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Archive for the ‘Genetic Mutations in Congenital Heart DIsease’ Category


Individuals without angiographic CAD but with hiPRS remain at significantly elevated risk of mortality after cardiac catheterization

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

A genome-wide Polygenic risk scores (PRS) improves risk stratification when added to traditional risk factors and coronary angiography. Individuals without angiographic CAD but with hiPRS remain at significantly elevated risk of mortality.

 

Background:

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is influenced by genetic variation and traditional risk factors. Polygenic risk scores (PRS), which can be ascertained before the development of traditional risk factors, have been shown to identify individuals at elevated risk of CAD. Here, we demonstrate that a genome-wide PRS for CAD predicts all-cause mortality after accounting for not only traditional cardiovascular risk factors but also angiographic CAD itself.

Methods:

Individuals who underwent coronary angiography and were enrolled in an institutional biobank were included; those with prior myocardial infarction or heart transplant were excluded. Using a pruning-and-thresholding approach, a genome-wide PRS comprised of 139 239 variants was calculated for 1503 participants who underwent coronary angiography and genotyping. Individuals were categorized into high PRS (hiPRS) and low-PRS control groups using the maximally selected rank statistic. Stratified analysis based on angiographic findings was also performed. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality following the index coronary angiogram.

Results:

Individuals with hiPRS were younger than controls (66 years versus 69 years; P=2.1×10-5) but did not differ by sex, body mass index, or traditional risk-factor profiles. Individuals with hiPRS were at significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality after cardiac catheterization, adjusting for traditional risk factors and angiographic extent of CAD (hazard ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2–2.2; P=0.004). The strongest increase in risk of all-cause mortality conferred by hiPRS was seen among individuals without angiographic CAD (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1–5.5; P=0.04). In the overall cohort, adding hiPRS to traditional risk assessment improved prediction of 5-year all-cause mortality (area under the receiver-operating curve 0.70; 95% CI, 0.66–0.75 versus 0.66; 95% CI, 0.61–0.70; P=0.001).

Conclusions:

A genome-wide PRS improves risk stratification when added to traditional risk factors and coronary angiography. Individuals without angiographic CAD but with hiPRS remain at significantly elevated risk of mortality.

Footnotes

https://www.ahajournals.org/journal/circgen

*A list of all Regeneron Genetics Center members is given in the Data Supplement.

Guest Editor for this article was Christopher Semsarian, MBBS, PhD, MPH.

The Data Supplement is available at https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/suppl/10.1161/CIRCGEN.118.002352.

Scott M. Damrauer, MD, Department of Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce St, Silverstein 4, Philadelphia, PA 19104. Email 
SOURCE
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The HFE H63D variant confers an increased risk for hypertension, no increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events or substantial left ventricular remodeling

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Conclusion:

The HFE H63D variant confers an increased risk for hypertension per allele and, given its frequency, accounts for a significant number of cases of hypertension. However, there was no increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events or substantial left ventricular remodeling.

 

HFE H63D Polymorphism and the Risk for Systemic Hypertension, Myocardial Remodeling, and Adverse Cardiovascular Events in the ARIC Study

Originally publishedHypertension. 2018;0:HYPERTENSIONAHA.118.11730

H63D has been identified as a novel locus associated with the development of hypertension. The quantitative risks for hypertension, cardiac remodeling, and adverse events are not well studied. We analyzed white participants from the ARIC study (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) with H63D genotyping (N=10 902). We related genotype status to prevalence of hypertension at each of 5 study visits and risk for adverse cardiovascular events. Among visit 5 participants (N=4507), we related genotype status to echocardiographic features. Frequencies of wild type (WT)/WT, H63D/WT, and H63D/H63D were 73%, 24.6%, and 2.4%. The average age at baseline was 54.9±5.7 years and 47% were men. Participants carrying the H63D variant had higher systolic blood pressure (P=0.004), diastolic blood pressure (0.012), and more frequently had hypertension (P<0.001). Compared with WT/WT, H63D/WT and H63D/H63D participants had a 2% to 4% and 4% to 7% absolute increase in hypertension risk at each visit, respectively. The population attributable risk of H63D for hypertension among individuals aged 45 to 64 was 3.2% (95% CI, 1.3–5.1%) and 1.3% (95% CI, 0.0–2.4%) among individuals >65 years. After 25 years of follow-up, there was no relationship between genotype status and any outcome (P>0.05). H63D/WT and H63D/H63D genotypes were associated with small differences in cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, the HFE H63D variant confers an increased risk for hypertension per allele and, given its frequency, accounts for a significant number of cases of hypertension. However, there was no increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events or substantial left ventricular remodeling.

Footnotes

The online-only Data Supplement is available with this article at https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/suppl/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.118.11730.

Correspondence to Scott D. Solomon, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115. Email 

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cvd-series-a-volume-iii


Series A: e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases
 

Series A Content Consultant: Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

VOLUME THREE

Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases:

Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

 

by  

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Senior Editor, Author and Curator

and

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor and Curator

Introduction to Volume Three 

PART 1
Genomics and Medicine

1.1  Genomics and Medicine: The Physician’s View

1.2  Ribozymes and RNA Machines – Work of Jennifer A. Doudna

1.3  Genomics and Medicine: Contributions of Genetics and Genomics to Cardiovascular Disease Diagnoses

1.4 Genomics Orientations for Individualized Medicine, Volume One

1.4.1 CVD Epidemiology, Ethnic subtypes Classification, and Medication Response Variability: Cardiology, Genomics and Individualized Heart Care: Framingham Heart Study (65 y-o study) & Jackson Heart Study (15 y-o study)

1.4.2 What comes after finishing the Euchromatic Sequence of the Human Genome?

1.5  Genomics in Medicine – Establishing a Patient-Centric View of Genomic Data

 

PART 2
Epigenetics – Modifiable Factors Causing Cardiovascular Diseases

2.1 Diseases Etiology

2.1.1 Environmental Contributors Implicated as Causing Cardiovascular Diseases

2.1.2 Diet: Solids, Fluid Intake and Nutraceuticals

2.1.3 Physical Activity and Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

2.1.4 Psychological Stress and Mental Health: Risk for Cardiovascular Diseases

2.1.5 Correlation between Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases

2.1.6 Medical Etiologies for Cardiovascular Diseases: Evidence-based Medicine – Leading DIAGNOSES of Cardiovascular Diseases, Risk Biomarkers and Therapies

2.1.7 Signaling Pathways

2.1.8 Proteomics and Metabolomics

2.1.9 Sleep and Cardiovascular Diseases

2.2 Assessing Cardiovascular Disease with Biomarkers

2.2.1 Issues in Genomics of Cardiovascular Diseases

2.2.2 Endothelium, Angiogenesis, and Disordered Coagulation

2.2.3 Hypertension BioMarkers

2.2.4 Inflammatory, Atherosclerotic and Heart Failure Markers

2.2.5 Myocardial Markers

2.3  Therapeutic Implications: Focus on Ca(2+) signaling, platelets, endothelium

2.3.1 The Centrality of Ca(2+) Signaling and Cytoskeleton Involving Calmodulin Kinases and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Failure, Arterial Smooth Muscle, Post-ischemic Arrhythmia, Similarities and Differences, and Pharmaceutical Targets

2.3.2 EMRE in the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Complex

2.3.3 Platelets in Translational Research ­ 2: Discovery of Potential Anti-platelet Targets

2.3.4 The Final Considerations of the Role of Platelets and Platelet Endothelial Reactions in Atherosclerosis and Novel Treatments

2.3.5 Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors (NOS-I)

2.3.6 Resistance to Receptor of Tyrosine Kinase

2.3.7 Oxidized Calcium Calmodulin Kinase and Atrial Fibrillation

2.3.8 Advanced Topics in Sepsis and the Cardiovascular System at its End Stage

2.4 Comorbidity of Diabetes and Aging

2.4.1 Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology: 1700 MIs and 2300 coronary heart disease events among about 29 000 eligible patients

2.4.2 Pathophysiological Effects of Diabetes on Ischemic-Cardiovascular Disease and on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

2.4.3 Risks of Hypoglycemia in Diabetics with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

2.4.4  Mitochondrial Mechanisms of Disease in Diabetes Mellitus

2.4.5 Mitochondria: More than just the “powerhouse of the cell”

2.4.6  Pathophysiology of GLP-1 in Type 2 Diabetes

2.4.7 Developments in the Genomics and Proteomics of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Treatment Targets

2.4.8 CaKMII Inhibition in Obese, Diabetic Mice leads to Lower Blood Glucose Levels

2.4.9 Protein Target for Controlling Diabetes, Fractalkine: Mediator cell-to-cell Adhesion though CX3CR1 Receptor, Released from cells Stimulate Insulin Secretion

2.4.10 Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-gamma) Receptors Activation: PPARγ transrepression for Angiogenesis in Cardiovascular Disease and PPARγ transactivation for Treatment of Diabetes

2.4.11 CABG or PCI: Patients with Diabetes – CABG Rein Supreme

2.4.12 Reversal of Cardiac Mitochondrial Dysfunction

2.4.13  BARI 2D Trial Outcomes

2.4.14 Overview of new strategy for treatment of T2DM: SGLT2 inhibiting oral antidiabetic agents

2.5 Drug Toxicity and Cardiovascular Diseases

2.5.1 Predicting Drug Toxicity for Acute Cardiac Events

2.5.2 Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse Effects

2.5.3 Decoding myocardial Ca2+ signals across multiple spatial scales: A role for sensitivity analysis

2.5.4. Leveraging Mathematical Models to Understand Population Variability in Response to Cardiac Drugs: Eric Sobie, PhD

2.5.5 Exploiting mathematical models to illuminate electrophysiological variability between individuals.

2.5.6 Clinical Effects and Cardiac Complications of Recreational Drug Use: Blood pressure changes, Myocardial ischemia and infarction, Aortic dissection, Valvular damage, and Endocarditis, Cardiomyopathy, Pulmonary edema and Pulmonary hypertension, Arrhythmias, Pneumothorax and Pneumopericardium

 

2.6 Male and Female Hormonal Replacement Therapy: The Benefits and the Deleterious Effects on Cardiovascular Diseases

2.6.1  Testosterone Therapy for Idiopathic Hypogonadotrophic Hypogonadism has Beneficial and Deleterious Effects on Cardiovascular Risk Factors

2.6.2 Heart Risks and Hormones (HRT) in Menopause: Contradiction or Clarification?

2.6.3 Calcium Dependent NOS Induction by Sex Hormones: Estrogen

2.6.4 Role of Progesterone in Breast Cancer Progression

PART 3
Determinants of Cardiovascular Diseases Genetics, Heredity and Genomics Discoveries

Introduction

3.1 Why cancer cells contain abnormal numbers of chromosomes (Aneuploidy)

3.1.1 Aneuploidy and Carcinogenesis

3.2 Functional Characterization of Cardiovascular Genomics: Disease Case Studies @ 2013 ASHG

3.3 Leading DIAGNOSES of Cardiovascular Diseases covered in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, 3/2010 – 3/2013

3.3.1: Heredity of Cardiovascular Disorders

3.3.2: Myocardial Damage

3.3.3: Hypertention and Atherosclerosis

3.3.4: Ethnic Variation in Cardiac Structure and Systolic Function

3.3.5: Aging: Heart and Genetics

3.3.6: Genetics of Heart Rhythm

3.3.7: Hyperlipidemia, Hyper Cholesterolemia, Metabolic Syndrome

3.3.8: Stroke and Ischemic Stroke

3.3.9: Genetics and Vascular Pathologies and Platelet Aggregation, Cardiac Troponin T in Serum

3.3.10: Genomics and Valvular Disease

3.4  Commentary on Biomarkers for Genetics and Genomics of Cardiovascular Disease

PART 4
Individualized Medicine Guided by Genetics and Genomics Discoveries

4.1 Preventive Medicine: Cardiovascular Diseases

4.1.1 Personal Genomics for Preventive Cardiology Randomized Trial Design and Challenges

4.2 Gene-Therapy for Cardiovascular Diseases

4.2.1 Genetic Basis of Cardiomyopathy

4.3 Congenital Heart Disease/Defects

4.4 Cardiac Repair: Regenerative Medicine

4.4.1 A Powerful Tool For Repairing Damaged Hearts

4.4.2 Modified RNA Induces Vascular Regeneration After a Heart

4.5 Pharmacogenomics for Cardiovascular Diseases

4.5.1 Blood Pressure Response to Antihypertensives: Hypertension Susceptibility Loci Study

4.5.2 Statin-Induced Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Reduction: Genetic Determinants in the Response to Rosuvastatin

4.5.3 SNPs in apoE are found to influence statin response significantly. Less frequent variants in PCSK9 and smaller effect sizes in SNPs in HMGCR

4.5.4 Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel and Pharmacogenetic Association with Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes: Hypertension Treatment with Verapamil SR (CCB) vs Atenolol (BB) or Trandolapril (ACE)

4.5.5 Response to Rosuvastatin in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: Hepatic Metabolism and Transporter Gene Variants Effect

4.5.6 Helping Physicians identify Gene-Drug Interactions for Treatment Decisions: New ‘CLIPMERGE’ program – Personalized Medicine @ The Mount Sinai Medical Center

4.5.7 Is Pharmacogenetic-based Dosing of Warfarin Superior for Anticoagulation Control?

Summary & Epilogue to Volume Three

 

 

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Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) gene missense mutation causes Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection (TAAD) in Humans because of inadequate cross-linking of collagen and elastin in the aortic wall

Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions.

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Loss of function mutation in LOX causes thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in humans

  1. Vivian S. Leea,
  2. Carmen M. Halabia,b,
  3. Erin P. Hoffmanc,1,
  4. Nikkola Carmichaelc,d,
  5. Ignaty Leshchinerc,d,
  6. Christine G. Liand,e,
  7. Andrew J. Bierhalsf,
  8. Dana Vuzmanc,d,
  9. Brigham Genomic Medicine2,
  10. Robert P. Mechama,
  11. Natasha Y. Frankc,d,g,3, and
  12. Nathan O. Stitzielh,i,j,3

Edited by J. G. Seidman, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and approved June 7, 2016 (received for review January 27, 2016)

  • Author contributions: V.S.L., R.P.M., N.Y.F., and N.O.S. designed research; V.S.L., C.M.H., and N.O.S. performed research; E.P.H., N.C., C.G.L., D.V., B.G.M.P., R.P.M., and N.Y.F. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; V.S.L., C.M.

Significance

The mechanical integrity of the arterial wall is dependent on a properly structured ECM. Elastin and collagen are key structural components of the ECM, contributing to the stability and elasticity of normal arteries. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) normally cross-links collagen and elastin molecules in the process of forming proper collagen fibers and elastic lamellae. Here, using whole-genome sequencing in humans and genome engineering in mice, we show that a missense mutation in LOX causes aortic aneurysm and dissection because of insufficient elastin and collagen cross-linking in the aortic wall. These findings confirm mutations in LOX as a cause of aortic disease in humans and identify LOX as a diagnostic and potentially therapeutic target.

Abstract

Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) represent a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many individuals presenting with an inherited form of TAAD do not have causal mutations in the set of genes known to underlie disease. Using whole-genome sequencing in two first cousins with TAAD, we identified a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene (c.893T > G encoding p.Met298Arg) that cosegregated with disease in the family. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering tools, we introduced the human mutation into the homologous position in the mouse genome, creating mice that were heterozygous and homozygous for the human allele. Mutant mice that were heterozygous for the human allele displayed disorganized ultrastructural properties of the aortic wall characterized by fragmented elastic lamellae, whereas mice homozygous for the human allele died shortly after parturition from ascending aortic aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage. These data suggest that a missense mutation in LOX is associated with aortic disease in humans, likely through insufficient cross-linking of elastin and collagen in the aortic wall. Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions. LOX sequencing for clinical TAAD may identify additional mutation carriers in the future. Additional studies using our mouse model of LOX-associated TAAD have the potential to clarify the mechanism of disease and identify novel therapeutics specific to this genetic cause.

SOURCE

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/07/15/1601442113.abstract

Missense LOX Mutation Linked to Aortic Rupture, Aneurysm

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine have linked a LOX gene variant with aortic rupture and aneurysm.

As they reported in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences yesterday, the researchers sequenced two first cousins from a family with a history of aortic ruptures and aneurysms to uncover a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene, which encodes a protein that cross-links elastin and collagen. When they used CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering to introduce the mutation into a mouse model, mice heterogeneous for the mutation had disorganized aortic walls, while mice homozygous for the mutation died shortly after birth of ascending aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage, suggesting that the LOX variant might be causal.

Read more @ the Source

SOURCE

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/missense-lox-mutation-linked-aortic-rupture-aneurysm

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