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Archive for the ‘Frontiers in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disorders’ Category


Live Conference Coverage  from Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle: A Symposium on Diet and Human Health : 12:00 – 1:00

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

12.00 The Italian Mediterranean Diet as a Model of Identity of a People with a Universal Good to Safeguard Health?

Prof. Antonino De Lorenzo, MD, PhD.

Director of the School of Specialization in Clinical Nutrition, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”

It is important to determine how our bodies interacts with the environment, such as absorption of nutrients.

Studies shown here show decrease in life expectancy of a high sugar diet, but the quality of the diet, not just the type of diet is important, especially the role of natural probiotics and phenolic compounds found in the Mediterranean diet.

The WHO report in 2005 discusses the unsustainability of nutrition deficiencies and suggest a proactive personalized and preventative/predictive approach of diet and health.

Most of the noncommunicable diseases like CV (46%) cancer 21% and 11% respiratory and 4% diabetes could be prevented and or cured with proper dietary approaches

Italy vs. the US diseases: in Italy most disease due to environmental contamination while US diet plays a major role

The issue we are facing in less than 10% of the Italian population (fruit, fibers, oils) are not getting the proper foods, diet and contributing to as we suggest 46% of the disease

The Food Paradox: 1.5 billion are obese; we notice we are eating less products of quality and most quality produce is going to waste;

  •  growing BMI and junk food: our studies are correlating the junk food (pre-prepared) and global BMI
  • modern diet and impact of human health (junk food high in additives, salt) has impact on microflora
  • Western Diet and Addiction: We show a link (using brain scans) showing correlation of junk food, sugar cravings, and other addictive behaviors by affecting the dopamine signaling in the substantia nigra
  • developed a junk food calculator and a Mediterranean diet calculator
  • the intersection of culture, food is embedded in the Mediterranean diet; this is supported by dietary studies of two distinct rural Italian populations (one of these in the US) show decrease in diet
  • Impact of diet: have model in Germany how this diet can increase health and life expectancy
  • from 1950 to present day 2.7 unit increase in the diet index can increase life expectancy by 26%
  • so there is an inverse relationship with our index and breast cancer

Environment and metal contamination and glyphosate: contribution to disease and impact of maintaining the healthy diet

  • huge problem with use of pesticides and increase in celiac disease

12:30 Environment and Health

Dr. Iris Maria Forte, PhD.

National Cancer Institute “Pascale” Foundation | IRCCS · Department of Research, Naples, Italy

Cancer as a disease of the environment.  Weinberg’s hallmarks of Cancer reveal how environment and epigenetics can impact any of these hallmarks.

Epigenetic effects

  • gene gatekeepers (Rb and P53)
  • DNA repair and damage stabilization

Heavy Metals and Dioxins:( alterations of the immune system as well as epigenetic regulations)

Asbestos and Mesothelioma:  they have demonstrated that p53 can be involved in development of mesothelioma as reactivating p53 may be a suitable strategy for therapy

Diet, Tomato and Cancer

  • looked at tomato extract on p53 function in gastric cancer: tomato extract had a growth reduction effect and altered cell cycle regulation and results in apoptosis
  • RBL2 levels are increased in extract amount dependent manner so data shows effect of certain tomato extracts of the southern italian tomato (     )

Antonio Giordano: we tested whole extracts of almost 30 different varieties of tomato.  The tomato variety  with highest activity was near Ravela however black tomatoes have shown high antitumor activity.  We have done a followup studies showing that these varieties, if grow elsewhere lose their antitumor activity after two or three generations of breeding, even though there genetics are similar.  We are also studying the effects of different styles of cooking of these tomatoes and if it reduces antitumor effect

please see post https://news.temple.edu/news/2017-08-28/muse-cancer-fighting-tomatoes-study-italian-food

 

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#MediterraneanDiet

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Please see related articles on Live Coverage of Previous Meetings on this Open Access Journal

Real Time Conference Coverage for Scientific and Business Media: Unique Twitter Hashtags and Handles per Conference Presentation/Session

LIVE – Real Time – 16th Annual Cancer Research Symposium, Koch Institute, Friday, June 16, 9AM – 5PM, Kresge Auditorium, MIT

Real Time Coverage and eProceedings of Presentations on 11/16 – 11/17, 2016, The 12th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Tweets Impression Analytics, Re-Tweets, Tweets and Likes by @AVIVA1950 and @pharma_BI for 2018 BioIT, Boston, 5/15 – 5/17, 2018

BIO 2018! June 4-7, 2018 at Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

LIVE 2018 The 21st Gabay Award to LORENZ STUDER, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, contributions in stem cell biology and patient-specific, cell-based therapy

HUBweek 2018, October 8-14, 2018, Greater Boston – “We The Future” – coming together, of breaking down barriers, of convening across disciplinary lines to shape our future

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Live Conference Coverage  from Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle: A Symposium on Diet and Human Health : Opening Remarks 11:00 – 12:00

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

11:00 Welcome

 

 

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

Director and President of the Sbarro Health Research Organization, College of Science and Technology, Temple University

Welcome to this symposium on Italian lifestyle and health.  This is similar to a symposium we had organized in New York.  A year ago Bloomberg came out with a study on higher longevity of the italian population and this study was concluded that this increased longevity was due to the italian lifestyle and diet especially in the southern part of Italy, a region which is older than Rome (actually founded by Greeks and Estonians).  However this symposium will delve into the components of this healthy Italian lifestyle which contributes to this longevity effect.  Some of this work was done in collaboration with Temple University and sponsored by the Italian Consulate General in Philadelphia ( which sponsors programs in this area called Ciao Philadelphia).

Greetings: Fucsia Nissoli Fitzgerald, Deputy elected in the Foreign Circumscription – North and Central America Division

Speaking for the Consulate General is Francesca  Cardurani-Meloni.   I would like to talk briefly about the Italian cuisine and its evolution, from the influence of the North and South Italy, economic factors, and influence by other cultures.  Italian cooking is about simplicity, cooking with what is in season and freshest.  The meal is not about the food but about comfort around the table, and comparible to a cullinary heaven, about sharing with family and friends, and bringing the freshest ingredients to the table.

Consul General, Honorable Pier Attinio Forlano, General Consul of Italy in Philadelphia

 

11:30 The Impact of Environment and Life Style in Human Disease

Prof. Antonio Giordano MD, PhD.

 

 

 

To follow or Tweet on Twitter please use the following handles (@) and hashtags (#):

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#MediterraneanDiet

#health

#nutrition

Please see related articles on Live Coverage of Previous Meetings on this Open Access Journal

Real Time Conference Coverage for Scientific and Business Media: Unique Twitter Hashtags and Handles per Conference Presentation/Session

LIVE – Real Time – 16th Annual Cancer Research Symposium, Koch Institute, Friday, June 16, 9AM – 5PM, Kresge Auditorium, MIT

Real Time Coverage and eProceedings of Presentations on 11/16 – 11/17, 2016, The 12th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Tweets Impression Analytics, Re-Tweets, Tweets and Likes by @AVIVA1950 and @pharma_BI for 2018 BioIT, Boston, 5/15 – 5/17, 2018

BIO 2018! June 4-7, 2018 at Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

LIVE 2018 The 21st Gabay Award to LORENZ STUDER, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, contributions in stem cell biology and patient-specific, cell-based therapy

HUBweek 2018, October 8-14, 2018, Greater Boston – “We The Future” – coming together, of breaking down barriers, of convening across disciplinary lines to shape our future

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Live Conference Coverage  from Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle: A Symposium on Diet and Human Health @S.H.R.O. and Temple University October 19, 2018

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

 The Sbarro Health Research Organization, in collaboration with the Consulate General of Italy in Philadelphia will sponsor a symposium on the Mediterranean Diet and Human Health on October 19, 2018 at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA.  This symposium will discuss recent finding concerning the health benefits derived from a Mediterranean-style diet discussed by the leaders in this field of research.

Mediterranean Diet

The description of the Mediterranean Diet stems from the nutritionist Ancel Keys, who in 1945, in the wake of the US Fifth Army, landed in Southern Italy, where he observed one of the highest concentrations of centenarians in the world. He also noticed that cardiovascular diseases, widespread in the USA, were less frequent there. In particular, among the Southern Italians, the prevalence of “wellness” diseases such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus, was particularly associated with fat consumption, suggesting that the main factor responsible for the observations was the type of diet traditionally consumed among people facing the Mediterranean Sea, which is low in animal fat, as opposed to the Anglo-Saxon diet. The link between serum cholesterol and coronary heart disease mortality was subsequently demonstrated by the Seven Countries Study. Later, the concept of Mediterranean Diet was extended to a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, fish and olive oil as the main source of lipid, shared among people living in Spain, Greece, Southern Italy and other countries facing the Mediterranean basin …

Prof. Antonino De Lorenzo, MD, PhD.

   

 

The Symposium will be held at:

Biolife Science Building, Room 234

Temple University, 1900 North 12th street

Philadelphia, PA 19122

 

For further information, please contact:

Ms. Marinela Dedaj – Sbarro Institute,  Office #: 215-204-9521

 

11:00 Welcome

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

Director and President of the Sbarro Health Research Organization, College of Science and Technology, Temple University

 

Greetings

Fucsia Nissoli Fitzgerald

Deputy elected in the Foreign Circumscription – North and Central America Division

 

Consul General, Honorable Pier Attinio Forlano

General Consul of Italy in Philadelphia

 

11:30 The Impact of Environment and Life Style in Human Disease

Prof. Antonio Giordano MD, PhD.

 

12.00 The Italian Mediterranean Diet as a Model of Identity of a People with a Universal Good to Safeguard Health?

Prof. Antonino De Lorenzo, MD, PhD.

Director of the School of Specialization in Clinical Nutrition, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”

 

12:30 Environment and Health

Dr. Iris Maria Forte, PhD.

National Cancer Institute “Pascale” Foundation | IRCCS · Department of Research, Naples, Italy

 

13:00 Lunch

 

2:30 Mediterranean Diet, Intangible Heritage and Sustainable Tourism?

Prof. Fabio Parasecoli, PhD.

Nutrition and Food Department, New York University

 

3.00 Italy as a Case Study: Increasing Students’ Level of Awareness of the Historical, Cultural, Political and Culinary Significance of Food

Prof. Lisa Sasson

Nutrition and Food Department, New York University

 

3:30 Italian Migration and Global Diaspora

Dr. Vincenzo Milione, PhD

Director of Demographics Studies, Calandra Institute, City University of New York

 

4:00 Pasta Arte: New Model of Circular Agricultural Economy: When an Innovated Tradition Takes Care of You and of the Environment

Dr. Massimo Borrelli

CEO and Founder of Arte

 

4:15 Conclusions

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

 

Coordinator of the Symposium, Dr. Alessandra Moia, PhD.

 

Prof. Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD.

Professor of Molecular Biology at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA where he is also Director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine. He is also Professor of Pathology at the University of Siena, Italy. He has published over 500 articles, received over 40 awards for his contributions to cancer research and is the holder of 17 patents.

 

Prof. Antonino De Lorenzo, MD, PhD.

Full Professor of Human Nutrition and Director of the Specialization School in Food Science at the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. He is the Coordinator of the Specialization Schools in Food Science at the National University Council and Coordinator of the PhD. School of “Applied Medical-Surgical Sciences” Director of UOSD “Service of Clinical Nutrition, Parenteral Therapy and Anorexia”. He also serves as President of “Istituto Nazionale per la Dieta Mediterranea e la Nutrigenomica”.

 

Dr. Iris Maria Forte, PhD.

Iris Maria Forte is an oncology researcher of INT G. Pascale Foundation of Naples, Italy. She majored in Medical Biotechnology at the “Federico II” University of Naples, earned a PhD. in “Oncology and Genetics” at the University of Siena in 2012 and a Master of II level in “Environment and Cancer” in 2014. Iris Maria Forte has worked with Antonio Giordano’s group since 2008 and her research interests include both molecular and translational cancer research. She published 21 articles mostly focused in understanding the molecular basis of human cancer. She worked on different kinds of human solid tumors but her research principally focused on pleural mesothelioma and on cell cycle deregulation in cancer.

 

Prof. Fabio Parasecoli, PhD.

Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies. He has a Doctorate in Agricultural Sciences (Dr.sc.agr.) from Hohenheim University, Stuttgart (Germany), MA in Political Sciences from the Istituto Universitario Orientale, Naples (Italy), BA/MA in Modern Foreign Languages and Literature from the Università La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). His research explores the intersections among food, media, and politics. His most recent projects focus on Food Design and the synergies between Food Studies and design.

 

Prof. Lisa Sasson, MS

Dietetic Internship Director and a Clinical Associate Professor in the department. She has interests in dietetic education, weight and behavior management, and problem-based learning. She also is a private practice nutritionist with a focus on weight management. She serves as co-director of the Food, Nutrition and Culture program in Florence Italy, the New York State Dietetic Association and the Greater New York Dietetic Association (past president and treasurer).

 

Dr. Vincenzo Milione, PhD.

Director of Demographic Studies for The John D. Calandra Italian American Institute, Queens College, City University of New York. He has conducted social science research on Italian Americans. His research has included the educational and occupational achievements; Italian language studies at the elementary and secondary levels, high school non-completion rates; negative media portrayals of ethnic populations including migration studies and global diaspora.

 

Dr. Massimo Borrelli

Agricultural entrepreneur, Manager of the Italian Consortium for Biogas (CIB) and delegate for the Bioeconomy National Department of Confagricoltura. He developed A.R.T.E based on a model of agricultural circular economy, beginning and ending in the ground. He constructed the first biogas plant in the territory creating a new way to make agriculture, investing in research and development, experimentation and most of all, in people. In a few short years, he succeeded to close the production chain producing goods characterized by their high quality and usage of renewable energy.

 

Dr. Alessandra Moia, PhD.

Vice-President for Institutional and International Relations of the Istituto Nazionale per la Dieta Mediterranea e la Nutrigenomica (I.N.D.I.M.). Has managed relations with the academic institutions to increase awareness and develops projects for the diffusion of the Mediterranean Diet. She served as Director of Finance for the National Institute of Nutrition, for the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.

 

About the Sbarro Health Research Organization

The Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO) is non-profit charity committed to funding excellence in basic genetic research to cure and diagnose cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and other chronic illnesses and to foster the training of young doctors in a spirit of professionalism and humanism. To learn more about the SHRO please visit www.shro.org

To follow or Tweet on Twitter please use the following handles (@) and hashtags (#):

@ handles


@S_H_R_O 

@SbarroHealth

@Pharma_BI 

@ItalyinPhilly

@WHO_Europe

@nutritionorg

# hashtags


#healthydiet

#MediterraneanDiet

#health

#nutrition

Please see related articles on Live Coverage of Previous Meetings on this Open Access Journal

Real Time Conference Coverage for Scientific and Business Media: Unique Twitter Hashtags and Handles per Conference Presentation/Session

LIVE – Real Time – 16th Annual Cancer Research Symposium, Koch Institute, Friday, June 16, 9AM – 5PM, Kresge Auditorium, MIT

Real Time Coverage and eProceedings of Presentations on 11/16 – 11/17, 2016, The 12th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Tweets Impression Analytics, Re-Tweets, Tweets and Likes by @AVIVA1950 and @pharma_BI for 2018 BioIT, Boston, 5/15 – 5/17, 2018

BIO 2018! June 4-7, 2018 at Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

LIVE 2018 The 21st Gabay Award to LORENZ STUDER, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, contributions in stem cell biology and patient-specific, cell-based therapy

HUBweek 2018, October 8-14, 2018, Greater Boston – “We The Future” – coming together, of breaking down barriers, of convening across disciplinary lines to shape our future

 

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Rhythm Management Device Hardware (Dual-chamber Pacemaker) coupled with BackBeat’s Cardiac Neuromodulation Therapy (CNT) bioelectronic therapy for Lowering Systolic Blood Pressure for patients with Pacemakers

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

BackBeat’s CNT is a bioelectronic therapy that immediately, substantially and chronically lowers blood pressure (BP) while simultaneously modulating the autonomic nervous system (ANS).  Mimicking the effects of multiple medications by reducing pre-load, after-load and sympathetic tone, it can be delivered using standard rhythm management device hardware such as dual-chamber pacemakers.

For more information: www.orchestrabiomed.com

October 2, 2018 — Two-year results of the Moderato I Study demonstrated immediate, substantial and sustained reduction in blood pressure when BackBeat cardiac neuromodulation therapy (CNT) was used in patients with persistent hypertension (office BP > 150mmHg). Patients in the study had persistent hypertension despite two or more anti-hypertensive medications and an indication for a pacemaker.

Results of the multicenter clinical trial were presented at the 2018 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) conference, Sept. 21-25 in San Diego, by Daniel Burkhoff, M.D., Ph.D., director, heart failure, hemodynamics and mechanical circulatory support research for the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF).

“The clinical efficacy and safety data observed with BackBeat CNT in a patient population with a significant portion of isolated systolic disease is very promising. Hypertension affects over 70 percent of pacemaker patients. These patients could benefit substantially from a potent hypertension therapy such as BackBeat CNT that could be included in their already necessary pacemaker,” said Prof. Petr Neuzil, M.D., head of the Department of Cardiology of Na Homolce Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic and one of the principal investigators of the study.

The 27 patients that met the study inclusion criteria were implanted with BackBeat’s proprietary Moderato dual-chamber pacemaker that incorporates the BackBeat CNT algorithms. The primary safety and efficacy endpoint results of the study were as follows:

  • Efficacy Outcomes: Immediate, substantial and sustained reduction in blood pressure.
    • 14.2 mmHg decrease from baseline (p<0.001) in 24 hours ambulatory systolic blood pressure (AMB BP) at 3 months
    • 23.4 mmHg decrease from baseline (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP) sustained out to 2 years
  • High responder rate in a population where 78 percent of patients had isolated systolic hypertension.
    • 85 percent AMB BP reduced >5mmHg
    • 74 percent AMB BP reduced >10 mmHg
  • Safety Outcomes: The study met the safety endpoint.
    • Observed reduction in end systolic and diastolic volumes with no change to ejection fraction suggests improvement of cardiac function
    • Observed reduction in heart rate out to 2 years indicative of reduced sympathetic activity

“These statistically significant results demonstrate the potential for BackBeat CNT to be a broadly applicable therapy that substantially lowers blood pressure immediately and maintains reduced pressures for years,” commented Burkhoff. “It is rare to see a new therapy show such dramatic and sustained effects in such a small number of patients.”

To further investigate the efficacy and safety of BackBeat CNT for the treatment of hypertension, Orchestra BioMed is enrolling patients into a prospective, 1:1 randomized double-blind active treatment (BackBeat CNT) versus standard medical therapy trial, Moderato II. The study will enroll patients with uncontrolled blood pressure (office systolic > 140, day and AMB BP > 130 mmHg) treated with at least one anti-hypertension medication that are indicated for a dual-chamber pacemaker. The primary efficacy endpoint of the first cohort of the study is the comparison of the mean reduction in 24-hour systolic ambulatory blood pressure following 6 months of therapy between the treatment and the control. Primary safety endpoint is the rate of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) at 6 months between the treatment and control.  The company is expecting results on the first cohort of patients in 2019.

SOURCE

https://www.dicardiology.com/content/backbeat-cardiac-neuromodulation-therapy-reduces-blood-pressure-two-years?eid=333021707&bid=2258792

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The Promise of Low-Dose Aspirin on Longevity in the Geriatric Population: No Effect on Outcomes in the US and Australia

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

UPDATED on 10/17/2018

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1800722

Effect of Aspirin on Disability-free Survival in the Elderly

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Effect of Aspirin on Disability-free Survival in the Healthy Elderly

J.J. McNeil and Others

    

McNeil et al. conducted the randomized, placebo-controlled Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) trial to investigate whether the daily use of aspirin, at a dose of 100 mg, in healthy, community-dwelling older adults would prolong a healthy life span, free from dementia and persistent physical disability. Trial participants were community-dwelling men and women from Australia and the United States who were 70 years of age or older (or ≥65 years of age among blacks and Hispanics in the United States).

Clinical Pearls

  Is there any evidence to support the use of aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular or other chronic disease in healthy older adults?

Several large, randomized trials have shown the efficacy of aspirin for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease among persons with a history of coronary heart disease or stroke. The evidence supporting a benefit of aspirin therapy in the primary prevention of cardiovascular or other chronic disease is less conclusive despite favorable trends suggesting that aspirin use reduces the incidence of cardiovascular events and possibly reduces the incidence of cancer and cancer-related mortality, particularly from colorectal cancer.

  Does the daily use of 100 mg of aspirin prolong a healthy lifespan in older adults without cardiovascular disease, dementia, or physical disability?

In the ASPREE trial, the daily use of 100 mg of enteric-coated aspirin did not differ significantly from placebo in influencing the rates of disability-free survival at a median of 4.7 years. The primary end point of death, dementia, or physical disability occurred in 921 participants in the aspirin group (21.5 events per 1000 person-years) and in 914 in the placebo group (21.2 events per 1000 person-years). The between-group difference was not significant (hazard ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.11; P=0.79). Among participants who had a primary end-point event, death was the most common first event (in 911 participants [50% of the events] at a mean age of 77.5 years), dementia was the next most common (in 549 participants [30% of the events] at a mean age of 77.7 years), and persistent physical disability was the least common.

Morning Report Questions

Q. How does a daily aspirin dose of 100 mg influence rates of death from any cause and the risk of major hemorrhage in healthy older adults?

A. In the ASPREE trial, the secondary end point of death from any cause, denoting death as the first, second, or third event to occur in the primary end point, occurred in 558 participants in the aspirin group (12.7 events per 1000 person-years) and in 494 participants in the placebo group (11.1 events per 1000 person-years) (hazard ratio, 1.14; unadjusted 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.29). Because there was no adjustment for multiple comparisons of secondary end points, no inferences can be made regarding differences in mortality between the two groups. Major hemorrhage occurred in 3.8% of the participants in the aspirin group, as compared with 2.8% of those in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.62; P<0.001). Fatal or nonfatal hemorrhagic stroke (including subarachnoid hemorrhage) occurred in 49 participants (0.5%) in the aspirin group and in 40 (0.4%) in the placebo group.

Q. How generalizable are the results of the ASPREE trial?

A. White participants comprised 91% of the overall trial cohort. Owing to the small number of blacks and Hispanics (including participants who were younger than 70 years of age) and other nonwhites, the applicability of the main findings of the ASPREE trial to these subgroups is unclear.

 

Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Found to Have No Effect on Healthy Life Span in Older People?

According to 3 articles published online The New England Journal of Medicine (16 September 2018), daily low-dose aspirin was found to have no effect on healthy life span in older people. This large NIH-funded study examined outcomes in United States and Australia

Results showed that in a large clinical trial to determine the risks and benefits of daily low-dose aspirin in healthy older adults without previous cardiovascular events,

Aspirin did not prolong healthy, independent living (life free of dementia or persistent physical disability).

Risk of dying from a range of causes, including cancer and heart disease, varied and will require further analysis and additional follow-up of study participants. These initial findings from the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) trial, partially supported by the National Institutes of Health.

ASPREE is an international, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that enrolled 19,114 older people (16,703 in Australia and 2,411 in the United States). The study began in 2010 and enrolled participants aged 70 and older; 65 was the minimum age of entry for African-American and Hispanic individuals in the United States because of their higher risk for dementia and cardiovascular disease. At study enrollment, ASPREE participants could not have dementia or a physical disability and had to be free of medical conditions requiring aspirin use. They were followed for an average of 4.7 years to determine outcomes.

In the total study population, treatment with 100 mg of low-dose aspirin per day did not affect survival free of dementia or disability. Among the people randomly assigned to take aspirin,

  • 90.3% remained alive at the end of the treatment without persistent physical disability or dementia, compared with 90.5% of those taking a placebo.
  • Rates of physical disability were similar, and rates of dementia were almost identical in both groups. However,
  • the group taking aspirin had an increased risk of death compared to the placebo group: 5.9% of participants taking aspirin and 5.2% taking placebo died during the study.

This effect of aspirin has not been noted in previous studies; and caution is needed in interpreting this finding. The higher death rate in the aspirin-treated group was due primarily to a higher rate of cancer deaths. A small increase in new cancer cases was reported in the group taking aspirin but the difference could have been due to chance. The authors also analyzed the ASPREE results to determine whether cardiovascular events took place. They found that

  • the rates for major cardiovascular events — including coronary heart disease, nonfatal heart attacks, and fatal and nonfatal ischemic stroke — were similar in the aspirin and the placebo groups. In the aspirin group, 448 people experienced cardiovascular events, compared with 474 people in the placebo group.

Significant bleeding — a known risk of regular aspirin use — was also measured. The authors noted that

  • aspirin was associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding, primarily in the gastrointestinal tract and brain. Clinically significant bleeding — hemorrhagic stroke, bleeding in the brain, gastrointestinal hemorrhages or hemorrhages at other sites that required transfusion or hospitalization — occurred in 361 people (3.8%) on aspirin and in 265 (2.7%) taking the placebo.
  • As would be expected in an older adult population, cancer was a common cause of death, and 50% of the people who died in the trial had some type of cancer.
  • Heart disease and stroke accounted for 19% of the deaths and major bleeding for 5%.

The ASPREE team is continuing to analyze the results of this study and has implemented plans for monitoring participants. As these efforts continue, the authors emphasized that older adults should follow the advice from their own physicians about daily aspirin use. It is important to note that the new findings do not apply to people with a proven indication for aspirin such as stroke, heart attack or other cardiovascular disease. In addition, the study did not address aspirin’s effects in people younger than age 65. Also, since only 11% of participants had regularly taken low-dose aspirin prior to entering the study, the implications of ASPREE’s findings need further investigation to determine whether healthy older people who have been regularly using aspirin for disease prevention should continue or discontinue use.

SOURCE

From: OnTarget <ontarget@targethealth.com>

Date: September 23, 2018 at 10:47:06 PM EDT

To: avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu

Subject: OnTarget Newsletter

 

Other 121 articles on ASPIRIN were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, including the following:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Aspirin

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Extraordinary Breakthrough in Artificial Eyes and Artificial Muscle Technology

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

Metalens, flat surface that use nanostructures to focus light promise to transform optics by replacing the bulky, curved lenses presently used in optical devices with a simple, flat surface.

Scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences designed metalens who are mainly focused on light and minimizes spherical aberrations through a dense pattern of nanostructures, since the information density in each lens will be high due to nanostructures being small.

According to Federico Capasso, “This demonstrates the feasibility of embedded optical zoom and auto focus for a wide range of applications, including cell phone cameras, eyeglasses, and virtual and augmented reality hardware. It also shows the possibility of future optical microscopes, which operate fully electronically and can correct many aberrations simultaneously.”

However, when scientists tried to scale up the lens, the file size of the design alone would balloon up to gigabytes or even terabytes. And as a result, create a new algorithm in order to shrivel the file size to make the metalens flawless with the innovation currently used to create integrated circuits. Afterward, scientists follow the large metalens to an artificial muscle without conceding its ability to focus light. In the human eye, the lens is enclosed by ciliary muscle, which stretches or compresses the lens, changing its shape to adjust its focal length. Scientists at that moment choose a thin, transparent dielectric elastomer with low to attach to the lens.

Within the experiment, when the voltage is applied to elastomers, it stretches, the position of nanopillars on the surface of the lens shift. The scientists as a result show that the lens can focus instantaneous, control abnormalities triggered by astigmatisms, and achieve image shift. Since the adaptive metalens is flat, you can correct those deviations and assimilate diverse optical capabilities onto a single plane of control.

SOURCE

https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2018/02/researchers-combine-artificial-eye-and-artificial-muscle

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Top 100 of 415 articles published on PubMed in 2018 on TAVR

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

SOURCE

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed  [2018 TAVR]

Select item 301029701.

Ninety-Day Readmissions of Bundled Valve Patients: Implications for Healthcare Policy.

Koeckert MS, Grossi EA, Vining PF, Abdallah R, Williams MR, Kalkut G, Loulmet DF, Zias EA, Querijero M, Galloway AC.

Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg2018 Aug 10. pii: S1043-0679(18)30168-0. doi: 10.1053/j.semtcvs.2018.07.017. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30102970
Select item 300946422.

TAVR Vs. SAVR in Intermediate-Risk Patients: What Influences Our Choice of Therapy.

Still S, Szerlip M, Mack M.

Curr Cardiol Rep2018 Aug 9;20(10):82. doi: 10.1007/s11886-018-1026-3. Review.

PMID:
30094642
Select item 300945323.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis and heart failure.

Bavishi C, Kolte D, Gordon PC, Abbott JD.

Heart Fail Rev2018 Aug 9. doi: 10.1007/s10741-018-9726-8. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:
30094532
Select item 300930574.

Disarming the Ticking Time Bomb: Post-Procedure Electrocardiography Predictors of High-Degree Conduction Disturbances After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Nazif TM, Chen S, Kodali SK.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1527-1530. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.07.003. No abstract available.

PMID:
30093057
Select item 300930565.

Predictors of Advanced Conduction Disturbances Requiring a Late (≥48 H) Permanent Pacemaker Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Mangieri A, Lanzillo G, Bertoldi L, Jabbour RJ, Regazzoli D, Ancona MB, Tanaka A, Mitomo S, Garducci S, Montalto C, Pagnesi M, Giannini F, Giglio M, Montorfano M, Chieffo A, Rodès-Cabau J, Monaco F, Paglino G, Della Bella P, Colombo A, Latib A.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1519-1526. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.06.014.

PMID:
30093056
Select item 300930556.

Immediate Post-Procedural 12-Lead Electrocardiography as Predictor of Late Conduction Defects After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Jørgensen TH, De Backer O, Gerds TA, Bieliauskas G, Svendsen JH, Søndergaard L.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1509-1518. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.011.

PMID:
30093055
Select item 300925577.

Von Willebrand factor and the aortic valve: Concepts that are important in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement era.

Ibrahim H, Rondina MT, Kleiman NS.

Thromb Res2018 Jul 30;170:20-27. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2018.07.028. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

PMID:
30092557
Select item 300893298.

Antiplatelet Treatment for Catheter-Based Interventions in High-Risk Patients: Current Guidelines and Expert Opinion.

Rath D, Gawaz M.

Hamostaseologie2018 Aug 8. doi: 10.1055/s-0038-1668165. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30089329
Select item 300870259.

The Evolution of Echocardiographic Type and Anesthetic Technique for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement at a High-Volume Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Center.

Marino M, Lilie CJ, Culp WC Jr, Schepel SR, Tippett JC.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 Jun 30. pii: S1053-0770(18)30468-3. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.06.022. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30087025
Select item 3007961110.

Propensity matched comparison of in-hospital outcomes of TAVR vs. SAVR in patients with previous history of CABG: Insights from the Nationwide inpatient sample.

Nalluri N, Atti V, Patel NJ, Kumar V, Arora S, Nalluri S, Nelluri BK, Maniatis GA, Kandov R, Kliger C.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27708. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079611
Select item 3007956111.

Permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in bicuspid aortic valve patients.

Xiong TY, Liao YB, Li YJ, Zhao ZG, Wei X, Tsauo JY, Xu YN, Feng Y, Chen M.

J Interv Cardiol2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1111/joic.12546. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079561
Select item 3007952212.

Effect of transcatheter aortic valve replacement on left atrial function.

Truong VT, Chung E, Nagueh S, Kereiakes D, Schaaf J, Volz B, Ngo TNM, Mazur W.

Echocardiography2018 Aug 5. doi: 10.1111/echo.14109. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30079522
Select item 3007679413.

TAVR 2.0: Collaborating to Measure, Assure, and Advance Quality.

Shahian DM, Gleason TG, Shemin RJ, Carroll JD, Mack MJ.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Aug 1. pii: S0003-4975(18)31034-8. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.07.004. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30076794
Select item 3007608114.

Low Iodine Contrast Injection for CT Acquisition Prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Aorta Assessment and Screening for Coronary Artery Disease.

Hachulla AL, Noble S, Ronot M, Guglielmi G, de Perrot T, Montet X, Vallée JP.

Acad Radiol2018 Aug 1. pii: S1076-6332(18)30330-1. doi: 10.1016/j.acra.2018.06.016. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30076081
Select item 3007532615.

Variation in post-TAVR antiplatelet therapy utilization and associated outcomes: Insights from the STS/ACC TVT Registry.

Sherwood MW, Vemulapalli S, Harrison JK, Dai D, Vora AN, Mack MJ, Holmes DR, Rumsfeld JS, Cohen DJ, Thourani VH, Kirtane A, Peterson ED.

Am Heart J2018 Jul 9;204:9-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.06.006. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30075326
Select item 3006878516.

State of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Spain Versus Europe and Non-European Countries.

Biagioni C, Tirado-Conte G, Rodés-Cabau J, Ryan N, Cerrato E, Nazif TM, Eltchaninoff H, Sondergaard L, Ribeiro HB, Barbanti M, Nietlispach F, De Jaegere P, Agostoni P, Trillo R, Jiménez-Quevedo P, D’Ascenzo F, Wendler O, Maluenda G, Chen M, Tamburino C, Macaya C, Leon MB, Nombela-Franco L.

J Invasive Cardiol2018 Aug;30(8):301-309.

Select item 3006493717.

Accuracy of predicted orthogonal projection angles for valve deployment during transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Steinvil A, Weissman G, Ertel AW, Weigold G, Rogers T, Koifman E, Buchanan KD, Shults C, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Satler LF, Ben-Dor I, Waksman R.

J Cardiovasc Comput Tomogr2018 May 26. pii: S1934-5925(18)30130-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcct.2018.05.017. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30064937
Select item 3006277818.

Absence of Electrocardiographic Left Ventricular Hypertrophy is Associated with Increased Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kampaktsis PN, Ullal AV, Swaminathan RV, Minutello RM, Kim L, Bergman GS, Feldman DN, Singh H, Chiu Wong S, Okin PM.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jul 30. doi: 10.1002/clc.23034. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 3005825919.

Early and midterm outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valves.

Aalaei-Andabili SH, Beaver TM, Petersen JW, Anderson RD, Karimi A, Thoburn E, Kabir A, Bavry AA, Arnaoutakis GJ.

J Card Surg2018 Jul 29. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13775. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30058259
Select item 3005725220.

The Incidence of Dysphagia Among Patients Undergoing TAVR With Either General Anesthesia or Moderate Sedation.

Mukdad L, Kashani R, Mantha A, Sareh S, Mendelsohn A, Benharash P.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 May 26. pii: S1053-0770(18)30373-2. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.05.040. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30057252
Select item 3005685121.

Sex-Specific Differences in Outcome of Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kaier K, von Zur Mühlen C, Zirlik A, Schmoor C, Roth K, Bothe W, Hehn P, Reinöhl J, Zehender M, Bode C, Stachon P.

Can J Cardiol2018 Aug;34(8):992-998. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2018.04.009. Epub 2018Apr 12.

PMID:
30056851
Select item 3005602322.

Hemodynamic monitoring by pulse contour analysis during trans-catheter aortic valve replacement: A fast and easy method to optimize procedure results.

Ristalli F, Romano SM, Stolcova M, Meucci F, Squillantini G, Valente S, Di Mario C.

Cardiovasc Revasc Med2018 Jul 19. pii: S1553-8389(18)30314-2. doi: 10.1016/j.carrev.2018.07.015. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30056023
Select item 3005418823.

TAVR Versus SAVR in the Era of NSQIP.

Vadlamudi R, Duggan M.

J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth2018 May 26. pii: S1053-0770(18)30370-7. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.05.037. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30054188
Select item 3005090924.

Expanding TAVI to Low and Intermediate Risk Patients.

Voigtländer L, Seiffert M.

Front Cardiovasc Med2018 Jul 12;5:92. doi: 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00092. eCollection 2018. Review.

Select item 3004863225.

Albumin Is Predictive of 1-Year Mortality After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Hebeler KR, Baumgarten H, Squiers JJ, Wooley J, Pollock BD, Mahoney C, Filardo G, Lima B, DiMaio JM.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Jul 23. pii: S0003-4975(18)31022-1. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.06.024. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30048632
Select item 3004178326.

Bioprosthetic structural valve deterioration: How do TAVR and SAVR prostheses compare?

Aldalati O, Kaura A, Khan H, Dworakowski R, Byrne J, Eskandari M, Deshpande R, Monaghan M, Wendler O, MacCarthy P.

Int J Cardiol2018 Oct 1;268:170-175. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.04.091.

PMID:
30041783
Select item 3003771727.

Exposure to glucocorticoids prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with reduced incidence of high-degree AV block and pacemaker.

Oestreich B, Gurevich S, Adabag S, Kelly R, Helmer G, Raveendran G, Yannopoulos D, Biring T, Garcia S.

Cardiovasc Revasc Med2018 Jul 18. pii: S1553-8389(18)30311-7. doi: 10.1016/j.carrev.2018.07.012. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30037717
Select item 3003742428.

Comparison of Hospital Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation With Versus Without Hypothyroidism.

Subahi A, Yassin AS, Adegbala O, Akintoye E, Abubakar H, Elmoghrabi A, Ibrahim W, Ajam M, Pahuja M, Weinberger JJ, Levine D, Afonso L.

Am J Cardiol2018 Jun 5. pii: S0002-9149(18)31197-4. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.05.025. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30037424
Select item 3003171929.

Arrhythmic Burden as Determined by Ambulatory Continuous Cardiac Monitoring in Patients With New-Onset Persistent Left Bundle Branch Block Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: The MARE Study.

Rodés-Cabau J, Urena M, Nombela-Franco L, Amat-Santos I, Kleiman N, Munoz-Garcia A, Atienza F, Serra V, Deyell MW, Veiga-Fernandez G, Masson JB, Canadas-Godoy V, Himbert D, Castrodeza J, Elizaga J, Francisco Pascual J, Webb JG, de la Torre JM, Asmarats L, Pelletier-Beaumont E, Philippon F.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1495-1505. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.016. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

PMID:
30031719
Select item 3003171830.

Arrhythmias and Conduction Disturbances Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Out of Sight, Out of Mind?

Pighi M, Piazza N.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Aug 13;11(15):1506-1508. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.05.038. Epub 2018 Jul 18. No abstract available.

PMID:
30031718
Select item 3002924731.

Numerical Parametric Study of Paravalvular Leak Following a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Deployment Into a Patient-Specific Aortic Root.

Mao W, Wang Q, Kodali S, Sun W.

J Biomech Eng2018 Oct 1;140(10). doi: 10.1115/1.4040457.

PMID:
30029247
Select item 3002920732.

Comparative Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Polymeric Transcatheter and Surgical Aortic Valves’ Hemodynamics and Structural Mechanics.

Ghosh R, Marom G, Rotman O, Slepian MJ, Prabhakar S, Horner M, Bluestein D.

J Biomech Eng2018 Jun 25. doi: 10.1115/1.4040600. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30029207
Select item 3002830433.

Extended benefits of TAVR in young patients with low-intermediate risk score: proceed with care.

Doshi R.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 20;14(4):e485. doi: 10.4244/EIJ-D-18-00236L. No abstract available.

Select item 3002830034.

Valve-in-valve TAVR using the SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve: still plagued by patient-prosthesis mismatch.

Saxon JT, Cohen DJ, Feldman T.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 20;14(4):e377-e379. doi: 10.4244/EIJV14I4A66. No abstract available.

Select item 3002573135.

The SAVI-TF Registry: 1-Year Outcomes of the European Post-Market Registry Using the ACURATE neo Transcatheter Heart Valve Under Real-World Conditions in 1,000 Patients.

Kim WK, Hengstenberg C, Hilker M, Kerber S, Schäfer U, Rudolph T, Linke A, Franz N, Kuntze T, Nef H, Kappert U, Zembala MO, Toggweiler S, Walther T, Möllmann H.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1368-1374. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.023.

Select item 3002557236.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement of Failed Surgically Implanted Bioprostheses: The STS/ACC Registry.

Tuzcu EM, Kapadia SR, Vemulapalli S, Carroll JD, Holmes DR Jr, Mack MJ, Thourani VH, Grover FL, Brennan JM, Suri RM, Dai D, Svensson LG.

J Am Coll Cardiol2018 Jul 24;72(4):370-382. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.04.074.

PMID:
30025572
Select item 3002410237.

Transcatheter valve-in-valve versus redo surgical aortic valve replacement for the treatment of degenerated bioprosthetic aortic valve: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Tam DY, Vo TX, Wijeysundera HC, Dvir D, Friedrich JO, Fremes SE.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 19. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27686. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30024102
Select item 3001983938.

Predicted magnitude of alternate access in the contemporary transcatheter aortic valve replacement era.

Rogers T, Gai J, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Shults C, Ben-Dor I, Satler LF, Waksman R.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27668. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30019839
Select item 3001982839.

Slope of left ventricular filling as an index of valvular and paravalvular regurgitation in native and prosthetic aortic valves.

Makki N, Ghao X, Whitson B, Shreenivas S, Crestanello J, Lilly S.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27684. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30019828
Select item 3001982240.

Is two better than one? Re-evaluating the surgical approval process for TAVR.

Shreenivas S, Lilly S, Reardon M, Answini GA, Kereiakes DJ.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 18. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27666. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30019822
Select item 3001816741.

Improving the Diagnostic Performance of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Prosthetic Heart Valve Endocarditis.

Swart LE, Gomes A, Scholtens AM, Sinha B, Tanis W, Lam MGEH, van der Vlugt MJ, Streukens SAF, Aarntzen EHJG, Bucerius J, van Assen S, Bleeker-Rovers CP, van Geel PP, Krestin GP, van Melle JP, Roos-Hesselink JW, Slart RHJA, Glaudemans AWJM, Budde RPJ.

Circulation2018 Jul 17. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035032. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.035032. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30018167
Select item 3001752042.

Software-automated multidetector computed tomography-based prosthesis-sizing in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Inter-vendor comparison and relation to patient outcome.

Baeßler B, Mauri V, Bunck AC, Pinto Dos Santos D, Friedrichs K, Maintz D, Rudolph T.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jul 9. pii: S0167-5273(18)32256-3. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.07.008. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30017520
Select item 3001751843.

Inflammation in aortic stenosis: Shaping the biomarkers network.

Schiattarella GG, Perrino C.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jul 6. pii: S0167-5273(18)33669-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.07.026. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
30017518
Select item 3001728244.

Inter- and intra-observer repeatability of aortic annulus measurements on screening CT for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR): Implications for appropriate device sizing.

Knobloch G, Sweetman S, Bartels C, Raval A, Gimelli G, Jacobson K, Lozonschi L, Kohmoto T, Osaki S, François C, Nagle S.

Eur J Radiol2018 Aug;105:209-215. doi: 10.1016/j.ejrad.2018.06.003. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

PMID:
30017282
Select item 3001614745.

Atherosclerosis on CT Angiogram Predicts Acute Kidney Injury After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kandathil A, Abbara S, Hanna M, Minhajuddin A, Wehrmann L, Merchant AM, Mills R, Fox AA.

AJR Am J Roentgenol2018 Jul 17:1-7. doi: 10.2214/AJR.17.19340. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30016147
Select item 3001289046.

Transfemoral Implantation of the Acurate neo for the Treatment of Aortic Regurgitation.

Toggweiler S, Cerillo AG, Kim WK, Biaggi P, Lloyd C, Hilker M, Almagor Y, Cuculi F, Brinkert M, Kobza R, Muller O, Rück A, Corti R.

J Invasive Cardiol2018 Jul 15. pii: JIC2018715-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 3000980047.

Suprasternal and Left Axillary Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Morbidly Obese Patients.

Olds A, Eudailey K, Nazif T, Vahl T, Khalique O, Lewis C, Hahn R, Leon M, Bapat V, Ahmed M, Kodali S, George I.

Ann Thorac Surg2018 Jul 13. pii: S0003-4975(18)30978-0. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2018.05.095. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30009800
Select item 3000336648.

Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation (VinV-TAVR) for failed surgical aortic bioprosthetic valves.

Wernly B, Zappe AK, Unbehaun A, Sinning JM, Jung C, Kim WK, Fichtlscherer S, Lichtenauer M, Hoppe UC, Alushi B, Beckhoff F, Wewetzer C, Franz M, Kretzschmar D, Navarese E, Landmesser U, Falk V, Lauten A.

Clin Res Cardiol2018 Jul 12. doi: 10.1007/s00392-018-1326-z. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30003366
Select item 3000209949.

Myocardial Scar and Mortality in Severe Aortic Stenosis: Data from the BSCMR Valve Consortium.

Musa TA, Treibel TA, Vassiliou VS, Captur G, Singh A, Chin C, Dobson LE, Pica S, Loudon M, Malley T, Rigolli M, Foley JRJ, Bijsterveld P, Law GR, Dweck MR, Myerson SG, McCann GP, Prasad SK, Moon JC, Greenwood JP.

Circulation2018 Jul 12. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032839. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032839. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
30002099
Select item 2999613850.

Aortic Angulation and TAVR.

Gandotra P.

Cardiology2018 Jul 11;140(3):141-142. doi: 10.1159/000490094. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

Select item 2998906851.

Endovascular repair of severe aortic coarctation, transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis, and percutaneous coronary intervention in an elderly patient with long term follow-up.

Fallatah R, Elasfar A, Amoudi O, Ajaz M, AlHarbi I, Abuelatta R.

J Saudi Heart Assoc2018 Jul;30(3):271-275. doi: 10.1016/j.jsha.2018.01.003. Epub 2018 Feb 9.

Select item 2998711952.

Impact of Rapid Ventricular Pacing on Outcome After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Fefer P, Bogdan A, Grossman Y, Berkovitch A, Brodov Y, Kuperstein R, Segev A, Guetta V, Barbash IM.

J Am Heart Assoc2018 Jul 9;7(14). pii: e009038. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.118.009038.

Select item 2998314253.

Imaging Evaluation for the Detection of Leaflet Thrombosis After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Zhao ZG, Wang MY, Jilaihawi H.

Interv Cardiol Clin2018 Jul;7(3):293-299. doi: 10.1016/j.iccl.2018.03.007. Epub 2018Jun 29. Review.

PMID:
29983142
Select item 2998314154.

Imaging Evaluation and Interpretation for Vascular Access for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Foley TR, Stinis CT.

Interv Cardiol Clin2018 Jul;7(3):285-291. doi: 10.1016/j.iccl.2018.03.006. Epub 2018Jun 29. Review.

PMID:
29983141
Select item 2998121455.

Echocardiography in transcatheter aortic (Core)Valve implantation: Part 2-Transesophageal echocardiography.

Naqvi TZ.

Echocardiography2018 Jul;35(7):1020-1041. doi: 10.1111/echo.14034. Review.

PMID:
29981214
Select item 2998029956.

Impact of patient-specific morphologies on sinus flow stasis in transcatheter aortic valve replacement: An in vitro study.

Hatoum H, Dollery J, Lilly SM, Crestanello J, Dasi LP.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg2018 Jun 7. pii: S0022-5223(18)31521-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2018.05.086. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29980299
Select item 2997656857.

Malnutrition and Mortality in Frail and Non-Frail Older Adults Undergoing Aortic Valve Replacement.

Goldfarb M, Lauck S, Webb JG, Asgar AW, Perrault LP, Piazza N, Martucci G, Lachapelle K, Noiseux N, Kim DH, Popma JJ, Lefèvre T, Labinaz M, Lamy A, Peterson MD, Arora RC, Morais JA, Morin JF, Rudski L, Afilalo J; FRAILTY-AVR Investigators .

Circulation2018 Jul 5. pii: CIRCULATIONAHA.118.033887. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.033887. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29976568
Select item 2997636358.

Debris Heterogeneity Across Different Valve Types Captured by a Cerebral Protection System During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Schmidt T, Leon MB, Mehran R, Kuck KH, Alu MC, Braumann RE, Kodali S, Kapadia SR, Linke A, Makkar R, Naber C, Romero ME, Virmani R, Frerker C.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 9;11(13):1262-1273. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.001.

PMID:
29976363
Select item 2997426459.

A Review of Alternative Access for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Young MN, Singh V, Sakhuja R.

Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med2018 Jul 4;20(7):62. doi: 10.1007/s11936-018-0648-5. Review.

PMID:
29974264
Select item 2997123860.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Concomitant Mitral Regurgitation.

Stähli BE, Reinthaler M, Leistner DM, Landmesser U, Lauten A.

Front Cardiovasc Med2018 Jun 19;5:74. doi: 10.3389/fcvm.2018.00074. eCollection 2018. Review.

Select item 2996942761.

Propensity matched comparison of clinical outcomes after transaortic versus transfemoral aortic valve replacement.

Chollet T, Marcheix B, Boudou N, Elbaz M, Campelo-Parada F, Bataille V, Bouisset F, Lairez O, Porterie J, Galinier M, Carrie D, Lhermusier T.

EuroIntervention2018 Jul 3. pii: EIJ-D-18-00168. doi: 10.4244/EIJ-D-18-00168. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2996827362.

Alternative access for transcatheter aortic valve replacement in older adults: A collaborative study from France and United States.

Damluji AA, Murman M, Byun S, Moscucci M, Resar JR, Hasan RK, Alfonso CE, Carrillo RG, Williams DB, Kwon CC, Cho PW, Dijos M, Peltan J, Heldman AW, Cohen MG, Leroux L.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 3. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27690. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29968273
Select item 2996613163.

Does Aortic Angulation Impact Outcomes in TAVR.

Czarny MJ, Resar JR.

Cardiology2018;140(2):103-105. doi: 10.1159/000489697. Epub 2018 Jul 2. No abstract available.

PMID:
29966131
Select item 2996339164.

Transcaval transcatheter aortic valve replacement: a visual case review.

Muhammad KI, Tokarchik GC.

J Vis Surg2018 May 14;4:102. doi: 10.21037/jovs.2018.04.02. eCollection 2018.

Select item 2996107265.

Aortic Angulation Does Not Impact Outcomes in Self-Expandable or Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Elmously A, Gray KD, Truong QA, Burshtein A, Wong SC, de Biasi AR, Worku B, Salemi A.

Cardiology2018;140(2):96-102. doi: 10.1159/000488933. Epub 2018 Jun 29.

PMID:
29961072
Select item 2996075666.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Extremely Large Annuli: (Over)expanding Bioprosthetic Technology to the Limits?

Mehilli J, Jochheim D.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1388-1389. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.05.007. Epub 2018 Jun 27. No abstract available.

PMID:
29960756
Select item 2996075567.

Impact of Aortic Root Anatomy and Geometry on Paravalvular Leak in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Extremely Large Annuli Using the Edwards SAPIEN 3 Valve.

Tang GHL, Zaid S, George I, Khalique OK, Abramowitz Y, Maeno Y, Makkar RR, Jilaihawi H, Kamioka N, Thourani VH, Babaliaros V, Webb JG, Htun NM, Attinger-Toller A, Ahmad H, Kaple R, Sharma K, Kozina JA, Kaneko T, Shah P, Hirji SA, Desai ND, Anwaruddin S, Jagasia D, Herrmann HC, Basra SS, Szerlip MA, Mack MJ, Mathur M, Tan CW, Don CW, Sharma R, Gafoor S, Zhang M, Kapadia SR, Mick SL, Krishnaswamy A, Amoroso N, Salemi A, Wong SC, Kini AS, Rodés-Cabau J, Leon MB, Kodali SK.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1377-1387. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.034. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

PMID:
29960755
Select item 2995818268.
Select item 2995225269.

Stent fractures after common femoral artery bail-out stenting due to suture device failure in TAVR.

Veulemans V, Afzal S, Ledwig P, Heiss C, Busch L, Sansone R, Soetemann DB, Maier O, Kleinebrecht L, Kelm M, Zeus T, Hellhammer K.

Vasa2018 Jun 28:1-9. doi: 10.1024/0301-1526/a000712. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29952252
Select item 2995183070.

Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement: Functional Requirements for Device Design, Bench-Top, and Pre-Clinical Evaluation.

Iyer R, Chalekian A, Lane R, Evans M, Yi S, Morris J.

Cardiovasc Eng Technol2018 Jun 27. doi: 10.1007/s13239-018-0364-z. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29951830
Select item 2994327371.

Gender-dependent association of diabetes mellitus with mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Linke A, Schlotter F, Haussig S, Woitek FJ, Stachel G, Adam J, Höllriegel R, Lindner A, Mohr FW, Schuler G, Kiefer P, Leontyev S, Thiele H, Borger MA, Holzhey D, Mangner N.

Clin Res Cardiol2018 Jun 25. doi: 10.1007/s00392-018-1309-0. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29943273
Select item 2994311572.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the 34 mm Medtronic Evolut valve : Early results of single institution experience.

D’Ancona G, Dißmann M, Heinze H, Zohlnhöfer-Momm D, Ince H, Kische S.

Neth Heart J2018 Aug;26(7-8):401-408. doi: 10.1007/s12471-018-1122-4.

Select item 2994136973.

Midterm Outcomes With the Self-Expanding ACURATE neo Aortic Bioprosthesis: The “Bumblebee Paradox” in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Barbanti M, Todaro D.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 23;11(14):1375-1376. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.06.004. Epub 2018 Jun 22. No abstract available.

PMID:
29941369
Select item 2993663474.

Atrioventricular and intraventricular block after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

Lee JJ, Goldschlager N, Mahadevan VS.

J Interv Card Electrophysiol2018 Jun 24. doi: 10.1007/s10840-018-0391-6. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29936634
Select item 2993449375.

Recurrent Unilateral Transudative Pleural Effusion Due to Low Flow, Low Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis.

Al-Khafaji JF, Taha M, Abdalla AO, Rowan C.

Am J Case Rep2018 Jun 23;19:739-743. doi: 10.12659/AJCR.909448.

Select item 2992964276.

Whose Urgency Is it, Anyway?

Brener SJ.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1186-1187. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.035. No abstract available.

PMID:
29929642
Select item 2992964177.

Outcomes Following Urgent/Emergent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Insights From the STS/ACC TVT Registry.

Kolte D, Khera S, Vemulapalli S, Dai D, Heo S, Goldsweig AM, Aronow HD, Elmariah S, Inglessis I, Palacios IF, Thourani VH, Sharaf BL, Gordon PC, Abbott JD.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1175-1185. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.002. Epub 2018 Mar 11.

PMID:
29929641
Select item 2992963978.

Medium-Term Follow-Up of Early Leaflet Thrombosis After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Ruile P, Minners J, Breitbart P, Schoechlin S, Gick M, Pache G, Neumann FJ, Hein M.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun 25;11(12):1164-1171. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.006.

PMID:
29929639
Select item 2992775879.

Left Subclavian Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Under Combined Interscalene and Pectoralis Nerve Blocks: A Case Series.

Block M, Pitchon DN, Schwenk ES, Ruggiero N, Entwistle J, Goldhammer JE.

A A Pract2018 Jun 18. doi: 10.1213/XAA.0000000000000819. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29927758
Select item 2992620680.

Optimal pre-TAVR annulus sizing in patients with bicuspid aortic valve: area-derived perimeter by CT is the best-correlated measure with intraoperative sizing.

Wang Y, Wang M, Song G, Wang W, Lv B, Wang H, Wu Y.

Eur Radiol2018 Jun 20. doi: 10.1007/s00330-018-5592-y. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29926206
Select item 2992437681.

Immediate improvement of left ventricular mechanics following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Lozano Granero VC, Fernández Santos S, Fernández-Golfín C, Plaza Martín M, de la Hera Galarza JM, Faletra FF, Swaans MJ, López-Fernández T, Mesa D, La Canna G, Echeverría García T, Habib G, Martíne Monzonís A, Zamorano Gómez JL.

Cardiol J2018 Jun 20. doi: 10.5603/CJ.a2018.0066. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2992312682.

Sex-Specific Considerations in Women with Aortic Stenosis and Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Mihos CG, Klassen SL, Yucel E.

Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med2018 Jun 19;20(7):52. doi: 10.1007/s11936-018-0651-x. Review.

PMID:
29923126
Select item 2992253583.
Select item 2991587884.

Less pronounced reverse left ventricular remodeling in patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared to tricuspid aortic stenosis.

Xiong TY, Wang X, Li YJ, Liao YB, Zhao ZG, Wei X, Xu YN, Zheng MX, Zhou X, Peng Y, Wei JF, Feng Y, Chen M.

Int J Cardiovasc Imaging2018 Jun 18. doi: 10.1007/s10554-018-1401-6. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29915878
Select item 2991274185.

Predictors of Persistent Tricuspid Regurgitation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Baseline Tricuspid Regurgitation.

Worku B, Valovska MT, Elmously A, Kampaktsis P, Castillo C, Wong SC, Salemi A.

Innovations (Phila)2018 May/Jun;13(3):190-199. doi: 10.1097/IMI.0000000000000504.

PMID:
29912741
Select item 2991243286.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the setting of left atrial appendage thrombus.

Salemi A, De Micheli A, Aftab A, Elmously A, Chang R, Wong SC, Worku BM.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg2018 Jun 14. doi: 10.1093/icvts/ivy189. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29912432
Select item 2991133687.

TAVR versus SAVR: Who determines the risk?

Lazar HL.

J Card Surg2018 Jun 17. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13744. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available.

PMID:
29911336
Select item 2991130788.

Evolving trends in aortic valve replacement: A statewide experience.

Kim KM, Shannon F, Paone G, Lall S, Batra S, Boeve T, DeLucia A, Patel HJ, Theurer PF, He C, Clark MJ, Sultan I, Deeb GM, Prager RL.

J Card Surg2018 Jun 17. doi: 10.1111/jocs.13740. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29911307
Select item 2990896989.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement on an Aortic Mechanical Valve.

Arzamendi D, Ruiz V, Ramallal R, Alcasena MS, Beunza MT, Larman M.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jul 9;11(13):e107-e108. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2018.04.046. Epub 2018 Jun 13. No abstract available.

PMID:
29908969
Select item 2990351990.

Transcatheter or surgical treatment of severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease: A comparative analysis from the Italian OBSERVANT study.

Barbanti M, Buccheri S, Capodanno D, D’Errigo P, Ranucci M, Rosato S, Santoro G, Fusco D, Tamburino C, Biancari F, Seccareccia F; OBSERVANT Research Group.

Int J Cardiol2018 Jun 7. pii: S0167-5273(17)36915-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.06.011. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29903519
Select item 2989884891.

Oral anti-Xa anticoagulation after trans-aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis: The randomized ATLANTIS trial.

Collet JP, Berti S, Cequier A, Van Belle E, Lefevre T, Leprince P, Neumann FJ, Vicaut E, Montalescot G.

Am Heart J2018 Jun;200:44-50. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.03.008. Epub 2018 Mar 10.

PMID:
29898848
Select item 2989883792.

Utility of an additive frailty tests index score for mortality risk assessment following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

Steinvil A, Buchanan KD, Kiramijyan S, Bond E, Rogers T, Koifman E, Shults C, Xu L, Torguson R, Okubagzi PG, Pichard AD, Satler LF, Ben-Dor I, Waksman R.

Am Heart J2018 Jun;200:11-16. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2018.01.007. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

PMID:
29898837
Select item 2989684793.

Advanced chronic kidney disease: Relationship to outcomes post-TAVR, a meta-analysis.

Makki N, Lilly SM.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1002/clc.22993. [Epub ahead of print] Review.

Select item 2989677794.

Comparing outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with stenotic bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valve: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Kanjanahattakij N, Horn B, Vutthikraivit W, Biso SM, Ziccardi MR, Lu MLR, Rattanawong P.

Clin Cardiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1002/clc.22992. [Epub ahead of print]

Select item 2989560095.

Stroke and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Carotid Disease Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

Kochar A, Li Z, Harrison JK, Hughes GC, Thourani VH, Mack MJ, Matsouaka RA, Cohen DJ, Peterson ED, Jones WS, Vemulapalli S.

Circ Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun;11(6):e006322. doi: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.117.006322.

PMID:
29895600
Select item 2989459496.

Percutaneous access versus surgical cut down for TAVR: Where do we go from here?

Ates I, Cilingiroglu M.

Catheter Cardiovasc Interv2018 Jun;91(7):1363-1364. doi: 10.1002/ccd.27653.

PMID:
29894594
Select item 2989341797.

Inadvertent pacemaker lead dislodgement.

Eulert-Grehn JJ, Schmidt G, Kempfert J, Starck C.

Pacing Clin Electrophysiol2018 Jun 12. doi: 10.1111/pace.13412. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
29893417
Select item 2988800998.

Successful Coronary Protection during TAVI in Heavily Calcified Aortic Leaflets in Patient with Short and Low Left Coronary System.

Kabach M, Alrifai A, Lovitz L, Rothenberg M, Faber C, Nores M.

Case Rep Cardiol2018 May 14;2018:2758170. doi: 10.1155/2018/2758170. eCollection 2018.

Select item 2988746499.

Role of T2 mapping in left ventricular reverse remodeling after TAVR.

Gastl M, Behm P, Haberkorn S, Holzbach L, Veulemans V, Jacoby C, Schnackenburg B, Zeus T, Kelm M, Bönner F.

Int J Cardiol2018 Sep 1;266:262-268. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.02.029.

PMID:
29887464
Select item 29885699100.

Early changes in N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels after transcatheter aortic valve replacement and its impact on long-term mortality.

Liebetrau C, Gaede L, Kim WK, Arsalan M, Blumenstein JM, Fischer-Rasokat U, Wolter JS, Kriechbaum S, Huber MT, van Linden A, Berkowitsch A, Dörr O, Nef H, Hamm CW, Walther T, Möllmann H.

Int J Cardiol2018 Aug 15;265:40-46. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.02.037.

PMID:
29885699

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