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Archive for the ‘Aortic Valve: TAVR, TAVI vs Open Heart Surgery’ Category


Comparison between balloon-expandable (Sapien XT or Sapien 3 valve, Edwards Lifesciences) vs self-expanding (CoreValve, Medtronic) TAVR from 2013 to 2015, Results: Lower mortality rate and other advantages with balloon-expandable valves over self-expanding valves.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

French Studies Point to Inherent Differences in TAVR Valves

FRANCE-TAVI database was funded and managed by the French Society of Cardiology and French Working Group of Interventional Cardiology. Edwards Lifesciences and Medtronic partly funded the registry, but had no role in data collection, analysis, or manuscript drafting. Van Belle, Dehara, Abdel-Wahab, and Thiele report no relevant conflicts of interest.

Circulation. Published online November 16, 2019. AbstractAbstractEditorial

American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2019; presented November 16, 2019.

Follow Patrice Wendling on Twitter: @pwendl. For more from theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology, join us on Twitter and Facebook.

Patrice Wendling

November 25, 2019

The coprimary end point of at least moderate paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) at discharge and/or in-hospital mortality was more common with a self-expanding (SE) valve than with a balloon-expandable (BE) valve (19.8% vs 11.9%; relative risk [RR], 1.68). This related to nearly twofold more PVR (15.5% vs 8.3%; RR, 1.90) and a 1.4% absolute mortality difference (5.6% vs 4.2%; RR, 1.33).

Need for a permanent pacemaker (22.3% vs 11.0%; P < .0001) and a second transcatheter heart valve (3.7% vs 1.0%; P < .0001) was more frequent with SE valves.

Patients receiving an SE valve also had higher rates of myocardial infarction (0.4% vs 0.2%; P = .02) but had a lower mean transprosthetic gradient than those receiving a BE valve (7 vs 10; P < .0001).

At 2 years, use of a self-expanding valve was associated with a higher risk for all-cause mortality (29.8% vs 26.6%; hazard ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.06 – 1.28) and cardiovascular death (23.3% vs 20.9%; P = .001). This is explained by a 36% excess risk for death during the first 3 months (= .0001), with the two mortality curves remaining parallel thereafter, Van Belle said.

The findings were consistent across subgroups, although the difference in the primary composite end point was stronger for those who received transfemoral TAVR and for those treated at the end of the study in 2015.

On multivariable analysis, independent predictors of all-cause mortality were valve design and PVR severity, according to the study, simultaneously published online in Circulation.

Limitations include the use of observational data, potential unmeasured residual confounders, site-reported PVR grading and clinical events (except mortality), and a lack of newer valve designs, Van Belle said.

“The present study strongly supports conducting a randomized trial in order to compare head-to-head the most recent iterations of SE and BE THVs on all-cause mortality,” he concluded.

The study, he said, “points out, if nothing else, that perhaps there is an inherent difference between the TAVR valves. It may be incorrect to assume it is a class effect.”

A second propensity-matched analysis, also published online in Circulation but not presented at AHA, used the nationwide French administrative hospital-discharge database to compare 10,459 matched pairs who underwent TAVR with the balloon-expandable Sapien 3 or self-expanding Evolut R (Medtronic) valve from 2014 to 2018.

Over a mean follow-up of 358 days, use of the BE vs the SE valve was associated with a lower yearly incidence of all-cause death (rate ratio, 0.88; corrected P = .005), cardiovascular death (rate ratio, 0.82; corrected P = .002), and rehospitalization for heart failure (rate ratio, 0.84; corrected P < .0001).

Pacemaker implantation was also lower with the balloon-expandable valve (rate ratio, 0.72; corrected < .0001), Pierre Deharo, MD, PhD, CHU Timone, Marseille, France, and colleagues report.

In an editorial accompanying the two analyses, Mohamed Abdel-Wahab, MD, and Holger Thiele, MD, both with the Heart Center Leipzig at the University of Leipzig, Germany, praised the authors for reporting what is currently the largest published dataset comparing the two valve designs. The limitations of registry-based analyses, however, are “obvious, and the findings should therefore be considered thought-provoking but by no means definite.”

SOURCE

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/921791?nlid=132763_3866&src=WNL_mdplsfeat_191126_mscpedit_card&uac=93761AJ&spon=2&impID=2182575&faf=1

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following 73 articles:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=TAVR

 

 

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Post TAVR: Management of conduction disturbances and number of valve recapture and/or repositioning attempts – Optimize self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) positioning reduced the need for permanent pacemaker (PPM) implants down the road

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

  • The PPM rate dropped from 9.7% to 3.0% (P=0.035), according to a team led by Hasan Jilaihawi, MD, of NYU Langone Health in New York City.
  • the PARTNER 3 and CoreValve Low Risk trials in patients at low surgical risk showed PPM implant rates of 17.4% with the Evolut line, 6.6% with the balloon-expandable Sapien 3, and 4.1%-6.1% with surgery.

 

  • “The His bundle passes through the membranous septum, a few millimeters beneath the non-coronary/right coronary cusps. It is therefore not surprising that a deeper valve implantation increases the likelihood of mechanical damage of the His bundle leading to a transient or persistent conduction disturbance,” according to Rodés-Cabau.

To capture factors that contributed to need for PPM implantation, Jilaihawi and colleagues performed a detailed restrospective analysis on 248 consecutive Evolut recipients at Langone treated with the standard TAVR approach — aiming for 3-4 mm implant depth (in relation to the non-coronary cusp) and recapturing and repositioning when the device landed considerably lower. Patients with prior PPM implantation were excluded. Devices used were Medtronic’s Evolut R, Evolut Pro, and Evolut 34XL.

This analysis revealed that use of the large Evolut 34XL (OR 4.96, 95% CI 1.68-14.63) and implant depth exceeding membranous septum length (OR 8.04, 95% CI 2.58-25.04) were independent predictors of later PPM implantation.

From there, operators came up with the MIDAS technique and applied it prospectively to another 100 consecutive patients.

Besides bringing down the PPM implant rate to 3.0%, there were no more cases of valve embolization, dislocation, or need for a second valve.

The standard and MIDAS groups shared similar membranous septum lengths but diverged in average actual device depth, such that the standard group tended to have Evolut devices positioned deeper (3.3 mm vs 2.3 mm, P<0.001).

SOURCE

https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/pci/81849

 

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Mitralign and Corvia, Tewksbury, Mass – Investment and Acquisition by Edwards Lifesciences

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Edwards LifesciencesEdwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) said today that it made a pair of strategic bets on the structural heart space, paying $35 million for the right to acquire Corvia Medical and paying an unspecified amount for some of mitral valve repair device maker Mitralign‘s assets.

Tewksbury, Mass.-based Corvia is developing an interatrial shunt to treat heart failure by creating a small opening between the left and right atria to lower blood pressure in the left atrium and lungs. The device has CE Mark approval in the European Union and a pivotal U.S trial aimed at winning a nod from the FDA is under way, Edwards said.

“We are extremely pleased to have the support of the global leader in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease as we continue to advance this novel treatment for heart failure,” Corvia president & CEO George Fazio said in prepared remarks. “We are proud of our accomplishments to date and look forward to completing the pivotal study with the support of our global clinical investigators.”

The Irvine, Calif.-based company also said it bought “certain” Mitralign assets, including intellectual property and associated clinical and regulatory experience. Mitralign, also based in Tewksbury, is developing an annuloplasty system for treating functional mitral and tricuspid regurgitation.

Edwards said the transactions are not expected to affect its financial outlook for 2019.

SOURCE

https://www.massdevice.com/edwards-lifesciences-gets-in-on-corvia-mitralign/?spMailingID=1958&puid=370787

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Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

This article appeared on the website of Cardiovascular Business

‘Patient No. 1’ from a Hep C heart transplant study shares his story

By the time three transplant physicians approached Tom Giangiulio Jr. about being the first patient in a new clinical trial to accept a heart from a Hepatitis C-positive donor, Giangiulio didn’t have much of a choice.

He had already been on the heart transplant waitlist for more than two years, he was a live-in at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and he had a body size (6-foot-2, 220 pounds) and blood type (O-positive) that was difficult to match to a donor.

It took Giangiulio less than 24 hours to speak to his previous cardiologist and his family and decide to enroll in the program. The doctors at Penn explained to him that because of new medications that can cure Hepatitis C, they were confident the virus could be eradicated post-transplant.

“There was no hesitation at all, not with me,” said Carin Giangiulio, Tom’s wife of 33 years. “Because I knew what the alternative was and we didn’t have too much choice except for going on a VAD (ventricular assist device) … and he didn’t want to do that. I said, ‘If they have a cure, then it’s a no-brainer. Let’s just do it.’ And I’m glad we did because I don’t think he would’ve been here today.”

Tom, 59, is set to celebrate his second anniversary with his new heart in June. He received the heart the day after Father’s Day in 2017 and subsequently contracted Hepatitis C, which was promptly wiped out with a 12-week regimen of elbasvir/grazoprevir (Zepatier).

Some of Giangiulio’s doctors at Penn published in February their experience with the first 10 patients in the clinical trial, called USHER, in the American Journal of Transplantation. All nine patients who survived were cured of Hepatitis C thanks to the antiviral therapy.

The implications of the research are massive, said Rhondalyn McLean, MD, MHS, the medical director of Penn’s heart transplant program and lead author of the recently published study. For the past two decades, the U.S. has struggled to increase the number of heart transplants above about 3,000 per year. And every year, patients die waiting for a heart transplant or become too sick to handle a transplant surgery.

McLean estimated 700 hearts from donors with Hepatitis C are discarded each year in the U.S. If even half of those are suitable for transplant, it would increase by 10 percent the number of organs that are available for implantation.

“There are so many people who have end-stage heart failure who die waiting for transplant, so anytime that we can increase our access to organs then I think we’re all going to be happy about that,” McLean said. “I think the people believe in the medicine, they believe that Hepatitis C is curable, so the risk to these folks is low. With the results of the study, I think we’ve proven that we can do this safely and the medications have great efficacy.”

Transplanting Hepatitis C-positive hearts isn’t a new idea, McLean explained.

“We used to do this all the time (with) the thinking that Hepatitis C usually doesn’t cause a problem for many, many years, so if hearts are only going to last 13 years or so and Hepatitis C doesn’t usually cause a problem for 30 years in someone, it should be an OK thing to do,” she said.

But then a study published in the 1990s found Hepatitis C-negative patients who accepted a heart from a donor with Hepatitis C actually had an increased risk of death compared to those who received normal hearts, and the practice of using these organs ceased.

However, with the new medications—the first commercially available treatment for Hepatitis C was approved by the FDA in 2014—McLean and her team are systematically studying the safety of implanting these hearts and then wiping out the virus once it’s contracted. And they’re optimistic about the program, which showed the first 10 patients had no evidence of the virus after their 12-week medication regimens.

“That met the criteria for sustained virologic response and those patients are deemed to be cured,” she said. “There’s no reason to think that this population would be any different than your normal, nontransplant population (in terms of Hepatitis C reappearing) so I think it was a pretty successful study.”

Penn researchers are also studying a similar approach in kidney and lung transplant candidates, which could help patients stuck on waitlists for those organs as well.

McLean described the increasing availability of these organs as an “unfortunate benefit” of the opioid epidemic. Through sharing needles, many opioid users are contracting Hepatitis C and dying young. Organs from young donors tend to perform better and often have no other problems, so solving the Hep C issue through medication could have a huge impact if this strategy is eventually rolled out on a broader scale.

“It’s hard when you have single-center studies,” McLean said. “They’re always promising, but in order to get a better assessment of what we’re doing and how the drug is doing I think you need to combine numbers so there has to be a registry that looks at all of the patients who have received these drugs and then using numbers to determine whether this is a successful strategy for us. And I believe that it will be.”

Those are the large-scale implications of this research. Tom Giangiulio can share the personal side.

Patient No. 1

Giangiulio said he feels “extremely gifted” to be Patient No. 1 in the USHER program. He knows he may not be alive if he wasn’t.

He recalls going into ventricular tachycardia about a week before his transplant and said it “scared the daylights” out of him.

“The amount of red tape, meetings and research, technology, and things that had to happen at a very precise moment in time for me to be the first … it’s mind-boggling to think about it,” he said. “But for all that to happen and for it to happen when it happened—and for me to get the heart when I got it—there was a lot of divine intervention along with a lot of people that were involved.”

Giangiulio has also experienced some powerful moments since receiving the transplant. After a bit of written correspondence with his donor’s family, he met the young man’s family one weekend in December of 2018.

He said riding over to the meeting was probably the most tense he’s ever been, but once he arrived the experience far exceeded his expectations.

“We were there for 2 ½ hours and nobody wanted to leave,” Giangiulio said.

The donor’s mother got Giangiulio a gift, a ceramic heart with a photograph of her son. A fellow transplant patient had told Giangiulio about a product called Enso, a kidney-shaped object you can hold in your hand which plays a recording of a user’s heartbeat.

Giangiulio decided to give it to her.

“I was very cautious at the advice of the people here at Penn,” he said. “Nobody knew how she would react to it. It might bother her, she could be thrilled to death. And she was, she was thrilled to death with it and she sleeps with it every night. She boots up the app and she listens to my heartbeat on that app every night.”

Another moment that sticks out to Giangiulio is meeting Patient No. 7 in the USHER program, who he remains in touch with. They ran into each other while waiting to get blood work done, and began talking about their shared experience as transplant recipients.

The clinical trial came up and Giangiulio slow-played his involvement, asking Patient No. 7 about the trial and not letting on that he was ultra-familiar with the program.

When Giangiulio finally told him he was Patient No. 1, Patient No. 7 “came launching out of his chair” to hug him.

“He said, ‘I owe you my life,’” Giangiulio recalled.

After Giangiulio responded that it was the doctors he really owed, Patient No. 7 said he had specifically asked how Patient No. 1 was doing when McLean first offered the program to him.

“She explained that I was going to be No. 7. … I didn’t care about 6, 5, 4, 3 or 2. I wanted to know how No. 1 was doing,” Giangiulio recalled of the conversation. “He said, ‘That was you. … They told me how well you were doing and that if I wanted you’d come here and talk to me, so I owe you.’”

Giangiulio feels strongly about giving back and reciprocating the good fortune he’s had. That’s why he talks to fellow patients and the media to share his story—because it could save other people’s lives, too.

He can’t do as much physical labor as he used to, but he remains involved in the excavating company he owns with his brothers and is the Emergency Management Coordinator for Waterford Township, New Jersey. He also serves on the township’s planning board and was previously Director of Public Safety.

“To me, he’s Superman,” Carin Giangiulio said. “It was insane, completely insane what the human body can endure and still survive.”

That now includes being given a heart with Hepatitis C and then wiping out the virus with the help of modern medicine.

“I would tell (other transplant candidates) to not fear it, especially if you’re here at Penn,” Giangiulio said. “I know there’s a lot of good hospitals across the country, but my loyalty kind of lies here for understandable reasons.”

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

2016

People with blood type O have been reported to be protected from coronary heart disease, cancer, and have lower cholesterol levels.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/11/people-with-blood-type-o-have-been-reported-to-be-protected-from-coronary-heart-disease-cancer-and-have-lower-cholesterol-levels/

2015

A Patient’s Perspective: On Open Heart Surgery from Diagnosis and Intervention to Recovery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/05/10/a-patients-perspective-on-open-heart-surgery-from-diagnosis-and-intervention-to-recovery/

No evidence to change current transfusion practices for adults undergoing complex cardiac surgery: RECESS evaluated 1,098 cardiac surgery patients received red blood cell units stored for short or long periods

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/08/no-evidence-to-change-current-transfusion-practices-for-adults-undergoing-complex-cardiac-surgery-recess-evaluated-1098-cardiac-surgery-patients-received-red-blood-cell-units-stored-for-short-or-lon/

2013

ACC/AHA Guidelines for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/05/accaha-guidelines-for-coronary-artery-bypass-graft-surgery/

On Devices and On Algorithms: Arrhythmia after Cardiac SurgeryPrediction and ECG Prediction of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Onset

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/07/on-devices-and-on-algorithms-arrhythmia-after-cardiac-surgery-prediction-and-ecg-prediction-of-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation-onset/

 

Editor’s note:

I wish to encourage the e-Reader of this Interview to consider reading and comparing the experiences of other Open Heart Surgery Patients, voicing their private-life episodes in the ER that are included in this recently published volume, The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/11/21/the-voices-of-patients-hospital-ceos-health-care-providers-caregivers-and-families-personal-experience-with-critical-care-and-invasive-medical-procedures/

 

I also wish to encourage the e-Reader to consider, if interested, reviewing additional e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases from the same Publisher, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, on Amazon.com.

  • Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms, on Amazon since 6/2/12013

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

  • Cardiovascular, Volume Two: Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation, on Amazon since 11/30/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q5MCN8

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Three: Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics, on Amazon since 11/29/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four: Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutics Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases, on Amazon since 12/26/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A

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Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement (SAVR) vs Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): Results Comparison for Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch (PPM) – adjusted outcomes, including mortality, heart failure (HF) rehospitalization, stroke, and quality of life, at 1 year

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 11/27/2018

Journal of the American College of Cardiology

5-Year Outcomes of Self-Expanding Transcatheter Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients

Abstract

Background The CoreValve U.S. Pivotal High Risk Trial was the first randomized trial to show superior 1-year mortality of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) among high operative mortality–risk patients.

Objectives The authors sought to compare TAVR to SAVR for mid-term 5-year outcomes of safety, performance, and durability.

Methods Surgical high-risk patients were randomized (1:1) to TAVR with the self-expanding bioprosthesis or SAVR. VARC-1 (Valve Academic Research Consortium I) definitions were applied. Severe hemodynamic structural valve deterioration was defined as a mean gradient ≥40 mm Hg or a change in gradient ≥20 mm Hg or new severe aortic regurgitation. Five-year follow-up was planned.

Results A total of 797 patients were randomized at 45 U.S. centers, of whom 750 underwent an attempted implant (TAVR = 391, SAVR = 359). The overall mean age was 83 years, and the STS score was 7.4%. All-cause mortality rates at 5 years were 55.3% for TAVR and 55.4% for SAVR. Subgroup analysis showed no differences in mortality. Major stroke rates were 12.3% for TAVR and 13.2% for SAVR. Mean aortic valve gradients were 7.1 ± 3.6 mm Hg for TAVR and 10.9 ± 5.7 mm Hg for SAVR. No clinically significant valve thrombosis was observed. Freedom from severe SVD was 99.2% for TAVR and 98.3% for SAVR (p = 0.32), and freedom from valve reintervention was 97.0% for TAVR and 98.9% for SAVR (p = 0.04). A permanent pacemaker was implanted in 33.0% of TAVR and 19.8% of SAVR patients at 5 years.

Conclusions This study shows similar mid-term survival and stroke rates in high-risk patients following TAVR or SAVR. Severe structural valve deterioration and valve reinterventions were uncommon. (Safety and Efficacy Study of the Medtronic CoreValve® System in the Treatment of Symptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis in High Risk and Very High Risk Subjects Who Need Aortic Valve Replacement; NCT01240902)

SOURCE

http://www.onlinejacc.org/content/72/22/2687

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Sep 18. pii: S0735-1097(18)38287-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.09.001. [Epub ahead of print]

Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch in 62,125 Patients Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: From the STS/ACC TVT Registry.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis is generally associated with worse outcomes. Transcatheter AVR (TAVR) can achieve a larger valve orifice and the effects of PPM after TAVR are less well studied.

OBJECTIVES:

The authors utilized the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology TVT (Transcatheter Valve Therapy) registry to examine the frequency, predictors, and association with outcomes of PPM after TAVR in 62,125 patients enrolled between 2014 and 2017.

METHODS:

On the basis of the discharge echocardiographic effective valve area indexed to body surface area, PPM was classified as severe (<0.65 cm2/m2), moderate (0.65 to 0.85 cm2/m2), or none (>0.85 cm2/m2). Multivariable regression models were utilized to examine predictors of severe PPM as well as adjusted outcomes, including mortality, heart failure (HF) rehospitalization, stroke, and quality of life, at 1 year in 37,470 Medicare patients with claims linkage.

RESULTS:

  • Severe and moderate PPM were present following TAVR in 12% and 25% of patients, respectively. Predictors of severe PPM included small (≤23-mm diameter) valve prosthesis, valve-in-valve procedure, larger body surface area, female sex, younger age, non-white/Hispanic race, lower ejection fraction, atrial fibrillation, and severe mitral or tricuspid regurgitation.
  • At 1 year, mortality was 17.2%, 15.6%, and 15.9% in severe, moderate, and no PPM patients, respectively (p = 0.02).
  • HF rehospitalization had occurred in 14.7%, 12.8%, and 11.9% of patients with severe, moderate, and no PPM, respectively (p < 0.0001).
  • There was no association of severe PPM with stroke or quality of life score at 1 year.

CONCLUSIONS:

Severe PPM after TAVR was present in 12% of patients and was associated with higher mortality and HF rehospitalization at 1 year. Further investigation is warranted into the prevention of severe PPM in patients undergoing TAVR.

KEYWORDS:

aortic stenosis; prosthesis–patient mismatch; transcatheter aortic valve replacement

PMID:
30257798
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2018.09.001

SOURCE

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30257798

 

Prior Meta Analysis Study

Ann Thorac Surg. 2016 Mar;101(3):872-80

 

Ann Thorac Surg. 2016 Mar;101(3):872-80. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2015.11.048. Epub 2016 Jan 29.

Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We reviewed currently available studies that investigated prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with a systematic literature search and meta-analytic estimates.

METHODS:

To identify all studies that investigated PPM in TAVI, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through August 2015. Studies considered for inclusion met the following criteria: the study population included patients undergoing TAVI and outcomes included at least post-procedural PPM prevalence. We performed three quantitative meta-analyses about (1) PPM prevalence after TAVI, (2) PPM prevalence after TAVI versus surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), and (3) late all-cause mortality after TAVI in patients with PPM versus patients without PPM.

RESULTS:

We identified 21 eligible studies that included data on a total of 4,000 patients undergoing TAVI. The first meta-analyses found moderate PPM prevalence of 26.7%, severe PPM prevalence of 8.0%, and overall PPM prevalence of 35.1%. The second meta-analyses of six studies, including 745 patients, found statistically significant reductions in moderate (p = 0.03), severe (p = 0.0003), and overall (p = 0.02) PPM prevalence after TAVI relative to SAVR. The third meta-analyses of five studies, including 2,654 patients, found no statistically significant differences in late mortality between patients with severe PPM and patients without PPM (p = 0.44) and between patients with overall PPM and patients without PPM (p = 0.97).

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, moderate, and severe PPM prevalence after TAVI was 35%, 27%, and 8%, respectively, which may be less than that after SAVR. In contrast to PPM after SAVR, PPM after TAVI may not impair late survival.

Comment in

 

Other related studies published on TAVR, TAVI in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

  • New method for performing Aortic Valve Replacement: Transmural catheter procedure developed at NIH, Minimally-invasive tissue-crossing – Transcaval access, abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/31/new-method-for-performing-aortic-valve-replacement-transmural-catheter-procedure-developed-at-nih-minimally-invasive-tissue-crossing-transcaval-access-abdominal-aorta-and-the-inferior-vena-cava/

 

  • Second in the United States to implant Edwards Newly FDA-Approved Aortic Valve “Intuity Elite” Sutureless Valve at Northwestern Medicine

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/13/second-in-the-united-states-to-implant-edwards-newly-fda-approved-aortic-valve-intuity-elite-sutureless-valve-at-northwestern-medicine/

 

  • Medtronic’s CoreValve System Sustains Positive Outcomes Through Two Years in Extreme Risk Patients

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/09/15/medtronics-corevalve-system-sustains-positive-outcomes-through-two-years-in-extreme-risk-patients/

 

  • One year Post-Intervention Mortality Rate: TAVR and AVR – Aortic Valve Procedures 6.7% in AVR, 11.0% in AVR with CABG, 20.7 in Transvascular (TV-TAVR) and 28.0% in Transapical (TA-TAVR) Patients

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/04/one-year-post-intervention-mortality-rate-tavr-and-avr-aortic-valve-procedures-6-7-in-avr-11-0-in-avr-with-cabg-20-7-in-transvascular-tv-tavt-and-28-0-in-transapical-ta-tavr-patients/

 

  • Developments on the Frontier of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Devices

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/26/developments-on-the-frontier-of-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-tavr-devices/

 

  • Off-Label TAVR Procedures: 1 in 10 associated with higher in-hospital 30-day mortality, 1-year mortality was similar in the Off-Label and the On-Label groups

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/06/22/off-label-tavr-procedures-1-in-10-associated-with-higher-in-hospital-30-day-mortality-1-year-mortality-was-similar-in-the-off-lavel-and-the-on-label-groups/

 

  • First U.S. TAVR Patients Treated With Temporary Pacing Lead (Tempo Lead)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/21/first-u-s-tavr-patients-treated-with-temporary-pacing-lead-tempo-lead/

 

  • SAPIEN 3 Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in High-Risk and Inoperable Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis: One-Year Clinical Outcomes

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/14/sapien-3-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-in-high-risk-and-inoperable-patients-with-severe-aortic-stenosis-one-year-clinical-outcomes/

 

  • TAVR with Sapien 3: combined all-cause death & disabling stroke rate was 8.4% and 16.6% for the surgery arm

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/05/tavr-with-sapien-3-combined-all-cause-death-disabling-stroke-rate-was-8-4-and-16-6-for-the-surgery-arm/

 

  • Hadassah Opens Israel’s First Heart Valve Disease Clinic

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/06/hadassah-opens-israels-first-heart-valve-disease-clinic/

  • Trans-apical Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Patient with Severe and Complex Left Main Coronary Artery Disease (LMCAD)

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/17/management-of-difficult-trans-apical-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-in-a-patient-with-severe-and-complex-arterial-disease/

 

  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR): Postdilatation to Reduce Paravalvular Regurgitation During TAVR with a Balloon-expandable Valve

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/17/postdilatation-to-reduce-paravalvular-regurgitation-during-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement/

 

  • Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement for Inoperable Severe Aortic Stenosis


Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/03/transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-for-inoperable-severe-aortic-stenosis/

 

  • Updated Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): risk for stroke and suitability for surgery

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD,RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/07/transcatheter-aortic-valve-implantation-tavi-risky-and-costly-2/

 

  • The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) covers transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) under Coverage with Evidence Development (CED)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/19/the-centers-for-medicare-medicaid-services-cms-covers-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-tavr-under-coverage-with-evidence-development-ced/

 

  • Investigational Devices: Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Replacement Transfemoral Deployment

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/10/investigational-devices-edwards-sapien-transcatheter-aortic-heart-valve-replacement-transfemoral-deployment/

 

  • Investigational Devices: Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Valve Transapical Deployment

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/04/investigational-devices-edwards-sapien-transcatheter-heart-valve/

 

 

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Are TAVR volume requirements limiting rural and minority access to this life-saving procedure, or are they still necessary for patient safety?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

CMS Considers Changing TAVR Volume Requirements

Debate over transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures continues as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) considers changing the status quo. Are TAVR volume requirements limiting rural and minority access to this life-saving procedure, or are they still necessary for patient safety?

In June 2018, cardiology news sources widely reported that CMS opened public comment on established volume requirements for hospitals and heart teams to perform TAVR. The Medicare Evidence Development & Coverage Advisory Committee (MEDCAC) then met on July 25 to discuss the issue. A report in Cardiovascular Business suggested that the committee appeared split on the subject—especially in weighing the potential harms of limiting TAVR to only high volume hospitals.

Cases for and against TAVR volume requirements

The Case for TAVR Volume Requirements

For those on the side of maintaining TAVR volume requirements, the benefits are obvious—volume is associated with positive outcomes and lower rates of complications. In fact, a 2018 expert consensus document from four major cardiology societies actually supported increasing volume requirements to maintain a TAVR program, to ensure adequate data collection for statistically reliable quality metrics and quality assurance.

A new study published in September in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions seems to add new weight to this argument—data collected from hospitals participating in the international TAVR registry showed volume to have a significant effect on patient safety. The findings suggested that a learning curve of at least 225 procedures was required for hospitals to perform TAVRs with the lowest mortality rates, and that low annual volume hospitals were associated with decreased procedural safety and higher patient mortality.

John D. Carroll, MD, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine wrote an editorial in the same publication arguing that there is a “danger of lowering TAVR quality of care” by relaxing or eliminating TAVR volume requirements. “This would create many new centers starting a new learning curve, result in more low-volume centers, and potentially diluting the case volume and advanced skills of established and high-volume centers,” he writes.

The Case Against TAVR Volume Requirements

While the case for TAVR volume requirements is strong, it does little to answer the central question of the opposing viewpoint—does the benefit of expanding TAVR access to rural areas outweigh the cost of allowing the procedure to be conducted in relatively inexperienced or low-volume centers?

It is difficult to capture data depicting how many patients with aortic stenosis go without valve replacement due to TAVR volume requirements, but the concern seems genuine. We continue to learn more about TAVR, but experts have already established the procedure as the “treatment of choice in the extreme-risk patient who cannot have surgery,” said Martin B. Leon, MD, FACC at a 2017 American College of Cardiology conference.

In this population, where surgical valve replacement is not an option, median life expectancy is increased from 11 months to almost 30 months with TAVR, according to Leon. Indeed, some experts like Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH, FACC, believe that, regardless of surgical risk scores, patients over 80 should undergo TAVR rather than surgical valve replacements.

If TAVR volume requirements limit access to the procedure for this growing elderly population, the negative effects would be obvious. An Edwards Lifesciences resource about aortic stenosis states, “After the onset of symptoms, patients with severe aortic stenosis have a survival rate as low as 50% at 2 years.”

SOURCE

https://acp-online.org/tavr-volume-requirements-debate/

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Top 100 of 415 articles published on PubMed in 2018 on TAVR

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

SOURCE

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed  [2018 TAVR]

Select item 301029701.

Ninety-Day Readmissions of Bundled Valve Patients: Implications for Healthcare Policy.

Koeckert MS, Grossi EA, Vining PF, Abdallah R, Williams MR, Kalkut G, Loulmet DF, Zias EA, Querijero M, Galloway AC.

Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg2018 Aug 10. pii: S1043-0679(18)30168-0. doi: 10.1053/j.semtcvs.2018.07.017. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30102970
Select item 300946422.

TAVR Vs. SAVR in Intermediate-Risk Patients: What Influences Our Choice of Therapy.

Still S, Szerlip M, Mack M.

Curr Cardiol Rep2018 Aug 9;20(10):82. doi: 10.1007/s11886-018-1026-3. Review.

PMID:
30094642
Select item 300945323.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis and heart failure.

Bavishi C, Kolte D, Gordon PC, Abbott JD.

Heart Fail Rev2018 Aug 9. doi: 10.1007/s10741-018-9726-8. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:
30094532
Select item 300930574.

Disarming the Ticking Time Bomb: Post-Procedure Electrocardiography Predictors of High-Degree Conduction Disturbances After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Nazif TM, Chen S, Kodali SK.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1527-1530. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.07.003. No abstract available.

PMID:
30093057
Select item 300930565.

Predictors of Advanced Conduction Disturbances Requiring a Late (≥48 H) Permanent Pacemaker Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Mangieri A, Lanzillo G, Bertoldi L, Jabbour RJ, Regazzoli D, Ancona MB, Tanaka A, Mitomo S, Garducci S, Montalto C, Pagnesi M, Giannini F, Giglio M, Montorfano M, Chieffo A, Rodès-Cabau J, Monaco F, Paglino G, Della Bella P, Colombo A, Latib A.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1519-1526. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.06.014.

PMID:
30093056
Select item 300930556.

Immediate Post-Procedural 12-Lead Electrocardiography as Predictor of Late Conduction Defects After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Jørgensen TH, De Backer O, Gerds TA, Bieliauskas G, Svendsen JH, Søndergaard L.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1509-1518. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.011.

PMID:
30093055
Select item 300925577.

Von Willebrand factor and the aortic valve: Concepts that are important in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement era.

Ibrahim H, Rondina MT, Kleiman NS.

Thromb Res2018 Jul 30;170:20-27. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2018.07.028. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:
30092557
Select item 300893298.

Antiplatelet Treatment for Catheter-Based Interventions in High-Risk Patients: Current Guidelines and Expert Opinion.

Rath D, Gawaz M.

Hamostaseologie2018 Aug 8. doi: 10.1055/s-0038-1668165. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30089329
Select item 300870259.

The Evolution of Echocardiographic Type and Anesthetic Technique for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement at a High-Volume Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Center.

Marino M, Lilie CJ, Culp WC Jr, Schepel SR, Tippett JC.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 Jun 30. pii: S1053-0770(18)30468-3. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.06.022. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30087025
Select item 3007961110.

Propensity matched comparison of in-hospital outcomes of TAVR vs. SAVR in patients with previous history of CABG: Insights from the Nationwide inpatient sample.

Nalluri N, Atti V, Patel NJ, Kumar V, Arora S, Nalluri S, Nelluri BK, Maniatis GA, Kandov R, Kliger C.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27708. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079611
Select item 3007956111.

Permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in bicuspid aortic valve patients.

Xiong TY, Liao YB, Li YJ, Zhao ZG, Wei X, Tsauo JY, Xu YN, Feng Y, Chen M.

J Interv Cardiol2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1111/joic.12546. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079561
Select item 3007952212.

Effect of transcatheter aortic valve replacement on left atrial function.

Truong VT, Chung E, Nagueh S, Kereiakes D, Schaaf J, Volz B, Ngo TNM, Mazur W.

Echocardiography2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1111/echo.14109. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079522
Select item 3007679413.

TAVR 2.0: Collaborating to Measure, Assure, and Advance Quality.

Shahian DM, Gleason TG, Shemin RJ, Carroll JD, Mack MJ.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Aug 1. pii: S0003-4975(18)31034-8. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.07.004. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30076794
Select item 3007608114.

Low Iodine Contrast Injection for CT Acquisition Prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Aorta Assessment and Screening for Coronary Artery Disease.

Hachulla AL, Noble S, Ronot M, Guglielmi G, de Perrot T, Montet X, Vallée JP.

Acad Radiol2018 Aug 1. pii: S1076-6332(18)30330-1. doi: 10.1016/j.acra.2018.06.016. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30076081
Select item 3007532615.

Variation in post-TAVR antiplatelet therapy utilization and associated outcomes: Insights from the STS/ACC TVT Registry.

Sherwood MW, Vemulapalli S, Harrison JK, Dai D, Vora AN, Mack MJ, Holmes DR, Rumsfeld JS, Cohen DJ, Thourani VH, Kirtane A, Peterson ED.

Am Heart J2018 Jul 9;204:9-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.06.006. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30075326
Select item 3006878516.

State of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Spain Versus Europe and Non-European Countries.

Biagioni C, Tirado-Conte G, Rodés-Cabau J, Ryan N, Cerrato E, Nazif TM, Eltchaninoff H, Sondergaard L, Ribeiro HB, Barbanti M, Nietlispach F, De Jaegere P, Agostoni P, Trillo R, Jiménez-Quevedo P, D’Ascenzo F, Wendler O, Maluenda G, Chen M, Tamburino C, Macaya C, Leon MB, Nombela-Franco L.

J Invasive Cardiol2018 Aug;30(8):301-309.

Select item 3006493717.

Accuracy of predicted orthogonal projection angles for valve deployment during transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Steinvil A, Weissman G, Ertel AW, Weigold G, Rogers T, Koifman E, Buchanan KD, Shults C, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Satler LF, Ben-Dor I, Waksman R.

J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr2018 May 26. pii: S1934-5925(18)30130-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcct.2018.05.017. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30064937
Select item 3006277818.

Absence of Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Hypertrophy is Associated with Increased Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kampaktsis PN, Ullal AV, Swaminathan RV, Minutello RM, Kim L, Bergman GS, Feldman DN, Singh H, Chiu Wong S, Okin PM.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jul 30. doi: 10.1002/clc.23034. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 3005825919.

Early and midterm outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valves.

Aalaei-Andabili SH, Beaver TM, Petersen JW, Anderson RD, Karimi A, Thoburn E, Kabir A, Bavry AA, Arnaoutakis GJ.

J Card Surg2018 Jul 29. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13775. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30058259
Select item 3005725220.

The Incidence of Dysphagia Among Patients Undergoing TAVR With Either General Anesthesia or Moderate Sedation.

Mukdad L, Kashani R, Mantha A, Sareh S, Mendelsohn A, Benharash P.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 May 26. pii: S1053-0770(18)30373-2. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.05.040. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30057252
Select item 3005685121.

Sex-Specific Differences in Outcome of Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kaier K, von Zur Mühlen C, Zirlik A, Schmoor C, Roth K, Bothe W, Hehn P, Reinöhl J, Zehender M, Bode C, Stachon P.

Can J Cardiol2018 Aug;34(8):992-998. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2018.04.009. Epub 2018Apr 12.

PMID:
30056851
Select item 3005602322.

Hemodynamic monitoring by pulse contour analysis during trans-catheter aortic valve replacement: A fast and easy method to optimize procedure results.

Ristalli F, Romano SM, Stolcova M, Meucci F, Squillantini G, Valente S, Di Mario C.

Cardiovasc Revasc Med2018 Jul 19. pii: S1553-8389(18)30314-2. doi: 10.1016/j.carrev.2018.07.015. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30056023
Select item 3005418823.

TAVR Versus SAVR in the Era of NSQIP.

Vadlamudi R, Duggan M.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 May 26. pii: S1053-0770(18)30370-7. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.05.037. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30054188
Select item 3005090924.

Expanding TAVI to Low and Intermediate Risk Patients.

Voigtländer L, Seiffert M.

Front Cardiovasc Med2018 Jul 12;5:92. doi: 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00092. eCollection 2018. Review.

Select item 3004863225.

Albumin Is Predictive of 1-Year Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Hebeler KR, Baumgarten H, Squiers JJ, Wooley J, Pollock BD, Mahoney C, Filardo G, Lima B, DiMaio JM.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Jul 23. pii: S0003-4975(18)31022-1. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.06.024. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30048632
Select item 3004178326.

Bioprosthetic structural valve deterioration: How do TAVR and SAVR prostheses compare?

Aldalati O, Kaura A, Khan H, Dworakowski R, Byrne J, Eskandari M, Deshpande R, Monaghan M, Wendler O, MacCarthy P.

Int J Cardiol2018 Oct 1;268:170-175. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.04.091.

PMID:
30041783
Select item 3003771727.

Exposure to glucocorticoids prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with reduced incidence of high-degree AV block and pacemaker.

Oestreich B, Gurevich S, Adabag S, Kelly R, Helmer G, Raveendran G, Yannopoulos D, Biring T, Garcia S.

Cardiovasc Revasc Med2018 Jul 18. pii: S1553-8389(18)30311-7. doi: 10.1016/j.carrev.2018.07.012. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30037717
Select item 3003742428.

Comparison of Hospital Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation With Versus Without Hypothyroidism.

Subahi A, Yassin AS, Adegbala O, Akintoye E, Abubakar H, Elmoghrabi A, Ibrahim W, Ajam M, Pahuja M, Weinberger JJ, Levine D, Afonso L.

Am J Cardiol2018 Jun 5. pii: S0002-9149(18)31197-4. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.05.025. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30037424
Select item 3003171929.

Arrhythmic Burden as Determined by Ambulatory Continuous Cardiac Monitoring in Patients With New-Onset Persistent Left Bundle Branch Block Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: The MARE Study.

Rodés-Cabau J, Urena M, Nombela-Franco L, Amat-Santos I, Kleiman N, Munoz-Garcia A, Atienza F, Serra V, Deyell MW, Veiga-Fernandez G, Masson JB, Canadas-Godoy V, Himbert D, Castrodeza J, Elizaga J, Francisco Pascual J, Webb JG, de la Torre JM, Asmarats L, Pelletier-Beaumont E, Philippon F.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1495-1505. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.016. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

PMID:
30031719
Select item 3003171830.

Arrhythmias and Conduction Disturbances Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Out of Sight, Out of Mind?

Pighi M, Piazza N.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1506-1508. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.05.038. Epub 2018 Jul 18. No abstract available.

PMID:
30031718
Select item 3002924731.

Numerical Parametric Study of Paravalvular Leak Following a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Deployment Into a Patient-Specific Aortic Root.

Mao W, Wang Q, Kodali S, Sun W.

J Biomech Eng2018 Oct 1;140(10). doi: 10.1115/1.4040457.

PMID:
30029247
Select item 3002920732.

Comparative Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Polymeric Transcatheter and Surgical Aortic Valves’ Hemodynamics and Structural Mechanics.

Ghosh R, Marom G, Rotman O, Slepian MJ, Prabhakar S, Horner M, Bluestein D.

J Biomech Eng2018 Jun 25. doi: 10.1115/1.4040600. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30029207
Select item 3002830433.

Extended benefits of TAVR in young patients with low-intermediate risk score: proceed with care.

Doshi R.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 20;14(4):e485. doi: 10.4244/EIJ-D-18-00236L. No abstract available.

Select item 3002830034.

Valve-in-valve TAVR using the SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve: still plagued by patient-prosthesis mismatch.

Saxon JT, Cohen DJ, Feldman T.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 20;14(4):e377-e379. doi: 10.4244/EIJV14I4A66. No abstract available.

Select item 3002573135.

The SAVI-TF Registry: 1-Year Outcomes of the European Post-Market Registry Using the ACURATE neo Transcatheter Heart Valve Under Real-World Conditions in 1,000 Patients.

Kim WK, Hengstenberg C, Hilker M, Kerber S, Schäfer U, Rudolph T, Linke A, Franz N, Kuntze T, Nef H, Kappert U, Zembala MO, Toggweiler S, Walther T, Möllmann H.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1368-1374. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.023.

Select item 3002557236.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement of Failed Surgically Implanted Bioprostheses: The STS/ACC Registry.

Tuzcu EM, Kapadia SR, Vemulapalli S, Carroll JD, Holmes DR Jr, Mack MJ, Thourani VH, Grover FL, Brennan JM, Suri RM, Dai D, Svensson LG.

J Am Coll Cardiol2018 Jul 24;72(4):370-382. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.04.074.

PMID:
30025572
Select item 3002410237.

Transcatheter valve-in-valve versus redo surgical aortic valve replacement for the treatment of degenerated bioprosthetic aortic valve: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Tam DY, Vo TX, Wijeysundera HC, Dvir D, Friedrich JO, Fremes SE.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 19. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27686. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30024102
Select item 3001983938.

Predicted magnitude of alternate access in the contemporary transcatheter aortic valve replacement era.

Rogers T, Gai J, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Shults C, Ben-Dor I, Satler LF, Waksman R.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27668. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30019839
Select item 3001982839.

Slope of left ventricular filling as an index of valvular and paravalvular regurgitation in native and prosthetic aortic valves.

Makki N, Ghao X, Whitson B, Shreenivas S, Crestanello J, Lilly S.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27684. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30019828
Select item 3001982240.

Is two better than one? Re-evaluating the surgical approval process for TAVR.

Shreenivas S, Lilly S, Reardon M, Answini GA, Kereiakes DJ.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27666. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30019822
Select item 3001816741.

Improving the Diagnostic Performance of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Prosthetic Heart Valve Endocarditis.

Swart LE, Gomes A, Scholtens AM, Sinha B, Tanis W, Lam MGEH, van der Vlugt MJ, Streukens SAF, Aarntzen EHJG, Bucerius J, van Assen S, Bleeker-Rovers CP, van Geel PP, Krestin GP, van Melle JP, Roos-Hesselink JW, Slart RHJA, Glaudemans AWJM, Budde RPJ.

Circulation2018 Jul 17. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035032. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035032. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30018167
Select item 3001752042.

Software-automated multidetector computed tomography-based prosthesis-sizing in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Inter-vendor comparison and relation to patient outcome.

Baeßler B, Mauri V, Bunck AC, Pinto Dos Santos D, Friedrichs K, Maintz D, Rudolph T.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jul 9. pii: S0167-5273(18)32256-3. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.07.008. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30017520
Select item 3001751843.

Inflammation in aortic stenosis: Shaping the biomarkers network.

Schiattarella GG, Perrino C.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jul 6. pii: S0167-5273(18)33669-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.07.026. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30017518
Select item 3001728244.

Inter- and intra-observer repeatability of aortic annulus measurements on screening CT for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR): Implications for appropriate device sizing.

Knobloch G, Sweetman S, Bartels C, Raval A, Gimelli G, Jacobson K, Lozonschi L, Kohmoto T, Osaki S, François C, Nagle S.

Eur J Radiol2018 Aug;105:209-215. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2018.06.003. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

PMID:
30017282
Select item 3001614745.

Atherosclerosis on CT Angiogram Predicts Acute Kidney Injury After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kandathil A, Abbara S, Hanna M, Minhajuddin A, Wehrmann L, Merchant AM, Mills R, Fox AA.

AJR Am J Roentgenol2018 Jul 17:1-7. doi: 10.2214/AJR.17.19340. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30016147
Select item 3001289046.

Transfemoral Implantation of the Acurate neo for the Treatment of Aortic Regurgitation.

Toggweiler S, Cerillo AG, Kim WK, Biaggi P, Lloyd C, Hilker M, Almagor Y, Cuculi F, Brinkert M, Kobza R, Muller O, Rück A, Corti R.

J Invasive Cardiol2018 Jul 15. pii: JIC2018715-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 3000980047.

Suprasternal and Left Axillary Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Morbidly Obese Patients.

Olds A, Eudailey K, Nazif T, Vahl T, Khalique O, Lewis C, Hahn R, Leon M, Bapat V, Ahmed M, Kodali S, George I.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Jul 13. pii: S0003-4975(18)30978-0. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.05.095. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30009800
Select item 3000336648.

Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation (VinV-TAVR) for failed surgical aortic bioprosthetic valves.

Wernly B, Zappe AK, Unbehaun A, Sinning JM, Jung C, Kim WK, Fichtlscherer S, Lichtenauer M, Hoppe UC, Alushi B, Beckhoff F, Wewetzer C, Franz M, Kretzschmar D, Navarese E, Landmesser U, Falk V, Lauten A.

Clin Res Cardiol2018 Jul 12. doi: 10.1007/s00392-018-1326-z. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30003366
Select item 3000209949.

Myocardial Scar and Mortality in Severe Aortic Stenosis: Data from the BSCMR Valve Consortium.

Musa TA, Treibel TA, Vassiliou VS, Captur G, Singh A, Chin C, Dobson LE, Pica S, Loudon M, Malley T, Rigolli M, Foley JRJ, Bijsterveld P, Law GR, Dweck MR, Myerson SG, McCann GP, Prasad SK, Moon JC, Greenwood JP.

Circulation2018 Jul 12. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032839. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032839. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30002099
Select item 2999613850.

Aortic Angulation and TAVR.

Gandotra P.

Cardiology2018 Jul 11;140(3):141-142. doi: 10.1159/000490094. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

Select item 2998906851.

Endovascular repair of severe aortic coarctation, transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis, and percutaneous coronary intervention in an elderly patient with long term follow-up.

Fallatah R, Elasfar A, Amoudi O, Ajaz M, AlHarbi I, Abuelatta R.

J Saudi Heart Assoc2018 Jul;30(3):271-275. doi: 10.1016/j.jsha.2018.01.003. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

Select item 2998711952.

Impact of Rapid Ventricular Pacing on Outcome After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Fefer P, Bogdan A, Grossman Y, Berkovitch A, Brodov Y, Kuperstein R, Segev A, Guetta V, Barbash IM.

J Am Heart Assoc2018 Jul 9;7(14). pii: e009038. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.118.009038.

Select item 2998314253.

Imaging Evaluation for the Detection of Leaflet Thrombosis After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Zhao ZG, Wang MY, Jilaihawi H.

Interv Cardiol Clin2018 Jul;7(3):293-299. doi: 10.1016/j.iccl.2018.03.007. Epub 2018Jun 29. Review.

PMID:
29983142
Select item 2998314154.

Imaging Evaluation and Interpretation for Vascular Access for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Foley TR, Stinis CT.

Interv Cardiol Clin2018 Jul;7(3):285-291. doi: 10.1016/j.iccl.2018.03.006. Epub 2018Jun 29. Review.

PMID:
29983141
Select item 2998121455.

Echocardiography in transcatheter aortic (Core)Valve implantation: Part 2-Transesophageal echocardiography.

Naqvi TZ.

Echocardiography2018 Jul;35(7):1020-1041. doi: 10.1111/echo.14034. Review.

PMID:
29981214
Select item 2998029956.

Impact of patient-specific morphologies on sinus flow stasis in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: An in vitro study.

Hatoum H, Dollery J, Lilly SM, Crestanello J, Dasi LP.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg2018 Jun 7. pii: S0022-5223(18)31521-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2018.05.086. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29980299
Select item 2997656857.

Malnutrition and Mortality in Frail and Non-Frail Older Adults Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement.

Goldfarb M, Lauck S, Webb JG, Asgar AW, Perrault LP, Piazza N, Martucci G, Lachapelle K, Noiseux N, Kim DH, Popma JJ, Lefèvre T, Labinaz M, Lamy A, Peterson MD, Arora RC, Morais JA, Morin JF, Rudski L, Afilalo J; FRAILTY-AVR Investigators .

Circulation2018 Jul 5. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.118.033887. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.033887. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29976568
Select item 2997636358.

Debris Heterogeneity Across Different Valve Types Captured by a Cerebral Protection System During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Schmidt T, Leon MB, Mehran R, Kuck KH, Alu MC, Braumann RE, Kodali S, Kapadia SR, Linke A, Makkar R, Naber C, Romero ME, Virmani R, Frerker C.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 9;11(13):1262-1273. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.001.

PMID:
29976363
Select item 2997426459.

A Review of Alternative Access for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Young MN, Singh V, Sakhuja R.

Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med2018 Jul 4;20(7):62. doi: 10.1007/s11936-018-0648-5. Review.

PMID:
29974264
Select item 2997123860.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Concomitant Mitral Regurgitation.

Stähli BE, Reinthaler M, Leistner DM, Landmesser U, Lauten A.

Front Cardiovasc Med2018 Jun 19;5:74. doi: 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00074. eCollection 2018. Review.

Select item 2996942761.

Propensity matched comparison of clinical outcomes after transaortic versus transfemoral aortic valve replacement.

Chollet T, Marcheix B, Boudou N, Elbaz M, Campelo-Parada F, Bataille V, Bouisset F, Lairez O, Porterie J, Galinier M, Carrie D, Lhermusier T.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 3. pii: EIJ-D-18-00168. doi: 10.4244/EIJ-D-18-00168. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2996827362.

Alternative access for transcatheter aortic valve replacement in older adults: A collaborative study from France and United States.

Damluji AA, Murman M, Byun S, Moscucci M, Resar JR, Hasan RK, Alfonso CE, Carrillo RG, Williams DB, Kwon CC, Cho PW, Dijos M, Peltan J, Heldman AW, Cohen MG, Leroux L.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 3. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27690. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29968273
Select item 2996613163.

Does Aortic Angulation Impact Outcomes in TAVR.

Czarny MJ, Resar JR.

Cardiology2018;140(2):103-105. doi: 10.1159/000489697. Epub 2018 Jul 2. No abstract available.

PMID:
29966131
Select item 2996339164.

Transcaval transcatheter aortic valve replacement: a visual case review.

Muhammad KI, Tokarchik GC.

J Vis Surg2018 May 14;4:102. doi: 10.21037/jovs.2018.04.02. eCollection 2018.

Select item 2996107265.

Aortic Angulation Does Not Impact Outcomes in Self-Expandable or Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Elmously A, Gray KD, Truong QA, Burshtein A, Wong SC, de Biasi AR, Worku B, Salemi A.

Cardiology2018;140(2):96-102. doi: 10.1159/000488933. Epub 2018 Jun 29.

PMID:
29961072
Select item 2996075666.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Extremely Large Annuli: (Over)expanding Bioprosthetic Technology to the Limits?

Mehilli J, Jochheim D.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1388-1389. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.05.007. Epub 2018 Jun 27. No abstract available.

PMID:
29960756
Select item 2996075567.

Impact of Aortic Root Anatomy and Geometry on Paravalvular Leak in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Extremely Large Annuli Using the Edwards SAPIEN 3 Valve.

Tang GHL, Zaid S, George I, Khalique OK, Abramowitz Y, Maeno Y, Makkar RR, Jilaihawi H, Kamioka N, Thourani VH, Babaliaros V, Webb JG, Htun NM, Attinger-Toller A, Ahmad H, Kaple R, Sharma K, Kozina JA, Kaneko T, Shah P, Hirji SA, Desai ND, Anwaruddin S, Jagasia D, Herrmann HC, Basra SS, Szerlip MA, Mack MJ, Mathur M, Tan CW, Don CW, Sharma R, Gafoor S, Zhang M, Kapadia SR, Mick SL, Krishnaswamy A, Amoroso N, Salemi A, Wong SC, Kini AS, Rodés-Cabau J, Leon MB, Kodali SK.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1377-1387. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.034. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

PMID:
29960755
Select item 2995818268.
Select item 2995225269.

Stent fractures after common femoral artery bail-out stenting due to suture device failure in TAVR.

Veulemans V, Afzal S, Ledwig P, Heiss C, Busch L, Sansone R, Soetemann DB, Maier O, Kleinebrecht L, Kelm M, Zeus T, Hellhammer K.

Vasa2018 Jun 28:1-9. doi: 10.1024/0301-1526/a000712. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29952252
Select item 2995183070.

Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement: Functional Requirements for Device Design, Bench-Top, and Pre-Clinical Evaluation.

Iyer R, Chalekian A, Lane R, Evans M, Yi S, Morris J.

Cardiovasc Eng Technol2018 Jun 27. doi: 10.1007/s13239-018-0364-z. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29951830
Select item 2994327371.

Gender-dependent association of diabetes mellitus with mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Linke A, Schlotter F, Haussig S, Woitek FJ, Stachel G, Adam J, Höllriegel R, Lindner A, Mohr FW, Schuler G, Kiefer P, Leontyev S, Thiele H, Borger MA, Holzhey D, Mangner N.

Clin Res Cardiol2018 Jun 25. doi: 10.1007/s00392-018-1309-0. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29943273
Select item 2994311572.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the 34 mm Medtronic Evolut valve : Early results of single institution experience.

D’Ancona G, Dißmann M, Heinze H, Zohlnhöfer-Momm D, Ince H, Kische S.

Neth Heart J2018 Aug;26(7-8):401-408. doi: 10.1007/s12471-018-1122-4.

Select item 2994136973.

Midterm Outcomes With the Self-Expanding ACURATE neo Aortic Bioprosthesis: The “Bumblebee Paradox” in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Barbanti M, Todaro D.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1375-1376. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.06.004. Epub 2018 Jun 22. No abstract available.

PMID:
29941369
Select item 2993663474.

Atrioventricular and intraventricular block after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

Lee JJ, Goldschlager N, Mahadevan VS.

J Interv Card Electrophysiol2018 Jun 24. doi: 10.1007/s10840-018-0391-6. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29936634
Select item 2993449375.

Recurrent Unilateral Transudative Pleural Effusion Due to Low Flow, Low Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis.

Al-Khafaji JF, Taha M, Abdalla AO, Rowan C.

Am J Case Rep2018 Jun 23;19:739-743. doi: 10.12659/AJCR.909448.

Select item 2992964276.

Whose Urgency Is it, Anyway?

Brener SJ.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1186-1187. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.035. No abstract available.

PMID:
29929642
Select item 2992964177.

Outcomes Following Urgent/Emergent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Insights From the STS/ACC TVT Registry.

Kolte D, Khera S, Vemulapalli S, Dai D, Heo S, Goldsweig AM, Aronow HD, Elmariah S, Inglessis I, Palacios IF, Thourani VH, Sharaf BL, Gordon PC, Abbott JD.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1175-1185. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.002. Epub 2018 Mar 11.

PMID:
29929641
Select item 2992963978.

Medium-Term Follow-Up of Early Leaflet Thrombosis After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Ruile P, Minners J, Breitbart P, Schoechlin S, Gick M, Pache G, Neumann FJ, Hein M.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1164-1171. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.006.

PMID:
29929639
Select item 2992775879.

Left Subclavian Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Under Combined Interscalene and Pectoralis Nerve Blocks: A Case Series.

Block M, Pitchon DN, Schwenk ES, Ruggiero N, Entwistle J, Goldhammer JE.

A A Pract2018 Jun 18. doi: 10.1213/XAA.0000000000000819. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29927758
Select item 2992620680.

Optimal pre-TAVR annulus sizing in patients with bicuspid aortic valve: area-derived perimeter by CT is the best-correlated measure with intraoperative sizing.

Wang Y, Wang M, Song G, Wang W, Lv B, Wang H, Wu Y.

Eur Radiol2018 Jun 20. doi: 10.1007/s00330-018-5592-y. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29926206
Select item 2992437681.

Immediate improvement of left ventricular mechanics following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Lozano Granero VC, Fernández Santos S, Fernández-Golfín C, Plaza Martín M, de la Hera Galarza JM, Faletra FF, Swaans MJ, López-Fernández T, Mesa D, La Canna G, Echeverría García T, Habib G, Martíne Monzonís A, Zamorano Gómez JL.

Cardiol J2018 Jun 20. doi: 10.5603/CJ.a2018.0066. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2992312682.

Sex-Specific Considerations in Women with Aortic Stenosis and Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Mihos CG, Klassen SL, Yucel E.

Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med2018 Jun 19;20(7):52. doi: 10.1007/s11936-018-0651-x. Review.

PMID:
29923126
Select item 2992253583.
Select item 2991587884.

Less pronounced reverse left ventricular remodeling in patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared to tricuspid aortic stenosis.

Xiong TY, Wang X, Li YJ, Liao YB, Zhao ZG, Wei X, Xu YN, Zheng MX, Zhou X, Peng Y, Wei JF, Feng Y, Chen M.

Int J Cardiovasc Imaging2018 Jun 18. doi: 10.1007/s10554-018-1401-6. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29915878
Select item 2991274185.

Predictors of Persistent Tricuspid Regurgitation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Baseline Tricuspid Regurgitation.

Worku B, Valovska MT, Elmously A, Kampaktsis P, Castillo C, Wong SC, Salemi A.

Innovations (Phila)2018 May/Jun;13(3):190-199. doi: 10.1097/IMI.0000000000000504.

PMID:
29912741
Select item 2991243286.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the setting of left atrial appendage thrombus.

Salemi A, De Micheli A, Aftab A, Elmously A, Chang R, Wong SC, Worku BM.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg2018 Jun 14. doi: 10.1093/icvts/ivy189. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29912432
Select item 2991133687.

TAVR versus SAVR: Who determines the risk?

Lazar HL.

J Card Surg2018 Jun 17. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13744. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
29911336
Select item 2991130788.

Evolving trends in aortic valve replacement: A statewide experience.

Kim KM, Shannon F, Paone G, Lall S, Batra S, Boeve T, DeLucia A, Patel HJ, Theurer PF, He C, Clark MJ, Sultan I, Deeb GM, Prager RL.

J Card Surg2018 Jun 17. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13740. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29911307
Select item 2990896989.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement on an Aortic Mechanical Valve.

Arzamendi D, Ruiz V, Ramallal R, Alcasena MS, Beunza MT, Larman M.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 9;11(13):e107-e108. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.046. Epub 2018 Jun 13. No abstract available.

PMID:
29908969
Select item 2990351990.

Transcatheter or surgical treatment of severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease: A comparative analysis from the Italian OBSERVANT study.

Barbanti M, Buccheri S, Capodanno D, D’Errigo P, Ranucci M, Rosato S, Santoro G, Fusco D, Tamburino C, Biancari F, Seccareccia F; OBSERVANT Research Group.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jun 7. pii: S0167-5273(17)36915-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.06.011. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29903519
Select item 2989884891.

Oral anti-Xa anticoagulation after trans-aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis: The randomized ATLANTIS trial.

Collet JP, Berti S, Cequier A, Van Belle E, Lefevre T, Leprince P, Neumann FJ, Vicaut E, Montalescot G.

Am Heart J2018 Jun;200:44-50. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.03.008. Epub 2018 Mar 10.

PMID:
29898848
Select item 2989883792.

Utility of an additive frailty tests index score for mortality risk assessment following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Steinvil A, Buchanan KD, Kiramijyan S, Bond E, Rogers T, Koifman E, Shults C, Xu L, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Pichard AD, Satler LF, Ben-Dor I, Waksman R.

Am Heart J2018 Jun;200:11-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.01.007. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

PMID:
29898837
Select item 2989684793.

Advanced chronic kidney disease: Relationship to outcomes post-TAVR, a meta-analysis.

Makki N, Lilly SM.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1002/clc.22993. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

Select item 2989677794.

Comparing outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with stenotic bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valve: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Kanjanahattakij N, Horn B, Vutthikraivit W, Biso SM, Ziccardi MR, Lu MLR, Rattanawong P.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1002/clc.22992. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2989560095.

Stroke and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Carotid Disease Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kochar A, Li Z, Harrison JK, Hughes GC, Thourani VH, Mack MJ, Matsouaka RA, Cohen DJ, Peterson ED, Jones WS, Vemulapalli S.

Circ Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun;11(6):e006322. doi: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.117.006322.

PMID:
29895600
Select item 2989459496.

Percutaneous access versus surgical cut down for TAVR: Where do we go from here?

Ates I, Cilingiroglu M.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun;91(7):1363-1364. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27653.

PMID:
29894594
Select item 2989341797.

Inadvertent pacemaker lead dislodgement.

Eulert-Grehn JJ, Schmidt G, Kempfert J, Starck C.

Pacing Clin Electrophysiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1111/pace.13412. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29893417
Select item 2988800998.

Successful Coronary Protection during TAVI in Heavily Calcified Aortic Leaflets in Patient with Short and Low Left Coronary System.

Kabach M, Alrifai A, Lovitz L, Rothenberg M, Faber C, Nores M.

Case Rep Cardiol2018 May 14;2018:2758170. doi: 10.1155/2018/2758170. eCollection 2018.

Select item 2988746499.

Role of T2 mapping in left ventricular reverse remodeling after TAVR.

Gastl M, Behm P, Haberkorn S, Holzbach L, Veulemans V, Jacoby C, Schnackenburg B, Zeus T, Kelm M, Bönner F.

Int J Cardiol2018 Sep 1;266:262-268. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.02.029.

PMID:
29887464
Select item 29885699100.

Early changes in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels after transcatheter aortic valve replacement and its impact on long-term mortality.

Liebetrau C, Gaede L, Kim WK, Arsalan M, Blumenstein JM, Fischer-Rasokat U, Wolter JS, Kriechbaum S, Huber MT, van Linden A, Berkowitsch A, Dörr O, Nef H, Hamm CW, Walther T, Möllmann H.

Int J Cardiol2018 Aug 15;265:40-46. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.02.037.

PMID:
29885699

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