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Archive for the ‘Genetics & Innovations in Treatment’ Category


Breakthroughs: Insights From the Personalized Medicine & Diagnostics Track at the 2017 BIO International Convention

Guest Author: David Davenport, Office Administrator, Personalized Medicine Coalition

 

“Health care today is reactive and costly … anything but personalized … but we are now entering a new era where health care is becoming proactive, preventive, highly personalized and most importantly predictive,” said J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., Founder, President, CEO, J. Craig Venter Institute, during his opening keynote at the Personalized Medicine and Diagnostics Track at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego from June 21 – 22. The track, co-organized by PMC, brought together thought leaders to discuss breakthroughs in advancing personalized medicine. From those conversations several themes emerged:

Complex genetic data require a “knowledge network” to translate into personalized care.

During the session titled The Next Frontier: Navigating Clinical Adoption of Personalized Medicine, moderated by PMC Vice President for Science Policy Daryl Pritchard, Ph.D., panelists discussed how to accelerate the clinical adoption of innovative personalized therapies. Jennifer Levin Carter, M.D., Founder and Chief Medical Officer of N-of-One, a clinical diagnostic testing interpretation service company, explained that as data grows in complexity, there is a growing need for partnerships to efficiently analyze the data and develop effective targeted treatment plans. India Hook-Barnard, Ph.D., Director of Research Strategy, Associate Director of Precision Medicine, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), agreed and discussed the need to build a “knowledge network” that can harness data and expertise to inform provider-patient decision-making.

Discussing how personalized medicine can be integrated into community health centers lacking large research budgets, Lynn Dressler, Dr.P.H., Director of Personalized Medicine and Pharmacogenomics at Mission Health Systems, a rural community health care delivery system in Asheville, North Carolina, discussed the need to better educate physicians and patients as well as the role that a knowledge network could play in providing easy and cost-effective access to diagnostic testing services.

Delivering personalized medicine requires innovative partnerships involving industry, IT companies, providers, payers and the government.

During It’s a Converging World: Innovative Partnerships and Precision Medicine, a panel moderated by Kristin Pothier, Global Head of Life Sciences Strategy, Ernst & Young, discussed the need for “open data” where improved patient care is the shared goal, and how public-private partnerships that address education, evidence development and access to care can help foster personalized medicine.

During a session titled Nevada as a New Model for Population Health Study, Nevada-based health system Renown Health outlined a study in which it partnered with genetic testing company 23andMe to examine whether free access to genetic testing changes participants’ practices in managing their own health and facilitates the utilization of personalized medicine.

In the era of personalized medicine, measuring and delivering value requires a paradigm shift from population-based to individual-based evidence.

Following a discussion on regulatory and reimbursement challenges moderated by Bruce Quinn, M.D., Ph.D., Principal, Bruce Quinn Associates, during which panelists called for the simplification of payment structures to be more consistent, more efficient and more connected to the patient market, a panel moderated by Jennifer Snow, Director of Health Policy at Xcenda, discussed how value assessment frameworks must adapt to consider the value of personalized medicine. During The Whole Picture: Consideration of Personalized Medicine in Value Assessment Frameworks, panelist Mitch Higashi, Ph.D., Vice President, Health Economics and Outcomes Research, U.S., Bristol-Myers Squibb, called for patient-centered definitions of value and advocated for the inclusion of predictive biomarkers in all value frameworks. Donna Cryer, J.D., President, CEO, Global Liver Institute, added that the “patient must be the ultimate ‘arbiter of value’” and urged “transparency” in how value assessment frameworks are used.

Noting that different assessment frameworks have different goals, Roger Longman, CEO, Real Endpoints, called for more dynamic frameworks that allow different stakeholders to “use the same criteria but weigh them differently.” The panel concluded that to advance personalized medicine, value frameworks must be meaningful, practical and predictive for patients; reflect evolving evidence needs like real-world evidence; and consider breakthrough payment structures like bundled payments.

From Promise to Practice: The Way Forward for Personalized Medicine

During the concluding session, Creating a Universal Biomarker Program, moderated by Ian Wright, Owner, Strategic Innovations LLC, on behalf of Cedars-Sinai Precision Health, panelists discussed how to make patients the point of reference for their own care, as opposed to being compared to the “normal” range of population averages in treatment decisions using biomarkers. The speakers concluded that moving in that direction requires providers to establish baselines for each patient, along with tools and metrics to facilitate the approach.

In the words of Donna Cryer, “personalized medicine is the definition of value for a patient.” With the ability to detect diseases before they even express themselves, the promise of personalized medicine has never been greater.

However, changing the health care system to improve patient access to valuable personalized medicines requires innovation and collaboration. As PMC President Edward Abrahams, Ph.D., said during his opening remarks for the track, that change

“doesn’t come easily,” but “breakthrough” discussions like these continue to move us forward.

The complete track agenda can be downloaded here.

 

SOURCE

From: <pmc@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org>

Date: Monday, July 10, 2017 at 10:51 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Breakthroughs From the 2017 BIO Convention’s PM & Dx Track

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Genomic Diagnostics: Three Techniques to Perform Single Cell Gene Expression and Genome Sequencing Single Molecule DNA Sequencing

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

This article presents Three Techniques to Perform Single Cell Gene Expression and Genome Sequencing Single molecule DNA sequencing

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Ido Sagi – PhD Student @HUJI, 2017 Kaye Innovation Award winner for leading research that yielded the first successful isolation and maintenance of haploid embryonic stem cells in humans.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Ido Sagi – PhD Student, Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, HUJI, Israel

  • Ido Sagi’s research focuses on studying genetic and epigenetic phenomena in human pluripotent stem cells, and his work has been published in leading scientific journals, including NatureNature Genetics and Cell Stem Cell.
  • Ido Sagi received BSc summa cum laude in Life Sciences from the Hebrew University, and currently pursues a PhD at the laboratory of Prof. Nissim Benvenisty at the university’s Department of Genetics in the Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences.

The Kaye Innovation Awards at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have been awarded annually since 1994. Isaac Kaye of England, a prominent industrialist in the pharmaceutical industry, established the awards to encourage faculty, staff and students of the Hebrew University to develop innovative methods and inventions with good commercial potential, which will benefit the university and society.

Publications – Ido Sagi

Comparable frequencies of coding mutations and loss of imprinting in human pluripotent cells derived by nuclear transfer and defined factors.
Cell Stem Cell 2014 Nov 6;15(5):634-42. Epub 2014 Nov 6.
The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA; Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center & Department of Pediatrics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

November 2014

 



Stem cells: Aspiring to naivety.
Nature 2016 12 30;540(7632):211-212. Epub 2016 Nov 30.
The Azrieli Center for Stem Cells and Genetic Research, Department of Genetics, Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904, Israel.
November 2016

Download Full Paper

SOURCE

Other related articles on Genetic and Epigenetic phenomena in human pluripotent stem cells published by LPBI Group can be found in the following e-Books on Amazon.com

e-Books in Medicine

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_ebooks_9?ie=UTF8&text=Aviva+Lev-Ari&search-alias=digital-text&field-author=Aviva+Lev-Ari&sort=relevancerank

9 results for Kindle Store : “Aviva Lev-Ari”

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    Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics

    Nov 28, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Justin D. Pearlman MD ME PhD MA FACC and Stephen J. Williams PhD
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    Cancer Therapies: Metabolic, Genomics, Interventional, Immunotherapy and Nanotechnology in Therapy Delivery (Series C Book 2)

    May 13, 2017 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H. Bernstein and Demet Sag
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    Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms (Biomed e-Books Book 1)

    Jun 20, 2013 | Kindle eBook

    by Margaret Baker PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN
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    Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis (Series C: e-Books on Cancer & Oncology Book 1)

    Aug 10, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H Bernstein MD FCAP and Prabodh Kumar Kandala PhD
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    Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine (Frontiers in Genomics Research Book 1)

    Nov 22, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Sudipta Saha PhD and Ritu Saxena PhD
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    Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics (BioMedicine – Metabolomics, Immunology, Infectious Diseases Book 1)

    Jul 21, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H. Bernstein MD FCAP and Prabodah Kandala PhD
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    Milestones in Physiology: Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics (Series E: Patient-Centered Medicine Book 3)

    Dec 26, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H. Bernstein MD FACP and Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN
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    Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutic Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases

    Dec 26, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Justin D. Pearlman MD ME PhD MA FACC and Ritu Saxena PhD
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    Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation: The Art of Scientific & Medical Curation

    Nov 29, 2015 | Kindle eBook

    by Larry H. Bernstein MD FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN
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Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Scientists think excessive population growth is a cause of scarcity and environmental degradation. A male pill could reduce the number of unintended pregnancies, which accounts for 40 percent of all pregnancies worldwide.

 

But, big drug companies long ago dropped out of the search for a male contraceptive pill which is able to chemically intercept millions of sperm before they reach a woman’s egg. Right now the chemical burden for contraception relies solely on the female. There’s not much activity in the male contraception field because an effective solution is available on the female side.

 

Presently, male contraception means a condom or a vasectomy. But researchers from Center for Drug Discovery at Baylor College of Medicine, USA are renewing the search for a better option—an easy-to-take pill that’s safe, fast-acting, and reversible.

 

The scientists began with lists of genes active in the testes for sperm production and motility and then created knockout mice that lack those genes. Using the gene-editing technology called CRISPR, in collaboration with Japanese scientists, they have so far made more than 75 of these “knockout” mice.

 

They allowed these mice to mate with normal (wild type) female mice, and if their female partners don’t get pregnant after three to six months, it means the gene might be a target for a contraceptive. Out of 2300 genes that are particularly active in the testes of mice, the researchers have identified 30 genes whose deletion makes the male infertile. Next the scientists are planning a novel screening approach to test whether any of about two billion chemicals can disable these genes in a test tube. Promising chemicals could then be fed to male mice to see if they cause infertility.

 

Female birth control pills use hormones to inhibit a woman’s ovaries from releasing eggs. But hormones have side effects like weight gain, mood changes, and headaches. A trial of one male contraceptive hormone was stopped early in 2011 after one participant committed suicide and others reported depression. Moreover, some drug candidates have made animals permanently sterile which is not the goal of the research. The challenge is to prevent sperm being made without permanently sterilizing the individual.

 

As a better way to test drugs, Scientists at University of Georgia, USA are investigating yet another high-tech approach. They are turning human skin cells into stem cells that look and act like the spermatogonial cells in the testes. Testing drugs on such cells might provide more accurate leads than tests on mice.

 

The male pill would also have to start working quickly, a lot sooner than the female pill, which takes about a week to function. Scientists from University of Dundee, U.K. admitted that there are lots of challenges. Because, a women’s ovary usually release one mature egg each month, while a man makes millions of sperm every day. So, the male pill has to be made 100 percent effective and act instantaneously.

 

References:

 

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/603676/the-search-for-a-perfect-male-birth-control-pill/

 

https://futurism.com/videos/the-perfect-male-birth-control-pill-is-coming-soon/?utm_source=Digest&utm_campaign=c42fc7b9b6-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_03_20&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_03cd0a26cd-c42fc7b9b6-246845533

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/sex/the-male-pill-is-coming—and-its-going-to-change-everything/

 

http://www.mensfitness.com/women/sex-tips/male-birth-control-pill-making

 

http://health.howstuffworks.com/sexual-health/contraception/male-bc-pill.htm

 

http://europe.newsweek.com/male-contraception-side-effects-study-pill-injection-518237?rm=eu

 

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/01/07/health/male-birth-control-pill/index.html

 

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/contraception-guide/Pages/male-pill.aspx

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Evaluating the Genetic Profiles of Tumor Cells circulating in the Bloodstream could transform Cancer Care: A Blood Test for managing Lung Cancer @Stanford University Medical School

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

A Legacy of Innovation @Stanford University Medical School

  1. 1967

    First synthesis of biologically active DNA in test tube

  2. 1968

    First adult human heart transplant in the United States

    Norman Shumway successfully transplants a heart into 54-year-old steelworker Mike Kasperak, who survives for 14 days.

     

  3. 1973

    First expression of a foreign gene implanted in bacteria by recombinant DNA methods

  4. 1981

    First successful human combined heart/lung transplant in the world (fourth attempted worldwide)

  5. 1984

    Isolation of a gene coding for part of the T-cell receptor, a key to the immune system’s function

  6. 1988

    Isolation of pure hematopoietic stem cells from mice

  7. 2002

    First use of gene expression profiling to predict cancer outcomes

  8. 2007

    Application and expansion of optogenetics, a technique to control brain cell activity with light

SOURCE

Evaluating the Genetic Profiles of Tumor Cells circulating in the Bloodstream could transform Cancer Care: A Blood Test for managing Lung Cancer @Stanford University Medical School

The approach that the team developed could be used to look at mutations in three or four genes, and it requires no more than 2 milliliters of blood — about half a teaspoon. The test can be completed in about five hours, the researcher said, and costs less than $30. For comparison, a single state-of-the art biopsy of lung tissue with DNA sequencing costs about $18,000 and takes as long as three weeks to furnish results. Johnson & Johnson’s CellSearch — another blood test, already approved by the FDA — costs about $900 and takes a week to deliver results.

The researchers created a system for isolating circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients and reading a handful of genes from inside each tumor cell. Thus, they were able to obtain genetic information about the original cancer tumor that resides deep in the lungs without doing a biopsy, which can be dangerous for the patient.

“We are trying to make minimally invasive technology that allows us to continuously monitor one person’s health over time,” said radiology instructor Seung-min Park, PhD, a lead author of the new study, which was published online Dec. 12 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Park shares lead authorship of the study with former Stanford graduate students Dawson Wong, PhD, and Chin Chun Ooi.

A MagSifter chip, shown here fastened to an acrylic holder, can purify circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients.

The MagSifter is an electromagnetic sieve that can be turned on and off. When the MagSifter is on, it pulls the nanoparticle-labeled CTCs from the blood sample and allows the rest of the blood to flow through the sifter. The CTCs pulled from the blood are then deposited into a flat array of tiny wells, each large enough for only one cell. Now the tumor cells are ready for genetic analysis. Each flat of 25,600 wells looks like a miniature muffin tin, with room for a lot of tiny muffins.

SOURCE

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/12/blood-test-could-provide-cheaper-way-to-evaluate-lung-tumors.html

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Translation of whole human genome sequencing to clinical practice: The Joint Initiative for Metrology in Biology (JIMB) is a collaboration between the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) and Stanford University.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

JIMB’s mission is to advance the science of measuring biology (biometrology). JIMB is pursuing fundamental research, standards development, and the translation of products that support confidence in biological measurements and reliable reuse of materials and results. JIMB is particularly focused on measurements and technologies that impact, are related to, or enabled by ongoing advances in and associated with the reading and writing of DNA.

Stanford innovators and industry entrepreneurs have joined forces with the measurement experts from NIST to create a new engine powering the bioeconomy. It’s called JIMB — “Jim Bee” — the Joint Initiative for Metrology in Biology. JIMB unites people, platforms, and projects to underpin standards-based research and innovation in biometrology.

Genome in a Bottle
Authoritative Characterization of
Benchmark Human Genomes


The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is a public-private-academic consortium hosted by NIST to develop the technical infrastructure (reference standards, reference methods, and reference data) to enable translation of whole human genome sequencing to clinical practice. The priority of GIAB is authoritative characterization of human genomes for use in analytical validation and technology development, optimization, and demonstration. In 2015, NIST released the pilot genome Reference Material 8398, which is genomic DNA (NA12878) derived from a large batch of the Coriell cell line GM12878, characterized for high-confidence SNPs, indel, and homozygous reference regions (Zook, et al., Nature Biotechnology 2014).

There are four new GIAB reference materials available.  With the addition of these new reference materials (RMs) to a growing collection of “measuring sticks” for gene sequencing, we can now provide laboratories with even more capability to accurately “map” DNA for genetic testing, medical diagnoses and future customized drug therapies. The new tools feature sequenced genes from individuals in two genetically diverse groups, Asians and Ashkenazic Jews; a father-mother-child trio set from Ashkenazic Jews; and four microbes commonly used in research. For more information click here.  To purchase them, visit:

Data and analyses are publicly available (GIAB GitHub). A description of data generated by GIAB is published here. To standardize best practices for using GIAB genomes for benchmarking, we are working with the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health Benchmarking Team (benchmarking tools).

High-confidence small variant and homozygous reference calls are available for NA12878, the Ashkenazim trio, and the Chinese son with respect to GRCh37.  Preliminary high-confidence calls with respect to GRCh38 are also available for NA12878.   The latest version of these calls is under the latest directory for each genome on the GIAB FTP.

The consortium was initiated in a set of meetings in 2011 and 2012, and the consortium holds open, public workshops in January at Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA and in August/September at NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. Slides from workshops and conferences are available online. The consortium is open and welcomes new participants.

SOURCE

Stanford innovators and industry entrepreneurs have joined forces with the measurement experts from NIST to create a new engine powering the bioeconomy. It’s called JIMB — “Jim Bee” — the Joint Initiative for Metrology in Biology. JIMB unites people, platforms, and projects to underpin standards-based research and innovation in biometrology.

JIMB World Metrology Day Symposium

JIMB’s mission is to motivate standards-based measurement innovation to facilitate translation of basic science and technology development breakthroughs in genomics and synthetic biology.

By advancing biometrology, JIMB will push the boundaries of discovery science, accelerate technology development and dissemination, and generate reusable resources.

 SOURCE

VIEW VIDEO

https://player.vimeo.com/video/184956195?wmode=opaque&api=1&#8243;,”url”:”https://vimeo.com/184956195&#8243;,”width”:640,”height”:360,”providerName”:”Vimeo”,”thumbnailUrl”:”https://i.vimeocdn.com/video/594555038_640.jpg&#8221;,”resolvedBy”:”vimeo”}” data-block-type=”32″>

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

“Genome in a Bottle”: NIST’s new metrics for Clinical Human Genome Sequencing

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/06/genome-in-a-bottle-nists-new-metrics-for-clinical-human-genome-sequencing/

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p53 mutation – Li-Fraumeni Syndrome – Likelihood of Genetic or Hereditary conditions playing a role in Intergenerational incidence of Cancer

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

THIS ARTICLE IS RECOMMENDED READING TO ALL OUR e-Readers

because it is a REAL story of a high school student fighting Brain Cancer, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)

it presents the FRONTIER OF GENOMICS, PRECISION MEDICINE, Interventional Radiology and Interventional ONCOLOGY at

Stanford University, Canary Center at Stanford for Early Cancer Detection, Stanford Medical Center and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

I was exposed to Li-Fraumeni Syndrome in the following article:

‘And yet, you try’ – A father’s quest to save his son

http://stanmed.stanford.edu/2016fall/milan-gambhirs-li-fraumeni-syndrome.html

 

Li-Fraumeni syndrome

Other Names for This Condition

  • LFS
  • Sarcoma family syndrome of Li and Fraumeni
  • Sarcoma, breast, leukemia, and adrenal gland (SBLA) syndrome
  • SBLA syndrome

LFS is a rare disorder that greatly increases the risk of developing several types of cancer, particularly in children and young adults.

The cancers most often associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome include breast cancer, a form of bone cancer called osteosarcoma, and cancers of soft tissues (such as muscle) called

Soft tissue sarcoma forms in soft tissues of the body, including muscle, tendons, fat, blood vessels, lymph vessels, nerves, and tissue around joints.


(small hormone-producing glands on top of each kidney). Several other types of cancer also occur more frequently in people with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

A very similar condition called Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome shares many of the features of classic Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Both conditions significantly increase the chances of developing multiple cancers beginning in childhood; however, the pattern of specific cancers seen in affected family members is different.

Genetic Changes

The CHEK2 and TP53 genes are associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

More than half of all families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome have inherited mutations in the gene. TP53 is a tumor suppressor gene, which means that it normally helps control the growth and division of cells. Mutations in this gene can allow cells to divide in an uncontrolled way and form tumors. Other genetic and environmental factors are also likely to affect the risk of cancer in people with TP53 mutations.

A few families with cancers characteristic of Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome do not have TP53 mutations, but have mutations in the CHEK2 gene. Like the TP53 gene, CHEK2 is a tumor suppressor gene. Researchers are uncertain whether CHEK2 mutations actually cause these conditions or are merely associated with an increased risk of certain cancers (including breast cancer).

Inheritance Pattern

Li-Fraumeni syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to increase the risk of developing cancer. In most cases, an affected person has a parent and other family members with cancers characteristic of the condition.

Diagnosis and Management

These resources address the diagnosis or management of Li-Fraumeni syndrome:

References on LFS

SOURCE

https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/li-fraumeni-syndrome

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