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Archive for the ‘Frontiers in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disorders’ Category


Experimental Therapy (Left inter-atrial shunt implant device) for Heart Failure: Expert Opinion on a Preliminary Study on Heart Failure with preserved Ejection Fraction 

 

Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Expert Opinion by Cardiologist Justin D. Pearlman MD PhD FACC

 

Pearls From: Ted Feldman, MD – A glimmer of hope for HFpEF treatment?

Evanston Hospital in Illinois

by Nicole Lou, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today

SOURCE ARTICLE

https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/chf/72759?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2018-05-09

WATCH VIDEO

https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/chf/72759?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2018-05-09

 

Heart Failure with preserved Ejection Fraction (or HFpEF) – Experimental Therapy: Inter-atrial shunt implantable device for relieving pressure overload and improve the prognosis of patients with a 50% ejection fraction

vs

Heart Failure with reduced Ejection Fraction (HFrEF)

 

  • HFpEF is similar in frequency and sadly, similar in prognosis to heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, and everybody thinks about the EF 20% or 30% patient as having a poor prognosis and doesn’t realize that the EF 40% or 45% or 50% patient with clinical heart failure has the same prognosis.
  • Patients with mitral stenosis and elevated left atrial pressure, which is the genesis of HFpEF, if they had an ASD historically, this decompressed the left atrium and they presented much, much later in the course of the disease with any signs of heart failure.
  • Inspiration for design of the Left inter-atrial shunt implant device

Minimally invasive transcatheter closure is the primary treatment option for secundum atrial septal defects (ASD). The AMPLATZER™ Septal Occluder is the proven standard of care in transcatheter ASD closure

  • Left inter-atrial shunt implant device, Dr. Ted Feldman calls IASD.

It’s like an ASD occluder, a little nitinol disc, but it has a hole in the middle. We did some baseline hemodynamic modeling using a simulator and calculated that we would get a small shunt with an eight millimeter opening, that that would be enough to reduce left atrial pressure overload during exercise without overloading the right side of the heart, without creating too big a shunt.

Preliminary results: We found that peak exercise wedge pressure was significantly decreased in the patients with the device compared to those without a shunt. We found that the shunt ratio, the amount of flow across the shunt was a Qp:Qs, pulmonary to systemic flow ratio, of 1.2 preserved at 30 days and 6 months and that most of these patients feel better.

Ted Feldman, MD, Evanston Hospital in Illinois

The mechanism, I think we’ve established, that we do decompress the left atrium with exertion and now we need to demonstrate that the clinical outcomes in a larger population are robust enough to carry this into practice.

Expert Opinion by Cardiologist Justin D. Pearlman MD PhD FACC

  • It is a bit biased saying no treatment for CHD bias pEF, when there is support for so called triple therapy of beta blocker, acei/arb/arni, and aldosterone inhibitor, plus tight bp control and additional afterload reduction if valve leaks contribute.
  • It is an interesting proposition to induce an 8 mm IAS shunt, but it poses a risk for paradoxical emboli, which have been associated with
  1. visual field cuts,
  2. TIA and
  3. migraine.

Paradoxical Embolism

Updated: Jun 10, 2016
  • Author: Igor A Laskowski, MD; Chief Editor: Vincent Lopez Rowe, MD  more…
 Background

The clinical manifestations of paradoxical embolism (PDE) are nonspecific, [1and the diagnosis is difficult to establish. Patients with PDE may present with neurologic abnormalities or features suggesting arterial embolism. The disease starts with the formation of emboli within the venous system, which traverse a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and enter the systemic circulation. [234PFOs have been found on autopsy in up to 35% of the healthy population.

PDE originates in the veins of the lower extremities and occasionally in the pelvic veins. Emboli may be of various types, such as clots, air, tumor, fat, and amniotic fluid. [5Septic emboli have led to brain abscesses. Projectile embolization is rare (eg, from a shotgun pellet).

Management of PDE is both medical and surgical in nature. PDE is considered the major cause of cerebral ischemic events in young patients. On rare occasions, it may occlude the pelvic aortic bifurcation. The largest documented thrombus in a PFO (impending PDE) was 25 cm in length.

PDE is confirmed by the presence of thrombus within an intracardiac defect on contrast echocardiography or at autopsy. It may be presumed in the presence of arterial embolism with no evidence of left-side circulation thrombus, deep venous thrombosis (DVT) with or without pulmonary embolism (PE), and right-to-left shunting through an intracardiac communication, commonly the PFO. [6]

SOURCE for Paradoxical Embolism

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/460607-overview

 

SOURCE for Dr. Pearlman’s Expert Opinion

From: Justin MDMEPhD <jdpmdphd@gmail.com>

Date: Wednesday, May 9, 2018 at 2:25 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Cc: “Dr. Larry Bernstein” <larry.bernstein@gmail.com>

Subject: Re: WHICH of our Heart Failure ARTICLES I should UPDATE with the following Pearls From: Ted Feldman, MD | Medpage Today

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Curation of selected topics and articles on Role of G-Protein Coupled Receptors in Chronic Disease as supplemental information for #TUBiol3373

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, PhD 

Below is a series of posts and articles related to the role of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) in various chronic diseases.  This is only a cursory collection and by no means represents the complete extensive literature on pathogenesis related to G protein function or alteration thereof.  However it is important to note that, although we think of G protein signaling as rather short lived, quick, their chronic activation may lead to progression of various disease. As to whether disease onset, via GPCR, is a result of sustained signal, loss of desensitization mechanisms, or alterations of transduction systems is an area to be investigated.

From:

Molecular Pathogenesis of Progressive Lung Diseases

Author: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD)

Inflammatory and infectious factors are present in diseased airways that interact with G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as purinergic receptors and bradykinin (BK) receptors, to stimulate phospholipase C [PLC]. This is followed by the activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent activation of IP3 channel receptors in the ER, which results in channel opening and release of stored Ca2+ into the cytoplasm. When ER Ca2+ stores are depleted a pathway for Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane is activated. This has been referred to as “capacitative Ca2+ entry”, and “store-operated calcium entry” (3). In the next step PLC mediated Ca2+ i is mobilized as a result of GPCR activation by inflammatory mediators, which triggers cytokine production by Ca2+ i-dependent activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) in airway epithelia.

 

 

 

In Alzheimer’s Disease

Important Lead in Alzheimer’s Disease Model

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator discusses findings from a research team at University of California at San Diego (UCSD) which the neuropeptide hormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) as having an important role in the etiology of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). CRF activates the CRF receptor (a G stimulatory receptor).  It was found inhibition of the CRF receptor prevented cognitive impairment in a mouse model of AD.  Furthermore researchers at the Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology found the loss of a protein called G protein-coupled receptor 3 (GPR3) may lower the amyloid plaque aggregation, resulting in improved cognitive function.  Additionally inhibition of several G-protein coupled receptors alter amyloid precursor processing, providing a further mechanism of the role of GPCR in AD (see references in The role of G protein-coupled receptors in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease by Amantha Thathiah and Bart De Strooper Nature Reviews Feb 2011; 12: 73-87 and read post).

 

In Cardiovascular and Thrombotic Disease

 

Adenosine Receptor Agonist Increases Plasma Homocysteine

 

and read related articles in curation on effects of hormones on the cardiovascular system at

Action of Hormones on the Circulation

 

In Cancer

A Curated History of the Science Behind the Ovarian Cancer β-Blocker Trial

 

Further curations and references of G proteins and chronic disease can be found at the Open Access journal https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com using the search terms “GCPR” and “disease” in the Search box in the upper right of the home page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A new mechanism of action to attack in the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), Novartis developed Ilaris (canakinumab), a human monoclonal antibody targeting the interleukin-1beta innate immunity pathway

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Speaking at an ESC press briefing, Ridker said, “This is what personalized predictive medicine is all about.” Once a patient has experienced an MI, there is always residual risk of recurrence. Thus, he suggested that residual risk can be divided into

  • residual lipid-driven risk and
  • residual inflammatory-driven risk.

canakinumab might prove to be most useful if it were given to an identified high-responder group. Findings in the hs-CRP responders:

Patients whose hs-CRP declined to 1.8 mg/L or less had a much more robust response. In that subgroup, the number needed to treat to prevent a primary endpoint event was 50 at 2 years and 30 at 3.7 years.

He noted that after a single injection responders have a significant reduction in highly sensitive-CRP and it is those patients who would benefit from continuing on treatment.

“Maybe that first dose could be free,” Ridker added.

Co-investigator, Peter Libby, MD, of Massachusetts General Hospital, put it this way: 30 days after an MI, when a patient is on statin therapy and stable,

  • physicians could check LDL and then initiate more aggressive statin therapy if it is not well-controlled. Similarly,
  • physicians should check hs-CRP, and if it is elevated — 2.0 mg/L or higher — initiating anti-inflammatory therapy targeting interleukin-1 beta would be an option

Interestingly, the treatment had no effect on lipids, which suggests that the benefit was all attributable to the anti-inflammatory activity. 

In the Canakinumab Anti-inflammatory Thrombosis Outcomes Study (CANTOS), 150 mg of canakinumab every 3 months reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels by an average of 37% compared with placebo and achieved a 15% reduction in cardiovascular events — mostly MIs — compared with placebo, Paul Ridker, MD, reported here at the European Society of Cardiology 2017 congress.

The CANTOS findings were simultaneously published online by the New England Journal of Medicine.

After a median follow-up of 3.7 years, the event rate was 4.5 per 100 person-years in the placebo group versus 3.86 events per 100 person-years in the canakinumab 150 mg group. Two other arms — canakinumab 50 mg and 300 mg — also achieved reductions in events (4.11 and 3.90 per 100 person-years, respectively) but only the 150-mg dose achieved a statistically significant reduction.

There was no reduction in mortality. The trial recruited patients who had a history of MI and a hs-CRP level of 2.0 mg/L or higher.

  • There was no significant difference in all-cause mortality (HR for all canakinumab doses versus placebo, 0.94; 95% CI 0.83-1.06; P=0.31).

Benefits of Anti-inflammatory Canakinumab

although there was no cardiovascular mortality benefit, there was 30% reduction in need for bypass surgery, angioplasty, and heart failure — all of which means a significant improvement in quality of life. And treatment was also associated with a reduction in gout, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis, he said.

Cancer Benefit

There was an apparent decrease in risk of cancer, a finding that was elucidated in a Lancet paper also published today. In the cancer analysis, also authored by Ridker, total cancer mortality was lower only in the 300-mg group, but “[i]ncident lung cancer (n=129) was significantly less frequent in the 150 mg (HR 0.61 [95% CI 0.39–0.97]; P=0.034) and 300 mg groups (HR 0.33 [95% CI 0.18–0.59] P<0.0001.”

Negative findings

  • Canakinumab was associated with a higher incidence of fatal infection than placebo — the rate was 0.18 in the 3,344 patient placebo group versus 0.32 among the 6,717 patients who received any dose of the drug, which worked out to 23 deaths versus 78 deaths (P=0.02).
  • VIEW VIDEO

Study Author Paul M. Ridker. Interviewed by Peggy Peck, Editor-in-Chief of MedPage Today

https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/esc/67529

  • VIEW VIDEO

Clinical Impact or No Clinical Impact

Anthony DeMaria, MD discusses the major trials from ESC and what impact, if any, they will have on clinical practice.
Benefit vs Price
On June 28 heart failure specialist Milton Packer, MD, wrote this in his MedPage Today blog: “My prediction: [canakinumab] may cost $64,000 for a 15-20% reduction in the risk of a major cardiovascular event, without decreasing cardiovascular death by itself.
Amgen’s Repatha (evolocumab) is a PCSK9 inhibitor that aggressively lowers lipids and is approved for patients who fail statin therapy, including patients with heterozygous or homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. But while the lipid reductions with the PCSK9 therapy are impressive, and the FOURIER trial found a 15% reduction in events with treatment, neither evolocumab nor alirocumab (Praluent), a PCSK9 inhibitor from Sanofi/Regeneron have achieved wide uptake as payers balk at the high price tags for the drugs.
Other anti-inflammatory agents:
Ridker said. For example, “we have a [National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute] trial of methotrexate (RA agent) that is on-going. If that proves to be effective, it would be only pennies per treatment.” At the press conference, Ridker said the methotrexate trial has “randomized about 4,000 patients, and we will need to get to 7,000 so it will be a few years before we have results.”

SOURCE

https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/esc/67529

176 articles on monoclonal antibody

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=monoclonal+antibody

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Subarachnoid hemorrhage care at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for neurology and neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

A Mayo Clinic study found that 63.3 percent of people treated for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from 2001 to 2013 had no or few lasting symptoms.

Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report.

SOURCE

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/subarachnoid-hemorrhage/care-at-mayo-clinic/mac-20361025

 

Overview

The term subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) refers to extravasation of blood into the subarachnoid space between the pial and arachnoid membranes (see the image below). It occurs in various clinical contexts, the most common being head trauma. However, the familiar use of the term SAH refers to nontraumatic (or spontaneous) hemorrhage, which usually occurs in the setting of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation (AVM).

The classic presentation can include the following:

  • Sudden onset of severe headache (the classic feature)
  • Accompanying nausea or vomiting
  • Symptoms of meningeal irritation
  • Photophobia and visual changes
  • Focal neurologic deficits
  • Sudden loss of consciousness at the ictus
  • Seizures during the acute phase

Physical examination findings may be normal or may include the following:

  • Mild to moderate BP elevation
  • Temperature elevation
  • Tachycardia
  • Papilledema
  • Retinal hemorrhage
  • Global or focal neurologic abnormalities

Complications of SAH include the following:

  • Hydrocephalus
  • Rebleeding
  • Vasospasm
  • Seizures
  • Cardiac dysfunction

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of SAH usually depends on a high index of clinical suspicion combined with radiologic confirmation via urgent noncontrast CT, followed by lumbar puncture or CT angiography of the brain. After the diagnosis is established, further imaging should be performed to characterize the source of the hemorrhage.

Laboratory studies should include the following:

  • Serum chemistry panel
  • Complete blood count
  • Prothrombin time (PT)/activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT)
  • Blood typing/screening
  • Cardiac enzymes
  • Arterial blood gas (ABG) determination

Imaging studies that may be helpful include the following:

  • CT (noncontrast, contrast, or infusion)
  • Digital subtraction cerebral angiography
  • Multidetector CT angiography
  • MRI (if no lesion is found on angiography)
  • Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA; investigational for SAH)

Other diagnostic studies that may be warranted are as follows:

  • Baseline chest radiograph
  • ECG on admission
  • Lumbar puncture and CSF analysis

See Workup for more detail.

Management

Current treatment recommendations include the following:

  • Antihypertensive agents (eg, IV beta blockers) when mean arterial pressure exceeds 130 mm Hg
  • Avoidance of nitrates (which elevate ICP) when feasible
  • Hydralazine and calcium channel blockers
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (not first-line agents in acute SAH)
  • In patients with signs of increased ICP or herniation, intubation and hyperventilation

Other interventions for increased ICP are as follows:

  • Osmotic agents (eg, mannitol)
  • Loop diuretics (eg, furosemide)
  • IV steroids (controversial but recommended by some)

Surgical treatment to prevent rebleeding includes the following options:

  • Clipping the ruptured aneurysm
  • Endovascular treatment [1(ie, coiling)

The choice between coiling and clipping usually depends on the location of the lesion, the neck of the aneurysm, and the availability and experience of hospital staff.

SOURCE

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1164341-overview

 

Pharmaco-Therapy for SAH

  • Nimodipine is a drug used for SAH

Nimodipine is a second generation calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage.  Nimodipine is not widely used and has not been implicated in causing clinically apparent acute liver injury.

Introduction

Nimodipine is a second generation calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage.  Nimodipine is not widely used and has not been implicated in causing clinically apparent acute liver injury.

 

Background

Nimodipine (nye moe’ di preen) belongs to the dihydropyridine class of calcium channel blockers (similar to amlopidine and felodipine) and is used to treat cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage.  Like other calcium channel blockers, nimodipine acts by inhibition of the influx of calcium ions into smooth muscle cells during depolarization which results in vasodilation.  Nimodipine has high lipid solubility and was developed specifically to treat cerebral vasospasm.  Clinical trials have suggested that nimodipine reduces infarct size and complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage.  Nimodipine was approved for use in the United States in 1988 but is not widely used, largely because of its restricted indications.  Nimodipine is available in generic forms and under the commercial name Nimotop as capsules of 30 mg.  The recommend dose in adults is 60 mg every 4 hours for 21 days starting as soon as possible or within 96 hours of the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage.  Like most calcium channel blockers, nimodipine is generally well tolerated and side effects are largely due to its vasodilating activities and can include headache, dizziness, flushing, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, peripheral edema, palpitations and rash.

 

Hepatotoxicity, Outcome and Management

Nimodipine has been associated with only rare reports of serum enzyme elevations during therapy.  These elevations are usually mild, transient and not associated with symptoms or need for dose modification.  Nimodipine is not widely used and has not been linked to instances of clinically apparent liver injury.  Thus, hepatotoxicity from nimodipine must be rare, if it occurs at all.

 

Likelihood score: E  (Unlikely cause of clinically apparent liver injury).

 

The reason why some calcium channel blockers cause liver injury (verapamil, diltiazem, amlodipine) while others (such as nimodipine) do not is not known. Because liver injury from calcium channel blockers is rare, those that are uncommonly used may just not have had enough exposures to manifest idiosyncratic cases of liver injury. Nimodipine is metabolized in the liver largely via CYP 3A4 and is susceptible to drug-drug interactions with agents that induce or inhibit CYP 3A4.

 

Drug Class:  Cardiovascular AgentsCalcium Channel Blockers

 

Other Drugs in the Subclass, Calcium Channel Blockers:  AmlodipineDiltiazemFelodipineIsradipineNicardipineNifedipineNisoldipineVerapamil

 

SOURCE

https://livertox.nih.gov/Nimodipine.htm

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Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS): Strategies in Anticoagulant Selection: Diagnostics Approaches – Genetic Testing Aids vs. Biomarkers (Troponin types and BNP)

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 3/17/2018

An NT-proBNP <300 pg/ml strongly excludes the presence of acute HF.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Mar 20;71(11):1191-1200. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.01.021.

N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in the Emergency Department: The ICON-RELOADED Study

 

A breakthrough in emergence of

  • Genetic Testing Aids as a Personalized approach, genomics-based approach to selecting antiplatelet therapy, for reduction in ischemic and bleeding events, and
  • Biochemical Biomarker approaches for dosing anti-thrombotic drugs are presented here.

“This study fills in a part of the puzzle of genomic testing,” said Craig Beavers, PharmD, of the University of Kentucky in Lexington. “It shows we can use genomic information in clinical decision making. It was interesting that there appeared to be a change in prescribing based on genomics.”

SOURCE

https://www.medpagetoday.com/meetingcoverage/acc/71722?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2018-03-13&eun=g99985d0r&pos=3&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20Headlines%202018-03-13&utm_term=Daily%20Headlines%20-%20Active%20User%20-%20180%20days

At 12 months, 25.9% of patients receiving standard care had experienced the trial’s primary composite endpoint — cardiovascular death, non-fatal MI or stroke, and Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) 3-5 major bleeding — compared with 15.8% of patients receiving an anticoagulant drug on the basis of genetic testing (P<0.001), reported Diego Ardissino, MD, of Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma in Italy, and colleagues.

PHARMCLO is the first trial to combine clinical characteristics with genetic information to inform the choice of P2Y12 receptor antagonist in patients with ACS, Ardissino said in a presentation at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting. The study was simultaneously published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

“Selecting treatment on the basis of genetic data in addition to considerations concerning the patients’ clinical characteristics may lead to a more personalized, and therefore more efficient, antiplatelet therapy, thus reducing both ischemic and bleeding risk,” he said. “PHARMCLO is the first step of a new approach that will see a shift in emphasis away from trying to discover ever-more potent anti-thrombotic drugs, and toward ensuring that the right therapy is given to each individual patient.”

However, PHARMCLO was halted after about a fourth of the intended population was recruited. The Ethics Committee of Modena (Italy) required the trial to be prematurely stopped because of a lack of in vitro diagnosis certification for the testing instruments. The original patients were still followed, Ardissino stated.

The authors enrolled 888 patients, and randomly assigned them to be tested for

  • three genes associated with resistance to clopidogrel (Plavix), and then were assigned a
  • treatment based on clinical data informed by the testing results.
  • Tested genes were ABCB1, 2C19*2 and 2C19*17 with the STQ3 system.
  • Another group was assigned to treatment without reference to genetic testing.
  • Standard of care treatment was with Clopidogrel, Ticagrelor (Brilinta), or Prasugrel (Effient).
  1. Clopidogrel was more frequently used in the standard arm (50.7% versus 43.3%), while
  2. Ticagrelor in the pharmacogenomic arm (42.6% versus 32.7%, P<0.05) and
  3. Prasugrel were used equally in both.

The primary endpoint hazard ratio was 0.58 versus the standard arm (95% CI 0.43-0.78, P<0.001).

Previous studies have shown Prasugrel and Ticagrelor to be superior to Clopidogrel at preventing ischemic events. However, prasugrel and ticagrelor, which are more potent, are also known to increase the risk of bleeding. The findings suggest that having more information about a specific patient’s likely response to clopidogrel can help doctors weigh this trade-off, Ardissino said.

 SOURCES

The STANDARD OF CARE in Diagnosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) using BioMarkers in serum blood relays of values of Troponin types and BNP for dosing anti-thrombotic drugs.

The team at LPBI Group published the following articles on this topic:

A search into our Journal Archive for “Acute Coronary Syndrome” yielded 210 articles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Acute+Coronary+Syndrome

  1. High Sensitivity Troponin (hs cTn) Assays 

  • Previously undiscerned value of hs-troponin

Curators: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/18/previously-undiscerned-value-of-hs-troponin/

  • Recent Insights into the High Sensitivity Troponins for Acute Coronary Syndromes

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/09/08/recent-insights-into-the-high-sensitivity-troponins-for-acute-coronary-syndromes/

  • Dealing with the Use of the High Sensitivity Troponin (hs cTn) Assays: Preparing the United States for High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Author and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/18/dealing-with-the-use-of-the-hs-ctn-assays/

  • Preparing the United States for High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Assays

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/13/high-sensitivity-cardiac-troponin-assays/

 

2. BNP and proBNP

Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), also known as B-type natriuretic peptide, is a hormone secreted by cardiomyocytes in the heart ventricles in response to stretching caused by increased ventricular blood volume, decrease in systemic vascular resistance and central venous pressure as well as an increase in natriuresis. The net effect of these peptides is a decrease in blood pressure due to the decrease in systemic vascular resistance and, thus, afterload. Additionally, the actions of both BNP and ANP result in a decrease in cardiac output due to an overall decrease in central venous pressure and preload as a result of the reduction in blood volume that follows natriuresis and diuresis.

SOURCE

Maisel A, Krishnaswamy P, Nowak R, McCord J, Hollander J, Duc P, Omland T, Storrow A, Abraham W, Wu A, Clopton P, Steg P, Westheim A, Knudsen C, Perez A, Kazanegra R, Herrmann H, McCullough P (2002). “Rapid measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide in the emergency diagnosis of heart failure“. N Engl J Med347 (3): 161–7. 

 

The team at LPBI Group published the following articles on this topic:

  • Effect of Coronary Atherosclerosis and Myocardial Ischemia on Plasma Levels of High-Sensitivity Troponin T and NT-proBNP in Patients With Stable Angina

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/17/effect-of-coronary-atherosclerosis-and-myocardial-ischemia-on-plasma-levels-of-high-sensitivity-troponin-t-and-nt-probnp-in-patients-with-stable-angina/

  • More on the Performance of High Sensitivity Troponin T and with Amino Terminal Pro BNP in Diabetes

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/20/more-on-the-performance-of-high-sensitivity-troponin-t-and-with-amino-terminal-pro-bnp-in-diabetes/

  • Erythropoietin (EPO) and Intravenous Iron (Fe) as Therapeutics for Anemia in Severe and Resistant CHF: The Elevated N-terminal proBNP Biomarker

Co-Author of the FIRST Article: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP. Reviewer and Curator of the SECOND and of the THIRD Articles: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Article Architecture Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/10/epo-as-therapeutics-for-anemia-in-chf/

  • Highlights of LIVE Day 1: World Medical Innovation Forum – CARDIOVASCULAR • MAY 1-3, 2017  BOSTON, MA • UNITED STATES

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/05/01/highlights-of-live-day-1-world-medical-innovation-forum-cardiovascular-%E2%80%A2-may-1-3-2017-boston-ma-%E2%80%A2-united-states/

 

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 Cholesterol Lowering Novel PCSK9 drugs: Praluent [Sanofi and Regeneron] vs Repatha [Amgen] – which drug cuts CV risks enough to make it cost-effective?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Did Amgen’s Repatha cut CV risks enough to make it cost-effective? Analysts say no

Sanofi, Regeneron’s Praluent pulls off PCSK9 coup with 29% cut to death risks in most vulnerable patients
SEE our curations on PCSK9 drugs:

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Higher BMI (Obesity Marker): Earlier onset of incident CVD followed by Shorter overall Survival – Men and women of all ages

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Men and women of all ages with a higher BMI were found to have both an earlier onset of incident CVD followed by shorter overall survival, Sadiya Khan, MD, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, and colleagues wrote in JAMA Cardiology.

Among middle-aged men, there were 13,457 incident CVD events total, with the highest percentage attributed to fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarctions. This incidence rate of CVD events increased accordingly with BMI range, with the highest seen in those who were morbidly obese. Compared with men who died due to non-CVD related causes — the most common of which was cancer — men who weighed more had a significantly higher rate of experiencing their first CVD event.

When compared to middle-aged men of normal weight, those in higher BMI categories had an increased incidence of CVD:

  • Overweight: adjusted competing HR 1.21 (95% CI 1.14-1.28)
  • Obese: 1.67 (95% CI 1.55-1.79)
  • Morbidly obese: 3.14 (95% CI 2.48-3.97)

Similar event rates were seen among middle-aged women of a higher BMI, as well:

  • Overweight: HR 1.32 (95% CI 1.24-1.40)
  • Obese 1.85 (95% CI 1.72-1.99)
  • Morbidly obese: 2.53 (95% CI 2.20-2.91)

Both men and women had a longer time to first CVD event if they were of normal weight by around 7.5 year and 7.1 years, respectively, when compared with people with morbid obesity.

The researchers noted that the morbidly obese category likely saw the highest rate of CVD events mainly due to a five-fold increase in the incidence of congestive heart failure events. These patterns were also seen in the younger and older age groups.

Although the notion of the “obesity paradox” — when people with a higher BMI might actually live longer after CVD onset compared to those of normal weight — has been described in some prior studies, the researchers noted that their findings suggest that “this occurs because of a trend toward earlier onset of disease in individuals who are overweight and obese.”

 

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