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Archive for the ‘Medical Devices R&D and Inventions’ Category


Embryogenesis in Mechanical Womb

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

A highly effective platforms for the ex utero culture of post-implantation mouse embryos have been developed in the present study by scientists of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. The study was published in the journal Nature. They have grown more than 1,000 embryos in this way. This study enables the appropriate development of embryos from before gastrulation (embryonic day (E) 5.5) until the hindlimb formation stage (E11). Late gastrulating embryos (E7.5) are grown in three-dimensional rotating bottles, whereas extended culture from pre-gastrulation stages (E5.5 or E6.5) requires a combination of static and rotating bottle culture platforms.

At Day 11 of development more than halfway through a mouse pregnancy the researchers compared them to those developing in the uteruses of living mice and were found to be identical. Histological, molecular and single-cell RNA sequencing analyses confirm that the ex utero cultured embryos recapitulate in utero development precisely. The mouse embryos looked perfectly normal. All their organs developed as expected, along with their limbs and circulatory and nervous systems. Their tiny hearts were beating at a normal 170 beats per minute. But, the lab-grown embryos becomes too large to survive without a blood supply. They had a placenta and a yolk sack, but the nutrient solution that fed them through diffusion was no longer sufficient. So, a suitable mechanism for blood supply is required to be developed.

Till date the only way to study the development of tissues and organs is to turn to species like worms, frogs and flies that do not need a uterus, or to remove embryos from the uteruses of experimental animals at varying times, providing glimpses of development more like in snapshots than in live videos. This research will help scientists understand how mammals develop and how gene mutations, nutrients and environmental conditions may affect the fetus. This will allow researchers to mechanistically interrogate post-implantation morphogenesis and artificial embryogenesis in mammals. In the future it may be possible to develop a human embryo from fertilization to birth entirely outside the uterus. But the work may one day raise profound questions about whether other animals, even humans, should or could be cultured outside a living womb.

References:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03416-3

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867414000750?via%3Dihub

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1469-185X.1978.tb00993.x

https://www.nature.com/articles/199297a0

https://rep.bioscientifica.com/view/journals/rep/35/1/jrf_35_1_018.xml

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Left Ventricular Volume Reduction and Reshaping as a Treatment Option for Heart Failure

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Left Ventricular Remodeling and Its Reversal

When the myocardium is subjected to abnormal mechanical and neurohormonal stresses, left ventricular remodeling ensues with a progression of structural, cellular, molecular, metabolic, and functional changes.

In chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, this remodeling affects the left ventricle with consequences that include ventricular dilation, transition of the chamber shape from elliptical to spherical, and the shifting of papillary muscles and mitral valve apparatus into abnormal positions. Ironically, while remodeling is an outgrowth of the initial hemodynamic and metabolic insults that lead to heart failure, it is also self-propagating, contributing to the progressive loss of ventricular function over time.

In the July 20 online issue of Structural Heart, heart failure specialists at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons present a comprehensive review of treatment options that focus on restoring the normal ventricular size and preventing the remodeling process from continuing. But can preventing or limiting left ventricular remodeling following an insult or reversing it once it is present reduce cardiovascular morbidity?

Their article provides insight into this question with a view toward better understanding the impact of remodeling on ventricular dysfunction and an in-depth look at therapeutic approaches, including those that are well-established, several that are currently under investigation, as well as those that have been invalidated and no longer used. The authors focus on two fundamental therapeutic approaches – those that rely primarily on

  • biological mechanisms to induce responses in the myocardium and improve myocardial function, and
  • physical mechanisms, involving procedures where a portion of the heart is either removed or excluded and devices to reduce myocardial wall stress through ventricular constraint or reshaping.

Read more:

Left Ventricular Volume Reduction and Reshaping as a Treatment Option for Heart Failure.
https://doi.org/10.1080/24748706.2020.1777359

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, include the following:

Treatment Options for Left Ventricular Failure  –  Temporary Circulatory Support: Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) – Impella Recover LD/LP 5.0 and 2.5, Pump Catheters (Non-surgical) vs Bridge Therapy: Percutaneous Left Ventricular Assist Devices (pLVADs) and LVADs (Surgical) 

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP
and
Curator: Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/17/treatment-options-for-left-ventricular-failure-temporary-circulatory-support-intra-aortic-balloon-pump-iabp-impella-recover-ldlp-5-0-and-2-5-pump-catheters-non-surgical-vs-bridge-therapy/

Mechanical Circulatory Assist Devices as a Bridge to Heart Transplantation or as “Destination Therapy“: Options for Patients in Advanced Heart Failure

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

and

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/advanced-heart-failure/

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Bioresorbable Stent Clinical Trials with New Esprit Below-the-knee Scaffold

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Abbott announced on September 3, 2020, the beginning of the LIFE-BTK clinical trial to evaluate effectiveness and safety of  the Esprit BTK Everolimus Eluting Resorbable Scaffold System. The Esprit BTK System consists of a thin strutted scaffold made of poly-L-lactide, a semi-crystalline bioresorbable polymer engineered to resist vessel recoil and provide a platform for drug delivery. The scaffold is coated with poly-D, L-lactide (PDLLA) and the cytostatic drug, everolimus.

This trial is the first Investigational Device Exemption in the US to assess a fully bioresorbable stent to treat blocked arteries below the knees, also known as critical limb ischemia in people battling advanced stages of peripheral artery disease. For people with CLI, blocked vessels weaken blood flow to the lower extremities, which can lead to severe pain, wounds, and in severe cases, limb amputation.

At this time, the standard of care for patients battling critical limb ischemia is balloon angioplasty, which depend on on a small balloon delivered via a catheter to the blockage to compress it against the arterial wall, opening the vessel and restoring blood flow. Yet, blockages treated only with balloon angioplasty have poor short- and long-term results, and in many cases the vessels become blocked again, lacking additional treatment.

Patients treated with balloon angioplasty often require several procedures on treated arteries, and  a drug eluting resorbable device is if at all possible suited to provide mechanical support, decrease the chance of the vessel re-narrowing and then slowly disappear over time. At this time, there are no drug eluding stents, drug coated balloons or bare metal stents approved for use below the knee. Since, there is a limited number of options for stents below the knee, the FDA has granted Esprit BTK breakthrough device designation, which simplifies review and pre-market approval timelines.

According to Abbott, Espirit BTK System is not a permanent implant, but it does provide support to an artery right after a balloon angioplasty, stopping the vessel from reclosing. As soon as it is implanted, the scaffold distributes a drug over a few months that encourages healing and keeps the artery open. The scaffold is naturally resorbed into the body over time, like dissolving sutures, and eventually leaves only a healed artery behind.

The LIFE-BTK trial is the first Investigational Device Exemption trial in the U.S. to evaluate a fully dissoluble device to treat critical limb ischemia in people battling advanced stages of peripheral artery disease (PAD). The trial will be run by principal investigators Brian DeRubertis, M.D. (vascular surgeon, UCLA), Sahil Parikh M.D., (interventional cardiologist, New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center.

SOURCE

https://www.dicardiology.com/article/abbott-restarts-bioresorbable-stent-clinical-trials-new-esprit-below-knee-scaffold

 

 

 

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Targeting Atherosclerotic Plaques with Stents made of Drug-eluting Biomaterials

Reporter: Daniel Menzin, BSc BioMedical Engineering, expected, May 2021, Research Assistant 4, Core Applications Developer and Acting CTO 

 

Atherosclerosis is a chronic cardiovascular disease with a multitude of different implications. A coronary artery plaque may lead to congestive heart failure while an aortic plaque may cause angina. Both can quite possibly lead to a heart attack unless properly managed. One way to manage this condition is through the use of stents made of a mesh that is expanded following placement into the diseased vessel.

Unfortunately, stents are oftentimes initially effective but eventually restenosis occurs. Restenosis is a condition in which the affected vessel becomes blocked again. Cholesterol-rich blood vessel environments oftentimes lead to an irritation that results in white blood cells aggregating in the area and releasing proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, which cause fibrosis. To make matters worse, the cholesterol plaques undergo compression against the vessel wall which causes vessel injury and further inflammation. This leads to thrombus formation and may potentiate neointimal hyperplasia, an abnormal proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells in the tunica intima. Neointimal hyperplasia plays a major role in restenosis.

Recent research has found that interfacing drug eluting biomaterials with stents may help prevent restenosis. One study showed that rapamycin delivered with acid labile and ROS-sensitive forms of Beta-cyclodextrin produced promising results when treating atherosclerosis in rat models (Dou, et al). In this promising new paradigm of treatment, non-proinflammatory biomaterials are interfaced with stents. Once inflammation appears the biomaterial will begin to degrade, slowly releasing the drug which suppresses the underlying immune reaction and the resulting inflammation.

 

SOURCE

Dou Y;Chen Y;Zhang X;Xu X;Chen Y;Guo J;Zhang D;Wang R;Li X;Zhang J; “Non-Proinflammatory and Responsive Nanoplatforms for Targeted Treatment of Atherosclerosis.” Biomaterials, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 29 July 2017, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28778000/.

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include: 

75 articles found in the search 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=drug+eluting+stents

 

Among them:

Stent Design and Thrombosis:  Bifurcation Intervention, Drug Eluting Stents (DES) and Biodegrable Stents

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/06/stent-design-and-thrombosis-bifurcation-intervention-drug-eluting-stents-des-and-biodegrable-stents/

 

Drug Eluting Stents: On MIT‘s Edelman Lab’s Contributions to Vascular Biology and its Pioneering Research on DES

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/25/contributions-to-vascular-biology/

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First Surgical Robot Making Surgeon’s Life More Efficient

Reporter : Irina Robu, PhD

A team of microsurgeons and engineers, developed a high-precision robotic assistant called MUSA which is clinically and commercially available. The high precision robotic assistant is compatible with current operating techniques, workflow, instruments and other or instrument.   Microsure is a medical device company in The Netherlands founded by Eindhoven University of Technology and Maastricht University Medical Center in 2016. Microsure’s focus is to improve patients’ quality of life through developing robot systems for microsurgery.

The Microsure’s MUSA enhances surgical performance by stabilizing and scaling down the surgeon’s movements during complex microsurgical procedures on sub-millimeter scale. The surgical robot, allows lymphatic surgery on lymph vessels smaller than 0.3 mm in diameter. Microsure received the ISO 13485 certificate which assures that Microsure is adhering to the highest standards in quality management and regulatory compliance procedures to develop, manufacture, and test its products and services.

MUSA provides superhuman precision for microsurgeons, enabling new interventions that are currently impossible to perform by hand.

SOURCE

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190607005175/en/

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New Neuromodulation Device to Treat Migraines

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Theranica, Israeli startup is developing a non-invasive medical device that treats migraine pain through smartphone-controlled electric pulses unlike existing pharmaceutical solutions like triptans and ergotamine. The company recently received FDA De-novo clearance on Nerivio Migra, a class II medical device to treat acute migraine pain.

The non-invasive medical device, Nerivio Migra contains a bioelectric patch which is placed on the upper arm and a linked smartphone app which controls the electrical impulses and records data. The device’s electric pulses excite C-fiber nerves, generating an analgesic mechanism in the brain that lightens migraine pain.

In order to diminish the overuse of painkillers, the company developed the non-invasive device and tested it among acute migraine patients both two and 48 hours after treatment. Side effects from the device were mild and resolved within 24 hours.

Theranica’s product is lower in price than the existing alternatives and it is using existing smartphone technology. Their initial focus is on marketing to headache clinics as a start. And hoping to expand the indications for its device to the pediatric migraine population and finally use its platform to treat other idiopathic pain conditions like cluster headaches.

SOURCE

Israeli startup gets FDA nod for neuromodulation device to treat migraines

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Palmaz, Pinchuk, Schatz, Simpson and Yock are the 10th recipients of the Russ Prize for innovations leading to the widespread adoption of PCI at NAE Gala Ceremony, 2/20/2019, WashDC

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

National Academy of Engineering, Ohio University Award 2019 Russ Prize

Five interventional cardiologists awarded biennial $500,000 prize for innovations leading to the widespread adoption of PCI

National Academy of Engineering, Ohio University Award 2019 Russ Prize

January 3, 2019 — Ohio University and the National Academy of Engineering announced the 2019 Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize will be given to Julio Palmaz, Leonard Pinchuk, John Simpson, Richard Schatz and Paul Yock for innovations leading to the widespread adoption of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), also known as angioplasty with stent or coronary angioplasty. The $500,000 biennial prize, which recognizes a bioengineering achievement that significantly improves the human condition, cites PCI for “seminal contributions to coronary angioplasty, enabling minimally invasive treatment of advanced coronary artery disease.”

“The Russ Prize recipients personify engineering creations that advance health and healthcare every day,” said NAE President C. D. Mote, Jr.  “The PCI makes a remarkable contribution to patient well-being, helping millions afflicted with advanced coronary artery disease and significant angina. “

Ohio University alumnus and esteemed engineer Fritz Russ, BSEE ’42, HON ‘75, and his wife, Dolores Russ, established the biennial prize in 1999 with a multimillion dollar gift to Ohio University. They modeled it after the Nobel Prize, with the goal of recognizing bioengineering achievements worldwide that are in widespread use.

“This innovation — truly, sets of innovations — enables the treatment of coronary artery disease without the complexities, cost and risk of open heart surgery. Most of us have a friend or relative who has benefited greatly from angioplasty treatment,” said Russ College Dean Dennis Irwin. “These contributions have truly improved the human condition. Rewarding such innovations was the Russes’ intent.”

Percutaneous coronary intervention, also referred to as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), is a minimally invasive procedure that uses a catheter to place a small structure called a stent to open up blood vessels in the heart that have been narrowed by plaque buildup. PCI improves blood flow, thus decreasing heart-related chest pain, making patients feel better and increasing their ability to be active. Ten of millions of patients have benefited from PCI worldwide, and this procedure has replaced or significantly delayed the need for open heart coronary bypass surgery.

Julio C. Palmaz, inventor of the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved balloon-expandable vascular stent (1990), is Ashbel Smith Professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio and scientific adviser of Vactronix Scientific. The Palmaz stent is on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. In 1994 he and Richard Schatz created a modified coronary stent — two Palmaz stents joined by a single connector — approved by the FDA as the first stent indicated for the treatment of failure of coronary balloon angioplasty. The Palmaz-Schatz stent became the gold standard for every subsequent stent submitted for FDA approval.

Leonard Pinchuk is an inventor and entrepreneur in biomedical engineering, with 128 U.S. patents and 90 publications. He has co-founded 10 companies where his major accomplishments include invention of the Nylon 12 angioplasty balloon, helical wire stent, modular stent-graft, a drug-eluting stent (Taxus), several biomaterials (Bionate and polystyrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene [SIBS]), a novel glaucoma tube (InnFocus MicroShunt), and the next-generation intraocular lens. He is a Distinguished Research Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Miami.

John Simpson has helped revolutionize the field of cardiology through innovations that fundamentally altered how physicians treat cardiovascular disease. In 1981 he created a new catheter system for coronary angioplasty with an independently steerable guidewire in the central lumen of the balloon catheter, patented as the over-the-wire balloon angioplasty catheter. He now focuses his efforts on the treatment of vascular disease through the development of new technologies combined with a new approach to optical imaging.

Read the related article “Requirements for Interventional Echocardiographers”

Richard Schatz is research director of cardiovascular interventions at the Scripps Heart, Lung and Vascular Center, and director of gene and stem cell therapy. He is a recognized international expert in interventional cardiology and has published and lectured extensively. His seminal work in coronary stents spurred a revolution in the treatment of coronary artery disease — over 2 million of them are placed annually worldwide, with an immeasurable impact on relieving mortality and morbidity, improving patients’ lives, and reducing healthcare costs.

Paul Yock is the Martha Meier Weiland Professor of Medicine and founding co-chair of Stanford’s Department of Bioengineering, with courtesy appointments in the Graduate School of Business and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He is also founder and director of the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign. He has authored over 300 peer-reviewed publications, chapters, and editorials and two textbooks, and holds over 50 U.S. patents. Yock is internationally known for his work in inventing, developing and testing new devices, including the Rapid Exchange stenting and balloon angioplasty system, which is now the primary system in use worldwide. He also invented the fundamental approach to intravascular ultrasound imaging and founded Cardiovascular Imaging Systems (CVIS), later acquired by Boston Scientific.

“Ohio University is honored to join the National Academy of Engineering in recognizing these accomplished individuals, who have contributed to a bioengineering advancement that has enabled better health for heart patients across the world,” said Ohio University President M. Duane Nellis. “Their multi-disciplinary collaboration that lead to the development of PCI, a technology that has revolutionized coronary health, truly embraces the vision that Fritz and Dolores Russ had when creating the Russ Prize.”

Palmaz, Pinchuk, Schatz, Simpson and Yock are the 10th recipients of the Russ Prize. They will receive the award at a National Academy of Engineering gala ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 20, 2019

For more information: www.nae.edu

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Rhythm Management Device Hardware (Dual-chamber Pacemaker) coupled with BackBeat’s Cardiac Neuromodulation Therapy (CNT) bioelectronic therapy for Lowering Systolic Blood Pressure for patients with Pacemakers

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

BackBeat’s CNT is a bioelectronic therapy that immediately, substantially and chronically lowers blood pressure (BP) while simultaneously modulating the autonomic nervous system (ANS).  Mimicking the effects of multiple medications by reducing pre-load, after-load and sympathetic tone, it can be delivered using standard rhythm management device hardware such as dual-chamber pacemakers.

For more information: www.orchestrabiomed.com

October 2, 2018 — Two-year results of the Moderato I Study demonstrated immediate, substantial and sustained reduction in blood pressure when BackBeat cardiac neuromodulation therapy (CNT) was used in patients with persistent hypertension (office BP > 150mmHg). Patients in the study had persistent hypertension despite two or more anti-hypertensive medications and an indication for a pacemaker.

Results of the multicenter clinical trial were presented at the 2018 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) conference, Sept. 21-25 in San Diego, by Daniel Burkhoff, M.D., Ph.D., director, heart failure, hemodynamics and mechanical circulatory support research for the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF).

“The clinical efficacy and safety data observed with BackBeat CNT in a patient population with a significant portion of isolated systolic disease is very promising. Hypertension affects over 70 percent of pacemaker patients. These patients could benefit substantially from a potent hypertension therapy such as BackBeat CNT that could be included in their already necessary pacemaker,” said Prof. Petr Neuzil, M.D., head of the Department of Cardiology of Na Homolce Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic and one of the principal investigators of the study.

The 27 patients that met the study inclusion criteria were implanted with BackBeat’s proprietary Moderato dual-chamber pacemaker that incorporates the BackBeat CNT algorithms. The primary safety and efficacy endpoint results of the study were as follows:

  • Efficacy Outcomes: Immediate, substantial and sustained reduction in blood pressure.
    • 14.2 mmHg decrease from baseline (p<0.001) in 24 hours ambulatory systolic blood pressure (AMB BP) at 3 months
    • 23.4 mmHg decrease from baseline (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP) sustained out to 2 years
  • High responder rate in a population where 78 percent of patients had isolated systolic hypertension.
    • 85 percent AMB BP reduced >5mmHg
    • 74 percent AMB BP reduced >10 mmHg
  • Safety Outcomes: The study met the safety endpoint.
    • Observed reduction in end systolic and diastolic volumes with no change to ejection fraction suggests improvement of cardiac function
    • Observed reduction in heart rate out to 2 years indicative of reduced sympathetic activity

“These statistically significant results demonstrate the potential for BackBeat CNT to be a broadly applicable therapy that substantially lowers blood pressure immediately and maintains reduced pressures for years,” commented Burkhoff. “It is rare to see a new therapy show such dramatic and sustained effects in such a small number of patients.”

To further investigate the efficacy and safety of BackBeat CNT for the treatment of hypertension, Orchestra BioMed is enrolling patients into a prospective, 1:1 randomized double-blind active treatment (BackBeat CNT) versus standard medical therapy trial, Moderato II. The study will enroll patients with uncontrolled blood pressure (office systolic > 140, day and AMB BP > 130 mmHg) treated with at least one anti-hypertension medication that are indicated for a dual-chamber pacemaker. The primary efficacy endpoint of the first cohort of the study is the comparison of the mean reduction in 24-hour systolic ambulatory blood pressure following 6 months of therapy between the treatment and the control. Primary safety endpoint is the rate of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) at 6 months between the treatment and control.  The company is expecting results on the first cohort of patients in 2019.

SOURCE

https://www.dicardiology.com/content/backbeat-cardiac-neuromodulation-therapy-reduces-blood-pressure-two-years?eid=333021707&bid=2258792

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Extraordinary Breakthrough in Artificial Eyes and Artificial Muscle Technology

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Metalens, flat surface that use nanostructures to focus light promise to transform optics by replacing the bulky, curved lenses presently used in optical devices with a simple, flat surface.

Scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences designed metalens who are mainly focused on light and minimizes spherical aberrations through a dense pattern of nanostructures, since the information density in each lens will be high due to nanostructures being small.

According to Federico Capasso, “This demonstrates the feasibility of embedded optical zoom and auto focus for a wide range of applications, including cell phone cameras, eyeglasses, and virtual and augmented reality hardware. It also shows the possibility of future optical microscopes, which operate fully electronically and can correct many aberrations simultaneously.”

However, when scientists tried to scale up the lens, the file size of the design alone would balloon up to gigabytes or even terabytes. And as a result, create a new algorithm in order to shrivel the file size to make the metalens flawless with the innovation currently used to create integrated circuits. Afterward, scientists follow the large metalens to an artificial muscle without conceding its ability to focus light. In the human eye, the lens is enclosed by ciliary muscle, which stretches or compresses the lens, changing its shape to adjust its focal length. Scientists at that moment choose a thin, transparent dielectric elastomer with low to attach to the lens.

Within the experiment, when the voltage is applied to elastomers, it stretches, the position of nanopillars on the surface of the lens shift. The scientists as a result show that the lens can focus instantaneous, control abnormalities triggered by astigmatisms, and achieve image shift. Since the adaptive metalens is flat, you can correct those deviations and assimilate diverse optical capabilities onto a single plane of control.

SOURCE

Researchers combine artificial eye and artificial muscle

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Top 100 of 415 articles published on PubMed in 2018 on TAVR

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

SOURCE

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed  [2018 TAVR]

Select item 301029701.

Ninety-Day Readmissions of Bundled Valve Patients: Implications for Healthcare Policy.

Koeckert MS, Grossi EA, Vining PF, Abdallah R, Williams MR, Kalkut G, Loulmet DF, Zias EA, Querijero M, Galloway AC.

Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg2018 Aug 10. pii: S1043-0679(18)30168-0. doi: 10.1053/j.semtcvs.2018.07.017. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30102970
Select item 300946422.

TAVR Vs. SAVR in Intermediate-Risk Patients: What Influences Our Choice of Therapy.

Still S, Szerlip M, Mack M.

Curr Cardiol Rep2018 Aug 9;20(10):82. doi: 10.1007/s11886-018-1026-3. Review.

PMID:
30094642
Select item 300945323.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis and heart failure.

Bavishi C, Kolte D, Gordon PC, Abbott JD.

Heart Fail Rev2018 Aug 9. doi: 10.1007/s10741-018-9726-8. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:
30094532
Select item 300930574.

Disarming the Ticking Time Bomb: Post-Procedure Electrocardiography Predictors of High-Degree Conduction Disturbances After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Nazif TM, Chen S, Kodali SK.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1527-1530. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.07.003. No abstract available.

PMID:
30093057
Select item 300930565.

Predictors of Advanced Conduction Disturbances Requiring a Late (≥48 H) Permanent Pacemaker Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Mangieri A, Lanzillo G, Bertoldi L, Jabbour RJ, Regazzoli D, Ancona MB, Tanaka A, Mitomo S, Garducci S, Montalto C, Pagnesi M, Giannini F, Giglio M, Montorfano M, Chieffo A, Rodès-Cabau J, Monaco F, Paglino G, Della Bella P, Colombo A, Latib A.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1519-1526. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.06.014.

PMID:
30093056
Select item 300930556.

Immediate Post-Procedural 12-Lead Electrocardiography as Predictor of Late Conduction Defects After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Jørgensen TH, De Backer O, Gerds TA, Bieliauskas G, Svendsen JH, Søndergaard L.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1509-1518. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.011.

PMID:
30093055
Select item 300925577.

Von Willebrand factor and the aortic valve: Concepts that are important in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement era.

Ibrahim H, Rondina MT, Kleiman NS.

Thromb Res2018 Jul 30;170:20-27. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2018.07.028. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:
30092557
Select item 300893298.

Antiplatelet Treatment for Catheter-Based Interventions in High-Risk Patients: Current Guidelines and Expert Opinion.

Rath D, Gawaz M.

Hamostaseologie2018 Aug 8. doi: 10.1055/s-0038-1668165. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30089329
Select item 300870259.

The Evolution of Echocardiographic Type and Anesthetic Technique for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement at a High-Volume Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Center.

Marino M, Lilie CJ, Culp WC Jr, Schepel SR, Tippett JC.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 Jun 30. pii: S1053-0770(18)30468-3. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.06.022. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30087025
Select item 3007961110.

Propensity matched comparison of in-hospital outcomes of TAVR vs. SAVR in patients with previous history of CABG: Insights from the Nationwide inpatient sample.

Nalluri N, Atti V, Patel NJ, Kumar V, Arora S, Nalluri S, Nelluri BK, Maniatis GA, Kandov R, Kliger C.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27708. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079611
Select item 3007956111.

Permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in bicuspid aortic valve patients.

Xiong TY, Liao YB, Li YJ, Zhao ZG, Wei X, Tsauo JY, Xu YN, Feng Y, Chen M.

J Interv Cardiol2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1111/joic.12546. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079561
Select item 3007952212.

Effect of transcatheter aortic valve replacement on left atrial function.

Truong VT, Chung E, Nagueh S, Kereiakes D, Schaaf J, Volz B, Ngo TNM, Mazur W.

Echocardiography2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1111/echo.14109. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079522
Select item 3007679413.

TAVR 2.0: Collaborating to Measure, Assure, and Advance Quality.

Shahian DM, Gleason TG, Shemin RJ, Carroll JD, Mack MJ.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Aug 1. pii: S0003-4975(18)31034-8. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.07.004. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30076794
Select item 3007608114.

Low Iodine Contrast Injection for CT Acquisition Prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Aorta Assessment and Screening for Coronary Artery Disease.

Hachulla AL, Noble S, Ronot M, Guglielmi G, de Perrot T, Montet X, Vallée JP.

Acad Radiol2018 Aug 1. pii: S1076-6332(18)30330-1. doi: 10.1016/j.acra.2018.06.016. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30076081
Select item 3007532615.

Variation in post-TAVR antiplatelet therapy utilization and associated outcomes: Insights from the STS/ACC TVT Registry.

Sherwood MW, Vemulapalli S, Harrison JK, Dai D, Vora AN, Mack MJ, Holmes DR, Rumsfeld JS, Cohen DJ, Thourani VH, Kirtane A, Peterson ED.

Am Heart J2018 Jul 9;204:9-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.06.006. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30075326
Select item 3006878516.

State of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Spain Versus Europe and Non-European Countries.

Biagioni C, Tirado-Conte G, Rodés-Cabau J, Ryan N, Cerrato E, Nazif TM, Eltchaninoff H, Sondergaard L, Ribeiro HB, Barbanti M, Nietlispach F, De Jaegere P, Agostoni P, Trillo R, Jiménez-Quevedo P, D’Ascenzo F, Wendler O, Maluenda G, Chen M, Tamburino C, Macaya C, Leon MB, Nombela-Franco L.

J Invasive Cardiol2018 Aug;30(8):301-309.

Select item 3006493717.

Accuracy of predicted orthogonal projection angles for valve deployment during transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Steinvil A, Weissman G, Ertel AW, Weigold G, Rogers T, Koifman E, Buchanan KD, Shults C, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Satler LF, Ben-Dor I, Waksman R.

J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr2018 May 26. pii: S1934-5925(18)30130-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcct.2018.05.017. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30064937
Select item 3006277818.

Absence of Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Hypertrophy is Associated with Increased Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kampaktsis PN, Ullal AV, Swaminathan RV, Minutello RM, Kim L, Bergman GS, Feldman DN, Singh H, Chiu Wong S, Okin PM.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jul 30. doi: 10.1002/clc.23034. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 3005825919.

Early and midterm outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valves.

Aalaei-Andabili SH, Beaver TM, Petersen JW, Anderson RD, Karimi A, Thoburn E, Kabir A, Bavry AA, Arnaoutakis GJ.

J Card Surg2018 Jul 29. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13775. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30058259
Select item 3005725220.

The Incidence of Dysphagia Among Patients Undergoing TAVR With Either General Anesthesia or Moderate Sedation.

Mukdad L, Kashani R, Mantha A, Sareh S, Mendelsohn A, Benharash P.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 May 26. pii: S1053-0770(18)30373-2. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.05.040. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30057252
Select item 3005685121.

Sex-Specific Differences in Outcome of Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kaier K, von Zur Mühlen C, Zirlik A, Schmoor C, Roth K, Bothe W, Hehn P, Reinöhl J, Zehender M, Bode C, Stachon P.

Can J Cardiol2018 Aug;34(8):992-998. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2018.04.009. Epub 2018Apr 12.

PMID:
30056851
Select item 3005602322.

Hemodynamic monitoring by pulse contour analysis during trans-catheter aortic valve replacement: A fast and easy method to optimize procedure results.

Ristalli F, Romano SM, Stolcova M, Meucci F, Squillantini G, Valente S, Di Mario C.

Cardiovasc Revasc Med2018 Jul 19. pii: S1553-8389(18)30314-2. doi: 10.1016/j.carrev.2018.07.015. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30056023
Select item 3005418823.

TAVR Versus SAVR in the Era of NSQIP.

Vadlamudi R, Duggan M.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 May 26. pii: S1053-0770(18)30370-7. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.05.037. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30054188
Select item 3005090924.

Expanding TAVI to Low and Intermediate Risk Patients.

Voigtländer L, Seiffert M.

Front Cardiovasc Med2018 Jul 12;5:92. doi: 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00092. eCollection 2018. Review.

Select item 3004863225.

Albumin Is Predictive of 1-Year Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Hebeler KR, Baumgarten H, Squiers JJ, Wooley J, Pollock BD, Mahoney C, Filardo G, Lima B, DiMaio JM.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Jul 23. pii: S0003-4975(18)31022-1. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.06.024. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30048632
Select item 3004178326.

Bioprosthetic structural valve deterioration: How do TAVR and SAVR prostheses compare?

Aldalati O, Kaura A, Khan H, Dworakowski R, Byrne J, Eskandari M, Deshpande R, Monaghan M, Wendler O, MacCarthy P.

Int J Cardiol2018 Oct 1;268:170-175. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.04.091.

PMID:
30041783
Select item 3003771727.

Exposure to glucocorticoids prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with reduced incidence of high-degree AV block and pacemaker.

Oestreich B, Gurevich S, Adabag S, Kelly R, Helmer G, Raveendran G, Yannopoulos D, Biring T, Garcia S.

Cardiovasc Revasc Med2018 Jul 18. pii: S1553-8389(18)30311-7. doi: 10.1016/j.carrev.2018.07.012. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30037717
Select item 3003742428.

Comparison of Hospital Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation With Versus Without Hypothyroidism.

Subahi A, Yassin AS, Adegbala O, Akintoye E, Abubakar H, Elmoghrabi A, Ibrahim W, Ajam M, Pahuja M, Weinberger JJ, Levine D, Afonso L.

Am J Cardiol2018 Jun 5. pii: S0002-9149(18)31197-4. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.05.025. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30037424
Select item 3003171929.

Arrhythmic Burden as Determined by Ambulatory Continuous Cardiac Monitoring in Patients With New-Onset Persistent Left Bundle Branch Block Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: The MARE Study.

Rodés-Cabau J, Urena M, Nombela-Franco L, Amat-Santos I, Kleiman N, Munoz-Garcia A, Atienza F, Serra V, Deyell MW, Veiga-Fernandez G, Masson JB, Canadas-Godoy V, Himbert D, Castrodeza J, Elizaga J, Francisco Pascual J, Webb JG, de la Torre JM, Asmarats L, Pelletier-Beaumont E, Philippon F.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1495-1505. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.016. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

PMID:
30031719
Select item 3003171830.

Arrhythmias and Conduction Disturbances Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Out of Sight, Out of Mind?

Pighi M, Piazza N.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1506-1508. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.05.038. Epub 2018 Jul 18. No abstract available.

PMID:
30031718
Select item 3002924731.

Numerical Parametric Study of Paravalvular Leak Following a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Deployment Into a Patient-Specific Aortic Root.

Mao W, Wang Q, Kodali S, Sun W.

J Biomech Eng2018 Oct 1;140(10). doi: 10.1115/1.4040457.

PMID:
30029247
Select item 3002920732.

Comparative Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Polymeric Transcatheter and Surgical Aortic Valves’ Hemodynamics and Structural Mechanics.

Ghosh R, Marom G, Rotman O, Slepian MJ, Prabhakar S, Horner M, Bluestein D.

J Biomech Eng2018 Jun 25. doi: 10.1115/1.4040600. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30029207
Select item 3002830433.

Extended benefits of TAVR in young patients with low-intermediate risk score: proceed with care.

Doshi R.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 20;14(4):e485. doi: 10.4244/EIJ-D-18-00236L. No abstract available.

Select item 3002830034.

Valve-in-valve TAVR using the SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve: still plagued by patient-prosthesis mismatch.

Saxon JT, Cohen DJ, Feldman T.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 20;14(4):e377-e379. doi: 10.4244/EIJV14I4A66. No abstract available.

Select item 3002573135.

The SAVI-TF Registry: 1-Year Outcomes of the European Post-Market Registry Using the ACURATE neo Transcatheter Heart Valve Under Real-World Conditions in 1,000 Patients.

Kim WK, Hengstenberg C, Hilker M, Kerber S, Schäfer U, Rudolph T, Linke A, Franz N, Kuntze T, Nef H, Kappert U, Zembala MO, Toggweiler S, Walther T, Möllmann H.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1368-1374. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.023.

Select item 3002557236.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement of Failed Surgically Implanted Bioprostheses: The STS/ACC Registry.

Tuzcu EM, Kapadia SR, Vemulapalli S, Carroll JD, Holmes DR Jr, Mack MJ, Thourani VH, Grover FL, Brennan JM, Suri RM, Dai D, Svensson LG.

J Am Coll Cardiol2018 Jul 24;72(4):370-382. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.04.074.

PMID:
30025572
Select item 3002410237.

Transcatheter valve-in-valve versus redo surgical aortic valve replacement for the treatment of degenerated bioprosthetic aortic valve: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Tam DY, Vo TX, Wijeysundera HC, Dvir D, Friedrich JO, Fremes SE.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 19. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27686. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30024102
Select item 3001983938.

Predicted magnitude of alternate access in the contemporary transcatheter aortic valve replacement era.

Rogers T, Gai J, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Shults C, Ben-Dor I, Satler LF, Waksman R.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27668. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30019839
Select item 3001982839.

Slope of left ventricular filling as an index of valvular and paravalvular regurgitation in native and prosthetic aortic valves.

Makki N, Ghao X, Whitson B, Shreenivas S, Crestanello J, Lilly S.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27684. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30019828
Select item 3001982240.

Is two better than one? Re-evaluating the surgical approval process for TAVR.

Shreenivas S, Lilly S, Reardon M, Answini GA, Kereiakes DJ.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27666. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30019822
Select item 3001816741.

Improving the Diagnostic Performance of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Prosthetic Heart Valve Endocarditis.

Swart LE, Gomes A, Scholtens AM, Sinha B, Tanis W, Lam MGEH, van der Vlugt MJ, Streukens SAF, Aarntzen EHJG, Bucerius J, van Assen S, Bleeker-Rovers CP, van Geel PP, Krestin GP, van Melle JP, Roos-Hesselink JW, Slart RHJA, Glaudemans AWJM, Budde RPJ.

Circulation2018 Jul 17. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035032. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035032. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30018167
Select item 3001752042.

Software-automated multidetector computed tomography-based prosthesis-sizing in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Inter-vendor comparison and relation to patient outcome.

Baeßler B, Mauri V, Bunck AC, Pinto Dos Santos D, Friedrichs K, Maintz D, Rudolph T.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jul 9. pii: S0167-5273(18)32256-3. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.07.008. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30017520
Select item 3001751843.

Inflammation in aortic stenosis: Shaping the biomarkers network.

Schiattarella GG, Perrino C.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jul 6. pii: S0167-5273(18)33669-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.07.026. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30017518
Select item 3001728244.

Inter- and intra-observer repeatability of aortic annulus measurements on screening CT for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR): Implications for appropriate device sizing.

Knobloch G, Sweetman S, Bartels C, Raval A, Gimelli G, Jacobson K, Lozonschi L, Kohmoto T, Osaki S, François C, Nagle S.

Eur J Radiol2018 Aug;105:209-215. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2018.06.003. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

PMID:
30017282
Select item 3001614745.

Atherosclerosis on CT Angiogram Predicts Acute Kidney Injury After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kandathil A, Abbara S, Hanna M, Minhajuddin A, Wehrmann L, Merchant AM, Mills R, Fox AA.

AJR Am J Roentgenol2018 Jul 17:1-7. doi: 10.2214/AJR.17.19340. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30016147
Select item 3001289046.

Transfemoral Implantation of the Acurate neo for the Treatment of Aortic Regurgitation.

Toggweiler S, Cerillo AG, Kim WK, Biaggi P, Lloyd C, Hilker M, Almagor Y, Cuculi F, Brinkert M, Kobza R, Muller O, Rück A, Corti R.

J Invasive Cardiol2018 Jul 15. pii: JIC2018715-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 3000980047.

Suprasternal and Left Axillary Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Morbidly Obese Patients.

Olds A, Eudailey K, Nazif T, Vahl T, Khalique O, Lewis C, Hahn R, Leon M, Bapat V, Ahmed M, Kodali S, George I.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Jul 13. pii: S0003-4975(18)30978-0. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.05.095. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30009800
Select item 3000336648.

Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation (VinV-TAVR) for failed surgical aortic bioprosthetic valves.

Wernly B, Zappe AK, Unbehaun A, Sinning JM, Jung C, Kim WK, Fichtlscherer S, Lichtenauer M, Hoppe UC, Alushi B, Beckhoff F, Wewetzer C, Franz M, Kretzschmar D, Navarese E, Landmesser U, Falk V, Lauten A.

Clin Res Cardiol2018 Jul 12. doi: 10.1007/s00392-018-1326-z. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30003366
Select item 3000209949.

Myocardial Scar and Mortality in Severe Aortic Stenosis: Data from the BSCMR Valve Consortium.

Musa TA, Treibel TA, Vassiliou VS, Captur G, Singh A, Chin C, Dobson LE, Pica S, Loudon M, Malley T, Rigolli M, Foley JRJ, Bijsterveld P, Law GR, Dweck MR, Myerson SG, McCann GP, Prasad SK, Moon JC, Greenwood JP.

Circulation2018 Jul 12. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032839. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032839. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30002099
Select item 2999613850.

Aortic Angulation and TAVR.

Gandotra P.

Cardiology2018 Jul 11;140(3):141-142. doi: 10.1159/000490094. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

Select item 2998906851.

Endovascular repair of severe aortic coarctation, transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis, and percutaneous coronary intervention in an elderly patient with long term follow-up.

Fallatah R, Elasfar A, Amoudi O, Ajaz M, AlHarbi I, Abuelatta R.

J Saudi Heart Assoc2018 Jul;30(3):271-275. doi: 10.1016/j.jsha.2018.01.003. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

Select item 2998711952.

Impact of Rapid Ventricular Pacing on Outcome After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Fefer P, Bogdan A, Grossman Y, Berkovitch A, Brodov Y, Kuperstein R, Segev A, Guetta V, Barbash IM.

J Am Heart Assoc2018 Jul 9;7(14). pii: e009038. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.118.009038.

Select item 2998314253.

Imaging Evaluation for the Detection of Leaflet Thrombosis After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Zhao ZG, Wang MY, Jilaihawi H.

Interv Cardiol Clin2018 Jul;7(3):293-299. doi: 10.1016/j.iccl.2018.03.007. Epub 2018Jun 29. Review.

PMID:
29983142
Select item 2998314154.

Imaging Evaluation and Interpretation for Vascular Access for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Foley TR, Stinis CT.

Interv Cardiol Clin2018 Jul;7(3):285-291. doi: 10.1016/j.iccl.2018.03.006. Epub 2018Jun 29. Review.

PMID:
29983141
Select item 2998121455.

Echocardiography in transcatheter aortic (Core)Valve implantation: Part 2-Transesophageal echocardiography.

Naqvi TZ.

Echocardiography2018 Jul;35(7):1020-1041. doi: 10.1111/echo.14034. Review.

PMID:
29981214
Select item 2998029956.

Impact of patient-specific morphologies on sinus flow stasis in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: An in vitro study.

Hatoum H, Dollery J, Lilly SM, Crestanello J, Dasi LP.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg2018 Jun 7. pii: S0022-5223(18)31521-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2018.05.086. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29980299
Select item 2997656857.

Malnutrition and Mortality in Frail and Non-Frail Older Adults Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement.

Goldfarb M, Lauck S, Webb JG, Asgar AW, Perrault LP, Piazza N, Martucci G, Lachapelle K, Noiseux N, Kim DH, Popma JJ, Lefèvre T, Labinaz M, Lamy A, Peterson MD, Arora RC, Morais JA, Morin JF, Rudski L, Afilalo J; FRAILTY-AVR Investigators .

Circulation2018 Jul 5. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.118.033887. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.033887. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29976568
Select item 2997636358.

Debris Heterogeneity Across Different Valve Types Captured by a Cerebral Protection System During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Schmidt T, Leon MB, Mehran R, Kuck KH, Alu MC, Braumann RE, Kodali S, Kapadia SR, Linke A, Makkar R, Naber C, Romero ME, Virmani R, Frerker C.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 9;11(13):1262-1273. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.001.

PMID:
29976363
Select item 2997426459.

A Review of Alternative Access for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Young MN, Singh V, Sakhuja R.

Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med2018 Jul 4;20(7):62. doi: 10.1007/s11936-018-0648-5. Review.

PMID:
29974264
Select item 2997123860.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Concomitant Mitral Regurgitation.

Stähli BE, Reinthaler M, Leistner DM, Landmesser U, Lauten A.

Front Cardiovasc Med2018 Jun 19;5:74. doi: 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00074. eCollection 2018. Review.

Select item 2996942761.

Propensity matched comparison of clinical outcomes after transaortic versus transfemoral aortic valve replacement.

Chollet T, Marcheix B, Boudou N, Elbaz M, Campelo-Parada F, Bataille V, Bouisset F, Lairez O, Porterie J, Galinier M, Carrie D, Lhermusier T.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 3. pii: EIJ-D-18-00168. doi: 10.4244/EIJ-D-18-00168. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2996827362.

Alternative access for transcatheter aortic valve replacement in older adults: A collaborative study from France and United States.

Damluji AA, Murman M, Byun S, Moscucci M, Resar JR, Hasan RK, Alfonso CE, Carrillo RG, Williams DB, Kwon CC, Cho PW, Dijos M, Peltan J, Heldman AW, Cohen MG, Leroux L.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 3. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27690. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29968273
Select item 2996613163.

Does Aortic Angulation Impact Outcomes in TAVR.

Czarny MJ, Resar JR.

Cardiology2018;140(2):103-105. doi: 10.1159/000489697. Epub 2018 Jul 2. No abstract available.

PMID:
29966131
Select item 2996339164.

Transcaval transcatheter aortic valve replacement: a visual case review.

Muhammad KI, Tokarchik GC.

J Vis Surg2018 May 14;4:102. doi: 10.21037/jovs.2018.04.02. eCollection 2018.

Select item 2996107265.

Aortic Angulation Does Not Impact Outcomes in Self-Expandable or Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Elmously A, Gray KD, Truong QA, Burshtein A, Wong SC, de Biasi AR, Worku B, Salemi A.

Cardiology2018;140(2):96-102. doi: 10.1159/000488933. Epub 2018 Jun 29.

PMID:
29961072
Select item 2996075666.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Extremely Large Annuli: (Over)expanding Bioprosthetic Technology to the Limits?

Mehilli J, Jochheim D.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1388-1389. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.05.007. Epub 2018 Jun 27. No abstract available.

PMID:
29960756
Select item 2996075567.

Impact of Aortic Root Anatomy and Geometry on Paravalvular Leak in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Extremely Large Annuli Using the Edwards SAPIEN 3 Valve.

Tang GHL, Zaid S, George I, Khalique OK, Abramowitz Y, Maeno Y, Makkar RR, Jilaihawi H, Kamioka N, Thourani VH, Babaliaros V, Webb JG, Htun NM, Attinger-Toller A, Ahmad H, Kaple R, Sharma K, Kozina JA, Kaneko T, Shah P, Hirji SA, Desai ND, Anwaruddin S, Jagasia D, Herrmann HC, Basra SS, Szerlip MA, Mack MJ, Mathur M, Tan CW, Don CW, Sharma R, Gafoor S, Zhang M, Kapadia SR, Mick SL, Krishnaswamy A, Amoroso N, Salemi A, Wong SC, Kini AS, Rodés-Cabau J, Leon MB, Kodali SK.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1377-1387. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.034. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

PMID:
29960755
Select item 2995818268.
Select item 2995225269.

Stent fractures after common femoral artery bail-out stenting due to suture device failure in TAVR.

Veulemans V, Afzal S, Ledwig P, Heiss C, Busch L, Sansone R, Soetemann DB, Maier O, Kleinebrecht L, Kelm M, Zeus T, Hellhammer K.

Vasa2018 Jun 28:1-9. doi: 10.1024/0301-1526/a000712. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29952252
Select item 2995183070.

Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement: Functional Requirements for Device Design, Bench-Top, and Pre-Clinical Evaluation.

Iyer R, Chalekian A, Lane R, Evans M, Yi S, Morris J.

Cardiovasc Eng Technol2018 Jun 27. doi: 10.1007/s13239-018-0364-z. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29951830
Select item 2994327371.

Gender-dependent association of diabetes mellitus with mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Linke A, Schlotter F, Haussig S, Woitek FJ, Stachel G, Adam J, Höllriegel R, Lindner A, Mohr FW, Schuler G, Kiefer P, Leontyev S, Thiele H, Borger MA, Holzhey D, Mangner N.

Clin Res Cardiol2018 Jun 25. doi: 10.1007/s00392-018-1309-0. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29943273
Select item 2994311572.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the 34 mm Medtronic Evolut valve : Early results of single institution experience.

D’Ancona G, Dißmann M, Heinze H, Zohlnhöfer-Momm D, Ince H, Kische S.

Neth Heart J2018 Aug;26(7-8):401-408. doi: 10.1007/s12471-018-1122-4.

Select item 2994136973.

Midterm Outcomes With the Self-Expanding ACURATE neo Aortic Bioprosthesis: The “Bumblebee Paradox” in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Barbanti M, Todaro D.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1375-1376. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.06.004. Epub 2018 Jun 22. No abstract available.

PMID:
29941369
Select item 2993663474.

Atrioventricular and intraventricular block after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

Lee JJ, Goldschlager N, Mahadevan VS.

J Interv Card Electrophysiol2018 Jun 24. doi: 10.1007/s10840-018-0391-6. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29936634
Select item 2993449375.

Recurrent Unilateral Transudative Pleural Effusion Due to Low Flow, Low Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis.

Al-Khafaji JF, Taha M, Abdalla AO, Rowan C.

Am J Case Rep2018 Jun 23;19:739-743. doi: 10.12659/AJCR.909448.

Select item 2992964276.

Whose Urgency Is it, Anyway?

Brener SJ.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1186-1187. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.035. No abstract available.

PMID:
29929642
Select item 2992964177.

Outcomes Following Urgent/Emergent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Insights From the STS/ACC TVT Registry.

Kolte D, Khera S, Vemulapalli S, Dai D, Heo S, Goldsweig AM, Aronow HD, Elmariah S, Inglessis I, Palacios IF, Thourani VH, Sharaf BL, Gordon PC, Abbott JD.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1175-1185. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.002. Epub 2018 Mar 11.

PMID:
29929641
Select item 2992963978.

Medium-Term Follow-Up of Early Leaflet Thrombosis After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Ruile P, Minners J, Breitbart P, Schoechlin S, Gick M, Pache G, Neumann FJ, Hein M.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1164-1171. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.006.

PMID:
29929639
Select item 2992775879.

Left Subclavian Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Under Combined Interscalene and Pectoralis Nerve Blocks: A Case Series.

Block M, Pitchon DN, Schwenk ES, Ruggiero N, Entwistle J, Goldhammer JE.

A A Pract2018 Jun 18. doi: 10.1213/XAA.0000000000000819. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29927758
Select item 2992620680.

Optimal pre-TAVR annulus sizing in patients with bicuspid aortic valve: area-derived perimeter by CT is the best-correlated measure with intraoperative sizing.

Wang Y, Wang M, Song G, Wang W, Lv B, Wang H, Wu Y.

Eur Radiol2018 Jun 20. doi: 10.1007/s00330-018-5592-y. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29926206
Select item 2992437681.

Immediate improvement of left ventricular mechanics following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Lozano Granero VC, Fernández Santos S, Fernández-Golfín C, Plaza Martín M, de la Hera Galarza JM, Faletra FF, Swaans MJ, López-Fernández T, Mesa D, La Canna G, Echeverría García T, Habib G, Martíne Monzonís A, Zamorano Gómez JL.

Cardiol J2018 Jun 20. doi: 10.5603/CJ.a2018.0066. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2992312682.

Sex-Specific Considerations in Women with Aortic Stenosis and Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Mihos CG, Klassen SL, Yucel E.

Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med2018 Jun 19;20(7):52. doi: 10.1007/s11936-018-0651-x. Review.

PMID:
29923126
Select item 2992253583.
Select item 2991587884.

Less pronounced reverse left ventricular remodeling in patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared to tricuspid aortic stenosis.

Xiong TY, Wang X, Li YJ, Liao YB, Zhao ZG, Wei X, Xu YN, Zheng MX, Zhou X, Peng Y, Wei JF, Feng Y, Chen M.

Int J Cardiovasc Imaging2018 Jun 18. doi: 10.1007/s10554-018-1401-6. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29915878
Select item 2991274185.

Predictors of Persistent Tricuspid Regurgitation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Baseline Tricuspid Regurgitation.

Worku B, Valovska MT, Elmously A, Kampaktsis P, Castillo C, Wong SC, Salemi A.

Innovations (Phila)2018 May/Jun;13(3):190-199. doi: 10.1097/IMI.0000000000000504.

PMID:
29912741
Select item 2991243286.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the setting of left atrial appendage thrombus.

Salemi A, De Micheli A, Aftab A, Elmously A, Chang R, Wong SC, Worku BM.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg2018 Jun 14. doi: 10.1093/icvts/ivy189. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29912432
Select item 2991133687.

TAVR versus SAVR: Who determines the risk?

Lazar HL.

J Card Surg2018 Jun 17. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13744. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
29911336
Select item 2991130788.

Evolving trends in aortic valve replacement: A statewide experience.

Kim KM, Shannon F, Paone G, Lall S, Batra S, Boeve T, DeLucia A, Patel HJ, Theurer PF, He C, Clark MJ, Sultan I, Deeb GM, Prager RL.

J Card Surg2018 Jun 17. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13740. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29911307
Select item 2990896989.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement on an Aortic Mechanical Valve.

Arzamendi D, Ruiz V, Ramallal R, Alcasena MS, Beunza MT, Larman M.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 9;11(13):e107-e108. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.046. Epub 2018 Jun 13. No abstract available.

PMID:
29908969
Select item 2990351990.

Transcatheter or surgical treatment of severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease: A comparative analysis from the Italian OBSERVANT study.

Barbanti M, Buccheri S, Capodanno D, D’Errigo P, Ranucci M, Rosato S, Santoro G, Fusco D, Tamburino C, Biancari F, Seccareccia F; OBSERVANT Research Group.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jun 7. pii: S0167-5273(17)36915-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.06.011. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29903519
Select item 2989884891.

Oral anti-Xa anticoagulation after trans-aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis: The randomized ATLANTIS trial.

Collet JP, Berti S, Cequier A, Van Belle E, Lefevre T, Leprince P, Neumann FJ, Vicaut E, Montalescot G.

Am Heart J2018 Jun;200:44-50. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.03.008. Epub 2018 Mar 10.

PMID:
29898848
Select item 2989883792.

Utility of an additive frailty tests index score for mortality risk assessment following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Steinvil A, Buchanan KD, Kiramijyan S, Bond E, Rogers T, Koifman E, Shults C, Xu L, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Pichard AD, Satler LF, Ben-Dor I, Waksman R.

Am Heart J2018 Jun;200:11-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.01.007. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

PMID:
29898837
Select item 2989684793.

Advanced chronic kidney disease: Relationship to outcomes post-TAVR, a meta-analysis.

Makki N, Lilly SM.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1002/clc.22993. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

Select item 2989677794.

Comparing outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with stenotic bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valve: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Kanjanahattakij N, Horn B, Vutthikraivit W, Biso SM, Ziccardi MR, Lu MLR, Rattanawong P.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1002/clc.22992. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2989560095.

Stroke and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Carotid Disease Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kochar A, Li Z, Harrison JK, Hughes GC, Thourani VH, Mack MJ, Matsouaka RA, Cohen DJ, Peterson ED, Jones WS, Vemulapalli S.

Circ Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun;11(6):e006322. doi: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.117.006322.

PMID:
29895600
Select item 2989459496.

Percutaneous access versus surgical cut down for TAVR: Where do we go from here?

Ates I, Cilingiroglu M.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun;91(7):1363-1364. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27653.

PMID:
29894594
Select item 2989341797.

Inadvertent pacemaker lead dislodgement.

Eulert-Grehn JJ, Schmidt G, Kempfert J, Starck C.

Pacing Clin Electrophysiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1111/pace.13412. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29893417
Select item 2988800998.

Successful Coronary Protection during TAVI in Heavily Calcified Aortic Leaflets in Patient with Short and Low Left Coronary System.

Kabach M, Alrifai A, Lovitz L, Rothenberg M, Faber C, Nores M.

Case Rep Cardiol2018 May 14;2018:2758170. doi: 10.1155/2018/2758170. eCollection 2018.

Select item 2988746499.

Role of T2 mapping in left ventricular reverse remodeling after TAVR.

Gastl M, Behm P, Haberkorn S, Holzbach L, Veulemans V, Jacoby C, Schnackenburg B, Zeus T, Kelm M, Bönner F.

Int J Cardiol2018 Sep 1;266:262-268. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.02.029.

PMID:
29887464
Select item 29885699100.

Early changes in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels after transcatheter aortic valve replacement and its impact on long-term mortality.

Liebetrau C, Gaede L, Kim WK, Arsalan M, Blumenstein JM, Fischer-Rasokat U, Wolter JS, Kriechbaum S, Huber MT, van Linden A, Berkowitsch A, Dörr O, Nef H, Hamm CW, Walther T, Möllmann H.

Int J Cardiol2018 Aug 15;265:40-46. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.02.037.

PMID:
29885699

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