Boston, at the Westin Hotel, Boston

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group will cover the event in REAL TIME

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN will be streaming live from the floor of the Westin Hotel in Boston on May 1-3, 2017

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

 

Biggest Voices in Cardiovascular Care

2017 World Medical Innovation Forum: Cardiovascular, May 1-3, 2017, Partners HealthCare, Boston, at the Westin Hotel, Boston

 

UPDATED on 3/29/2017

Partners Media Contact: Rich Copp

617-278-1031 rcopp@partners.org

REINVENTING CARDIOVASCULAR AND CARDIOMETABOLIC CARE FOCUS OF GLOBAL GATHERING

BOSTON — March 29, 2017 — Partners HealthCare, the nation’s largest academic research enterprise, today announced the third annual World Medical Innovation Forum, which will bring together nearly 1,000 international cardiovascular innovation decision-makers from industry, investment, clinical and research communities from May 1 to May 3, 2017 in Boston.

The focus of the Forum is the new technologies and systems that are transforming the largest market in healthcare. Keynoters include the CEOs of Amgen, Boston Scientific, Medtronic, Philips, Cardinal Health, Abiomed, Alnylam, Bard, Edwards, Medicines Company, Moderna, MyoKardia, Yumanity, Zoll, Boehringer Ingelheim, American Heart Association, GE Healthcare, Siemens Healthcare, and GE Ventures. They will be joined by top investors, the head of National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Gary Gibbons, MD, the former FDA commissioner, Robert Califf, MD, and key leaders from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. There will be more than 120 speakers in total—all experts from industry, government, the investment community and Harvard Medical School. World Forum attendees include senior executives, investors, entrepreneurs, clinicians and scientists.

“The Forum will highlight the remarkable convergence occurring across different industries around the redesign of cardiovascular care,” says Calum MacRae, MD, PhD, Chief of Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. “The outcomes of this cooperation between academia and industry will impact the lives of millions of patients worldwide.”

Over three days, the Forum will review in detail the emerging cardiovascular therapies, ’omics, digital diagnostics, education and engagement with new delivery platforms to that will become the model of care for cardiovascular and related metabolic diseases.

The Forum is co-chaired by MacRae and Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, Chief, Cardiology Division at Massachusetts General Hospital and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Academic speakers will include dozens of senior Harvard Medical School-appointed clinicians and investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital and Newton-Wellesley Hospital including the Presidents of all three hospitals.

“The changing spectrum of heart disease has produced new clinical needs, and marshaling an effective response will require cooperation among a diverse array of stakeholders. Technology, patient insights and clinical management have been combined to propel diagnosis, treatment and long term care into a new era,” said Anthony Rosenzweig, MD. “This global gathering of top cardiovascular leaders will catalyze new connections, conversations and thinking around these opportunities.”

Among the many features of the Forum is announcement of the “Disruptive Dozen,” the technologies likely to have the greatest impact on cardiovascular and cardiometabolic care in the next decade.

The Forum will kick off with 10-minute rapid-fire presentations by BWH and MGH early career Harvard faculty leaders describing the clinical potential of their work. Discovery Café workshops will follow, led by senior Harvard faculty addressing cutting-edge cardiovascular challenges.

The World Medical Innovation Forum is organized by Partners HealthCare Innovation, a division of Partners HealthCare dedicated to advancing the commercial application of the unique capabilities of Partners’ Harvard faculty.

Sponsors of the Forum include Boston Scientific, Amgen, Lilly, GE, Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Bard, Edwards Lifesciences, Mintz Levin, Medtronic and Novo Nordisk.

About the World Medical Innovation Forum

The World Medical Innovation Forum is a global gathering of senior corporate, investor and academic leaders. It was established to respond to the intensifying transformation of health care and its impact on innovation. The Forum is rooted in the belief that no matter the magnitude of that change, the center of health care needs to be a shared, fundamental commitment to collaborative innovation—industry and academia working together and its ability to improve patient lives.

For more information or to register, please go to www.worldmedicalinnovation.org.

About Partners HealthCare

Partners HealthCare is an integrated health system founded by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. The Partners system includes academic, community and specialty hospitals, a managed care organization, community health centers, a physician network, home health and long-term care services, and other health-related entities. Partners HealthCare is one of the nation’s leading biomedical research organizations and a principal teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School. Partners HealthCare is a non-profit organization.

###

Monday, May 1, 2017

 

7:00 am – 8:00 am
8:00 am – 11:30 am
First Look: The Next Wave of Cardiology Breakthroughs

Harvard Medical School investigators describe their most promising work in rapid fire presentations highlighting commercial opportunities in cardiovascular and cardiometabolic care. Twenty rising stars from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital will present in 10-minute sessions.

11:45 am – 1:15 pm
Concurrent Discovery Cafés Breakout Sessions: Sharing Perspectives

Top Cardiology faculty from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital address compelling topics in clinical research and implementation of care.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Cardiac Replacement Therapy: The Next Ten Years
  • Heart Failure: Back in The Game through New Pathways
  • Payment Models: Provider’s Perspective
  • Microbiome: Implications for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease
  • Molecular Imaging: New Biological Endpoints – Function Over Structure
  • Technology: Enhancing Translational Medicine

 

1:15 pm – 1:30 pm
1:30 pm – 1:40 pm
Opening Remarks
Introduction by: Anne Klibanski, MD
  • Chief Academic Officer, Partners HealthCare
  • Laurie Carrol Guthart Professor of Medicine, Academic Dean for Partners, Harvard Medical School
  • CEO, Partners HealthCare
1:40 pm – 2:15 pm
Reinventing Cardiac Care

Two renowned clinical leaders provide an overview of the medical and economic challenges that cardiovascular and cardiometabolic disorders present.

They will highlight strategic direction in cardiac research and clinical care at Partners, and address how recent trends in investment, regulation, and policy may be dovetailed with efforts at Partners.

The experts also spotlight for attendees the various therapies, diagnostics, devices, and critical issues that will be discussed throughout the upcoming 2.5 days of the World Medical Innovation Forum.

  • CEO, Southern Cross Biotech Consulting
  • Chief of Cardiovascular Medicinem Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Chief, Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
2:15 pm – 3:05 pm
CEO Roundtable: Today’s Learning, Tomorrow’s Opportunities

Discussion on contribution of technology innovation to the treatment of cardiovascular disease reflecting on lessons and how they shape investment decisions.

Moderator: Benjamin Pless
  • Executive in Residence, Partners HealthCare Innovation
  • EVP Medical Affairs and CMO, UnitedHealth Group
  • CEO, Abiomed
  • CEO, Edwards Lifesciences
  • CEO, Bard
3:05 pm – 3:55 pm
Tackling the AFib Epidemic

Evolving trends in diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of atrial fibrillation. Factors that will influence patient care over the next 5 years are considered, including risk stratification, procedure and technology options, and potential implications of CMS policies, such as bundling.

 

  • Associate Chief, Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital Heart Center
  • Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Director, Cardiac Arrhythmia Service, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School
  • VP, GM, AF Solutions, Medtronic
  • President, Cardiovascular and Neuromodulation, Abbott
  • VP US Medical Affairs, CVMD TA, AstraZeneca
3:55 pm – 4:45 pm
Heart Failure’s Therapeutic Mandate

One million patients are hospitalized annually for HF—80% of total US cost of HF management. After discharge from HF hospitalization, 24% are rehospitalized within 30 days, greater than 50% within 6 months. Perspective on disease management, addressing the issues of hospital readmission and optimizing therapies.

 

  • VP and Medical Director, Abbott
  • CEO, MyoKardia
  • SVP, CMO, Global Health Policy, Rhythm Management, Boston Scientific
4:45 pm – 5:50 pm
CLINICAL HIGHLIGHT: A New Chapter of PAD

PAD is the most challenging atherosclerotic syndrome, largely due to the technological challenges of managing peripheral artery disease through minimally invasive strategies. Top physician, governmental, and industry leaders in the field discuss the potential for new breakthroughs including novel implantable devices, pharmacologic approaches, and reductions in associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

The panel will also discuss, Below The Knee: The Persisting Unmet Need

 

Moderator: Michael Jaff, DO
  • President, Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Partners Healthcare
  • Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Director, Coverage and Analysis Group, CMS
  • Chief, Peripheral Interventional Devices Branch, Food and Drug Administration
  • CMO, Cardinal Health
  • Co-Director, Endovascular Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School
  • SVP and President, Peripheral Interventions, Boston Scientific
6:00 pm – 6:45 pm

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

 

7:00 am – 7:45 am
7:00 am – 7:45 am
FOCUS SESSION: Japan Today: Advancing Cardiometabolic Therapies

Discussion on unique aspects of cardiometabolic market in Japan, its projected trend over the next 5 years and explore transformative models of open innovation to accelerate development of new therapeutic options.

  • Yoshiro Miwa Associate Chair and Founding Director, Center for Interdisciplinary Cardiovascular Sciences, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
7:00 am – 7:10 am
Opening
  • Chief Innovation Officer, Partners HealthCare
8:00 am – 8:50 am
Pricing to Enable Affordability and Innovation

Balancing acceptable answers to high and escalating drug prices in the United States while making strides in medical innovation. Leaders in innovation, policy, care delivery, academia, and insurance discuss potential collaborative solutions.

 

Moderator: Peter Slavin, MD
  • President, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • CEO, Cardinal Health
  • CEO, Boehringer Ingelheim USA
8:50 am – 9:40 am
CLINICAL HIGHLIGHT: Emerging Devices for Complex Structural Heart Disease

Evolution of mitral disease management, current practice and impact of new technologies on both repair and replacement, implications of a heterogeneous patient population, triage, timing of intervention.

  • CVP, Advanced Technology, CSO, Edwards Lifesciences
  • SVP and President, Coronary & Structural Heart, Medtronic
9:40 am – 10:10 am
1:1 Fireside Chat: John Lechleiter, Chairman, Eli Lilly
Moderator: Susan Dentzer
  • CEO, Network for Excellence in Health Innovation
  • Chairman, Eli Lilly and Company
10:10 am – 10:25 am
10:25 am – 11:15 am
Personal Monitoring for Disease Management

Considering the evolving trends in viability and utilization and the opportunities wearables may present for real-world clinical decision making.

 

Moderator: Joe Kvedar, MD
  • VP, Connected Health, Partners HealthCare
  • Associate Professor of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School
  • CEO, GE Healthcare
  • CEO, Philips
  • CEO, Siemens Healthcare
  • CEO, Zoll Medical
11:15 am – 11:45 am
1:1 Fireside Chat: Omar Ishrak, CEO, Medtronic
Moderator: Paul LaViolette
  • Managing Partner & COO, SV Life Sciences Advisers
  • CEO, Medtronic
12:00 pm – 12:30 pm
12:15 pm – 12:30 pm
1:00 pm – 1:10 pm
1:10 pm – 2:00 pm
Global Clinical Trials: Next Generation Design and Scalability

Cardiovascular trials currently account for 10 percent of all clinical trial participants. Discussion on design and implementation of clinical studies globally, considering strategies for patient access, regulatory implications, cost containment and management of relationships with global service providers.

 

  • Chairman, TIMI Study Group, Lewis Dexter, MD Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • VP, Cardiovascular & Metabolic Disease Head, Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca
  • VP Cardiovascular Medicine, Covance
  • Vice President, Global Development, Amgen
2:00 pm – 2:50 pm
Precision Cardiovascular Medicine: What is Different This Time

Explore how precision medicine is changing the face of cardiovascular medicine specifically. The session will examine the impact of combined phenotypic and genotypic characterization on optimizing response to therapeutics, trial design, improving outcomes, and redefining reimbursement.

  • CEO, GE Ventures & healthymagination
2:50 pm – 3:40 pm
CV Investing in the Next Decade

View on investing landscape, opportunities in the CV/metabolic marketplace, the drugs, devices and diagnostics currently in pipelines and notable positive trends.

  • Partner, Atlas Venture
  • VP, Venture, Partners HealthCare
  • Managing General Partner, Frazier Healthcare Partners
3:40 pm – 4:30 pm
CLINICAL HIGHLIGHT: Optimizing Care for the 51%: New Market Opportunities

Introduction: Cathy Minehan, Chair, MGH Corporation

Address implications of gender as a key biological factor for personalized medicine. Stroke is likely to be the first cardiovascular event, tied to AF and secondarily to hypertension. Opportunities for medication utilization and optimization in context of, manifestation of disease and understanding the biology, complications, strategies to collect relevant clinical evidence, and treatment response.

  • CEO, American Heart Association
  • Medical Director, Boston Scientific
4:30 pm – 5:20 pm
Disruptive Therapeutic Platforms: New Tools, New Outcomes

Recent advances of biological drugs have broadened the scope of therapeutic targets for a variety of human diseases. This holds true for dozens of RNA-based therapeutics currently under clinical investigation for diseases including heart failure. These emerging drugs could be considered in context of genomic/germ line screening, family history and epigenetics.

Moderator: Tony Coles, MD
  • CEO, Yumanity Therapeutics
  • Founder, AnGes
5:20 pm – 6:00 pm

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

 

7:30 am – 7:55 am
1:1 Fireside Chat: Robert Califf, Commissioner (former), Food and Drug Administration
  • Chairman, Department of Medicine, Physician-in-Chief, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine, Soma Weiss, MD Distinguished Chair in Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Commissioner (former), Food and Drug Administration
7:55 am – 8:45 am
Innovation in Translational Trials

CV/metabolic disorders comprise aggregates of many niche diseases that may be targeted with therapies against specific molecular alterations, yet the final potential markets are much larger. This model creates challenges for both drug development and patient care with implications for initial indication selection and design and execution of clinical trials – from first-in-human through post marketing studies.

 

  • SVP, Global Head of Regenerative Medicine Unit, Head of Scientific Affairs, Japan, Takeda
  • CEO, Mirna Therapeutics
  • SVP, R&D Pipeline, GlaxoSmithKline
  • CMO, Verily
  • Senior Vice President & CSO, PAREXEL International
9:15 am – 10:05 am
New Targets in Coronary Artery Disease

Cardiovascular trials have a proud history of providing some of the most robust data in evidence-based medicine. However the growing size and complexity of these trials imperils their future. This panel will discuss the design and implementation of clinical studies globally, considering strategies for patient access, leveraging electronic health records and mobile device data, personalized medicine, regulatory implications, cost containment and management of relationships with global service providers.

  • Director, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • VP Research, Cardiometabolic Disorders Therapeutic Area Head, Site Head Amgen San Francisco, Amgen
  • Director, Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Eugene Braunwald Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
10:05 am – 10:25 am
10:25 am – 10:55 am
1:1 Fireside Chat: Gary Gibbons, NHLBI
Moderator: Betsy Nabel, MD
  • President, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Director, NHLBI
10:55 am – 11:45 am
The Skinny on Fat: Therapeutic Opportunities

Explore the evolving role of adipose tissue as an active endocrine organ and discuss the possibilities to discover novel signaling pathways relevant to cardiovascular health and viable druggable targets.

  • SVP and US Medical Leader, Eli Lilly and Company
  • SVP and CSO, CVMET, Pfizer
  • CEO, Zafgen
  • VP, Therapy Area, Cardiovascular & Metabolism, AstraZeneca
11:45 am – 12:45 pm
Disruptive Dozen: 12 Technologies that will reinvent Cardiovascular Care
  • Chief of Cardiovascular Medicinem Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

@@@@

Listen to some of the top CEOs in the cardiovascular industry discuss their latest innovations.

Forum keynoters will include the CEOs of Eli Lilly, Boston Scientific, Medtronic, Boehringer Ingelheim, Cardinal Health, Edwards Life Sciences, Abiomed, Bard, American Heart Association, GE Healthcare, Siemens Healthcare, the FDA Commissioner and dozens of top investors, emerging company CEOs, and senior Harvard faculty. Be part of the new urgency to redefine cardiovascular and cardiometabolic care – the largest market in healthcare – through new therapies, digital diagnostics, ‘omics, platforms and engagement.

To join fellow decision makers at the World Medical Innovation Forum, please follow the link to register: worldmedicalinnovation.org

 

 

John Lechleiter, PhD

CEO, Eli Lilly and Company

George Barrett

CEO, Cardinal Health

Robert Califf, MD

Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration

Michael Mussallem

CEO, Edwards LifeSciences

Tony Coles, MD

CEO, Yumanity Therapeutics

Nancy Brown

CEO, American Heart Association

Frans van Houten

CEO, Philips

Bernd Montag, PhD

CEO, Siemens Healthcare

Michael Minogue

CEO, Abiomed

Tamara Syrek Jensen

Director, Coverage and Analysis Group, CMS

Betsy Nabel, MD

President, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Richard Migliori, MD

EVP Medical Affairs and CMO, UnitedHealth Group

Jean-François Formela, MD

Partner, Atlas Venture

Patrick Vallance, MD, PhD

R&D President, GlaxoSmithKline

Tassos Gianakakos

CEO, MyoKardia

 

Michael Mahoney

CEO, Boston Scientific

Omar Ishrak, PhD

CEO, Medtronic

John Flannery

CEO, GE Healthcare

Timothy Ring

CEO, Bard

Jessica Mega, MD

CMO, Verily

Gary Gibbons, MD

Director, NHLBI

Sue Siegel

CEO, GE Ventures & healthymagination

Jonathan Rennert

CEO, ZOLL Medical

Paul Lammers, MD

CEO, Mirna Therapeutics

André-Michel Ballester, PhD

CEO, LivaNova

Paul Fonteyne

CEO, Boehringer Ingelheim USA

Paul LaViolette

Managing Partner and COO, SV Life Sciences Advisers

Ora Pescovitz, MD

SVP and US Medical Leader, Eli Lilly and Company

Jeff Mirviss

SVP and President, Peripheral Interventions, Boston Scientific

Fouzia Laghrissi-Thode, MD

VP, Therapy Area, Cardiovascular & Metabolism, AstraZeneca

 

 

Atherosclerosis

  • New Targets in Coronary Artery Disease
  • PAD: Improving Outcomes

Clinical Evidence & Care Pathway

  • Gender and Cardiovascular Disease
  • Global Clinical Trials: Next Generation Design and Scalability
  • Innovations in Cardiac Delivery
  • Innovation in Translational Trials

Innovation and Policy

  • Cardiovascular Innovation: Triumphs, Challenges, Opportunities
  • Pricing to Enable Affordability and Innovation
  • Regulatory Priorities: FDA Commissioner (invited)
  • Technology, Populations and Disease: CV Investing in the Next Decade

 

Heart Failure

  • Heart Failure: Back in the Game Through New Pathways

Metabolic Syndrome

  • Cardioprotective Effects of Metabolic Drugs
  • The Skinny on Fat: Therapeutic Opportunities

Modalities

  • Disruptive Therapeutic Platforms: From Nucleic Acid to Proteins
  • Personal Monitoring for Disease Management
  • Precision Cardiovascular Medicine: What is Different This Time?

Rhythm Disorders

  • A Cure for AFib: Drugs, Ablation or Lifestyle?

Structural Heart

  • Emerging Devices for Complex Structural Heart Disease

 

 

 

The 2017 World Medical Innovation Forum, May 1-3, 2017, will be held at the Westin Copley Place in Boston, Massachusetts.

Register Today.

Early bird discounts apply.

Sign up before December 31.

worldmedicalinnovation.org

For more information contact:

Chris Coburn

Chief Innovation Officer

Partners HealthCare

 

 

 

Partners HealthCare Innovation

Partners HealthCare

Add to Calendar

Contact Us

 

SOURCE

From: Partners HealthCare Innovation <innovations@partners.org>

Date: Wednesday, December 14, 2016 at 9:47 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Cardiovascular’s next chapter of innovation begins now.

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