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Archive for the ‘Aortic Valve: TAVR, TAVI vs Open Heart Surgery’ Category


Medical Devices Early Feasibility FDA’s Pathway – Accelerated Recruitment for Randomized Clinical Trials: Replacement and Repair of Mitral Valves

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

VIEW VIDEO

https://www.dicardiology.com/videos/video-update-mitral-valve-repair-and-replacement-technologies/5638263949001?eid=333021707&bid=1921231

 

 

HEART VALVE TECHNOLOGY | NOVEMBER 07, 2017

Ted Feldman, M.D., MSCAI FACC FESC, director of the cardiac cath lab, Evanston Hospital, explains the current state of transcatheter mitral valve technologies in development and in trials. He is involved in some of these trials and was the principal investigator for the pivotal MitraClip trial. Watch the VIDEO “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Technology, Anatomical Challenges” with Juan Granada, M.D.. Read the articles “Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves,” and “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement Devices in Development.”

  • MitraClip 
  • Cardioband

 

SOURCE

https://www.dicardiology.com/videos/video-update-mitral-valve-repair-and-replacement-technologies/5638263949001?eid=333021707&bid=1921231

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Off-Label TAVR Procedures: 1 in 10 associated with higher in-hospital 30-day mortality, 1-year mortality was similar in the Off-Label and the On-Label groups

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 7/10, 2017

FDA clears Medtronic’s CoreValve Evolut TAVR in intermediate risk patients

JULY 10, 2017 BY FINK DENSFORD

http://www.massdevice.com/fda-clears-medtronics-corevalve-evolut-tavr-in-intermediate-risk-patients/?spMailingID=11443122&spUserID=MTU0MTAzNDg3OTA5S0&spJobID=1200865729&spReportId=MTIwMDg2NTcyOQS2

 

 

  • by Nicole Lou, Reporter, MedPage Today/CRTonline.org June 21, 2017

Action Points

  • Off-label transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) was associated with higher in-hospital, 30-day, and 1-year mortality rates compared with on-label TAVR use, but after adjustment, 1-year mortality was similar in the two groups.
  • Note that approximately one in 10 TAVR patients in the United States have received the procedure for an off-label indication.

Three-quarters of off-label indications were deemed so due to presence of severe aortic or mitral regurgitation or both; one-fifth were off-label because of bicuspid valves.

Successful device implantation was slightly less likely with off-label TAVR (92.9% versus 93.0%, P=0.02). But in-hospital outcomes were the bigger issue for off- versus on-label TAVR:

  • Mortality (6.3% versus 4.7%, P<0.001)
  • Cardiac arrest (6.6% versus 4.8%, P<0.001)
  • Transient ischemic attack (0.5% versus 0.2%, P=0.007)
  • Moderate-to-severe perivalvular leaks (12.4% versus 7.6%, P<0.001)

Mortality was most likely for patients with severe mitral regurgitation as the only off-label indication for TAVR. The authors suggested this is owing to secondary mitral regurgitation caused by left ventricular dilatation.

SOURCE

1 in 10 TAVR Procedures Done Off-Label Despite early risks vs on-label use, ‘acceptable results’ cited from registry

https://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/CHF/66173?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2017-06-22&eun=g99985d0r&pos=1

Other related TAVR articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal included the following 64 articles:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=TAVR

 

 

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Tommy King Memorial Cardiovascular Symposium

Saturday CEUs in Boston, May 20

St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

Boston, MA

May 20

7:30am – 3pm

PROGRAM SCHEDULE & SESSIONS

07:30am | Registration & Continental Breakfast

08:00am | Hemodynamics; Faisal Khan, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

09:00am | Radiation Protection; Satish Nair, PhD, F.X. Masse Associates

10:00am | Break & Exhibits

10:15am | Structural Heart – TAVR Updates and Watchman

Joseph Carrozza, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

11:15am | Road to the Cath Lab — Triggers for STEMI Activation 

Lawrence Garcia, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

12:15pm | Lunch

01:00pm | HF Program including Cardiomems

Lana Tsao, MD & Jaclyn Mayer, NP, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

02:00pm | Cath Lab Pharmacology

Mirembe Reed, Pharm.D, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

Register now »

SOURCE

From: <acvp@getresponse.com> on behalf of “Kurt, ACVP” <kurt@acp-online.org>

Reply-To: <kurt@acp-online.org>

Date: Monday, April 24, 2017 at 2:26 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: cardiovascular symposium in Boston, May 20

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First U.S. TAVR Patients Treated With Temporary Pacing Lead (Tempo Lead)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 8/2/2017

Medtronic wins FDA nod, CE Mark for Avalus aortic valve

AUGUST 2, 2017 BY FINK DENSFORD

http://www.massdevice.com/medtronic-wins-fda-nod-ce-mark-avalus-aortic-valve/?utm_source=newsletter-170802&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter-170802&spMailingID=11611945&spUserID=MTU0MTAzNDg3OTA5S0&spJobID=1220180538&spReportId=MTIyMDE4MDUzOAS2

 

 

BioTrace Medical, Inc., a venture backed company based in San Carlos, Calif., is dedicated to reinventing temporary pacing to improve patient outcomes and reduce hospital costs.

For more information: www.biotracemedical.com

 

FDA Clears Temporary Pacing Technology for Transcatheter Aortic Valve and EP Procedures

The BioTrace Medical Tempo temporary pacing lead is designed to reduce complications and hospital length of stay

The Tempo Lead represents the first major advance in temporary pacing since the technology was introduced decades ago,” said Susheel Kodali, M.D., director of the Heart Valve Program at the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy at Columbia University Medical Center in New York. “As a critical component of every TAVR procedure, temporary leads are integral to successful clinical outcomes for patients. I am excited about the potential of this technology and look forward to using it in my practice.”

Results of the first-in-human study of the technology will be presented at the annual Transcatheter Cardiac Therapeutics (TCT) conference in Washington, D.C. on Sunday, Oct. 30, at 10:59 a.m. eastern time in Room 209, Level 2.

“FDA clearance is an exciting milestone for BioTrace,” said Laura Dietch, CEO of BioTrace Medical. “We are pleased to bring this important innovation to the significant and growing number of patients needing better temporary pacing options to minimize risks and life-threatening complications. We look forward to launching in select U.S. centers in the coming weeks.”

For more information: www.biotracemedical.com

SOURCE

http://www.dicardiology.com/product/fda-clears-temporary-pacing-technology-transcatheter-aortic-valve-and-ep-procedures

December 19, 2016 — BioTrace Medical Inc. announced the first commercial use of the company’s Tempo Temporary Pacing Lead since U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance in October.

The first cases involved patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures and were performed by James Harkness, M.D., interventional cardiologist, and Brian K. Whisenant, M.D., medical director of the Structural Heart Disease Program at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Susheel Kodali, M.D., director of the Heart Valve Program at Columbia University Medical Center/New York Presbyterian Hospital.

BioTrace Medical’s Tempo Lead is for use in procedures in which

  • Temporary pacing is indicated, including
  • TAVR and
  • Electrophysiology (EP) procedures.

The lead is designed for secure and stable cardiac pacing with the goal of reducing complications and allowing patients to ambulate sooner after procedures.

“The Tempo Lead is designed to alleviate the risks associated with lead dislodgement and inconsistent pacing, providing a safer option for patients.”

Temporary leads are used in more than 350,000 procedures each year, a number that is growing rapidly as the population ages and TAVR becomes increasingly common. The temporary pacing lead, a small catheter with two electrodes, is placed in the right ventricle of the heart through a vein in the groin or neck. The lead is then connected to an external pacemaker allowing a physician to monitor and control a patient’s heart rate for several days.

SOURCE

http://www.dicardiology.com/content/first-us-tavr-patients-treated-temporary-pacing-lead?eid=333021707&bid=1620839

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Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves – Mitral and tricuspid valve repair technologies now in development

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Based on

http://www.dicardiology.com/article/advances-and-future-directions-transcatheter-valves

 

Read the article “First TAVR Device Receives European Approval to Treat Intermediate Risk Patients”from August 2016.

Watch the video “The Evolution of TAVR Technology.” Interview with Juan Granada, M.D., executive director and chief scientific officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation’s Skirball Center for Innovation, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Watch the video “TAVR Beats Surgery — Top News From ACC.16.” Dr. Vinod Thourani, professor of surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and a co-investigator for the PARTNER II Trial, discusses the biggest news item from ACC.16 — the Sapien 3 TAVR device performed better that surgical aortic valve replacement.

Watch the video “CoreValve Trumps Surgical Valve Replacement — TVT 2015.” Interview with Michael Reardon, M.D., professor of cardiothoracic surgery at DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, and chairman of the patient screening committee, CoreValve U.S. pivotal trial, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Read the article “FDA Clears Sapien XT for Valve-In-Valve Procedures.”

Read the article “FDA Expands Use of CoreValve for Aortic Valve-in-Valve Replacement.”

Transcatheter Mitral Valves are the Next Frontier

Most interventional and cardiac surgical experts say TMVR will be the next frontier in minimally invasive structural heart interventions. With the success and rapid growth of TAVR, there is an immense anticipation that TMVR will have an even greater impact in cardiology. This has translated into more than $2.5 billion being spent in the past year by vendors purchasing start-up TMVR companies, while less than 50 patients have actually been treated using these technologies, said Michael Mack, M.D., medical director, cardiovascular surgery, Baylor Health Care System and chairman of The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano Research Center.

However, the mitral valve involves much more complex anatomy than the aortic valve, so the devices, imaging for procedural planning and guidance will be much more sophisticated than what is used for TAVR. Among the challenges are: fixation of a device to the very small landing zone of the mitral annulus; avoiding the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT); avoiding compression of the atrioventricular (AV) node; avoiding the papillary muscle and chordae tendineae; ensuring the device seals properly to avoid paravalvular regurgitation; and the device needs to be able to adapt to remodeling of the anatomy. There are more than 20 TMVR devices in development. The majority of these valves utilize a self-expanding nitinol frame that engages both sides of the native mitral valve annulus for fixation, similar to Amplatzer septal closure devices.

The companies with first-in-human TMVR implants include Tendyne, Neovasc and Edwards Lifesciences’ Fortis and Sapien XT devices. The Neovasc Tiara, Tendyne Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve and CardiAQ Valve Technologies TMVR system all have been granted FDA conditional investigational device exemption (IDE) studies.

Watch the video “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Therapies in Development.” 

Watch the video “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Technologies.” An interview with Ted Feldman, M.D., FACC, MSCAI, FESC, cardiac cath lab director, Evanston Hospital, North Shore Health System, and principle investigator, Everest II MitraClip U.S. pivotal trial, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Advancements in TAVR and TMVR Technologies at TCT 2016 

Watch the video VIDEO “Transcatheter Valve Technology Advancements at TCT 2016.” This is an interview Torsten Vahl, M.D., about advancements in transcatheter valve repair technology, including new devices for the aortic, mitral and tricuspid valves. Vahl is director of experimental and translational research and assistant professor of medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy.

Watch the video “VIDEO: Transcatheter Mitral Valve Technology, Anatomical Challenges.” A discussion with Juan Granada, M.D., about transcatheter mitral valve advancements and device challenges at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2016 annual meeting. Granada is executive director and chief scientific officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation’s Skirball Center for Innovation.

SOURCE

FEATURE | HEART VALVE TECHNOLOGY | NOVEMBER 12, 2015| DAVE FORNELL

Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves – Mitral and tricuspid valve repair technologies now in development

http://www.dicardiology.com/article/advances-and-future-directions-transcatheter-valves

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Journal include the following:

 

Mitral Valve Repair: Who is a Patient Candidate for a Non-Ablative Fully Non-Invasive Procedure?

Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/04/mitral-valve-repair-who-is-a-candidate-for-a-non-ablative-fully-non-invasive-procedure/

 

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Hadassah Opens Israel’s First Heart Valve Disease Clinic

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

WEDNESDAY, NOV 30 2016

“Until recently, the default treatment for valve disease has been open heart surgery to replace the damaged valve or valves.”

The Hadassah Medical Organization has opened Israel’s first Heart Valve Disease Clinic, which is geared toward detecting and treating the most complicated cases of heart valve disease–a growing problem in an aging population.

Until recently, the default treatment for valve disease has been open heart surgery to replace the damaged valve or valves. Currently, these invasive procedures are often superseded by less invasive cardiac catheterizations. In any case, however, efficiently treating valve disease and minimizing life-threatening risk factors such as heart attack remains an ongoing struggle for cardiovascular specialists.

As Prof. Ronen Beeri, head of Hadassah’s Cardiovascular Research Center, explains: “A ‘cardio team’ is needed to treat a patient suffering from heart valve disease. The time from referral to our Heart Institute to receive treatment from the relevant specialist can sometimes take months. Generally, patients with complex issues cannot afford to wait that long. The multidisciplinary cardio team solution at our new Clinic will help streamline the process so that a patient will receive all the necessary echocardiograms and other exams needed to diagnose and begin treatment within a week’s time.”

SOURCE

http://www.hadassah.org/news-stories/heart-valve-disease.html

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New method for performing Aortic Valve Replacement: Transmural catheter procedure developed at NIH, Minimally-invasive tissue-crossing – Transcaval access, abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

VIEW VIDEO

 

The new method was developed by researchers at the National, Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and tested in a trial on 100 patients at 20 hospitals across the United States. Researchers said it proved successful in 99 of the patients.

“This is a seminal study,” said the lead author, cardiologist Adam B. Greenbaum, M.D., co-director of the Henry Ford Hospital Center for Structural Heart Disease, Detroit. “It challenged conventional wisdom, which objected to the idea of safe passage between the vena cava and the aorta. More important, it is the first of many non-surgical minimally-invasive tissue-crossing, or so-called transmural catheter procedures developed at NIH that can be applied to diverse fields of medicine.”

Robert J. Lederman, M.D., a senior investigator in NHLBI’s Division of Intramural Research who led the study, said researchers developed the method to address a specific clinical need, even though they knew it would be a challenging proposition for most surgeons and physicians to accept. The proposed and counterintuitive mechanism of action is that bleeding from the aorta spontaneously decompresses into a corresponding hole the physician makes in the vein, because the surrounding area behind the peritoneum has higher pressure than the vein.

The results of the research, which were independently confirmed by a committee of outside cardiologists, show the procedure not only has a high success rate, but also an acceptable rate of bleeding and vascular complications, particularly in the high risk patients studied. The study builds on the access technique that Lederman’s NHLBI team developed and first tested in animals in 2012 and first applied with Henry Ford physicians to help patients in 2013. NHLBI and its collaborators are now working to find ways to train more specialists to perform the procedure.

The study will also be presented on Monday, October 31 at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics conference in Washington, D.C. Co-authors include researchers from

  • Henry Ford Hospital;
  • Emory University, Atlanta;
  • Oklahoma Heart Institute, Tulsa;
  • Lexington Medical Center, West Columbia, South Carolina; and
  • Oschner Medical Center, New Orleans.

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have developed a new, less invasive way to perform transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a procedure widely used to treat aortic valve stenosis, a lethal heart condition. The new approach, called transcaval access, will make TAVR more available to high risk patients, especially women, whose femoral arteries are too small or diseased to withstand the standard procedure. The Journal of the American College of Cardiology published the findings.

Aortic valve stenosis involves the narrowing of the heart’s aortic valve which reduces blood flow through the heart. For about 85 percent of patients with this condition, doctors typically perform TAVR through the femoral artery in the leg. But for the other 15 percent, doctors must find a different access route. The most common alternative routes are through the chest, which requires surgery and are associated with significantly more complications.

Transcaval access, which can be performed in awake patients, involves electrifying a small wire so that it crosses between neighboring blood vessels in the abdomen. The technique calls for making large holes in both the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava, which physicians previously considered dangerous because of the risk of fatal bleeding.

SOURCE

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-method-performing-aortic-valve-replacement-proves-successful-high-risk-patients

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/871196?nlid=110314_3866&src=WNL_mdplsfeat_161101_mscpedit_card&uac=93761AJ&spon=2&impID=1226378&faf=1

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