Advertisements
Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Systemic Inflammatory Diseases as CVD Risk’ Category


The HFE H63D variant confers an increased risk for hypertension, no increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events or substantial left ventricular remodeling

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Conclusion:

The HFE H63D variant confers an increased risk for hypertension per allele and, given its frequency, accounts for a significant number of cases of hypertension. However, there was no increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events or substantial left ventricular remodeling.

 

HFE H63D Polymorphism and the Risk for Systemic Hypertension, Myocardial Remodeling, and Adverse Cardiovascular Events in the ARIC Study

Originally publishedHypertension. 2018;0:HYPERTENSIONAHA.118.11730

H63D has been identified as a novel locus associated with the development of hypertension. The quantitative risks for hypertension, cardiac remodeling, and adverse events are not well studied. We analyzed white participants from the ARIC study (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) with H63D genotyping (N=10 902). We related genotype status to prevalence of hypertension at each of 5 study visits and risk for adverse cardiovascular events. Among visit 5 participants (N=4507), we related genotype status to echocardiographic features. Frequencies of wild type (WT)/WT, H63D/WT, and H63D/H63D were 73%, 24.6%, and 2.4%. The average age at baseline was 54.9±5.7 years and 47% were men. Participants carrying the H63D variant had higher systolic blood pressure (P=0.004), diastolic blood pressure (0.012), and more frequently had hypertension (P<0.001). Compared with WT/WT, H63D/WT and H63D/H63D participants had a 2% to 4% and 4% to 7% absolute increase in hypertension risk at each visit, respectively. The population attributable risk of H63D for hypertension among individuals aged 45 to 64 was 3.2% (95% CI, 1.3–5.1%) and 1.3% (95% CI, 0.0–2.4%) among individuals >65 years. After 25 years of follow-up, there was no relationship between genotype status and any outcome (P>0.05). H63D/WT and H63D/H63D genotypes were associated with small differences in cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, the HFE H63D variant confers an increased risk for hypertension per allele and, given its frequency, accounts for a significant number of cases of hypertension. However, there was no increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events or substantial left ventricular remodeling.

Footnotes

The online-only Data Supplement is available with this article at https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/suppl/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.118.11730.

Correspondence to Scott D. Solomon, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115. Email 
Advertisements

Read Full Post »


 Cholesterol Lowering Novel PCSK9 drugs: Praluent [Sanofi and Regeneron] vs Repatha [Amgen] – which drug cuts CV risks enough to make it cost-effective?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 11/13/2018

ODYSSEY OUTCOMES: Alirocumab Cost-effective at $6000 a Year

Marlene Busko

November 11, 2018

CHICAGO — Treatment with the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor alirocumab (Praluent, Sanofi/Regeneron) is cost-effective at $6319 a year when the willingness-to-pay threshold is the generally accepted $100,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), new research reports.

Deepak L. Bhatt, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital Heart and Vascular Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, presented these cost-effectiveness findings for alirocumab, based on data from the ODYSSEY OUTCOMES trial, here at the American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 Scientific Sessions

As previously reported, results from ODYSSEY OUTCOMES were presented at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2018 Annual Scientific Session in March and the study was published November 7 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Strengths of the current cost analysis include that it used actual trial data as opposed to modeling estimates, Bhatt pointed out to theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.

SOURCE

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/904744?nlid=126063_3866&src=WNL_mdplsfeat_181113_mscpedit_card&uac=93761AJ&spon=2&impID=1799507&faf=1

 

Did Amgen’s Repatha cut CV risks enough to make it cost-effective? Analysts say no

Sanofi, Regeneron’s Praluent pulls off PCSK9 coup with 29% cut to death risks in most vulnerable patients
SEE our curations on PCSK9 drugs:

Read Full Post »



Systemic Inflammatory Diseases as Crohn’s disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Longer Psoriasis Duration May Mean Higher CVD Risk

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Longer Psoriasis Duration May Mean Higher CVD Risk

Effect size ‘similar to that of smoking’

Several studies have shown that methotrexate, which has anti-inflammatory effects, reduces CV risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting that good anti-inflammatory control may be expected to reduce CV risk in patients with psoriasis.

Menter has worked closely with the senior author of the current study, Nehal Mehta, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, to identify cardiovascular issues in the psoriasis population. In one recent study, investigators found that the prevalence of moderate-to-severe coronary calcification was similar between patients with psoriasis and those with type 2 diabetes, and approximately five times greater than healthy controls.

Investigators found that moderate-to-severe psoriasis was a significantly stronger predictor of coronary calcification than type 2 diabetes, and the effect was independent of known CV and cardiometabolic risk factors.

 

SOURCE

https://www.medpagetoday.com/Dermatology/Psoriasis/68429?xid=nl_mpt_cardiodaily_2017-10-09&eun=g99985d0r

Read Full Post »