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2019 Petrie-Flom Center Annual Conference: Consuming Genetics: Ethical and Legal Considerations of New Technologies

REAL TIME Press Coverage for http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com 

by Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Director & Founder, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston

Editor-in-Chief, Open Access Online Scientific Journal, http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

Editor-in-Chief, BioMed e-Series, 16 Volumes in Medicine, https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Three: Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics. On Amazon.com since 11/29/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

  • VOLUME 1: Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine. On Amazon.com since 11/23/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018DHBUO6

  • VOLUME 2: Latest in Genomics Methodologies for Therapeutics: Gene Editing, NGS & BioInformatics, Simulations and the Genome Ontology – Work-in-Progress

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-two-genomics-methodologies-ngs-bioinformatics-simulations-and-the-genome-ontology/

Logo, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston

 

2019 Petrie-Flom Center Annual Conference: Consuming Genetics: Ethical and Legal Considerations of New Technologies

AGENDA NOW AVAILABLE! 2019 Petrie-Flom Center Annual Conference image

 May 17, 2019 8:30 AM – 5:15 PM
 Conferences
 2018-2019
Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West (2019)
1585 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Register for this event

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce plans for our 2019 annual conference: “Consuming Genetics: The Ethical and Legal Considerations of Consumer Genetic Technologies.” This year’s conference is organized in collaboration with Nita A. Farahany, Duke Law School, and Henry T. Greely, Stanford Law School.

Description

Breakthroughs in genetics have often raised complex ethical and legal questions, which loom ever larger as genetic testing is becoming more commonplace, affordable, and comprehensive and genetic editing becomes poised to be a consumer technology. As genetic technologies become more accessible to individuals, the ethical and legal questions around the consumer use of these technologies become more pressing.

Already the global genetic testing and consumer/wellness genomics market was valued at $2.24 billion in 2015 and is expected to double by 2025 to nearly $5 billion. The rise of direct-to-consumer genetic testing and DIY kits raise questions about the appropriate setting for these activities, including a concern that delivering health-related results directly to consumers might cause individuals to draw the wrong medical conclusions. At the same time, advances in CRISPR and other related technologies raise anxieties about the implications of editing our own DNA, especially as access to these technologies explode in the coming years.

In an age where serial killers are caught because their relatives chose to submit DNA to a consumer genealogy database, is genetic privacy for individuals possible? Does the aggregation of data from genetic testing turn people into products by commercializing their data? How might this data reduce or exacerbate already significant health care disparities? How can we prepare for widespread access to genetic editing tools?

As these questions become more pressing, now is the time to re-consider what ethical and regulatory safeguards should be implemented and discuss the many questions raised by advancements in consumer genetics.

This event is free and open to the public, but space is limited and registration is required. Register now!

Agenda

8:30 – 9:00am, Registration

A continental breakfast will be available.

9:00 – 9:10am, Welcome Remarks

9:10 – 10:10am, Consumer Genetic Technologies: Rights, Liabilities, and Other Obligations

  • Gary Marchant, Regent’s Professor, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and Director, Center for Law, Science, and Innovation, Arizona State University (with Mark Barnes, Ellen Clayton, and Susan Wolf) – Direct to Consumer Genetics and Liability
  • Anya Prince,Associate Professor of Law, University of Iowa College of Law and Member of the University of Iowa Genetics Cluster – Consuming Genetics as an Insurance Consumer
  • Jessica Robertsa George Butler Research Professor and Director of the Health Law & Policy Institute, University of Houston Law Center – In Favor of a Limited Right of Genetic Conversion: An Argument for Genetic Property Rights

10:10 – 10:20am, Break

10:20 – 11:40am, Privacy in the Age of Consumer Genetics

  • Jorge Contreras, Professor, College Of Law and Adjunct Professor, Human Genetics, University of Utah – Direct to Consumer Genetics and Data Ownership
  • Seema MohapatraAssociate Professor of Law, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law – Abolishing the Facade of “Anonymous” Gamete Donation in the Age of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing
  • Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Chief, Research Ethics Service, Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM), University of Michigan Medical School – Improving Commercial Health Data Sharing Policy: Transparency, Accountability, and Ethics for Academic Use of Private Health Data Resources
  • Liza VertinskyAssociate Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law and Emory Global Health Institute Faculty Fellow (with Yaniv Heled) – Genetic Privacy and Public Figures

11:40am – 12:40pm, Tinkering with Ourselves: The Law and Ethics of DIY Genomics

  • Barbara J. EvansMary Ann & Lawrence E. Faust Professor of Law and Director, Center on Biotechnology & Law, University of Houston Law Center; Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cullen College of Engineering, University of Houston – Programming Our Genomes/Programming Ourselves: The Moral and Regulatory Limits of Self-Harm When Consumers Wield Genomic Technologies
  • Maxwell J. MehlmanDistinguished University Professor, Arthur E. Petersilge Professor of Law, and Director of the Law-Medicine Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Law, and Professor of Biomedical Ethics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (with Ron Conlon) – Governance of Do-It-Yourself Genomics
  • Patricia J. ZettlerAssociate Professor, Center for Law Health and Society, Georgia State University College of Law (with Christi Guerrini and Jacob S. Sherkow) – Finding a Regulatory Balance for Genetic Biohacking

12:40 – 1:20pm, Lunch

Lunch will be provided.

1:20 – 2:40pm, Consumer Genetics and Identity

  • Kif Augustine-AdamsIvan Meitus Chair and Professor of Law, BYU Law School – Generational Failures of Law and Ethics: Rape, Mormon Orthodoxy, and the Revelatory Power of Ancestry DNA
  • Jonathan KahnJames E. Kelley Chair in Tort Law and Professor of Law, Mitchell-Hamline School of Law – Precision Medicine and the Resurgence of Race in Genomic Medicine
  • Emily LargentAssistant Professor, Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy and Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania – Losing Our Minds? Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Alzheimer’s Disease: Consumer Education, Informed Consent, and Open Legal Questions
  • Natalie RamAssistant Professor of Law, University of Baltimore School of Law – Genetic Genealogy and the Problem of Familial Forensic Identification

2:40 – 2:50pm, Break

2:50 – 3:50pm, Regulating Consumer Genetic Technologies

  • James Hazelpostdoctoral fellow, Center for Genetic Privacy and Identity in Community Settings (GetPreCiSe), Vanderbilt University Medical Center – Privacy Best Practices for Consumer Genetic Testing Services: Are Industry Efforts at Self-Regulation Sufficient?
  • Scott SchweikartSenior Research Associate, Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs, American Medical Association and Legal Editor, AMA Journal of Ethics – Human Gene Editing: An Ethical Analysis and Arguments for Regulatory Guidance at Both the National and Global Levels
  • Catherine M. SharkeyCrystal Eastman Professor of Law, NYU School of Law (with Kenneth Offit) – Regulatory Aspects of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing: The Emerging Role of the FDA

3:50 – 4:00pm, Break

4:00 – 5:00pm, The Impact of Genetic Information

  • Benjamin Berkmanfaculty member and head of section on the ethics of genetics and emerging technologies, NIH Department of Bioethics and Deputy Director of the NHGRI Bioethics Core, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health (with Leila Jamal and Will Schupmann) – Reexamining Non-Directiveness in Genetic Counseling
  • Emily Qian, Genetic Counselor, Veritas Genetics (with Magalie Leduc, Rebecca Hodges, Ryan Durigan, Laurie McCright, Doug Flood, and Birgit Funke) – Physician-Mediated Elective Whole Genome Sequencing Tests: Impacts on Informed Consent
  • Vardit RavitskyAssociate Professor, Bioethics Programs, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Montreal; Director, Ethics and Health Branch, Center for Research on Ethics – Non-Invasive Prenatal Whole Genome Sequencing: Ethical and Regulatory Implications for Post-Birth Access to Information

5:00 – 5:15pm, Closing Remarks

Register

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Register now!

Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School with support from the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School and the Oswald DeN. Cammann Fund at Harvard University.

SOURCE

http://petrieflom.law.harvard.edu/events/details/2019-petrie-flom-center-annual-conference

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37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: News at #JPM2019 for Jan. 10, 2019: Deals and Announcements

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

From Biospace.com

 

JP Morgan Healthcare Conference Update: Sage, Mersana, Shutdown Woes and Babies

Speaker presenting to audience at a conference

With the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference winding down, companies remain busy striking deals and informing investors about pipeline advances. BioSpace snagged some of the interesting news bits to come out of the conference from Wednesday.

SAGE Therapeutics – Following a positive Phase III report that its postpartum depression treatment candidate SAGE-217 hit the mark in its late-stage clinical trial, Sage Therapeutics is eying the potential to have multiple treatment options available for patients. At the start of J.P. Morgan, Sage said that patients treated with SAGE-217 had a statistically significant improvement of 17.8 points in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, compared to 13.6 for placebo. The company plans to seek approval for SAGE-2017, but before that, the FDA is expected to make a decision on Zulresso in March. Zulresso already passed muster from advisory committees in November, and if approved, would be the first drug specifically for postpartum depression. In an interview with the Business Journal, Chief Business Officer Mike Cloonan said the company believes there is room in the market for both medications, particularly since the medications address different patient populations.

 

Mersana Therapeutics – After a breakup with Takeda Pharmaceutical and the shelving of its lead product, Cambridge, Mass.-based Mersana is making a new path. Even though a partial clinical hold was lifted following the death of a patient the company opted to shelve development of XMT-1522. During a presentation at JPM, CEO Anna Protopapas noted that many other companies are developing therapies that target the HER2 protein, which led to the decision, according to the Boston Business Journal. Protopapas said the HER2 space is highly competitive and now the company will focus on its other asset, XMT-1536, an ADC targeting NaPi2b, an antigen highly expressed in the majority of non-squamous NSCLC and epithelial ovarian cancer. XMT-1536 is currently in Phase 1 clinical trials for NaPi2b-expressing cancers, including ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and other cancers. Data on XMT-1536 is expected in the first half of 2019.

Novavax – During a JPM presentation, Stan Erck, CEO of Novavax, pointed to the company’s RSV vaccine, which is in late-stage development. The vaccine is being developed for the mother, in order to protect an infant. The mother transfers the antibodies to the infant, which will provide the baby with protection from RSV in its first six months. Erck called the program historic. He said the Phase III program is in its fourth year and the company has vaccinated 4,636 women. He said they are tracking the women and the babies. Researchers call the mothers every week through the first six months of the baby’s life to acquire data. Erck said the company anticipates announcing trial data this quarter. If approved, Erck said the market for the vaccine could be a significant revenue driver.

“You have 3.9 million birth cohorts and we expect 80 percent to 90 percent of those mothers to be vaccinated as a pediatric vaccine and in the U.S. the market rate is somewhere between $750 million and a $1 billion and then double that for worldwide market. So it’s a large market and we will be first to market in this,” Erck said, according to a transcript of the presentation.

Denali Therapeutics – Denali forged a collaboration with Germany-based SIRION Biotech to develop gene therapies for central nervous disorders. The two companies plan to develop adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to enable therapeutics to cross the blood-brain barrier for clinical applications in neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS and certain other diseases of the CNS.

AstraZeneca – Pharma giant AstraZeneca reported that in 2019 net prices on average across the portfolio will decrease versus 2018. With a backdrop of intense public and government scrutiny over pricing, Market Access head Rick Suarez said the company is increasing its pricing transparency. Additionally, he said the company is looking at new ways to price drugs, such as value-based reimbursement agreements with payers, Pink Sheet reported.

Amarin Corporation – As the company eyes a potential label expansion approval for its cardiovascular disease treatment Vascepa, Amarin Corporation has been proactively hiring hundreds of sales reps. In the fourth quarter, the company hired 265 new sales reps, giving the company a sales team of more than 400, CEO John Thero said. Thero noted that is a label expansion is granted by the FDA, “revenues will increase at least 50 percent over what we did in the prior year, which would give us revenues of approximate $350 million in 2019.”

Government Woes – As the partial government shutdown in the United States continues into its third week, biotech leaders at JPM raised concern as the FDA’s carryover funds are dwindling. With no new funding coming in, reviews of New Drug Applications won’t be able to continue past February, Pink Sheet said. While reviews are currently ongoing, no New Drug Applications are being accepted by the FDA at this time. With the halt of NDA applications, that has also caused some companies to delay plans for an initial public offering. It’s hard to raise potential investor excitement without the regulatory support of a potential drug approval. During a panel discussion, Jonathan Leff, a partner at Deerfield Management, noted that the ongoing government shutdown is a reminder of how “overwhelmingly dependent the whole industry of biotech and drug development is on government,” Pink Sheet said.

Other posts on the JP Morgan 2019 Healthcare Conference on this Open Access Journal include:

#JPM19 Conference: Lilly Announces Agreement To Acquire Loxo Oncology

36th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE January 8 – 11, 2018

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019; Opening Videos, Novartis expands Cell Therapies, January 7 – 10, 2019, Westin St. Francis Hotel | San Francisco, California

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: News at #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019: Deals and Announcements

 

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37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: News at #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019: Deals and Announcements

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

From Biospace.com

JP Morgan Healthcare Conference Update: FDA, bluebird, Moderna and the Price of Coffee

Researcher holding test tube up behind circle of animated research icons

Tuesday, January 8, was another busy day in San Francisco for the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference. One interesting sideline was the idea that the current government shutdown could complicate some deals. Kent Thiry, chief executive officer of dialysis provider DaVita, who is working on the sale of its medical group to UnitedHealth Group this quarter, said, “We couldn’t guarantee that even if the government wasn’t shut down, but we and the buyer are both working toward that goal with the same intensity if not more.”

And in a slightly amusing bit of synchrony, U.S.Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Commissioner Scott Gottlieb’s keynote address that was delivered by way of video conference from Washington, D.C., had his audio cut out in the middle of the presentation. Gottlieb was talking about teen nicotine use and continued talking, unaware that his audio had shut off for 30 seconds. When it reconnected, the sound quality was reportedly poor.

Click to search for life sciences jobs

bluebird bio’s chief executive officer, Nick Leschlygave an update of his company’s pipeline, with a particular emphasis on a proposed payment model for its upcoming LentiGlobin, a gene therapy being evaluated for transfusion-dependent ß-thalassemia (TDT). The gene therapy is expected to be approved in Europe this year and in the U.S. in 2020. Although the price hasn’t been set, figures up to $2.1 million per treatment have been floated. Bluebird is proposing a five-year payment program, a pledge to not raise prices above CPI, and no costs after the payment period.

Eli Lilly’s chief executive officer David Ricks, just days after acquiring Loxo Oncologyoffered up projections for this year, noting that 45 percent of its revenue will be created by drugs launched in 2015. Those include Trulicity, Taltz and Verzenio. The company also expects to launch two new molecular entities this year—nasal glucagons, a rescue medicine for high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), and Lasmiditan, a rescue drug for migraine headaches.

CNBC’s Jim Cramer interviewed Allergan chief executive officer Brent Saunders, in particular discussing the fact the company’s shares traded in 2015 for $331.15 but were now trading for $145.60. Cramer noted that the company’s internal fundamentals were strong, with multiple pipeline assets and a strong leadership team. Some of the stock problems are related to what Saunders said were “unforced errors,” including intellectual property rights to Restasis, its dry-eye drug, and Allergan’s dubious scheme to protect those patents by transferring the rights to the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe in New York. On the positive side, the company’s medical aesthetics portfolio, dominated by Botox, is very strong and the overall market is expected to double.

One of the big areas of conversation is so-called “flyover tech.” Biopharma startups are dominant in Boston and in San Francisco, but suddenly venture capital investors have realized there’s a lot going on in between. New York City-based Radian Capital, for example, invests exclusively in markets outside major U.S. cities.

“At Radian, we partner with entrepreneurs who have built their businesses with a focus on strong economics rather than growth at all costs,” Aly Lovett, partner at Radian, told The Observer. “Historically, given the amount of money required to stand up a product, the software knowledge base, and coastal access to capital, health start-ups were concentrated in a handful of cities. As those dynamics have inverted and as the quality of living becomes a more important factor in attracting talent, we’re not seeing a significant increase in the number of amazing companies being built outside of the Bay Area.”

“Flyover companies” mentioned include Bind in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Solera Health in Phoenix, Arizona; ClearDATA in Austin, Texas; Healthe, in Eden Prairie, Minnesota; HistoSonics in Ann Arbor, Michigan; and many others.

Only a month after its record-breaking IPO, Moderna Therapeutics’ chief executive officer Stephane Bancelspent time both updating the company’s clinical pipeline and justifying the company’s value despite the stock dropping off 26 percent since the IPO. Although one clinical program, a Zika vaccine, mRNA-1325, has been abandoned, the company has three new drugs coming into the clinic: mRNA-2752 for solid tumors or lymphoma; mRNA-4157, a Personalized Cancer Vaccine with Merck; and mRNA-5671, a KRAS cancer vaccine. The company also submitted an IND amendment to the FDA to add an ovarian cancer cohort to its mRNA-2416 program.

One interesting bit of trivia, supplied on Twitter by Rasu Shrestha, chief innovation officer for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, this year at the conference, 33 female chief executive officers were presenting corporate updates … compared to 19 men named Michael. Well, it’s a start.

And for another bit of trivia, Elisabeth Bik, of Microbiome Digest, tweeted, “San Francisco prices are so out of control that one hotel is charging the equivalent of $21.25 for a cup of coffee during a JPMorgan conference.”

Other posts on the JP Morgan 2019 Healthcare Conference on this Open Access Journal include:

#JPM19 Conference: Lilly Announces Agreement To Acquire Loxo Oncology

36th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE January 8 – 11, 2018

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019; Opening Videos, Novartis expands Cell Therapies, January 7 – 10, 2019, Westin St. Francis Hotel | San Francisco, California

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37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019; Opening Videos, Novartis expands Cell Therapies, January 7 – 10, 2019, Westin St. Francis Hotel | San Francisco, California

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

The annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference is the largest and most informative healthcare investment symposium in the industry, bringing together industry leaders, emerging fast-growth companies, innovative technology creators, and members of the investment community.

 

Joe Biden

Joe Biden on the Fight Against Cancer

Former Vice President of the United States joined the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference to discuss cancer initiatives.

Watch Video

Bill Gates

Bill Gates on the Current State of Global Health

In his keynote address at the annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference, Bill Gates spoke about the state of healthcare around the world.

Watch Video

CEO Anne

Anne Wojcicki on Disrupting the Healthcare Industry

The CEO of 23andMe discusses at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference how her genomics company is activating the power of the consumer.

Watch Video

  1. Another packed house as panel including Saurabh Saha, & Alexis Borisy discuss the rewiring of R&D for the digital age at Exec Bfast

Novartis Talks Move to Cell and Gene Therapies at JPM

Novartis logo on outdoor wall

Denis Linine / Shutterstock

Following a strong post-hoc analysis of mid-stage data in the fall of 2018, Novartis announced this morning the company’s experimental humanized anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was crizanlizumab granted Breakthrough Therapy Status by the U.S.Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Crizanlizumab received the designation as a treatment for the prevention of vaso-occlusive crises (VOCs) in patients of all genotypes with sickle cell disease (SCD). VOCs, which can be extremely painful for patients, happen when multiple blood cells stick to each other and to blood vessels, causing blockages.

The designation was awarded following results from the Phase II SUSTAIN trial, which showed that crizanlizumab reduced the median annual rate of VOCs leading to health care visits by 45.3 percent compared to placebo. The SUSTAIN study also showed that crizanlizumab significantly increased the percentage of patients who did not experience any VOCs vs placebo, 35.8 percent vs. 16.9 percent.

The FDA designation came one day after the Swiss pharma giant laid out its map for a future of success, sustainability and, if things work out, respect from consumers. In an interview with CNBC Monday, Novartis Chief Executive Officer Vas Narasimhan noted that the company is looking to become an entity that doesn’t draw its profits from treating disease, but will make money by providing cures. He pointed to the moves Novartis has made toward gene and cellular therapies that have the potential to cure patients of various diseases in what many researchers hope could be a “one-and-done” treatment. Narasimhan told CNBC that cures are what society wants and that is something they will value. The challenge will be determining the payment system.

As an example, the company is eying potential approval of a gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a fatal genetic disease marked by progressive, debilitating muscle weakness in infants and toddlers. Novartis’ gene therapy Zolgensma is expected to be approved by the FDA this year and could have a price tag of between $4 and $5 million. While significantly high, non-profit SMA groups have already suggested that the gene therapy treatment could be more cost-effective than Spinraza, the only approved SMA treatment on the market.

During its presentation at J.P. Morgan, Novartis pointed to the moves it has made as the company pivots to this future of gene and cell therapies. The presentation noted that over the course of 2018, the company made several deals to sell off non-essential businesses, such as the $13 billion sale of its share of a consumer health business to partner GlaxoSmithKline. Not only that, but Novartis also made significant acquisitions to reshape its portfolio, including the $8.7 billion acquisition of AveXis for the SMA gene therapy. The deal for AveXis wasn’t the only gene therapy deal the company struck. Novartis began 2018 with a deal for Spark Therapeutics’ gene therapy Luxturna, a one-time gene therapy to restore functional vision in children and adult patients with biallelic mutations of the RPE65 (retinal pigment epithelial 65 kDa protein) gene.

In his interview with CNBC, Narasimhan said the company is about “platforms,” which also includes radio-ligand therapy. The company forged ahead in that area with two acquisitions, Advanced Accelerator Applications and Endocyte. Radiopharmaceuticals like Endocyte’s Lu-PSMA-617 are innovative medicinal formulations containing radioisotopes used clinically for both diagnosis and therapy. When the Endocyte deal was announced, Novartis noted the field is expected to become an increasingly important treatment option for patients, as well as a key growth driver for the company’s oncology business.

Other posts on the JP Morgan 2019 Healthcare Conference on this Open Access Journal include:

#JPM19 Conference: Lilly Announces Agreement To Acquire Loxo Oncology

36th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE January 8 – 11, 2018

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Koch Institute 2019 Immune Engineering Symposium

 


January 28-29, 2019, 8AM – 4PM
Kresge Auditorium, MIT

 

Biological, chemical, and materials engineers are engaged at the forefront of immunology research. At their disposal is an analytical toolkit honed to solve problems in the petrochemical and materials industries, which share the presence of complex reaction networks, and convective and diffusive molecular transport. Powerful synthetic capabilities have also been crafted: binding proteins can be engineered with effectively arbitrary specificity and affinity, and multifunctional nanoparticles and gels have been designed to interact in highly specific fashions with cells and tissues. Fearless pursuit of knowledge and solutions across disciplinary boundaries characterizes this nascent discipline of immune engineering, synergizing with immunologists and clinicians to put immunotherapy into practice.

The 2019 symposium will include two poster sessions and four abstract-selected talks. Abstract submission deadline is December 22, 2018. Registration closes December 23rd.

Featuring:

Facundo Batista (Ragon Institute)
Michael Birnbaum (MIT, Koch Institute)
Bryan Bryson (MIT, Department of Biological Engineering)
Yvonne Chen (University of California, Los Angeles)
Stephanie Dougan (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute)
Glenn Dranoff (Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research)
Michael Dustin (University of Oxford)
Phil Greenberg (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center)
Darrell Irvine (MIT, Koch Institute; HHMI)
Tyler Jacks (MIT, Koch Institute; HHMI)
Max Krummel (University of California, San Francisco)
Diane Mathis (Harvard Medical School)
Mikael Pittet (Massachusetts General Hospital)
Aviv Regev (Broad Institute; Koch Institute)
Bob Schreiber (Wash University of St. Louis)
Alex Shalek (MIT, Department of Chemistry, Koch Institute)
Jamie Spangler (John Hopkins University)
Stefani Spranger (MIT, Koch Institute)
Tim Springer (Boston Children’s Hospital)
Melody Swartz (University of Chicago)
Cathy Wu (Massachusetts General Hospital)

Biological, chemical, and materials engineers are engaged at the forefront of immunology research. At their disposal is an analytical toolkit honed to solve problems in the petrochemical and materials industries, which share the presence of complex reaction networks, and convective and diffusive molecular transport. Powerful synthetic capabilities have also been crafted: binding proteins can be engineered with effectively arbitrary specificity and affinity, and multi functional nanoparticles and gels have been designed to interact in highly specific fashions with cells and tissues. Fearless pursuit of knowledge and solutions across disciplinary boundaries characterizes this nascent discipline of immune engineering, synergizing with immunologists and clinicians to put immunotherapy into practice.

 

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Tweeter and Real Time Conference Press Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
  1. LIVE eProceeding Day Two – The 14th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference: The Business of Personalization, November 15, 2018, HMS, Boston via

  2. Cary Pfeffer, M.D., Partner, Third Rock Ventures IP can’t be reduced by other country unfair trade

  3. Pellini – CMS will take the lead partnerships early and often in clinical trials,

  4. Michael Pellini, M.D., Managing Partner, Section 32; Board Member, Personalized Medicine Coalition Patients and Consumers will force in five years figuring out – every diagnosis of cancer will be sequenced to interpret results and paid for

  5. Salveen Richter, Goldman Sachs Sequencing cost plunged, public investors placing funding in start ups even without return in the horizon, companies with multiple modalities spurring innovation – Europe vs US, China has no FDA ,talent from US China

  6. Michael Pellini, M.D., Managing Partner, Section 32; Board Member, Personalized Medicine Coalition Diagnostics component inside 4.8 Trillion in the therapeutics selection in the system as a whole Foundation Medicine saw Roche for International reach

  7. William A. Sahlman, Ph.D., Baker Foundation Professor, Harvard Business School Biotech IPO, VC, windows slam shut, drug failure – drivers and non Increasing return to scale: AI, NGS, screening, – foreign money, Tsinghua went back to China from CA

  8. William A. Sahlman, Ph.D., Baker Foundation Professor, Harvard Business School market – can it sustain the opportunity – winners and losers innovative financial models Biotech IPO, VC, windows slam shut, drug failure – drivers and non

  9. Salveen Richter, C.F.A., Vice President, Research Division, Goldman Sachs Europe successful in financing Health care in the US system must change – investment will flee, to fund pricing drug is key in changing the system CART Pricing is key

  10. Michael Pellini, M.D., Managing Partner, Section 32; Board Member, Personalized Medicine Coalition Impasse or Inflection Point? it s Inflection Point NOT an Impasse Diagnostics component inside 4.8 Trillion in the therapeutics selection in system

  11. Cary Pfeffer, M.D., Partner, Third Rock Ventures MS drug efficacy was in 50% non respondents 25% Genomic sequencing to identify patient populations – target therapy Mayocardia – drug in CVD for patients identified by Genomics Genomics develop drugs

  12. Michael Pellini, M.D., Managing Partner, Section 32; Board Member, Personalized Medicine Coalition Impasse or Inflection Point? it s Inflection Point NOT an Impasse

  13. Kristine Bordenave, M.D., F.A.C.P., Corporate Medical Director, Humana CMS Guideline: every test ordered must guide treatment otherwise not covered

  14. Kristine Bordenave, M.D., F.A.C.P., Corporate Medical Director, Humana Guidelines on ordering genomic testing, AI can assist providers, MDs need to catch up on a weekly basis companion diagnostics and pharmaceutical paid together SOCare is paid

  15. Kristine Bordenave, M.D., F.A.C.P., Corporate Medical Director, Humana show us any value as good value – avoiding patient going to MDs Office, Hospital, ER – cost increase due to Pharmacogenomics testing $5K per test

  16. Scott Ramsey, M.D., Ph.D., Full Member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research Pricing of Testing NGS and Targeted therapy represent a threat to adoption of Genomics in Medicine

  17. Kristine Bordenave, M.D., F.A.C.P., Corporate Medical Director, Humana What test needed to be ordered? Patient stay healthy NGS $650 – $2000 in 2018, in 2016 it was $25,000 cost of testing, cost of drugs

  18. Kristine Bordenave, M.D., F.A.C.P., Corporate Medical Director, Humana cost of doing the test vs not doing this test – assess value CMS – provide data on what is covered and what is not Humana: any missed opportunities, MD order tests of no impact MR

  19. Dr. Ramsey – Survival in this cohort NGS vs EGFR – improved survival 6 month longer, Increased survivals, why? cost of sequencing – #14 most influential – cost does not drive value #1 drug cost, out of pocket expense was the factor #2 survival

  20. Scott Ramsey, M.D., Ph.D., Full Member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research Value and utility are interconnected cost effectiveness of NGS in melanoma: single gene testing, EGFR vs NGS

  21. Kristine Bordenave, M.D., F.A.C.P., Corporate Medical Director, Humanalabs, payers, providers, pharma — the GAP to be bridged opportunities to prevent and treat disease Payers, MDs, cost and impact, markers, Humana has a research division Use Tests

  22. MODERATOR | Daryl Pritchard, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Science Policy, Personalized Medicine Coalition genetic profiling, adopt policy for mass deployment of NGS demonstrate value, payers needs little more that evidence exist for payer to cover

  23. Luba Greenwood, J.D., Strategic Business Development and Corporate Ventures, Verily (an Alphabet company) Patient need to own the genome data not a Databank

  24. Birgit Funke, Ph.D., F.A.C.M.G., Vice President, Clinical Affairs, Veritas Genetics; Associate Professor of Pathology (Part-Time), Harvard Medical School Risk prevention, driving DOWN operating cost curation of the Genome

  25. Luba Greenwood, J.D., Strategic Business Development and Corporate Ventures, Verily (an Alphabet company) Diagnostics in use to keep patients OUT of hospitals – management of chronic diseases

  26. Luba Greenwood, J.D., Strategic Business Development and Corporate Ventures, Verily (an Alphabet company) treatment solution therapeutics except og Oncology threatment is a strugle in the genomics field and pharmacogenomics General Medicine: CVD DM

  27. Keith Stewart, M.B., CH.B., Carlson and Nelson Endowed Director, Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic genomics for detection of predisposition, inherited Barriers to deploy genomics: Knowledge, readiness of providers, cost of uninsured,

  28. Ellen Sigal Recipient of 14th PMC Award

  29. Sigal: Patient deserve right answers right choices, calls doctors on behave of patients treatments done out of the community in Academic hospitals – patients are scared to death. Patients are asking for options: Right testing, access to testing

  30. The 14th Annual Leadership in Personalized Medicine Award to Ellen V. Sigal, Ph.D., Chairperson, Founder, Friends of Cancer Research Patient Challenges: 90% are treated Community and they need a second opinion, insurance, access, clinical trials

  31.  Retweeted

    Frederick Banting, awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of insulin, was born on this day in 1891. The discovery of insulin is one of the biggest breakthroughs in medicine and has saved millions of lives.

  32. Amy Abernethy, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Medical Officer, Chief Scientific Officer, Senior Vice President, Oncology, Flatiron Health Technologies: AI, Countries with platforms Regulatory framework, reproducibility of results Taking care of people,

  33.   Retweeted

    I am covering this Conference at Harvard Medical School in Real Time, 11/14-11/15/2018 ⁦

  34. Edward Tepporn, Executive Vice President, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum 1985 minorities education all surveys conducted in English, Asian American access to affordable health care services to accommodate services for communities

  35. Adolph P. Falcón, Executive Vice President, National Alliance for Hispanic Health community based organization 50 million improving healthcare access improve inclusion in science, no advancement in 45 years Hard to reach through – academic language

  36. Alex J. Carlisle, Ph.D., Chairman, CEO, National Alliance Against Disparities in Patient Health PM with focus on disparities, racialbiologic, socioecological Patient centered – raise health education Translation for interpretation Physicians&Patients

  37. Vence L. Bonham, Jr., J.D., Senior Advisor, Director on Genomics and Health Disparities, U.S. NHGRI Genomics data is of European dissents no diversity minority populations not represente sland populations not represented hispanics not

  38. Kimberly Popovits, proprietary test vs. test offered by all labs — different markets Utility agreed upon like “” demonstrate a pathway of product development that was already followed

  39. Kimberly Popovits, Chairman of the Board, CEO, President, Genomic Health – Oncology, Breast cancer molecular diagnostics Genomic testing saved the Health care System billions of dollars Genomic testing will not be placebo, 12 years study controlled

  40. Julie Khani, President, American Clinical Laboratory Association FDA will establish a center for Diagnostics, proposal for pre-certification like in Medical devices congress is involved in the decision making

  41. Michael Doherty, Senior Vice President, Head of Product Development, Head of Research & Development, Foundation Medicine – ex Genetech/Roche Operate in regulated environment, how to establish a company for long term companion diagnostics

  42. Joseph V. Ferrara, CEO, Boston Healthcare Associates Regulatory action for reimbursement of test new categories of tests: new payment if Innovation, PLA codes, 45 months approval, CPT codes

  43. Best Talk like last year by David King , keynote at

  44. David King, J.D., Chairman, CEO, LabCorp Non respondent – further researched MDs understanding, confidence of results PM Promise: close education GAP, convene on VALUE for individual cases not populations assess value among initiatives PM

  45. Tom Miller, Managing Partner, GreyBird Ventures LLC algorithms are behind the firewall of the Hospital, for privacy. the patient’s identity is not of central point, privacy is the key

  46. Radiology: SW used in detection of disease Personalized Medicine and AI Data mining of Text using AI Vital signs monitoring – providers can spot Arrhythmias earlier tagging images is a matual process

  47. Darrell M. West, Ph.D., Vice President of Governance Studies and Director of Center for Technology Innovation, Douglas Dillon Chair in Governance Studies, Interest in AI and in particular: Health care large part of the economy

  48. Gregg Talbert, Ph.D., Global Head of Digital and Personalized Health Care Partnering, Roche – Data on mutations Data falls short on Patient follow up (longitudinal data on Patients) curation of EMR IS NOT AN EASY OR AUTOMATED PROCESS i.e., IMAGES

  49. Tom Miller, Managing Partner, GreyBird Ventures LLC AI applied to capture unusual movement allowing to detect a forthcoming neurological event. Technologies used now

  50. Colin Hill, Chairman, CEO, Co-Founder, GNS Healthcare is moderator for and Medicine, panelists from , and The ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦

  51. Bryce Olson, Global Marketing Director, Health and Life Sciences Group, Intel Corporation; stage IV prostate cancer patient Patient engage in their care, involvement in interpretation og ONES OWN Genome sequence is ate most engaging

  52. Emily Kramer-Golinkoff, Co-Founder, Emily’s Entourage, cystic fibrosis patient “Better for a is the Patient him/herself”

  53. Great Panel moderation by Toni Andreu scientific director of

  54.   Retweeted

    can help cancer patients live longer, healthier lives. Learn more about how we’re working to advance the field ‘s 11/15 when Ellen Sigal receives the 14th Annual Leadership in Personalized Medicine Award:

  55. Enjoyed most learning about the leading evolution in Genomics in Israel, UK, Canada and Finland

  56.   Retweeted

    In 14th Annual Elizabeth Nabel- made an excellent overview exploring the Promise of Personalized Medicine: Healthcare state-of-the-art; Digital health; Professionals-Payers-Providers relationships and next future challenges

  57. Amazing International Panel: UE, Israel, UK, Canada, Finland

  58. Great talk of a visionary in Management of Academic

  59. Great Confernec, 14th in one row

  60. Antonio L. Andreu, M.D., Ph.D., Scientific Director, EATRIS European Infrastructure for Translational Medicine General Medicine: Metabolomics, biological systems vs GENOMICS Medical care w/genomic testing, MDs will call to tell patients future news

    Translate Tweet

  61. Ora Dar, Ph.D., Senior Expert, Medical Sciences, consultant to the Israel Innovation Authority $300Miliion R&D sponsored clinical data on genomics, MDs are trained to place genomics data on EMR, epidemiology, sequencing of genetic diseases

  62. Liisa-Maria Voipio-Pulkki, M.D., Ph.D., Director General, Chief Medical Officer, Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, Finland Public sector is the majority of Health care systems, Expertise is as high as can be, entrepreneurship is on the rise

  63. Marc LePage, President, CEO, Genome Canada Social impact, adoption systems for focusing on rare diseases, following UK and US trends, 10 sites in Canada, aggregate the datethe National level, extract clinical data securely implementation expertise

  64. Tom Fowler, Ph.D., Deputy Chief Scientist, Building infrastructure, education, future, National approach to genomic testing, built in a National lab, scaling research

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LIVE eProceedings Day Two – The 14th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference: The Business of Personalization, November 15, 2018, HMS, Boston

Real Time Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

PART II

 

The Business of Personalization

The successful implementation of [personalized medicine] will depend on the embrace of [its] principles in the business community.

 RAJU KUCHERLAPATI, PH.D.
Paul C. Cabot Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School

*** Speakers will be added to the schedule on a rolling basis as they are confirmed. ***

7:00 a.m.
Registration and Continental Breakfast

Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School
77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115

8:00 a.m.
Opening Remarks

SPEAKER | Stephen L. Eck, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Medical Officer, Immatics U.S. Inc; Board Chair, Personalized Medicine Coalition

8:10 a.m.
Pioneering Precision: Inside the Pharmaceutical Industry’s Push Toward Personalized Medicine — A Fireside Chat

MODERATOR | Meg Tirrell, Reporter, CNBC

Daniel O’Day, CEO, Roche Pharmaceuticals

8:55 a.m.
Considering Costs: Evaluating Emerging Pharmaceutical and Insurance Industry Business Models in Personalized Medicine

The pharmaceutical industry is deeply invested in commercializing personalized therapies that must recoup fixed development costs from smaller patient populations covered by health insurance companies that are increasingly concerned about rising health care costs. In that context, this diverse panel will explore the viability of the business model for developing and paying for personalized medicines, tackling issues related to costs, prices, and access.

MODERATOR | Meg Tirrell, Reporter, CNBC

Peter Juhn, M.D., M.P.H., Global Head of Value-Based Partnerships, Amgen

Nick Leschly, CEO, Bluebird Bio

Michael Sherman, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, Senior Vice President, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care

Sean Tunis, M.D., Founder, CEO, Center for Medical Technology Policy

9:55 a.m.
Networking Break

Light refreshments provided.

Sponsored By

10:25 a.m.
Reinventing Research: Are Adaptive Platform Trials the Model of the Future? (A Harvard Business School Case Study)

Recognizing that traditional randomized controlled clinical trials can only study the safety and efficacy of a single therapy in one large population of patients, researchers in personalized medicine increasingly hope that “adaptive platform trials,” which employ advanced statistical techniques to simultaneously test the effectiveness of several personalized treatments in multiple sub-populations of patients, may be the key to new drug approvals in the future. Adaptive platform trials may make drug development more efficient by revealing which of several drug candidates are most promising for which patients, but maximizing the potential of these trials requires unprecedented collaboration among the institutions conducting and sponsoring research on various personalized treatments — and no obvious business models have emerged.

During this interactive case study discussion, professors from Harvard Business School will help us examine how researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute considered and addressed myriad challenges in their effort to design and operationalize an adaptive platform trial for glioblastoma patients, a deadly disease state for which there are few existing treatment options.

PRESENTED BY

Richard Hamermesh, D.B.A., Co-Faculty Chair, Harvard Business School Kraft Precision Medicine Accelerator; and

Ariel D. Stern, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Technology and Operations Management Unit, Harvard Business School

11:40 a.m.
The 14th Annual Leadership in Personalized Medicine Award

INTRODUCTION | Steven D. Averbuch, M.D., Vice President, Head of Precision Medicine, Bristol-Myers Squibb

  • Ellen V. Sigal head of Friends of Cancer Research
  • Advanced science by Diagnostics Tests
  • Cancer Moonshot Program
  • Revolution therapies brought to market by Sigel’s sponsorship

AWARDEE | Ellen V. Sigal, Ph.D., Chairperson, Founder, Friends of Cancer Research

Friendly conversation:

  • Thanks to PMC
  • sister die on breast cancer at 40 with child of 4 1/2.
  • appointed to celebrate 20th year of American Cancer Association – Funding for Research, money spend in Washington is for Patients.
  • After ten years, interested in measurement of achieving evaluation, FDA structure was of interest.
  • Precision Medicine: biomarkers and targets for patients to define success for each patient, WHat is the right population for any drug, responders to drug therapy, if no response, change the drug.
  • Patient perspective: Challenges: 90% are treated in the Community and they need a second opinion, insurance, access, clinical trials done out of the community in Academic hospitals – patients are scared to death. Patients are asking for options: Right testing, access to testing involve insurance
  • combination therapy  – 6-8 months in advance,
12:10 p.m.
Bag Lunch
1:10 p.m.
Predicting and Preventing: Evaluating Progress Toward Personalized Medicine

The original architects of the personalized medicine paradigm envisioned an era in which clinicians could predict, prevent and treat disease based on an improved understanding of how human biology interacts with external environments. During this session, a panel of experts will examine our progress on each of these fronts during a wide-ranging conversation about personalized medicine’s past, present and future.

MODERATOR | Cynthia Casson Morton, Ph.D., William Lambert Richardson Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Harvard Medical School

  • 1 Million volunteer participants for genome sequencing and microbiome data
  • PM Past, Present and Future
  • Issues that are rapidly evolving: Physician, Patients

Birgit Funke, Ph.D., F.A.C.M.G., Vice President, Clinical Affairs, Veritas Genetics; Associate Professor of Pathology (Part-Time), Harvard Medical School

  • Risk prevention,
  • driving DOWN operating cost curation of the Genome

Luba Greenwood, J.D., Strategic Business Development and Corporate Ventures, Verily (an Alphabet company)

  • view on diagnostics from Roche, CHemist and lawyer, Venture capital, beyond Genomics, from diagnosis to prognosis,at Verily projects tapping into the entire life span aspect of health
  • treatment solution therapeutics except og Oncology threatment is a strugle in the genomics field and pharmaco-genomics
  • Power the patients vs Genomics in Diabetes
  • Diagnostics in use to keep patients OUT of hospitals – management of chronic diseases
  • Patient need to own the genome data not a Databank

Keith Stewart, M.B., CH.B., Carlson and Nelson Endowed Director, Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic

  • Hematologist, genomics apply genomics for detection of predisposition, inherited , Health genome sequencing,
  • Barriers to deploy genomics: Knowledge, readiness of providers, cost of uninsured,
  • Diagnostics high value low cost
  • drug adherence, pharmacists to be involved in drug adherence before refill
2:10 p.m.
Assessing the Assays: Determining the Clinical and Economic Utility of Genomic Sequencing

Advocates for personalized medicine have contended that genomic sequencing can deliver clinical and economic value to patients and the health system by allowing providers to more efficiently diagnose disease and develop treatment plans. Following increased use of genomic sequencing in clinical settings, many stakeholders, including payers, have begun to examine that value proposition more closely. During this session, a pharmaceutical industry representative, a payer, and a health economist will discuss the status and future of the emerging evidence regarding the clinical and economic utility of genomic sequencing, including studies recently commissioned by the Personalized Medicine Coalition.

MODERATOR Daryl Pritchard, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Science Policy, Personalized Medicine Coalition

  • genetic profiling, adopt policy and procedures for mass deployment of NGS
  • show that it works – demonstrate value, payers and providers
  • a little more that evidence exist for payer to cover
  • rare diagnosed disease

Kristine Bordenave, M.D., F.A.C.P., Corporate Medical Director, Humana

  • labs, payers, providers, pharma — the GAP to be bridged
  • opportunities to prevent and treat disease
  • Payer, MDs, cost and impact, markers,
  • Humana has a research division Use Testing to find value, pharmacogenomics  – on Medicare, Medicaid patients
  • cost of doing the test vs not doing this test – assess value
  • pharmacisit, economist, statisticians – CMS – provide data on what is covered and what is not Humana: any missed opportunities, MD order tests of no impact per medical record
  • What test needed to be ordered? Patient stay healthy
  • NGS $650 – $2000 in 2018, in 2016 it was $25,000 cost of testing, cost of drugs
  • show us any value as good value – avoiding patient going to MDs Office, Hospital, ER – cost increase due to Pharmacogenomics testing $5K per test
  • Guidelines on ordering genomic testing, AI can assist providers, MDs need to catch up on a weekly basis
  • CMS Guideline: every test ordered must guide treatment otherwise not covered

Scott Ramsey, M.D., Ph.D., Full Member, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research

  • Value and utility are interconnected
  • cost effectiveness of NGS in melanoma: single gene testing – EGFR vs NGS – help clinicians to evaluate Lung Cancer
  • Flariton Database, 300 centers  – 140,000 – Patients got NGS – 7% ADDITIONAL patients founded mutations beyond EGFR
  • Survival in this cohort NGS vs EGFR – improved survival 6 month longer, mean survival 3 weeks long, not significant.
  • Increased survivals, why? cost of sequencing  – #14 most influential – cost does not drive value
  • #1 drug cost was the factor
  • #2 survival
  • marginal cost in platform comparison
  • Pricing of Testing NGS and Targeted therapy represent a threat to adoption of Genomics in Medicine
  • disparities and access – cost and patients: Partners and Mayo clinic patients are lucky

 

3:10 p.m.
PhRMA Foundation Challenge Awards: Developing Value Assessment Strategies That Align With Personalized Medicine

INTRODUCTION | Daryl Pritchard, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, Science Policy, Personalized Medicine Coalition

PRESENTER | Shreeram Aradhye, M.D., Head of Global Medical Affairs, Chief Medical Officer, Pharmaceuticals, Novartis; Board Member, PhRMA Foundation

#1 Prize $50,000 – Dr. Garrison, UK

#2 Prize $25,000 – Dr. Robim Hayeems, Hospital for Sick Children Institute, Toronto, Canada

#3 Prize @ $10,000  – Dr. A Le, PharmD., PhD, Western University of Health Sciences

3:20 p.m.
Networking Break

Light refreshments provided.

3:50 p.m.
Impasse or Inflection Point? — An Investment Analysis

Sustaining the pace of innovation in personalized medicine will require continued investment in new initiatives, but the financial outlook for the field remains unclear. In that context, this panel of investors will examine whether personalized medicine is at an impasse, an inflection point or somewhere in between.

MODERATOR | William A. Sahlman, Ph.D., Baker Foundation Professor, Harvard Business School

  • market – can it sustain the opportunity – winners and losers
  • innovative financial models
  • Biotech IPO, VC, windows slam shut, drug failure – drivers and non
  • Increasing return to scale: AI, NGS, screening, – foreign money, China
  • Tsinghua University went back to China from Silicon Valley

Cary Pfeffer, M.D., Partner, Third Rock Ventures

  • was a decade at Biogen, MS indication drug, no biomarkers for patients – efficacy was in 50% non respondents 25%
  • Genomic sequencing to identify patient populations – no good effective medicine without target therapy
  • Mayocardia – drug in CVD for patients identified by Genomics
  • Genomics information needed to develop drugs

Michael Pellini, M.D., Managing Partner, Section 32; Board Member, Personalized Medicine Coalition

  • Impasse or Inflection Point? it s Inflection Point NOT an Impasse
  • Diagnostics component inside 4.8 Trillion in the therapeutics selection in the system as a whole
  • Foundation Medicine saw Roche as Big brother with International reach
  • Patients and Consumers will force in five years figuring out – every diagnosis of cancer will be sequenced and the infrastructure to interpret results and paid for

Salveen Richter, C.F.A., Vice President, Research Division, Goldman Sachs

  • innovative and disruptive, orphan drugs, Health IT, US Market 3 trillion – size of the opportunity 80% genetically driven
  • Cancer, CART therapy, easier to pay by performance, cost of the drug itself. profit in the 1st generation od Pharma manufacturers
  • One time pricing vs further indications, annuity type system, Hemophilia – $19Million market,
  • Europe successful in financing Health care — in the US — system must change – investment will flee, to fund pricing drug is key in changing the system CART Pricing is still difficult to pay for
  • Sequencing cost plunged, public investors placing funding in start ups even without return in the horizon, companies with multiple modalities spurring innovation – confusing in the investment side, technologies become obsolete very fast
  • Europe vs US, China is different no regulation like FDA,talent from US Pharma went back to China

 

4:50 p.m.
Closing Remarks

SPEAKER | Edward Abrahams, Ph.D., President, Personalized Medicine Coalition

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