Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Frontiers in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disorders’ Category


Cheetah Medical Introduces New Algorithm for Fluid Management

Reporter: Lawrence J Mulligan, PhD

 

Cheetah Medical Advances the Science of Fluid Management

Cheetah Medical is the pioneer and leading global provider of 100% noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring technologies that are designed for use in critical care, OR and emergency department settings. The CHEETAH NICOM™ and STARLING™ SV technologies use a proprietary algorithm to calculate parameters related to the volume of blood and the functioning of patients’ circulatory systems. Medical professionals use this information to assess patients’ unique volume requirements, guide volume management decisions and maintain adequate organ perfusion. Cheetah Medical technologies are designed to enable more confident, informed therapy decisions that support clinical goals of improving patient outcomes and driving economic efficiencies.

NEWTON, Mass. –(BUSINESS WIRE)– Cheetah Medical announced today that its eighth abstract on fluid management will be presented at Society of Critical Care Medicine meeting in January. Building on previous work, this abstract demonstrates a strong association between large volume fluid administration in septic shock and increased risk of death in more than 23,000 patients.

Each year, millions of patients require hemodynamic monitoring to ensure optimal volume and perfusion management. While intravenous fluid is typical first-line therapy for many critical care situations, volume management has been a challenge for the healthcare community. It is often difficult for a clinician to know the right amount of fluid to administer to patients, and there are serious complications associated with both under and over resuscitation.

“Ever since we’ve been using intravenous fluid, clinicians have been asking, ‘What is the right amount?’” said Doug Hansell, MD and Cheetah’s Chief Physician Executive. “Today, with non-invasive Cheetah technology, we have new tools to answer this question, and we are learning that getting this question right is more important than ever.”

Cheetah Medical has been working with leading researchers using a large U.S. dataset to better understand the risks and benefits of fluid administration. During the past two years, researchers have now released eight clinical abstracts on the importance of fluid management.

  • FLUID ADMINISTRATION IN SEPSIS AND SEPTIC SHOCK – PATTERNS AND OUTCOMES: Sepsis and septic shock is a huge national priority, as it is the most expensive condition to treat, at $24 billion per year (AHRQ). This study identified a strong association between large fluid administration (more than five liters) and excess mortality in septic shock patients. As expected, sicker patients received more fluid. However, even after accounting for the severity of illness, these patients had an increased risk of dying. (Society of Critical Care Medicine Annual Conference, January 2017)
  • FLUID ADMINISTRATION IN OPEN AND LAPAROSCOPIC ABDOMINAL SURGERY: The study looked at the relationship between intraoperative fluid therapy and complications following abdominal surgery.Based on data from 18,633 patients, an increase in complications was found with day-of-surgery fluid use above five liters for open abdominal procedures. The study recommended individualized fluid therapy to reduce potentially negative effects from over/under resuscitation with intravenous fluids. (American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] 2016 Annual Meeting)
  • FLUID PRESCRIPTIONS IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS WITH RENAL FAILURE: The implication of volume resuscitation and potential complications among patients with acute kidney injuries (AKIs) has been widely debated. This study examined the relationship between fluid administration and outcomesamong 62,695 AKI patients. It found the potential for both under and over resuscitation in those who received treatments with vasopressors. A better understanding of individual fluid needs was seen for patients requiring pressor and mechanical ventilation support. (European Society of Intensive Care Medicine [ESICM] Annual Congress, 2016)
  • EFFECTS OF FLUIDS ADMINISTRATION IN PATIENTS WITH SEPTIC SHOCK WITH OR WITHOUT HEART FAILURE (HF): The study examined the relationship between indications of fluid overload in sepsis patients (with or without diastolic HF) and outcomes. For 29,098 patients, mortality was the highest among those who received the highest volumes of fluid. It also noted that patients with diagnosed diastolic HF received less fluids and exhibited a significantly lower mortality than predicted. These lower mortality rates could be a result of a more conservative fluid treatment strategy applied in patients known to be at risk for fluid overload. (American Thoracic Society [ATS] 2016 International Conference)
  • WIDE PRACTICE VARIABILITY IN FLUID RESUSCITATION OF CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS WITH ARDS: The study looked at how variable fluid resuscitation testing and treatments impacted the outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). An analysis of 1,052 patients highlighted a highly variable fluid resuscitation. The findings suggest a widespread variability in provider decision-making regarding fluid resuscitation, which may be detrimental to quality and costs, lowering the overall value of care. (American Thoracic Society [ATS] 2016 International Conference)
  • POTENTIAL HARM ASSOCIATED WITH SEVERITY-ADJUSTED TREATMENT VARIABILITY IN FLUID RESUSCITATION OF CRITICALLY ILL SEPTIC PATIENTS: The study set out to determine treatment variability for patients with severe sepsis and how it may impact mortality. Retrospectively analyzing 77,032 patients, a high degree of treatment variability was found for fluid resuscitation, with a range of 250 ml to more than 7L of fluid administered. For patients who received less fluid, there was no increased risk of mortality. In those who received the most fluid, there was a strong association with worse hospital mortality. (American Thoracic Society [ATS] 2016 International Conference)
  • ASSOCIATION OF FLUIDS AND OUTCOMES IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT PATIENTS HOSPITALIZED WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA (CAP): Analyzing 192,806 CAP patients, the study looked at the correlation between fluid-volume overload, hospital mortality and ventilator-free days (VFDs). A significant association was found between the amount of fluid administered on day one, increased mortality and decreased VFDs. The study may have also identified a subset of CAP patients who could benefit from a more restrictive fluid strategy. (36thInternational Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine)
  • FLUID ADMINISTRATION IN COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED SEPSISEXAMINATION OF A LARGE ADMINISTRATIVE DATABASE: The study looked at variation in fluid administration practices and compliance with “Surviving Sepsis” guidelines, which recommend a minimum initial fluid administration of 30cc/kg in sepsis-induced tissue hypoperfusion patients. It found that a substantial proportion of patients (47.4 %) with community-acquired sepsis received less than the recommended guidelines within the first 24 hours. (Society of Critical Care Medicine Annual Conference, 2016)

“We are very proud to have supported this work – we are advancing the science of fluid management and helping to improve our understanding of how better fluid management may improve patient outcomes,” said Chris Hutchison, CEO of Cheetah Medical.

 

SOURCE

https://www.cheetah-medical.com/cheetah-medical-advances-science-fluid-management/

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access On-line Scientific Journal includes the following:

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


Reversing Heart Disease: Combination of PCSK9 Inhibitors and Statins – Opinion by Steven Nissen, MD, Chairman of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

How 2 Drugs Lower Cholesterol Remarkably — and Reverse Heart Disease

Study shows promise for combination of newer drug and statins

How 2 Drugs Lower Cholesterol Remarkably --- and Reverse Heart Disease

Newer cholesterol-lowering drugs combined with more conventional medicine reduces bad cholesterol to incredibly low levels, a new study shows. Perhaps even more important, the combination also reduces the heart-attack-inducing plaque that forms inside the arteries, the study says.

The study was led by cardiologist Steven Nissen, MD, Chairman of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. Results appeared recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

The study looked at the use of a drug called evolocumab by people who took statins to lower the amount of LDL, or bad, cholesterol in their blood. Evolocumab is a drug called a PCSK9 inhibitor. This is a newer kind of medicine that can make LDL cholesterol levels plummet.

The people who took statins and evolocumab had greater reductions in atherosclerosis compared with people who took statins and a placebo.  Atherosclerosis is  a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries.  The condition can lead to serious problems, including heart attack, stroke, or even death.

The results are an intriguing indicator — rather than definite proof — that evolocumab may have benefit for patients taking statins, Dr. Nissen says. Researchers are still awaiting the results of large clinical trials investigating whether evolocumab is safe and will prevent heart attack, stroke or death. The first results of these studies are expected in April 2017.

Special ultrasound

In the study, researchers treated for 18 months 968 high-risk people who had extremely high levels of blood cholesterol.

Participants were randomly assigned to take either a statin and a placebo, or a statin and evolocumab.

Researchers monitored the participants’ cholesterol levels. They also used a special ultrasound probe to measure the amount of plaque in their arteries at the beginning and the end of the study. 

“We were able to show that getting the bad cholesterol levels down to really low levels, down to the 20s and 30s, can actually remove plaque from the coronary arteries,” Dr. Nissen says. “This going to levels that we’ve never been able to achieve before.”           

Low cholesterol, less plaque

Results show the group treated with statins and a placebo reduced their LDL cholesterol levels to 93 on average. At the same time, the group treated with the combination of the statin plus evolocumab got down to an average bad cholesterol level of 36.6.

“No one’s ever reached levels that low in a clinical trial,” Dr. Nissen says.

Participants who took evolocumab also had less plaque in their arteries at the end of the study — essentially reversing their heart disease.

“We, for the first time now, have shown that this new class of drugs, the PCSK9 inhibitors, has a favorable effect on the development of plaques on the coronary artery and can actually regress those plaques,” Dr. Nissen says. “And it turns out about two-thirds of patients actually had less plaque at the end of 18 months than they started with.” 

PCSK9 inhibitors, which are expensive, are not for everybody, Dr. Nissen says. Currently, the drug is used in addition to statins for the highest-risk patients with particularly high cholesterol.

SOURCE

Read Full Post »


First U.S. TAVR Patients Treated With Temporary Pacing Lead (Tempo Lead)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

BioTrace Medical, Inc., a venture backed company based in San Carlos, Calif., is dedicated to reinventing temporary pacing to improve patient outcomes and reduce hospital costs.

For more information: www.biotracemedical.com

 

FDA Clears Temporary Pacing Technology for Transcatheter Aortic Valve and EP Procedures

The BioTrace Medical Tempo temporary pacing lead is designed to reduce complications and hospital length of stay

The Tempo Lead represents the first major advance in temporary pacing since the technology was introduced decades ago,” said Susheel Kodali, M.D., director of the Heart Valve Program at the Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy at Columbia University Medical Center in New York. “As a critical component of every TAVR procedure, temporary leads are integral to successful clinical outcomes for patients. I am excited about the potential of this technology and look forward to using it in my practice.”

Results of the first-in-human study of the technology will be presented at the annual Transcatheter Cardiac Therapeutics (TCT) conference in Washington, D.C. on Sunday, Oct. 30, at 10:59 a.m. eastern time in Room 209, Level 2.

“FDA clearance is an exciting milestone for BioTrace,” said Laura Dietch, CEO of BioTrace Medical. “We are pleased to bring this important innovation to the significant and growing number of patients needing better temporary pacing options to minimize risks and life-threatening complications. We look forward to launching in select U.S. centers in the coming weeks.”

For more information: www.biotracemedical.com

SOURCE

http://www.dicardiology.com/product/fda-clears-temporary-pacing-technology-transcatheter-aortic-valve-and-ep-procedures

December 19, 2016 — BioTrace Medical Inc. announced the first commercial use of the company’s Tempo Temporary Pacing Lead since U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance in October.

The first cases involved patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures and were performed by James Harkness, M.D., interventional cardiologist, and Brian K. Whisenant, M.D., medical director of the Structural Heart Disease Program at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Susheel Kodali, M.D., director of the Heart Valve Program at Columbia University Medical Center/New York Presbyterian Hospital.

BioTrace Medical’s Tempo Lead is for use in procedures in which

  • Temporary pacing is indicated, including
  • TAVR and
  • Electrophysiology (EP) procedures.

The lead is designed for secure and stable cardiac pacing with the goal of reducing complications and allowing patients to ambulate sooner after procedures.

“The Tempo Lead is designed to alleviate the risks associated with lead dislodgement and inconsistent pacing, providing a safer option for patients.”

Temporary leads are used in more than 350,000 procedures each year, a number that is growing rapidly as the population ages and TAVR becomes increasingly common. The temporary pacing lead, a small catheter with two electrodes, is placed in the right ventricle of the heart through a vein in the groin or neck. The lead is then connected to an external pacemaker allowing a physician to monitor and control a patient’s heart rate for several days.

SOURCE

http://www.dicardiology.com/content/first-us-tavr-patients-treated-temporary-pacing-lead?eid=333021707&bid=1620839

Read Full Post »


2017 World Medical Innovation Forum: Cardiovascular, May 1-3, 2017, Partners HealthCare, Boston, at the Westin Hotel, Boston

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group will cover the event in REAL TIME

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN will be streaming live from the floor of the Westin Hotel in Boston on May 1-3, 2017

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

 

Biggest Voices in Cardiovascular Care

2017 World Medical Innovation Forum: Cardiovascular, May 1-3, 2017, Partners HealthCare, Boston, at the Westin Hotel, Boston

Monday, May 1, 2017

7:00 am – 8:00 am
8:00 am – 11:30 am
First Look: The Next Wave of Cardiology Breakthroughs

Harvard Medical School investigators describe their most promising work in rapid fire presentations highlighting commercial opportunities in cardiovascular and cardiometabolic care. Twenty rising stars from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital will present in 10-minute sessions.

11:45 am – 1:15 pm
Concurrent Discovery Cafés Breakout Sessions: Sharing Perspectives

Top Cardiology faculty from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital address compelling topics in clinical research and implementation of care.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Cardiac Replacement Therapy: The Next Ten Years
  • Heart Failure: Back in The Game through New Pathways
  • Payment Models: Provider’s Perspective
  • Microbiome: Implications for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease
  • Molecular Imaging: New Biological Endpoints – Function Over Structure
  • Technology: Enhancing Translational Medicine

 

1:15 pm – 1:30 pm
1:30 pm – 1:40 pm
Opening Remarks
Introduction by: Anne Klibanski, MD
  • Chief Academic Officer, Partners HealthCare
  • Laurie Carrol Guthart Professor of Medicine, Academic Dean for Partners, Harvard Medical School
  • CEO, Partners HealthCare
1:40 pm – 2:15 pm
Reinventing Cardiac Care

Two renowned clinical leaders provide an overview of the medical and economic challenges that cardiovascular and cardiometabolic disorders present.

They will highlight strategic direction in cardiac research and clinical care at Partners, and address how recent trends in investment, regulation, and policy may be dovetailed with efforts at Partners.

The experts also spotlight for attendees the various therapies, diagnostics, devices, and critical issues that will be discussed throughout the upcoming 2.5 days of the World Medical Innovation Forum.

  • CEO, Southern Cross Biotech Consulting
  • Chief of Cardiovascular Medicinem Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Chief, Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
2:15 pm – 3:05 pm
CEO Roundtable: Today’s Learning, Tomorrow’s Opportunities

Discussion on contribution of technology innovation to the treatment of cardiovascular disease reflecting on lessons and how they shape investment decisions.

Moderator: Benjamin Pless
  • Executive in Residence, Partners HealthCare Innovation
  • EVP Medical Affairs and CMO, UnitedHealth Group
  • CEO, Abiomed
  • CEO, Edwards Lifesciences
  • CEO, Bard
3:05 pm – 3:55 pm
Tackling the AFib Epidemic

Evolving trends in diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of atrial fibrillation. Factors that will influence patient care over the next 5 years are considered, including risk stratification, procedure and technology options, and potential implications of CMS policies, such as bundling.

 

  • Associate Chief, Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital Heart Center
  • Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Director, Cardiac Arrhythmia Service, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School
  • VP, GM, AF Solutions, Medtronic
  • President, Cardiovascular and Neuromodulation, Abbott
  • VP US Medical Affairs, CVMD TA, AstraZeneca
3:55 pm – 4:45 pm
Heart Failure’s Therapeutic Mandate

One million patients are hospitalized annually for HF—80% of total US cost of HF management. After discharge from HF hospitalization, 24% are rehospitalized within 30 days, greater than 50% within 6 months. Perspective on disease management, addressing the issues of hospital readmission and optimizing therapies.

 

  • VP and Medical Director, Abbott
  • CEO, MyoKardia
  • SVP, CMO, Global Health Policy, Rhythm Management, Boston Scientific
4:45 pm – 5:50 pm
CLINICAL HIGHLIGHT: A New Chapter of PAD

PAD is the most challenging atherosclerotic syndrome, largely due to the technological challenges of managing peripheral artery disease through minimally invasive strategies. Top physician, governmental, and industry leaders in the field discuss the potential for new breakthroughs including novel implantable devices, pharmacologic approaches, and reductions in associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

The panel will also discuss, Below The Knee: The Persisting Unmet Need

 

Moderator: Michael Jaff, DO
  • President, Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Partners Healthcare
  • Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Director, Coverage and Analysis Group, CMS
  • Chief, Peripheral Interventional Devices Branch, Food and Drug Administration
  • CMO, Cardinal Health
  • Co-Director, Endovascular Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School
  • SVP and President, Peripheral Interventions, Boston Scientific
6:00 pm – 6:45 pm

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

7:00 am – 7:45 am
7:00 am – 7:45 am
FOCUS SESSION: Japan Today: Advancing Cardiometabolic Therapies

Discussion on unique aspects of cardiometabolic market in Japan, its projected trend over the next 5 years and explore transformative models of open innovation to accelerate development of new therapeutic options.

  • Yoshiro Miwa Associate Chair and Founding Director, Center for Interdisciplinary Cardiovascular Sciences, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
7:00 am – 7:10 am
Opening
  • Chief Innovation Officer, Partners HealthCare
8:00 am – 8:50 am
Pricing to Enable Affordability and Innovation

Balancing acceptable answers to high and escalating drug prices in the United States while making strides in medical innovation. Leaders in innovation, policy, care delivery, academia, and insurance discuss potential collaborative solutions.

 

Moderator: Peter Slavin, MD
  • President, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • CEO, Cardinal Health
  • CEO, Boehringer Ingelheim USA
8:50 am – 9:40 am
CLINICAL HIGHLIGHT: Emerging Devices for Complex Structural Heart Disease

Evolution of mitral disease management, current practice and impact of new technologies on both repair and replacement, implications of a heterogeneous patient population, triage, timing of intervention.

  • CVP, Advanced Technology, CSO, Edwards Lifesciences
  • SVP and President, Coronary & Structural Heart, Medtronic
9:40 am – 10:10 am
1:1 Fireside Chat: John Lechleiter, Chairman, Eli Lilly
Moderator: Susan Dentzer
  • CEO, Network for Excellence in Health Innovation
  • Chairman, Eli Lilly and Company
10:10 am – 10:25 am
10:25 am – 11:15 am
Personal Monitoring for Disease Management

Considering the evolving trends in viability and utilization and the opportunities wearables may present for real-world clinical decision making.

 

Moderator: Joe Kvedar, MD
  • VP, Connected Health, Partners HealthCare
  • Associate Professor of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School
  • CEO, GE Healthcare
  • CEO, Philips
  • CEO, Siemens Healthcare
  • CEO, Zoll Medical
11:15 am – 11:45 am
1:1 Fireside Chat: Omar Ishrak, CEO, Medtronic
Moderator: Paul LaViolette
  • Managing Partner & COO, SV Life Sciences Advisers
  • CEO, Medtronic
12:00 pm – 12:30 pm
12:15 pm – 12:30 pm
1:00 pm – 1:10 pm
1:10 pm – 2:00 pm
Global Clinical Trials: Next Generation Design and Scalability

Cardiovascular trials currently account for 10 percent of all clinical trial participants. Discussion on design and implementation of clinical studies globally, considering strategies for patient access, regulatory implications, cost containment and management of relationships with global service providers.

 

  • Chairman, TIMI Study Group, Lewis Dexter, MD Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • VP, Cardiovascular & Metabolic Disease Head, Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca
  • VP Cardiovascular Medicine, Covance
  • Vice President, Global Development, Amgen
2:00 pm – 2:50 pm
Precision Cardiovascular Medicine: What is Different This Time

Explore how precision medicine is changing the face of cardiovascular medicine specifically. The session will examine the impact of combined phenotypic and genotypic characterization on optimizing response to therapeutics, trial design, improving outcomes, and redefining reimbursement.

  • CEO, GE Ventures & healthymagination
2:50 pm – 3:40 pm
CV Investing in the Next Decade

View on investing landscape, opportunities in the CV/metabolic marketplace, the drugs, devices and diagnostics currently in pipelines and notable positive trends.

  • Partner, Atlas Venture
  • VP, Venture, Partners HealthCare
  • Managing General Partner, Frazier Healthcare Partners
3:40 pm – 4:30 pm
CLINICAL HIGHLIGHT: Optimizing Care for the 51%: New Market Opportunities

Introduction: Cathy Minehan, Chair, MGH Corporation

Address implications of gender as a key biological factor for personalized medicine. Stroke is likely to be the first cardiovascular event, tied to AF and secondarily to hypertension. Opportunities for medication utilization and optimization in context of, manifestation of disease and understanding the biology, complications, strategies to collect relevant clinical evidence, and treatment response.

  • CEO, American Heart Association
  • Medical Director, Boston Scientific
4:30 pm – 5:20 pm
Disruptive Therapeutic Platforms: New Tools, New Outcomes

Recent advances of biological drugs have broadened the scope of therapeutic targets for a variety of human diseases. This holds true for dozens of RNA-based therapeutics currently under clinical investigation for diseases including heart failure. These emerging drugs could be considered in context of genomic/germ line screening, family history and epigenetics.

Moderator: Tony Coles, MD
  • CEO, Yumanity Therapeutics
  • Founder, AnGes
5:20 pm – 6:00 pm

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

7:30 am – 7:55 am
1:1 Fireside Chat: Robert Califf, Commissioner (former), Food and Drug Administration
  • Chairman, Department of Medicine, Physician-in-Chief, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine, Soma Weiss, MD Distinguished Chair in Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Commissioner (former), Food and Drug Administration
7:55 am – 8:45 am
Innovation in Translational Trials

CV/metabolic disorders comprise aggregates of many niche diseases that may be targeted with therapies against specific molecular alterations, yet the final potential markets are much larger. This model creates challenges for both drug development and patient care with implications for initial indication selection and design and execution of clinical trials – from first-in-human through post marketing studies.

 

  • SVP, Global Head of Regenerative Medicine Unit, Head of Scientific Affairs, Japan, Takeda
  • CEO, Mirna Therapeutics
  • SVP, R&D Pipeline, GlaxoSmithKline
  • CMO, Verily
  • Senior Vice President & CSO, PAREXEL International
9:15 am – 10:05 am
New Targets in Coronary Artery Disease

Cardiovascular trials have a proud history of providing some of the most robust data in evidence-based medicine. However the growing size and complexity of these trials imperils their future. This panel will discuss the design and implementation of clinical studies globally, considering strategies for patient access, leveraging electronic health records and mobile device data, personalized medicine, regulatory implications, cost containment and management of relationships with global service providers.

  • Director, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • VP Research, Cardiometabolic Disorders Therapeutic Area Head, Site Head Amgen San Francisco, Amgen
  • Director, Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Eugene Braunwald Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
10:05 am – 10:25 am
10:25 am – 10:55 am
1:1 Fireside Chat: Gary Gibbons, NHLBI
Moderator: Betsy Nabel, MD
  • President, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Director, NHLBI
10:55 am – 11:45 am
The Skinny on Fat: Therapeutic Opportunities

Explore the evolving role of adipose tissue as an active endocrine organ and discuss the possibilities to discover novel signaling pathways relevant to cardiovascular health and viable druggable targets.

  • SVP and US Medical Leader, Eli Lilly and Company
  • SVP and CSO, CVMET, Pfizer
  • CEO, Zafgen
  • VP, Therapy Area, Cardiovascular & Metabolism, AstraZeneca
11:45 am – 12:45 pm
Disruptive Dozen: 12 Technologies that will reinvent Cardiovascular Care
  • Chief of Cardiovascular Medicinem Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

@@@@

Listen to some of the top CEOs in the cardiovascular industry discuss their latest innovations.

Forum keynoters will include the CEOs of Eli Lilly, Boston Scientific, Medtronic, Boehringer Ingelheim, Cardinal Health, Edwards Life Sciences, Abiomed, Bard, American Heart Association, GE Healthcare, Siemens Healthcare, the FDA Commissioner and dozens of top investors, emerging company CEOs, and senior Harvard faculty. Be part of the new urgency to redefine cardiovascular and cardiometabolic care – the largest market in healthcare – through new therapies, digital diagnostics, ‘omics, platforms and engagement.

To join fellow decision makers at the World Medical Innovation Forum, please follow the link to register: worldmedicalinnovation.org

 

 

John Lechleiter, PhD

CEO, Eli Lilly and Company

George Barrett

CEO, Cardinal Health

Robert Califf, MD

Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration

Michael Mussallem

CEO, Edwards LifeSciences

Tony Coles, MD

CEO, Yumanity Therapeutics

Nancy Brown

CEO, American Heart Association

Frans van Houten

CEO, Philips

Bernd Montag, PhD

CEO, Siemens Healthcare

Michael Minogue

CEO, Abiomed

Tamara Syrek Jensen

Director, Coverage and Analysis Group, CMS

Betsy Nabel, MD

President, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Richard Migliori, MD

EVP Medical Affairs and CMO, UnitedHealth Group

Jean-François Formela, MD

Partner, Atlas Venture

Patrick Vallance, MD, PhD

R&D President, GlaxoSmithKline

Tassos Gianakakos

CEO, MyoKardia

 

Michael Mahoney

CEO, Boston Scientific

Omar Ishrak, PhD

CEO, Medtronic

John Flannery

CEO, GE Healthcare

Timothy Ring

CEO, Bard

Jessica Mega, MD

CMO, Verily

Gary Gibbons, MD

Director, NHLBI

Sue Siegel

CEO, GE Ventures & healthymagination

Jonathan Rennert

CEO, ZOLL Medical

Paul Lammers, MD

CEO, Mirna Therapeutics

André-Michel Ballester, PhD

CEO, LivaNova

Paul Fonteyne

CEO, Boehringer Ingelheim USA

Paul LaViolette

Managing Partner and COO, SV Life Sciences Advisers

Ora Pescovitz, MD

SVP and US Medical Leader, Eli Lilly and Company

Jeff Mirviss

SVP and President, Peripheral Interventions, Boston Scientific

Fouzia Laghrissi-Thode, MD

VP, Therapy Area, Cardiovascular & Metabolism, AstraZeneca

 

 

Atherosclerosis

  • New Targets in Coronary Artery Disease
  • PAD: Improving Outcomes

Clinical Evidence & Care Pathway

  • Gender and Cardiovascular Disease
  • Global Clinical Trials: Next Generation Design and Scalability
  • Innovations in Cardiac Delivery
  • Innovation in Translational Trials

Innovation and Policy

  • Cardiovascular Innovation: Triumphs, Challenges, Opportunities
  • Pricing to Enable Affordability and Innovation
  • Regulatory Priorities: FDA Commissioner (invited)
  • Technology, Populations and Disease: CV Investing in the Next Decade

 

Heart Failure

  • Heart Failure: Back in the Game Through New Pathways

Metabolic Syndrome

  • Cardioprotective Effects of Metabolic Drugs
  • The Skinny on Fat: Therapeutic Opportunities

Modalities

  • Disruptive Therapeutic Platforms: From Nucleic Acid to Proteins
  • Personal Monitoring for Disease Management
  • Precision Cardiovascular Medicine: What is Different This Time?

Rhythm Disorders

  • A Cure for AFib: Drugs, Ablation or Lifestyle?

Structural Heart

  • Emerging Devices for Complex Structural Heart Disease

 

 

 

The 2017 World Medical Innovation Forum, May 1-3, 2017, will be held at the Westin Copley Place in Boston, Massachusetts.

Register Today.

Early bird discounts apply.

Sign up before December 31.

worldmedicalinnovation.org

For more information contact:

Chris Coburn

Chief Innovation Officer

Partners HealthCare

 

 

 

Partners HealthCare Innovation

Partners HealthCare

Add to Calendar

Contact Us

 

SOURCE

From: Partners HealthCare Innovation <innovations@partners.org>

Date: Wednesday, December 14, 2016 at 9:47 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Cardiovascular’s next chapter of innovation begins now.

Read Full Post »


Advanced Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD): Axillary Artery PCI for Insertion and Removal of Impella Device

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

July 15, 2016
Authors:

Rajiv Tayal, MD, MPH1,2;  Mihir Barvalia, MD, MHA1;  Zeshan Rana, MD2;  Benjamin LeSar, MD1;  Humayun Iftikhar, MD1;  Spas Kotev, MD1;  Marc Cohen, MD1;  Najam Wasty, MD1

Abstract: Traditionally, brachial and common femoral arteries have served as access sites of choice, with many operators recently converting to radial artery access for coronary angiography and percutaneous intervention due to literature suggesting reduced bleeding risk, better patient outcomes, and lower hospital-associated costs. However, radial access has limitations when percutaneous procedures requiring larger sheath sizes are performed. Six Fr sheaths are considered the limit for safe use with the radial artery given that the typical luminal diameter of the vessel is approximately 2 mm, while peripheral artery disease (PAD) may often limit use of the common femoral artery, particularly in patients with multiple co-morbid risk factors. Similarly, the brachial artery has fallen out of favor due to both thrombotic and bleeding risks, while also not safely and reliably accommodating sheaths larger than 7 Fr. Here we describe 3 cases of a new entirely percutaneous technique utilizing the axillary artery for delivery of Impella 2.5 (13.5 Fr) and CP (14 Fr) cardiac-assist devices for protected percutaneous coronary intervention in the setting of prohibitive PAD.

J INVASIVE CARDIOL 2016;28(9):374-380. 2016 July 15 (Epub ahead of print)

Key words: axillary artery, percutaneous access, high-risk PCI

 

SOURCE

http://amptheclimeeting.com/ampcentral/articles/totally-percutaneous-insertion-and-removal-impella-device-using-axillary-artery-setting

Read Full Post »


Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves – Mitral and tricuspid valve repair technologies now in development

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Based on

http://www.dicardiology.com/article/advances-and-future-directions-transcatheter-valves

 

Read the article “First TAVR Device Receives European Approval to Treat Intermediate Risk Patients”from August 2016.

Watch the video “The Evolution of TAVR Technology.” Interview with Juan Granada, M.D., executive director and chief scientific officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation’s Skirball Center for Innovation, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Watch the video “TAVR Beats Surgery — Top News From ACC.16.” Dr. Vinod Thourani, professor of surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine and a co-investigator for the PARTNER II Trial, discusses the biggest news item from ACC.16 — the Sapien 3 TAVR device performed better that surgical aortic valve replacement.

Watch the video “CoreValve Trumps Surgical Valve Replacement — TVT 2015.” Interview with Michael Reardon, M.D., professor of cardiothoracic surgery at DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, and chairman of the patient screening committee, CoreValve U.S. pivotal trial, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Read the article “FDA Clears Sapien XT for Valve-In-Valve Procedures.”

Read the article “FDA Expands Use of CoreValve for Aortic Valve-in-Valve Replacement.”

Transcatheter Mitral Valves are the Next Frontier

Most interventional and cardiac surgical experts say TMVR will be the next frontier in minimally invasive structural heart interventions. With the success and rapid growth of TAVR, there is an immense anticipation that TMVR will have an even greater impact in cardiology. This has translated into more than $2.5 billion being spent in the past year by vendors purchasing start-up TMVR companies, while less than 50 patients have actually been treated using these technologies, said Michael Mack, M.D., medical director, cardiovascular surgery, Baylor Health Care System and chairman of The Heart Hospital Baylor Plano Research Center.

However, the mitral valve involves much more complex anatomy than the aortic valve, so the devices, imaging for procedural planning and guidance will be much more sophisticated than what is used for TAVR. Among the challenges are: fixation of a device to the very small landing zone of the mitral annulus; avoiding the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT); avoiding compression of the atrioventricular (AV) node; avoiding the papillary muscle and chordae tendineae; ensuring the device seals properly to avoid paravalvular regurgitation; and the device needs to be able to adapt to remodeling of the anatomy. There are more than 20 TMVR devices in development. The majority of these valves utilize a self-expanding nitinol frame that engages both sides of the native mitral valve annulus for fixation, similar to Amplatzer septal closure devices.

The companies with first-in-human TMVR implants include Tendyne, Neovasc and Edwards Lifesciences’ Fortis and Sapien XT devices. The Neovasc Tiara, Tendyne Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve and CardiAQ Valve Technologies TMVR system all have been granted FDA conditional investigational device exemption (IDE) studies.

Watch the video “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Therapies in Development.” 

Watch the video “Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Technologies.” An interview with Ted Feldman, M.D., FACC, MSCAI, FESC, cardiac cath lab director, Evanston Hospital, North Shore Health System, and principle investigator, Everest II MitraClip U.S. pivotal trial, at the Transcatheter Valve Therapies 2015 meeting.

 

Advancements in TAVR and TMVR Technologies at TCT 2016 

Watch the video VIDEO “Transcatheter Valve Technology Advancements at TCT 2016.” This is an interview Torsten Vahl, M.D., about advancements in transcatheter valve repair technology, including new devices for the aortic, mitral and tricuspid valves. Vahl is director of experimental and translational research and assistant professor of medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy.

Watch the video “VIDEO: Transcatheter Mitral Valve Technology, Anatomical Challenges.” A discussion with Juan Granada, M.D., about transcatheter mitral valve advancements and device challenges at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2016 annual meeting. Granada is executive director and chief scientific officer of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation’s Skirball Center for Innovation.

SOURCE

FEATURE | HEART VALVE TECHNOLOGY | NOVEMBER 12, 2015| DAVE FORNELL

Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves – Mitral and tricuspid valve repair technologies now in development

http://www.dicardiology.com/article/advances-and-future-directions-transcatheter-valves

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Journal include the following:

 

Mitral Valve Repair: Who is a Patient Candidate for a Non-Ablative Fully Non-Invasive Procedure?

Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/04/mitral-valve-repair-who-is-a-candidate-for-a-non-ablative-fully-non-invasive-procedure/

 

Read Full Post »


A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care — Richmond University Medical Center, New York’s Leader in Health Care and Medical Education 

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

Richmond University Medical Center (www.RUMSCI.org), an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and the Icahn School of Medicine, is a 470+ bed health care facility and teaching institution in Staten Island, New York. The hospital is a leader in the areas of acute, medical and surgical care, including emergency care, surgery, minimally invasive laparoscopic and robotic surgery, gastroenterology, cardiology, pediatrics, podiatry, endocrinology, urology, oncology, orthopedics, neonatal intensive care and maternal health. RUMC earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for quality and patient safety.

RUMC is a designated Level 1 Trauma Center, a Level 2 Pediatric Trauma Center, a Level 3 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), which is the highest level attainable, and a designated Stroke Center, receiving top national recognition from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.  Their state-of-the-art Cardiac Catheterization Lab has Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) capabilities, for elective and emergent procedures in coronary angioplasty that treats obstructive coronary artery disease, including unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction (MI), and multi-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD).

RUMC maintains a Wound Care/Hyperbaric Center and a Sleep Disorder Center on-site at its main campus.  The facility also offers behavioral health services, encompassing both inpatient and outpatient services for children, adolescents and adults, including emergent inpatient and mobile outreach units.  RUMC is the only facility that offers inpatient psychiatric services for adolescents in the community.

In April 2016, RUMC announced its intent to merge with Staten Island Mental Health Society in order to expand its footprint in Staten Island and integrate behavioral health services alongside primary care. As part of New York’s Medicaid reforms, funding is available to incentivize providers to integrate treatment for addiction, mental health issues and developmental disabilities with medical services.

With over 2,500 employees, RUMC is one of the largest employers on Staten Island, New York.

rumcexteriorrumcexterior2rumcinterior

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, New York. Interior and exterior photographs of the hospital.

 

Below is my interview with President and Chief Executive Officer Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, which occurred in September, 2016.

What has been your greatest achievement?

Dr. Messina: Professionally, my greatest achievement is my current responsibility – to be President and Chief Executive Officer of one of the greatest hospitals with a strong, solid foundation and rich history. I was born in this hospital and raised on Staten Island, so to me, there is no greater gift than to be part of a transformative organization and have the ability to advance the quality of health care on Staten Island.

My parents taught me the value of responsibility and motivation and instilled in me the drive and tenacity to be the best person I could be – for my employees and for my family. I am a highly competitive person, who is goal-oriented, hands-on and inspired by teamwork. I rarely sit behind my desk as I believe my place is alongside my team in making things happen.

As a personal goal, I recently climbed the 20,000-foot Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. It was the experience of a lifetime. I could not have completed this challenge without the support of the guides and porters who helped me and my group along the way. For me, it was a challenge in proving to myself that I could be out of my comfort zone. My group and I hiked hours and hours each day, dodging rocks and scrambling along rock walls with the goal of reaching the summit. In many ways, it takes a village to climb the mountain, relying on each other in the group to get you to the next level.

In many ways, that is how I see my professional day at the hospital, working with a strong team of dedicated medical staff and employees who are focused on one goal, which is to continue our hard work, continue to improve care and continue to move forward to advance life and health care.

The mission of Richmond University Medical Center, an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine, serves the ethnically diverse community of Staten Island, New York, by providing patients with a range of services.

How has your collaboration with the Mount Sinai network helped to expand health care delivery and services for patients of Staten Island, New York?

Dr. Messina: Being able to serve our patients year after year continues to be a top priority, so we are constantly improving upon our rich history of 100 years of exceptional patient-focused care given by our medical and surgical health care professionals as well as innovative technologies and programs created by our award-winning hospital team. We have committed medical specialists, passionate employee staff, exceptional Board of Trustees, supportive elected government officials – all who in their own way contributes to providing the highest level of patient care to the more than 500,000 residents of Staten Island, New York.

As a member of the Mount Sinai Health network, we have found ways to work collaboratively with our academic partner to ensure that our patients’ health care needs not only are fully met but also exceeded. This alliance will facilitate the development of a new, Comprehensive Breast and Women’s Healthcare Center. We have leveraged our Breast and Women’s Health Center with our RUMC general surgeons in conjunction with breast imaging, fellowship-trained physicians from Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine. The physicians who are granted this renowned fellowship interact with our patients and become an active participant in multidisciplinary breast conferences and resident and medical student education. For patients, this means that they have access to the best minds and latest research, therapies and treatment regimens throughout our network.

What makes Richmond University Medical Center and its specialty areas stand out from other hospitals?

Dr. Messina: We bring the highest level of advanced medicine to our patients. For more than 100 years, we have built a rich history of delivering patient-focused care that is unique. Our organization is recognized as a family organization with strong community spirit and family values. We are proud to be a high-technology/high-touch organization of caring professionals that go above and beyond the standard of health care. Our strengths lie in the areas of acute, medical and surgical care, including emergency care, surgery, minimally invasive laparoscopic and robotic surgery, gastroenterology, cardiology, pediatrics, podiatry, endocrinology, urology, oncology, orthopedics, neonatal intensive care and maternal health.

Each year, we embark upon a comprehensive, robust strategic planning process that involves our senior leadership team, clinical chairs, Board of Trustees as well as our medical and surgical staff and hospital employees that looks out three to five years in the future to determine what is best for the patient. We are each committed in our own way to quality patient care and building an even stronger organization.

Some of our achievements are noteworthy:

  • As a New York City Department of Emergency Services designated Level 1 Trauma Center and Level 2 Pediatric Trauma Center, the only Trauma Center dually verified in New York City, we rely on sophisticated equipment so our medical and surgical specialists are prepared to treat severe conditions within minutes.
  • Our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a designated Level 3 facility, the highest level attainable. The unit delivers 3,000 babies annually and it was recognized as having the lowest mortality rate in the metropolitan area and a survival rate of 99 percent, that exceeds national benchmarks. Our specialists in our pediatric ambulatory services department treat over 10,000 patients annually and our children’s urgent care area records over 23,000 visits annually.
  • Our state-of-the-art, 38,000-square-foot Emergency Department (ED), which will be replaced by an expanded facility and projected to open in 2018, will provide for more focused care, operational efficiency and flexibility for our staff and patient. We also will be better integrated and connected to the entire hospital campus.

Originally designed to serve 22,000 patients each year, the ED is expected to accommodate an increased volume of patients, which is estimated at 70,000 and give our medical specialists the tools they need to provide the best in care for this volume of patients. In a new patient and family-centered space with 49 treatment positions, the new ED will be connected to the existing hospital, close to surgical services, the radiology department and lab services.

Equally as important, the hospital has been strong in the face of natural disasters, especially Hurricane Sandy which occurred a few years ago, and the new ED is being designed with storm resilient and redundant design to minimize impact from severe weather conditions.

In fact, the New York City Council and the Staten Island Borough President have set aside a combined $13.5 million for this $60+ million project and believe in the transformative impact that it will have on emergency care on Staten Island. These local officials believe that Staten Island residents deserve quality, readily accessible health care.

  • Heroin addiction is an epidemic on Staten Island, so we have a number of programs in place at RUMC’s Silberstein Center to provide outpatient treatment, rehabilitation and clinics, along with group therapy sessions, Alcoholics Anonymous meetings and individual therapy sessions.
  • Our new primary care/walk-in facility in the heart of Staten Island borough is operational and there are no appointments required. Patients can visit with one of three physicians or a nurse practitioner. This off-site facility is not located in the hospital complex and is an expansion of our services outside of the hospital walls.
  • We also maintain a Wound Care Center, Pain Management Center and a Sleep Disorder Center at our facility. In fact, we are the only local facility that offers inpatient psychiatric services for adolescents and we are expanding our capacity to meet the needs of the community.

 

RUMC has been awarded a top designation jointly by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association. What does that mean to the hospital?

Dr. Messina: This designation makes us proud as the recipient of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Quality Achievement Award for six consecutive years and its first Elite Plus recognition. This means that we have achieved 85 percent or higher adherence in indicators for two or more consecutive 12-month periods to improve quality of patient care and outcomes for stroke patients.

Our cardiac catheterization lab with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) capabilities – the newest facility of its kind on Staten Island — now treats semi-urgent and elective coronary procedures.

For patients, this means that we have a commitment to ensure that stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence. With a stroke, when time is lost, brain is lost, and this award demonstrates our commitment to ensuring patients receive care based on evidenced-based guidelines. We are dedicated to continually improving the quality of stroke care and this recognition helps us achieve that goal.

Studies have shown that hospitals that consistently follow these quality improvement measures can reduce length of stay and 30-day readmission rates and reduce disparities in care. To qualify for the Elite Plus recognition, we met quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. If given intravenously in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. We earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period.

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number five cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

The values of Richmond University Medical Center are summarized in the acronym, WE CARE (Welcoming Energized Compassion Advocacy Respect Excellence). How is this part of your day-to-day life?

Dr. Messina: For more than 100 years, Richmond University Medical Center has

been building a rich history of exceptional patient-focused care for the residents of Staten Island. Each year, we carry that tradition forward by our medically innovative and patient-focused care and services we offer. It is the passion, creativity and caring of everyone who is part of our ‘hospital team’ that moves the organization to new heights.

The chart below summarizes our credo, the values that guide us every day and help us focus on the care and well-being of the people who come through our doors.

We are welcoming and gracious toward each other, and toward all who come to receive our services.

Personnel are energized for quality, creativity, commitment and teamwork.

Compassion is the way we share deep concern and care toward each person.

Advocacy is our activity that promotes the rights and responsibilities of patients, families and staff, in the hospital setting and in the community.

We show respect by recognizing the basic dignity of every person in all our interactions and in the formulation of policies and procedures.

Excellence is our way of demonstrating that we can always be more and always be better.

 

The Richmond University Medical Center Board is comprised of distinguished leaders of the Staten Island community who are committed to the success of the hospital and to the health of Staten Islanders.

How is this local approach revolutionizing health care for the Staten Island community?

Dr. Messina: The members of our distinguished Board of Trustees, who represent a cross-section of business professionals and community leaders, continue our goal of meeting the needs of our patients and our hospital.

Our Board remains committed to providing solutions for our patients to challenging healthcare issues they face every day and to making a difference in the lives of patients by providing the latest thinking and technology solutions. Our Board Chairperson Kathryn K. Rooney, Esq., and Vice Chairperson Ronald A. Purpora, as well as the other Board members, and even our elected government officials, have a strong connection to Staten Island and we believe it truly ‘takes a village’ to make this organization flourish.

Each year, our Board of Trustees is presented with new opportunities and possibilities for growth and development. That is why their top priority for this past year was approving the construction of a state-of-the-art Emergency Department (ED) as this undertaking will serve both the patients and staff equally. In order to serve the residents of Staten Island properly, the new ED will accommodate an increased number of patients and our medical staff will receive the tools and technology to provide the best in care for our patients.

This past year, we were provided with a $1.5 million gift from the Staten Island Foundation that will go toward the hospital’s capital campaign to construct the new $60 million Emergency Department. We decided to name the RUMC’s Allan Weissglass Pavilion Center for Ambulatory Care, in honor of our long-time community and business leader, who is a founding Board member and Board of Trustees member. Allan Weissglass devoted his time, energy and talent to the success of this hospital over many years.

We are positioning our organization for the future and we continuously build on our strengths, being responsive to the needs of the community. In the past, we saw the patient was the only ‘customer’ of the hospital. Today, that perception is evolving and our ‘customers’ are many.  With the help and support of donors, local foundations, volunteers, staff, and the community, local government officials, we are building a bright future for Richmond University Medical Center.

What is RUMC’s commitment to graduate medical education?

Dr. Messina: Our six Graduate Medical Education (GME) programs in Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Diagnostic Radiology and Podiatry, signify our commitment to teaching as a cornerstone of our philosophy. Our medical staff are seen as role models for our medical residents and provide quality training, medical education and research capabilities. Our existing medical staff functions as supervising physicians and gives medical residents exposure to specific responsibilities and patient care, as well as scholarly opportunities. One interesting fact is that the doctors we train come back to help treat our patients by using their knowledge and experience to work in our community.

You mentioned that ‘outreach in the community’ as a key factor in the success of the hospital’s mission to enhance the quality of life for residents of Staten Island. What types of activities are under way?

Dr. Messina: Our lifesaving work takes many forms. We are constantly finding new and different ways to engage with our community – to raise awareness and educate on a number of diseases and conditions, and, hopefully move toward better health care. We believe that our patients need to see us outside of a clinical environment, which strengthens our relationship.

For example, over the past year:

  • We sponsored an annual health and wellness expo with the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation that was attended by over 2,000 people to equip the community with knowledge about their health and the local health services available to them.
  • We pioneered an organ donor enrollment day by welcoming 59 visitors and guests who can potentially donate their organs to save lives.
  • We partnered with the New York City Department of Transportation and our own Trauma team to demonstrate and educate the community on car seat safety.
  • Our Dermatologist team took part in the Borough President’s “Back to the Beach” festival by performing skin screenings and distributing sunscreen and information on skin cancer.
  • Our Obstetrics and Gynecology team hosted a baby expo to talk with new mothers and mothers-to-be about services available at the hospital.
  • Our Diabetologist team partnered with the YMCA on a 16-week partnership to curb the diabetes epidemic on Staten Island through information talks and health screenings.
  • We were even present at last year’s Staten Island Yankees home opening baseball game to throw out the first pitch and conduct a blood drive while distributing wellness information.

 

Since roughly one third of the residents on Staten Island are enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare, what steps are you taking to improve the delivery of treatment for them?

Dr. Messina: We started several initiatives last year that were funded by the federal and state governments to look at the way care is delivered to patients who are enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid. So far, we’ve reduced costs by $3.75 million and realized $1.8 million in shared savings that are re-invested in key hospital programs.

As you know, Medicare and Medicaid are two different government-run programs that were created in 1965 in response to the inability of older and low-income Americans to buy private health insurance. They were part of our government’s social commitment to meeting individual health care needs. Medicare is a federal program that provides health coverage if you are 65 or older or have a severe disability, no matter your income, while Medicaid is a state and federal program that provides health coverage if you have a very low income.

We’ve set up our own Richmond Quality Accountable Care Organization (ACO), that comprises 30 providers serving 7,500 Medicare patients. This innovative program is accountable for the quality, cost and overall care provided to people on Medicare and who are enrolled in the traditional fee-for-service program.  One program that is ongoing is one that we’ve partnered with the Visiting Nurse Service of Staten Island to prevent hospital readmissions and to identify hospitalized patients who would benefit from a higher level of care and home care services.

Another program that is under way for our Medicaid patients is teaching our staff to prevent hospital readmissions by creating an accurate list of medications that a patient takes and comparing that list against physician’s admission, transfer and discharge orders to ensure that the correct medication plan is in place.

We believe that we are transforming the underlying systems with a focus on delivering quality care and hopefully better outcomes for patients.

RUMC recently announced a merger with Staten Island Mental Health Society (SIMHS) to integrate SIMHS’ broad range of behavioral health programs into the hospital’s existing medical and behavioral program throughout Staten Island. What does this merger bring to the community?

Dr. Messina: We believe that the proposed merger between RUMC and the Staten Island Mental Health Society (SIMHS) will provide a strengthened, comprehensive network of behavioral health services across Staten Island.

This partnership will bring together two Staten Island institutions, with a combined 230 years of service to the borough, and create one strong and vibrant organization dedicated to meeting the health needs of the diverse community.

Merging the range of community-based behavioral health services provided by SIMHS with the solid foundation of primary care services provided by RUMC will create a seamless range of behavioral and medical services for our residents. We are in the unique position to transform and enhance the services of these two vital health care providers. The SIMHS will keep its name and become a division of the hospital. The merger is expected to close during calendar year 2017.

 rumcdanmessina

Image SOURCE: Photograph of President and Chief Executive Officer Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, courtesy of Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, New York.

Daniel J. Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA
President & Chief Executive Officer

Daniel Messina, Ph.D., FACHE, LNHA, became President and Chief Executive Officer of Richmond University Medical Center (RUMC) – an affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine – in April 2014.

Dr. Messina, a life-long resident of Staten Island, is a seasoned executive with nearly 30 years of healthcare leadership expertise. For the previous 13 years, he served as the System Chief Operating Officer of CentraState Healthcare System in Freehold, New Jersey, where his responsibilities included all System Operations for the Medical Center, Assisted Living Facility, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center and Continuing Care Retirement Community. While in this role, Dr. Messina developed additional growth strategies that include a new Cancer Center, a Proton Therapy Center, Radio-Surgery, a new Infusion Center and programs in Robotics, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Bariatric and Neurosurgery. Other accomplishments include a new state-of-the-art 26-bed Critical Care Unit, a 49-bed Emergency Department, and the development of an 180,000 sq. ft. Ambulatory Campus and Wellness Center anchored by a 35,000 sq. ft. Medical Fitness Center. Additionally, Dr. Messina developed the Linda E. Cardinale MS Center – one of the largest and most comprehensive MS Centers in the tristate area – leading to a fundraising event that has generated over $2 million.

Dr. Messina received his B.S. in Health Science/Respiratory Therapy from Long Island University Brooklyn, and earned his M.P.A. in Healthcare Administration from LIU Post. He obtained his Ph.D. in Health Sciences and Leadership at Seton Hall University where he currently serves as an adjunct professor in the School of Health and Allied Sciences. He is active in the American College of Health Care Executives, is board certified in healthcare management as an ACHE Fellow, and recently completed a three-year term as Regent for New Jersey.

Dr. Messina serves as trustee on the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the New Jersey Metro Chapter, and the Alumni Board of Trustees at Seton Hall University. He is a Board member of the VNA Health Group of New Jersey and a member of the Policy Development Committee of the New Jersey Hospital Association. Dr. Messina has been honored by various organizations for his service to the community, including Seton Hall University with the “Many Are One” award, the American College of Healthcare Executives with Senior, Early and Distinguished Service Awards, New Jersey Women Against MS, CentraState Auxiliary, and the Staten Island CYO.

Editor’s note:

We would like to thank William Smith, director of Public Relations, Richmond University Medical Center, for the help and support he provided during this interview.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

 

Richmond University Medical Center (http://rumcsi.org/Main/Home.aspx)

Other related articles:

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/annualreport.aspx

Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_University_Medical_Center

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/rumcinthenews/si-live-5202016-170.aspx

Retrieved from http://rumcsi.org/main/rumcinthenews/merger-agreement-4132016-159.aspx

Retrieved from http://blog.silive.com/gracelyns_chronicles/2016/06/rumc_receives_presitigious_bab.html

Retrieved from https://www.statnews.com/2016/10/17/vivan-lee-hospitals-utah/

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

Risk Factor for Health Systems: High Turnover of Hospital CEOs and Visionary’s Role of Hospitals In 10 Years

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/08/risk-factor-for-health-systems-high-turnover-of-hospital-ceos-and-visionarys-role-of-hospitals-in-10-years/

Healthcare conglomeration to access Big Data and lower costs

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/13/healthcare-conglomeration-to-access-big-data-and-lower-costs/

A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/22/a-new-standard-in-health-care-farrer-park-hospital-singapores-first-fully-integrated-healthcarehospitality-complex/

2013

Helping Physicians identify Gene-Drug Interactions for Treatment Decisions: New ‘CLIPMERGE’ program – Personalized Medicine @ The Mount Sinai Medical Center

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/15/helping-physicians-identify-gene-drug-interactions-for-treatment-decisions-new-clipmerge-program-personalized-medicine-the-mount-sinai-medical-center/

Nation’s Biobanks: Academic institutions, Research institutes and Hospitals – vary by Collections Size, Types of Specimens and Applications: Regulations are Needed

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/26/nations-biobanks-academic-institutions-research-institutes-and-hospitals-vary-by-collections-size-types-of-specimens-and-applications-regulations-are-needed/

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »