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Archive for the ‘CRISPR alternative for editing genes without cutting’ Category


Bioinformatic Tools for RNASeq: A Curation

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D. 

 

Note:  This will be an ongoing curation as new information and tools become available.

RNASeq is a powerful tool for the analysis of the transcriptome profile and has been used to determine the transcriptional changes occurring upon stimuli such as drug treatment or detecting transcript differences between biological sample cohorts such as tumor versus normal tissue.  Unlike its genomic companion, whole genome and whole exome sequencing, which analyzes the primary sequence of the genomic DNA, RNASeq analyzes the mRNA transcripts, thereby more closely resembling the ultimate translated proteome. In addition, RNASeq and transcriptome profiling can determine if splicing variants occur as well as determining the nonexomic sequences, such as miRNA and lncRNA species, all of which have shown pertinence in the etiology of many diseases, including cancer.

However, RNASeq, like other omic technologies, generates enormous big data sets, which requires multiple types of bioinformatic tools in order to correctly analyze the sequence reads, and to visualize and interpret the output data.  This post represents a curation by the RNA-Seq blog of such tools useful for RNASeq studies and lists and reviews published literature using these curated tools.

 

From the RNA-Seq Blog

List of RNA-Seq bioinformatics tools

Posted by: RNA-Seq Blog in Data Analysis, Web Tools September 16, 2015 6,251 Views

from: https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/List_of_RNA-Seq_bioinformatics_tools

A review of some of the literature using some of the aforementioned curated tools are discussed below:

 

A.   Tools Useful for Single Cell RNA-Seq Analysis

 

B.  Tools for RNA-Seq Analysis of the Sliceasome

 

C.  Tools Useful for RNA-Seq read assembly visualization

 

Other articles on RNA and Transcriptomics in this Open Access Journal Include:

NIH to Award Up to $12M to Fund DNA, RNA Sequencing Research: single-cell genomics, sample preparation, transcriptomics and epigenomics, and genome-wide functional analysis.

Single-cell Genomics: Directions in Computational and Systems Biology – Contributions of Prof. Aviv Regev @Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cochair, the Human Cell Atlas Organizing Committee with Sarah Teichmann of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Complex rearrangements and oncogene amplification revealed by long-read DNA and RNA sequencing of a breast cancer cell line

Single-cell RNA-seq helps in finding intra-tumoral heterogeneity in pancreatic cancer

First challenge to make use of the new NCI Cloud Pilots – Somatic Mutation Challenge – RNA: Best algorithms for detecting all of the abnormal RNA molecules in a cancer cell

Evolution of the Human Cell Genome Biology Field of Gene Expression, Gene Regulation, Gene Regulatory Networks and Application of Machine Learning Algorithms in Large-Scale Biological Data Analysis

 

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Medicine in 2045 – Perspectives by World Thought Leaders in the Life Sciences & Medicine

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

This report is based on an article in Nature Medicine | VOL 25 | December 2019 | 1800–1809 | http://www.nature.com/naturemedicine

Looking forward 25 years: the future of medicine.

Nat Med 25, 1804–1807 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41591-019-0693-y

 

Aviv Regev, PhD

Core member and chair of the faculty, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; director, Klarman Cell Observatory, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; professor of biology, MIT; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; founding co-chair, Human Cell Atlas.

  • millions of genome variants, tens of thousands of disease-associated genes, thousands of cell types and an almost unimaginable number of ways they can combine, we had to approximate a best starting point—choose one target, guess the cell, simplify the experiment.
  • In 2020, advances in polygenic risk scores, in understanding the cell and modules of action of genes through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and in predicting the impact of combinations of interventions.
  • we need algorithms to make better computational predictions of experiments we have never performed in the lab or in clinical trials.
  • Human Cell Atlas and the International Common Disease Alliance—and in new experimental platforms: data platforms and algorithms. But we also need a broader ecosystem of partnerships in medicine that engages interaction between clinical experts and mathematicians, computer scientists and engineers

Feng Zhang, PhD

investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; core member, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; James and Patricia Poitras Professor of Neuroscience, McGovern Institute for Brain Research, MIT.

  • fundamental shift in medicine away from treating symptoms of disease and toward treating disease at its genetic roots.
  • Gene therapy with clinical feasibility, improved delivery methods and the development of robust molecular technologies for gene editing in human cells, affordable genome sequencing has accelerated our ability to identify the genetic causes of disease.
  • 1,000 clinical trials testing gene therapies are ongoing, and the pace of clinical development is likely to accelerate.
  • refine molecular technologies for gene editing, to push our understanding of gene function in health and disease forward, and to engage with all members of society

Elizabeth Jaffee, PhD

Dana and Albert “Cubby” Broccoli Professor of Oncology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; deputy director, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins.

  • a single blood test could inform individuals of the diseases they are at risk of (diabetes, cancer, heart disease, etc.) and that safe interventions will be available.
  • developing cancer vaccines. Vaccines targeting the causative agents of cervical and hepatocellular cancers have already proven to be effective. With these technologies and the wealth of data that will become available as precision medicine becomes more routine, new discoveries identifying the earliest genetic and inflammatory changes occurring within a cell as it transitions into a pre-cancer can be expected. With these discoveries, the opportunities to develop vaccine approaches preventing cancers development will grow.

Jeremy Farrar, OBE FRCP FRS FMedSci

Director, Wellcome Trust.

  • shape how the culture of research will develop over the next 25 years, a culture that cares more about what is achieved than how it is achieved.
  • building a creative, inclusive and open research culture will unleash greater discoveries with greater impact.

John Nkengasong, PhD

Director, Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

  • To meet its health challenges by 2050, the continent will have to be innovative in order to leapfrog toward solutions in public health.
  • Precision medicine will need to take center stage in a new public health order— whereby a more precise and targeted approach to screening, diagnosis, treatment and, potentially, cure is based on each patient’s unique genetic and biologic make-up.

Eric Topol, MD

Executive vice-president, Scripps Research Institute; founder and director, Scripps Research Translational Institute.

  • In 2045, a planetary health infrastructure based on deep, longitudinal, multimodal human data, ideally collected from and accessible to as many as possible of the 9+ billion people projected to then inhabit the Earth.
  • enhanced capabilities to perform functions that are not feasible now.
  • AI machines’ ability to ingest and process biomedical text at scale—such as the corpus of the up-to-date medical literature—will be used routinely by physicians and patients.
  • the concept of a learning health system will be redefined by AI.

Linda Partridge, PhD

Professor, Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing.

  • Geroprotective drugs, which target the underlying molecular mechanisms of ageing, are coming over the scientific and clinical horizons, and may help to prevent the most intractable age-related disease, dementia.

Trevor Mundel, MD

President of Global Health, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  • finding new ways to share clinical data that are as open as possible and as closed as necessary.
  • moving beyond drug donations toward a new era of corporate social responsibility that encourages biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies to offer their best minds and their most promising platforms.
  • working with governments and multilateral organizations much earlier in the product life cycle to finance the introduction of new interventions and to ensure the sustainable development of the health systems that will deliver them.
  • deliver on the promise of global health equity.

Josep Tabernero, MD, PhD

Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO); president, European Society for Medical Oncology (2018–2019).

  • genomic-driven analysis will continue to broaden the impact of personalized medicine in healthcare globally.
  • Precision medicine will continue to deliver its new paradigm in cancer care and reach more patients.
  • Immunotherapy will deliver on its promise to dismantle cancer’s armory across tumor types.
  • AI will help guide the development of individually matched
  • genetic patient screenings
  • the promise of liquid biopsy policing of disease?

Pardis Sabeti, PhD

Professor, Harvard University & Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard; investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  • the development and integration of tools into an early-warning system embedded into healthcare systems around the world could revolutionize infectious disease detection and response.
  • But this will only happen with a commitment from the global community.

Els Toreele, PhD

Executive director, Médecins Sans Frontières Access Campaign

  • we need a paradigm shift such that medicines are no longer lucrative market commodities but are global public health goods—available to all those who need them.
  • This will require members of the scientific community to go beyond their role as researchers and actively engage in R&D policy reform mandating health research in the public interest and ensuring that the results of their work benefit many more people.
  • The global research community can lead the way toward public-interest driven health innovation, by undertaking collaborative open science and piloting not-for-profit R&D strategies that positively impact people’s lives globally.

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@BroadInstitute a shift from Permanently editing DNA to Temporarily revising RNA – An approach with promise for addressing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s by deactivating APOE4 – RESCUE: RNA Editing for Specific C to U Exchange, the platform builds on REPAIR: RNA Editing for Programmable A to I

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

  • The RNA editors converted “the nucleotide base adenine to inosine, or letters A to I. Zhang and colleagues took the REPAIR fusion and evolved it in the lab until it could change cytosine to uridine, or C to U.”
  • Using Cas13, Zhang’s team was able to take the APOE4 gene — believed to carry the added risk of spurring Alzheimer’s — and changed it to a benign APOE2.

RNA-guided DNA insertion with CRISPR-associated transposases

Science  05 Jul 2019:
Vol. 365, Issue 6448, pp. 48-53
DOI: 10.1126/science.aax9181
SOURCE

Other related articles on CRISPR derived Gene Editing for Gene Therapy published in this Open Access on Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Latest in Genomics Methodologies for Therapeutics: Gene Editing, NGS & BioInformatics, Simulations and the Genome Ontology

Forthcoming 12/2019, Volume Two

by

Prof. Marcus W. Feldman, PhD, Editor, Stanford University

Prof. Stephen J. Williams, PhD, Editor, Temple University

and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor, LPBI Group 

 

Part 2: CRISPR for Gene Editing and DNA Repair

2.1 The Science – 77 articles

2.2 Technologies and Methodologies – 27 articles

2.3 Clinical Aspects – 9 articles

2.4 Business and Legal – 18 articles

 

Series B: Frontiers in Genomics Research

 

  • VOLUME 1: Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine. On Amazon.com since 11/23/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018DHBUO6

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Breakthrough in Gene Editing CRISPR–Cas systems: First example of a fully programmable, RNA-guided integrase and lays the foundation for genomic manipulations that obviate the requirements for double-strand breaks and homology-directed repair.

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

CRISPR alternatives for editing genes without cutting: CRISPR 12, 12a, 13, 14 – Alternative Techniques to CRISPR/Cas9

 

  • Alternative to CRISPR/Cas9 – CAST (CRISPR-associated transposase) – A New Gene-editing Approach for Insertion of Large DNA Sequences into a Genome developed @BroadInstitute @MIT @Harvard

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/06/11/alternative-to-crispr-cas9-cast-crispr-associated-transposase-a-new-gene-editing-approach-for-insertion-of-large-dna-sequences-into-a-genome-developed-broadinstitute-mit-harvard/

 

  • Vertex Pharmaceuticals agreed to pay $420 million to acquire Exonics and to expand its partnership with CRISPR Therapeutics. The deal sets in motion a planto use CRISPR to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy and myotonic dystrophy type 1.

 

  • In May, a team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center described a method developed there to use gold nanoparticles to carry CRISPR components into cells and to use the Cas12a enzyme to make cleaner cuts than Cas9 typically does.

 

  • A UC Berkeley spinoff, GenEdit, is also developing a gold-based CRISPR system.

 

  • Other recently proposed ideas for improving CRISPR include attaching a hairpin-like guide to RNA to improve the accuracy of DNA cuts and adding an on-off switch to Cas9 enzymes to ensure they can’t make edits anywhere other than the targeted sites.

 

  • The next step for Sternberg’s team at Columbia is to test the INTEGRATE technology in mammalian cells. They believe the technique could eventually be applied to a variety of products, such as gene therapies and engineered crops.

 

Transposon-encoded CRISPR–Cas systems direct RNA-guided DNA integration

Abstract

Conventional CRISPR–Cas systems maintain genomic integrity by leveraging guide RNAs for the nuclease-dependent degradation of mobile genetic elements, including plasmids and viruses. Here we describe a remarkable inversion of this paradigm, in which bacterial Tn7-like transposons have co-opted nuclease-deficient CRISPR–Cas systems to catalyze RNA-guided integration of mobile genetic elements into the genome. Programmable transposition of Vibrio cholerae Tn6677 in E. coli requires CRISPR- and transposon-associated molecular machineries, including a novel co-complex between Cascade and the transposition protein TniQ. Donor DNA integration occurs in one of two possible orientations at a fixed distance downstream of target DNA sequences, and can accommodate variable length genetic payloads. Deep sequencing experiments reveal highly specific, genome-wide DNA integration across dozens of unique target sites. This work provides the first example of a fully programmable, RNA-guided integrase and lays the foundation for genomic manipulations that obviate the requirements for double-strand breaks and homology-directed repair.

 SOURCE

A CRISPR alternative for editing genes without cutting

Scientists at Columbia University’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons are now proposing an alternative gene-editing system—one that sidesteps the need for DNA cutting altogether.

The researchers are using a “jumping gene,” or transposon, from a bacterium called Vibrio cholerae. The transposon is able to insert itself into different regions of the genome and can be programmed to carry any DNA sequence to any site. Therefore their technology, which they dubbed INTEGRATE, acts less like molecular scissors and more like molecular glue, they explained in the journal Nature.

“Rather than introduce DNA breaks and rely on the cell to repair the break, INTEGRATE directly inserts a user-defined DNA sequence at a precise location in the genome, a capability that molecular biologists have sought for decades,” said senior author Sam Sternberg, Ph.D., assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics at Columbia, in a statement. Sternberg recently joined Columbia after a stint working in the lab of CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Alternative to CRISPR/Cas9 – CAST (CRISPR-associated transposase) – A New Gene-editing Approach for Insertion of Large DNA Sequences into a Genome developed @BroadInstitute @MIT @Harvard

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

A new gene-editing CAST member

In Science, a team led by Jonathan Strecker, Alim Ladha, and core institute member Feng Zhang reports a new gene-editing approach that can precisely and efficiently insert large DNA sequences into a genome. The system, called CRISPR-associated transposase (CAST), is a completely new platform to integrate genetic sequences into cellular DNA, addressing a long-sought goal for precision gene editing. The team molecularly characterized and harnessed the natural CAST system from cyanobacteria, also unveiling a new way that some CRISPR-associated systems perform in nature: not to protect bacteria from viruses, but to facilitate the spread of transposon DNA. Check out more in coverage from STAT and New Scientist.

SOURCE

https://www.broadinstitute.org/news/research-roundup-june-7-2019

 

RNA-guided DNA insertion with CRISPR-associated transposases

Science  06 Jun 2019:
eaax9181
DOI: 10.1126/science.aax9181

Abstract

CRISPR-Cas nucleases are powerful tools to manipulate nucleic acids; however, targeted insertion of DNA remains a challenge as it requires host cell repair machinery. Here we characterize a CRISPR-associated transposase (CAST) from cyanobacteria Scytonema hofmanni which consists of Tn7-like transposase subunits and the type V-K CRISPR effector (Cas12k). ShCAST catalyzes RNA-guided DNA transposition by unidirectionally inserting segments of DNA 60-66 bp downstream of the protospacer. ShCAST integrates DNA into unique sites in the E. coli genome with frequencies of up to 80% without positive selection. This work expands our understanding of the functional diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems and establishes a paradigm for precision DNA insertion.

 

SOURCE

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2019/06/05/science.aax9181

 

Other related articel published in thies Open Access Online Scientific Journal, include:

Breakthrough in Gene Editing CRISPR–Cas systems: First example of a fully programmable, RNA-guided integrase and lays the foundation for genomic manipulations that obviate the requirements for double-strand breaks and homology-directed repair.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/06/13/breakthrough-in-gene-editing-crispr-cas-systems-first-example-of-a-fully-programmable-rna-guided-integrase-and-lays-the-foundation-for-genomic-manipulations-that-obviate-the-requirements-for/

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