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Archive for the ‘Frontiers in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disorders’ Category


Medical Scientific Discoveries for the 21st Century & Interviews with Scientific Leaders at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078313281 – electronic Table of Contents 

Author, Curator and Editor: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Available on Kindle Store @ Amazon.com since 12/9/2017

List of Contributors & Contributors’ Biographies

Volume Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Preface, all Introductions, all Summaries and Epilogue

Part One:

1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3, 2.3, 2.4, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 2.5, 2.6.1, 2.6.2, 2.6.3, 2.6.4, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Part Two:

5.2, 5.3, 5.6, 6.1.2, 6.1.4, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.3.2, 6.3.4, 6.3.5, 6.3.6, 6.3.8, 6.3.10, 6.4.1, 6.4.2, 6.5.1.2, 6.5.1.3, 6.5.2.2, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 8.7, 8.8, 8.9, 8.9.1, 8.9.3, 8.9.4, 8.9.5, 8.9.6, 8.10.1, 8.10.2, 8.10.3, 8.10.4, 9.2, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.9, 9.10, 9.11, 9.12, 9.13, 9.14, 9.15, 9.16, 10.2, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 10.10, 10.11, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.5, 11.6, 11.7, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 12.7, 12.8, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11, 12.12, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.6, 13.12, 13.13, 14.1, 14.2

Guest Authors:

Pnina Abir-Am, PhD Part Two: 6.1.1

Stephen J Williams, PhDPart Two: 6.2.6, 6.5.2.2, 10.4, 10.9, 13.4

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN:

Part One:

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.7, 2.2.1, 2.3

Part Two:

5.1, 5.4, 5.5, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11, 6.1.3, 6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.5, 6.3.1, 6.3.3, 6.3.7, 6.3.9, 6.4.3, 6.5.1.1, 6.5.2.1, 6.5.2.2, 6.5.3.1, 6.5.4, 6.5.5, 6,5,6, 8.9.2, 8.10.2, 9.1, 9.4, 10.1, 10.3, 11.4, 12.6, 13.5, 13.7, 13.8, 13.9, 13.10, 13.11

Adam Sonnenberg, BSC, MSc(c)Part Two: 13.9

 

electronic Table of Contents

PART ONE:

Physician as Authors, Writers in Medicine and Educator in Public Health

 

Chapter 1: Physicians as Authors

Introduction

1.1  The Young Surgeon and The Retired Pathologist: On Science, Medicine and HealthCare Policy – Best writers Among the WRITERS

1.2 Atul Gawande: Physician and Writer

1.3 Editorial & Publication of Articles in e-Books by  Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence:  Contributions of Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

1.4 Abraham Verghese, MD, Physician and Notable Author

1.5 Eric Topol, M.D.

1.6 Gregory House, MD

1.7 Peter Mueller, MD  Professor of Radiology @MGH & HMS – 2015 Synergy’s Honorary Award Recipient

Summary

Chapter 2: Professional Recognition

Introduction

2.1 Proceedings

2.1.1 Research Presentations

2.1.2 Proceedings of the NYAS

2.1.3 Cold Spring Harbor Conference Meetings

2.1.4 Young Scientist Seminars

2.2 Meet Great Minds

2.2.1 Meet the Laureates

2.2.2 Richard Feynman, Genius and Laureate

2.2.3 Fractals and Heat Energy

2.3 MacArthur Foundation Awards

2.4 Women’s Contributions went beyond Rosie the Riveter

2.4.1 Secret Maoist Chinese Operation Conquered Malaria

2.4.2 Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel

2.5 Impact Factors and Achievement

2.6   RAPsodisiac Medicine

2.6.1 Outstanding-achievements-in-radiology-or-radiotherapy

2.6.2 Outstanding-achievement-in-anesthesiology

2.6.3 Outstanding-achievement-in-pathology

2.6.4 Topics in Pathology – Special Issues from Medscape Pathology

2.7 How to win the Nobel Prize

2.8 Conversations about Medicine

2.9 Current Advances in Medical Technology

2.10 Atul Butte, MD, PhD

Summary

Chapter 3:  Medical and Allied Health Sciences Education

Introduction

3.1 National Outstanding Medical Student Award Winners

3.2 Outstanding Awards in Medical Education

3.3 Promoting Excellence in Physicians and Nurses

3.4 Excellence in mentoring

Summary

Chapter 4: Science Teaching in Math and Technology (STEM)

Introduction

4.1 Science Teaching in Math and Technology

4.2 Television as a Medium for Science Education

4.2.1 Science Discovery TV

4.3 From Turing to Watson

Summary

PART TWO:

Medical Scientific Discoveries Interviews with Scientific Leaders

Chapter 5: Cardiovascular System

Introduction

5.1 Physiologist, Professor Lichtstein, Chair in Heart Studies at The Hebrew University elected Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

5.2 Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cardiac Disorders

5.3 Notable Contributions to Regenerative Cardiology

5.4 For Accomplishments in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Diseases: The Arrigo Recordati International Prize for Scientific Research

5.5 Becoming a Cardiothoracic Surgeon: An Emerging Profile in the Surgery Theater and through Scientific Publications

5.6 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

5.7 CVD Prevention and Evaluation of Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities: Coronary Calcium Score by CT Scan Screening to justify or not the Use of Statin

5.8 2013 as A Year of Revolutionizing Medicine and Top 11 Cardiology Stories

5.9 Bridging the Gap in Medical Innovations – Elazer Edelman @ TEDMED 2013

5.10 Development of a Pancreatobiliary Chemotherapy Eluting Stent for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma PIs: Jeffrey Clark (MGH), Robert Langer (Koch), Elazer Edelman (Harvard:MIT HST Program)

5.11 Publications on Heart Failure by Prof. William Gregory Stevenson, M.D., BWH

Summary

Chapter 6: Genomics

Introduction
6.1 Genetics before the Human Genome Project

6.1.1 Why did Pauling Lose the “Race” to James Watson and Francis Crick? How Crick Describes his Discovery in a Letter to his Son

6.1.2 John Randall’s MRC Research Unit and Rosalind Franklin’s role at Kings College

6.1.3 Interview with the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA: Watson on The Double Helix and his changing view of Rosalind Franklin

6.1.4 The Initiation and Growth of Molecular Biology and Genomics, Part I

6.2 The Human Genome Project: Articles of Note  @ pharmaceuticalintelligence.com by multiple authors

6.2.1 CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: The Birth of BioInformatics & Computational Genomics

6.2.2 What comes after finishing the Euchromatic Sequence of the Human Genome?

6.2.3 Human Genome Project – 10th Anniversary: Interview with Kevin Davies, PhD – The $1000 Genome

6.2.4 University of California Santa Cruz’s Genomics Institute will create a Map of Human Genetic Variations

6.2.5 Exceptional Genomes: The Process to find them

6.2.6 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

6.3 The Impact of Genome Sequencing on Biology and Medicine

6.3.1 Genomics in Medicine – Establishing a Patient-Centric View of Genomic Data

6.3.2 Modification of genes by homologous recombination – Mario Capecchi, Martin Evans, Oliver Smithies

6.3.3 AAAS February 14-18, 2013, Boston: Symposia – The Science of Uncertainty in Genomic Medicine

6.3.4 The Metabolic View of Epigenetic Expression

6.3.5  Pharmacogenomics

6.3.6 Neonatal Pathophysiology

6.3.7 Genetics of Conduction Disease: Atrioventricular (AV) Conduction Disease (block): Gene Mutations – Transcription, Excitability, and Energy Homeostasis

6.3.8 3D mapping of genome in combine FISH and RNAi

6.3.9 Human Variome Project: encyclopedic catalog of sequence variants indexed to the human genome sequence

6.3.10 DNA mutagenesis and DNA repair

6.4 Scientific Leadership Recognition for Contributions to Genomics

6.4.1 Interview with Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak (44 minutes)

6.4.2 DNA Repair Pioneers Win Nobel – Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich, and Aziz Sancar 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the mechanisms of DNA repair

6.4.3  Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

6.5 Contemporary Field Leaders in Genomics

6.5.1 ROBERT LANGER

6.5.1.1 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Fundamental Physics and Life Sciences for a Total of $21 Million – MIT’s Robert Langer gets $3 Million

6.5.1.2 National Medal of Science – 2006 Robert S. Langer

6.5.1.3  Confluence of Chemistry, Physics, and Biology

6.5.2 JENNIFER DOUDNA

6.5.2.1 Jennifer Doudna, cosmology teams named 2015 Breakthrough Prize winners

6.5.2.2 UPDATED – Medical Interpretation of the Genomics Frontier – CRISPR – Cas9: Gene Editing Technology for New Therapeutics

6.5.3 ERIC LANDER

6.5.3.1  2012 Harvey Prize in April 30: at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology to Eric S. Lander @MIT & Eli Yablonovitch @UC, Berkeley

6.5.4 2013 Genomics: The Era Beyond the Sequencing of the Human Genome: Francis Collins, Craig Venter, Eric Lander, et al.

6.5.5 Recognitions for Contributions in Genomics by Dan David Prize Awards

6.5.6   65 Nobel Laureates meet 650 young scientists covering the fields of physiology and medicine, physics, and chemistry, 28 June – 3 July, 2015, Lindau & Mainau Island, Germany

Summary

Chapter 7: The RNAs

Introduction

7.1 RNA polymerase – molecular basis for DNA transcription – Roger Kornberg, MD

7.2  One gene, one protein – Charles Yanofsky

7.3 Turning genetic information into working proteins – James E. Darnell Jr.

7.4 Small but mighty RNAs – Victor Ambros, David Baulcombe, and Gary Ruvkun, Phillip A. Sharp

7.5 Stress-response gene networks – Nina V. Fedoroff

Summary

Chapter 8: Proteomics, Protein-folding, and Cell Regulation
Introduction.

8.1 The Life and Work of Allan Wilson

8.2 Proteomics

8.3 More Complexity in Protein Evolution

8.4 Proteins: An evolutionary record of diversity and adaptation

8.5 Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Leroy Hood

8.6 Ubiquitin researchers win Nobel – Ciechanover, Hershko, and Rose awarded for discovery of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis

8.7 Buffering of genetic modules involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism provides homeostatic regulation

8.8 Dynamic Protein Profiling

8.9 Protein folding

8.9.1 Protein misfolding and prions – Susan L. Lindquist, Stanley B. Prusiner

8.9.2 A Curated Census of Autophagy-Modulating Proteins and Small Molecules Candidate Targets for Cancer Therapy

8.9.3 Voluntary and Involuntary S-Insufficiency

8.9.4 Transthyretin and Lean Body Mass in Stable and Stressed State

8.9.5 The matter of stunting in the Ganges Plains

8.9.6 Proteins, Imaging and Therapeutics

8.10 Protein Folding and Vesicle Cargo

8.10.1 Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) and Molecular Chaperones

8.10.2 Collagen-binding Molecular Chaperone HSP47: Role in Intestinal Fibrosis – colonic epithelial cells and sub epithelial myofibroblasts

8.10.3 Biology, Physiology and Pathophysiology of Heat Shock Proteins

8.10.4 The Role of Exosomes in Metabolic Regulation 


Summary

Chapter 9:  Neuroscience

Introduction

9.1 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 for Cell Transport: James E. Rothman of Yale University; Randy W. Schekman of the University of California, Berkeley; and Dr. Thomas C. Südhof of Stanford University

9.2 Proteins that control neurotransmitter release – Richard H. Scheller

9.3 Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Robert J. Lefkowitz

9.4 MIND AND MEMORY: BIOLOGICAL AND DIGITAL – 2014 Dan David Prize Symposium

9.5 A new way of moving – Michael Sheetz, James Spudich, Ronald Vale

9.6 Role the basal ganglia

9.7 The Neurogenetics of Language – Patricia Kuhl – 2015 George A. Miller Award

9.8 The structure of our visual system

9.9 Outstanding Achievement in Schizophrenia Research

9.10 George A. Miller, a Pioneer in Cognitive Psychology, Is Dead at 92

9.11 – To understand what happens in the brain to cause mental illness

9.12 Brain and Cognition

9.13 – To reduce symptoms of mental illness and retrain the brain

9.14 Behavior

9.15 Notable Papers in Neurosciences

9.16 Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) – an unproved supplement

Summary

Chapter 10: Microbiology & Immunology

Introduction

10.1 Reference Genes in the Human Gut Microbiome: The BGI Catalogue

10.2 Malnutrition in India, high newborn death rate and stunting of children age under five years

10.3 In His Own Words: Leonard Herzenberg, The Immunologist Who Revolutionized Research, Dies at 81

10.4 Heroes in Medical Research: Dr. Robert Ting, Ph.D. and Retrovirus in AIDS and Cancer

10.5 Tang Prize for 2014: Immunity and Cancer

10.6 Halstedian model of cancer progression

10.7 The History of Hematology and Related Sciences

10.8 Pathology Emergence in the 21st Century

10.9 Heroes in Medical Research: Barnett Rosenberg and the Discovery of Cisplatin

10.10  T cell-mediated immune responses & signaling pathways activated by TLRs – Bruce A. Beutler, Jules A. Hoffmann, Ralph M. Steinman

10.11 Roeder – the coactivator OCA-B, the first cell-specific coactivator, discovered by Roeder in 1992, is unique to immune system B cells

Summary

Chapter 11: Endocrine Hormones

Introduction

11.1 Obesity – 2010 Douglas L. ColemanJeffrey M. Friedman

11.2 Lonely Receptors: RXR – Jensen, Chambon, and Evans – Nuclear receptors provoke RNA production in response to steroid hormones

11.3 The Fred Conrad Koch Lifetime Achievement Award—the Society’s highest honor—recognizes the lifetime achievements and exceptional contributions of an individual to the field of endocrinology

11.4 Gerald D Aurbach Award for Outstanding Translational Research

11.5 Roy O. Greep Award for Outstanding Research in Endocrinology – Martin M. Matzuk

11.6 American Physiology Society Awards

11.7 Solomon Berson and Rosalyn Yalow

Summary

Chapter 12. Stem Cells

Introduction

12.1 Mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent – John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka

12.2 Observing the spleen colonies in mice and proving the existence of stem cells – Till and McCulloch

12.3 McEwen Award for Innovation: Irving Weissman, M.D., Stanford School of Medicine, and Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D., Hubrecht Institute

12.4 Developmental biology

12.5  CRISPR/Cas-mediated genome engineering – Rudolf Jaenisch

12.6 Ribozymes and RNA Machines –  Work of Jennifer A. Doudna

12.7 Ralph Brinster, ‘Father of Transgenesis’

12.8 Targeted gene modification

12.9 Stem Cells and Cancer

12.10 ALPSP Awards

12.11 Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators

12.12 Breaking news about genomic engineering, T2DM and cancer treatments

Summary
Chapter 13: 3D Printing and Medical Application

Introduction

13.1 3D Printing

13.2 What is 3D printing?

13.3 The Scientist Who Is Making 3D Printing More Human

13.4 Join These Medical 3D Printing Groups on Twitter and LinkedIn for great up to date news

13.5 Neri Oxman and her Mediated Matter group @MIT Media Lab have developed a technique for 3D-printing Molten Glass

13.6 The ‘chemputer’ that could print out any drug

13.7 3-D-Bioprinting in use to Create Cardiac Living Tissue: Print your Heart out

13.8 LPBI’s Perspective on Medical and Life Sciences Applications – 3D Printing: BioInks, BioMaterials-BioPolymer

13.9 Medical MEMS, Sensors and 3D Printing: Frontier in Process Control of BioMaterials

13.10 NIH and FDA on 3D Printing in Medical Applications: Views for On-demand Drug Printing, in-Situ direct Tissue Repair and Printed Organs for Live Implants

13.11 ‘Pop-up’ fabrication technique trumps 3D printing

13.12 Augmentation of the ONTOLOGY of the 3D Printing Research

13.13 Superresolution Microscopy

Summary

Chapter 14: Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

Introduction

14.1 Insights in Biological and Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

14.2 Breakthrough work in cancer

Summary to Part Two

Volume Summary and Conclusions

EPILOGUE

 

 

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Series A: e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases – electronic Table of Contents per Volume 1,2,3,4

 

Editor-in-Chief, BioMed e-Series, LPBI Group: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

Volume 1

Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

Click here

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/perspectives-nitric-oxide-disease-mechanisms-table-aviva/

 

Volume 2

Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q5MCN8

Click here

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cardiovascular-original-research-cases-methodology-aviva/

 

Volume 3

Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics – electronic Table of Contents http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

Click here

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/etiologies-cardiovascular-diseases-epigenetics-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

Volume 4

Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutics Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases – eTOCs http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A

Click here

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/regenerative-translational-medicine-therapeutics-lev-ari-phd-rn/

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FDA approval on 12/1/2017 of Amgen’s evolocumb (Repatha) a PCSK9 inhibitor for the prevention of heart attacks, strokes, and coronary revascularizations in patients with established cardiovascular disease

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Evolocumab was first FDA approved in 2015 for patients with

  • familial hypercholesterolemia and
  • others who fail to achieve LDL cholesterol lowering through diet and maximally-tolerated statin therapy.

In the Repatha cardiovascular outcomes study (FOURIER), Repatha reduced the risk of

  • heart attack by 27 percent, the risk of
  • stroke by 21 percent and the risk of
  • coronary revascularization by 22 percent.2

 

U.S. Repatha Indication

Repatha is a PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9) inhibitor antibody indicated:

  • to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and coronary revascularization in adults with established cardiovascular disease.
  • as an adjunct to diet, alone or in combination with other lipid-lowering therapies (e.g., statins, ezetimibe), for treatment of adults with primary hyperlipidemia (including heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia [HeFH]) to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).
  • as an adjunct to diet and other LDL‑lowering therapies (e.g., statins, ezetimibe, LDL apheresis) in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) who require additional lowering of LDL‑C.

The safety and effectiveness of Repatha have not been established in pediatric patients with HoFH who are younger than 13 years old.

The safety and effectiveness of Repatha have not been established in pediatric patients with primary hyperlipidemia or HeFH.

Eligible patients with high cholesterol (LDL-C ≥70 mg/dL or non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [non-HDL-C] ≥100 mg/dL) and established cardiovascular disease at more than 1,300 study locations around the world were randomized to receive Repatha subcutaneous 140 mg every two weeks or 420 mg monthly plus high- or moderate-intensity effective statin dose; or placebo subcutaneous every two weeks or monthly plus high- to moderate-intensity statin dose. Statin therapy was defined in the protocol as at least atorvastatin 20 mg or equivalent daily with a recommendation for at least atorvastatin 40 mg or equivalent daily where approved. The study was event driven and continued until at least 1,630 patients experienced a key secondary endpoint.

About Repatha® (evolocumab)
Repatha® (evolocumab) is a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Repatha binds to PCSK9 and inhibits circulating PCSK9 from binding to the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR), preventing PCSK9-mediated LDLR degradation and permitting LDLR to recycle back to the liver cell surface. By inhibiting the binding of PCSK9 to LDLR, Repatha increases the number of LDLRs available to clear LDL from the blood, thereby lowering LDL-C levels.1

About Amgen in the Cardiovascular Therapeutic Area
Building on more than three decades of experience in developing biotechnology medicines for patients with serious illnesses, Amgen is dedicated to addressing important scientific questions to advance care and improve the lives of patients with cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.8 Amgen’s research into cardiovascular disease, and potential treatment options, is part of a growing competency at Amgen that utilizes human genetics to identify and validate certain drug targets. Through its own research and development efforts, as well as partnerships, Amgen is building a robust cardiovascular portfolio consisting of several approved and investigational molecules in an effort to address a number of today’s important unmet patient needs, such as high cholesterol and heart failure.

Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia (HoFH): In 49 patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia studied in a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 33 patients received 420 mg of Repatha subcutaneously once monthly. The adverse reactions that occurred in at least 2 (6.1 percent) Repatha-treated patients and more frequently than in placebo-treated patients, included upper respiratory tract infection (9.1 percent versus 6.3 percent), influenza (9.1 percent versus 0 percent), gastroenteritis (6.1 percent versus 0 percent), and nasopharyngitis (6.1 percent versus 0 percent).

Immunogenicity: Repatha is a human monoclonal antibody. As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity with Repatha.

Please contact Amgen Medinfo at 800-77-AMGEN (800-772-6436) or 844-REPATHA (844-737-2842) regarding Repatha® availability or find more information, including full Prescribing Information, at www.amgen.com and www.Repatha.com.

References

  1. Repatha® U.S. Prescribing Information. Amgen.
  2. Sabatine MS, Giugliano RP, Keech AC, et al, for the FOURIER Steering Committee and Investigators. N Engl J Med. Evolocumab and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease. 2017;376:1713-22.
  3. Cannon CP, et al. N Engl J Med. 2004;350:1495-1504.
  4. LaRosa JC, et al. N Engl J Med. 2005;352:1425-1435.
  5. Pederson TR, et al. JAMA. 2005;294:2437-2445.
  6. Search Collaborative Group Lancet 2010;376:1658–69.
  7. Cannon CP, et al. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:2387-2397.
  8. World Health Organization. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) fact sheet. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs317/en/. Accessed October 30, 2017.

 

SOURCE: Amgen

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Long-term Canakinumab Treatment Lowering Inflammation Independent of Lipid Levels for Residual Inflammatory Risk Benefit – Personalized Medicine for Recurrent MI, Strokes and Cardiovascular Death

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Major findings from the trial were presented earlier this year. The trial was designed to test whether canakinumab, which lowers inflammation independent of lipid levels, could reduce risk of a future cardiovascular event by reducing inflammation among people who have had a prior heart attack and who have persistently elevated levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) despite aggressive care.

Overall, the trial found a 15 percent reduction in risk of recurrent heart attacks, strokes and cardiovascular death among participants who received canakinumab at doses of either 150 or 300 milligrams given once every three months.

SOURCE

https://hms.harvard.edu/news/banishing-inflammation?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=hms-linkedin-general

 

Relationship of C-reactive protein reduction to cardiovascular event reduction following treatment with canakinumab: a secondary analysis from the CANTOS randomised controlled trial

Prof Paul M Ridker, MD'Correspondence information about the author Prof Paul M Ridker

,

Jean G MacFadyen, BA

,

Brendan M Everett, MD

,

Prof Peter Libby, MD

,

Tom Thuren, MD

,

Prof Robert J Glynn, PhD

on behalf of the

Findings

Baseline clinical characteristics did not define patient groups with greater or lesser cardiovascular benefits when treated with canakinumab. However, trial participants allocated to canakinumab who achieved hsCRP concentrations less than 2 mg/L had a 25% reduction in major adverse cardiovascular events (multivariable adjusted hazard ratio [HRadj]=0·75, 95% CI 0·66–0·85, p<0·0001), whereas no significant benefit was observed among those with on-treatment hsCRP concentrations of 2 mg/L or above (HRadj=0·90, 0·79–1·02, p=0·11). For those treated with canakinumab who achieved on-treatment hsCRP concentrations less than 2 mg/L, cardiovascular mortality (HRadj=0·69, 95% CI 0·56–0·85, p=0·0004) and all-cause mortality (HRadj=0·69, 0·58–0·81, p<0·0001) were both reduced by 31%, whereas no significant reduction in these endpoints was observed among those treated with canakinumab who achieved hsCRP concentrations of 2 mg/L or above. Similar differential effects were found in analyses of the trial prespecified secondary cardiovascular endpoint (which additionally included hospitalisation for unstable angina requiring unplanned revascularisation) and in sensitivity analyses alternatively based on median reductions in hsCRP, on 50% or greater reductions in hsCRP, on the median percent reduction in hsCRP, in dose-specific analyses, and in analyses using a causal inference approach to estimate the effect of treatment among individuals who would achieve a targeted hsCRP concentration.

Interpretation

The magnitude of hsCRP reduction following a single dose of canakinumab might provide a simple clinical method to identify individuals most likely to accrue the largest benefit from continued treatment. These data further suggest that lower is better for inflammation reduction with canakinumab.

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Daily Highlights at 2017 American Heart Association Annual Meeting Scientific Sessions

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Science News

Scientific Sessions 2017

Scientific Sessions: November 11–15

Resuscitation Science Symposium: November 11–13

Cardiovascular Nursing Clinical Symposium: November 13–14

Anaheim, California

SOURCE

http://professional.heart.org/professional/EducationMeetings/MeetingsLiveCME/ScientificSessions/UCM_316934_Science-News-Scientific-Sessions.jsp#mon

 

Late Breaking Clinical Trials 2: Late Breaking Science in Prevention

  • REAL-CAD
    RESULTS: Higher intensity pitavastatin therapy lowered LDL-C and reduced adverse cardiovascular events more than moderate-intensity pitavastatin therapy in this Japanese study population.
  • REVEAL
    RESULTS: Major coronary events lower with anacetrapib for patients with and without DM.
  • FOURIER
    RESULTS: In patients with PAD, evolocumab significantly reduced LDL-C and major cardiovascular events, including death, heart attack, and stroke.
  • FOURIER with MI – Analysis
    RESULTS: In patients with a prior MI, evolocumab significantly reduced the risk for major cardiovascular events, including death, heart attack, and stroke.
  • CANTOS 
    RESULTS: Targeting inflammatory pathways with canakinumab reduced rates of adverse cardiovascular events.

Late Breaking Clinical Trials 3: Latest Insights into Hypertension Management

  • BP TITRE
    RESULTS: More time spent at the target blood pressure resulted in a lower risk for cardiovascular disease and death.
  • SPRINT
    RESULTS: Blood pressure control was similar even with different levels of BP attendance.
  • GATEWAY
    RESULTS: Bariatric surgery reduced the need for antihypertensive drugs while keeping blood pressure controlled.

Late Breaking Clinical Trials 4: Sweet Spot in Cardiometabolic Care

  • CANVAS 
    RESULTS: Canagliflozin reduced adverse cardiovascular events for patient with type 2 diabetes and no history of cardiovascular disease.
  • EXSCEL 
    RESULTS: The treatment effect of exenatide was similar across all risk groups (low – high) for clinical outcomes, regardless of baseline risk. Baseline risk did not predict clinical benefit.
  • EMPA-REG OUTCOME
    RESULTS: In these patients with HF, T2DM, and PAD, empagliflozin compared to placebo reduced the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause death, and HF hospitalizations.
  • BiomarCaRE 
    RESULTS: In the general population, 4 metabolites were noted to be inversely associated with coronary heart disease. This may aid risk stratification.

Other studies of note published Monday

Tuesday, Nov. 14

Late Breaking Clinical Trials 5: New Insights into the Risks, Benefits, and Costs of Antithrombotic Therapy

Late Breaking Clinical Trials 6: Evaluating Quality Improvement and Patient Centered Care Interventions

Wednesday, Nov. 15

Late Breaking Clinical Trials 7:  Innovative Therapies and Novel Applications

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2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults – A REPORT OF THE American College of Cardiology/ American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

The new Hypertension Guideline changes the definition of hypertension, which is now considered to be any systolic BP measurement of 130 mm Hg or higher—or any diastolic BP measurement of 80 mm Hg or higher.

 

SOURCE

http://professional.heart.org/idc/groups/ahamah-public/@wcm/@sop/@smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_497446.pdf

 

 

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2017 American Heart Association Annual Meeting: Sunday’s Science at #AHA17 – Presidential Address

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

WATCH VIDEOS

http://professional.heart.org/professional/EducationMeetings/MeetingsLiveCME/ScientificSessions/UCM_316934_Science-News-Scientific-Sessions.jsp#vid-ss17-open1

 

Best of Sunday at Scientific Sessions 2017

TRiCS III – What differences were seen in cardiac surgery outcomes with restrictive red cell transfusion vs a more liberal strategy?

DACAB – Which was better for CABG saphenous vein graft patency at one year: Ticagrelor + ASA or ASA alone?

BRUISE CONTROL-2 – In AF patients, did different NOAC anticoagulant strategies change outcomes?

PRESERVE – To prevent adverse outcomes after angiography, what were the benefits of using sodium bicarbonate or N-Acetylcysteine?

SOURCE

From: Science News from the American Heart Association <email@heartemail.org>

Reply-To: American Heart Association <reply-fe4f13707d63017a7c11-7991033_HTML-1648404797-10171707-0@heartemail.org>

Date: Sunday, November 12, 2017 at 11:40 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Sunday’s Science at #AHA17: Presidential Address, peri-procedural dilemmas – pocket bruising, improving CABG graft patency, transfusion strategies, and more

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