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Archive for the ‘Tricuspid Valve Repair’ Category


Medical Devices Early Feasibility FDA’s Pathway – Accelerated Recruitment for Randomized Clinical Trials: Replacement and Repair of Mitral Valves

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

VIEW VIDEO

https://www.dicardiology.com/videos/video-update-mitral-valve-repair-and-replacement-technologies/5638263949001?eid=333021707&bid=1921231

 

 

HEART VALVE TECHNOLOGY | NOVEMBER 07, 2017

Ted Feldman, M.D., MSCAI FACC FESC, director of the cardiac cath lab, Evanston Hospital, explains the current state of transcatheter mitral valve technologies in development and in trials. He is involved in some of these trials and was the principal investigator for the pivotal MitraClip trial. Watch the VIDEO “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Technology, Anatomical Challenges” with Juan Granada, M.D.. Read the articles “Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves,” and “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement Devices in Development.”

  • MitraClip 
  • Cardioband

 

SOURCE

https://www.dicardiology.com/videos/video-update-mitral-valve-repair-and-replacement-technologies/5638263949001?eid=333021707&bid=1921231

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Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves – Mitral and tricuspid valve repair technologies now in development

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Based on

http://www.dicardiology.com/article/advances-and-future-directions-transcatheter-valves

 

Read the article “First TAVR Device Receives European Approval to Treat Intermediate Risk Patients”from August 2016.

Watch the video “The Evolution of TAVR Technology.” Interview with Juan Granada, M.D., executive director and chief scientific officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation’s Skirball Center for Innovation, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Watch the video “TAVR Beats Surgery — Top News From ACC.16.” Dr. Vinod Thourani, professor of surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and a co-investigator for the PARTNER II Trial, discusses the biggest news item from ACC.16 — the Sapien 3 TAVR device performed better that surgical aortic valve replacement.

Watch the video “CoreValve Trumps Surgical Valve Replacement — TVT 2015.” Interview with Michael Reardon, M.D., professor of cardiothoracic surgery at DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, and chairman of the patient screening committee, CoreValve U.S. pivotal trial, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Read the article “FDA Clears Sapien XT for Valve-In-Valve Procedures.”

Read the article “FDA Expands Use of CoreValve for Aortic Valve-in-Valve Replacement.”

Transcatheter Mitral Valves are the Next Frontier

Most interventional and cardiac surgical experts say TMVR will be the next frontier in minimally invasive structural heart interventions. With the success and rapid growth of TAVR, there is an immense anticipation that TMVR will have an even greater impact in cardiology. This has translated into more than $2.5 billion being spent in the past year by vendors purchasing start-up TMVR companies, while less than 50 patients have actually been treated using these technologies, said Michael Mack, M.D., medical director, cardiovascular surgery, Baylor Health Care System and chairman of The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano Research Center.

However, the mitral valve involves much more complex anatomy than the aortic valve, so the devices, imaging for procedural planning and guidance will be much more sophisticated than what is used for TAVR. Among the challenges are: fixation of a device to the very small landing zone of the mitral annulus; avoiding the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT); avoiding compression of the atrioventricular (AV) node; avoiding the papillary muscle and chordae tendineae; ensuring the device seals properly to avoid paravalvular regurgitation; and the device needs to be able to adapt to remodeling of the anatomy. There are more than 20 TMVR devices in development. The majority of these valves utilize a self-expanding nitinol frame that engages both sides of the native mitral valve annulus for fixation, similar to Amplatzer septal closure devices.

The companies with first-in-human TMVR implants include Tendyne, Neovasc and Edwards Lifesciences’ Fortis and Sapien XT devices. The Neovasc Tiara, Tendyne Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve and CardiAQ Valve Technologies TMVR system all have been granted FDA conditional investigational device exemption (IDE) studies.

Watch the video “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Therapies in Development.” 

Watch the video “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Technologies.” An interview with Ted Feldman, M.D., FACC, MSCAI, FESC, cardiac cath lab director, Evanston Hospital, North Shore Health System, and principle investigator, Everest II MitraClip U.S. pivotal trial, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Advancements in TAVR and TMVR Technologies at TCT 2016 

Watch the video VIDEO “Transcatheter Valve Technology Advancements at TCT 2016.” This is an interview Torsten Vahl, M.D., about advancements in transcatheter valve repair technology, including new devices for the aortic, mitral and tricuspid valves. Vahl is director of experimental and translational research and assistant professor of medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy.

Watch the video “VIDEO: Transcatheter Mitral Valve Technology, Anatomical Challenges.” A discussion with Juan Granada, M.D., about transcatheter mitral valve advancements and device challenges at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2016 annual meeting. Granada is executive director and chief scientific officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation’s Skirball Center for Innovation.

SOURCE

FEATURE | HEART VALVE TECHNOLOGY | NOVEMBER 12, 2015| DAVE FORNELL

Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves – Mitral and tricuspid valve repair technologies now in development

http://www.dicardiology.com/article/advances-and-future-directions-transcatheter-valves

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Journal include the following:

 

Mitral Valve Repair: Who is a Patient Candidate for a Non-Ablative Fully Non-Invasive Procedure?

Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/04/mitral-valve-repair-who-is-a-candidate-for-a-non-ablative-fully-non-invasive-procedure/

 

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Hadassah Opens Israel’s First Heart Valve Disease Clinic

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

WEDNESDAY, NOV 30 2016

“Until recently, the default treatment for valve disease has been open heart surgery to replace the damaged valve or valves.”

The Hadassah Medical Organization has opened Israel’s first Heart Valve Disease Clinic, which is geared toward detecting and treating the most complicated cases of heart valve disease–a growing problem in an aging population.

Until recently, the default treatment for valve disease has been open heart surgery to replace the damaged valve or valves. Currently, these invasive procedures are often superseded by less invasive cardiac catheterizations. In any case, however, efficiently treating valve disease and minimizing life-threatening risk factors such as heart attack remains an ongoing struggle for cardiovascular specialists.

As Prof. Ronen Beeri, head of Hadassah’s Cardiovascular Research Center, explains: “A ‘cardio team’ is needed to treat a patient suffering from heart valve disease. The time from referral to our Heart Institute to receive treatment from the relevant specialist can sometimes take months. Generally, patients with complex issues cannot afford to wait that long. The multidisciplinary cardio team solution at our new Clinic will help streamline the process so that a patient will receive all the necessary echocardiograms and other exams needed to diagnose and begin treatment within a week’s time.”

SOURCE

http://www.hadassah.org/news-stories/heart-valve-disease.html

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First-in-Man Mitral Valve Repairs Device used for Tricuspid Valve Repair: Cardioband used by University Hospital Zurich Heart Team

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

University Hospital Zurich Heart Team First to Perform Tricuspid Valve Repair with Cardioband

Device has traditionally been used for mitral valve repairs

Cardioband, first tricuspid valve repair, University Hospital Zurich, Francesco Maisano

October 10, 2016 — Francesco Maisano, clinic director at the University Hospital Zurich, recently led a team of cardiac surgeons and cardiologists in for the first time repairing a leaky tricuspid valve using a new catheter technology.

Maisano, who is also director of the Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery at USZ, co-director of the University Heart Center and professor at the University of Zurich, began using the Cardioband in Switzerland for repair of the mitral valve. Now he and his team have succeeded in an application at a leaky tricuspid a 75-year-old patient. The patient is doing well.

The device has been used previously as a patient-friendly method of repairing a leaking mitral valve in the left heart. It is the minimally invasive alternative to open-heart surgery. Maisano was instrumental in the development of Cardioband, which can be gathered with the help of the leaky valve ring and contracted. For this, the band is placed using a catheter around the valve ring (annulus), and is fixed there by small screws and contracted with a wire, so that the flap closes again tightly.

The tricuspid valve separates the right atrium from the right chamber of the heart. A tricuspid regurgitation, i.e. an insufficient performance of the door, can cause serious symptoms. The backflow of blood into the ventricle and in the veins occur and can cause elevated pressure. This can result in problems in the legs and in the abdomen and liver damage. Also, atrial fibrillation may be associated with the consequences of tricuspid regurgitation. The current treatment of insufficiency of the tricuspid valve consisted of a surgical open-heart surgery using a heart-lung machine.

Maisano explained the advantages of the new Cardioband method: “Since the insufficiency of this heart valve is often created as the result of mitral valve disease, open-heart surgery is often risky surgery. The use of the Cardioband minimally invasive therapy without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass protects the patient and reduces the risk.”

For more information: www.valtechcardio.com

SOURCE

http://www.dicardiology.com/content/university-hospital-zurich-heart-team-first-perform-tricuspid-valve-repair-cardioband?eid=333021707&bid=1554809

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