Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Conference Coverage with Social Media’ Category


2021 EmTech Next

AGENDA for June 19, 2021

Thursday, June 1011:30 AM EDT

https://emtechnext21.pathable.co/agenda#/?limit=20&scroll=item,TwBc42y546R75hXJY,TwBc42y546R75hXJY,370.44482421875,18&sortByFields[0]=startsAt&sortByOrders[0]=1&uid=DFwuJhrAAFrqvN6jv

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

12:00 PM EDT

  • MAINSTAGEThe Future of Productivity12:00 PM – 1:30 PM EDTErik BrynjolfssonStanford UniversityProfessor and Director, Stanford Digital Economy LabAnthony Chang, MD, MBA, MPH, MSChildren’s Hospital of Orange CountyChief Intelligence and Innovation Officer, Medical DirectorAashima GuptaGoogle CloudDirector, Global Healthcare Strategy and SolutionsDavid RotmanMIT Technology ReviewEditor at LargeJulie ShahMITProfessor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, CSAILJennifer StrongMIT Technology ReviewSenior Editor for Podcasts and Live Journalism

REAL TIME COVERAGE

  • Erik Brynjolfsson Stanford UniversityProfessor and Director, Stanford Digital Economy Lab
  • AI –>>> Productivity and Future of Work

    • Rethink processes x10 bigger than technology
    • Top Decile lead the the rest 90% lag.
    • productivity has a J – shape curve
    • Technology & wages: Substitution, Complementarity,
    • 950 Occupations: Radiology – threat from automation, 27 task they do many are not to be done by the amchine
    • Not entire occupations will disappear; Top 1% will will benefit more cashiers: ML will do the job
    • Technologies very powerful ready for deployment
    • changes in business processes
    • Wellbeing and Productivity by Type
    • GDP – nominator and # Hours of Work is the denominator

  • Julie Shah MIT Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, CSAIL
  • Reverse Engineer the human mind in robot design

    use of robot in automotive and electronics is prevalent

    economic competitiveness depends on robotics at OEM

    Automation engineers are expensive for medium size firms

    Collaborative robots are not well accounted in the equation of labor replacement

    Human-Robot Integration Models are a challenge: Step by Step understanding

    1:30 PM EDT

    • Aashima Gupta Google Cloud Director, Global Healthcare Strategy and Solutions

    2:00 PM EDT

    • MAINSTAGEAI Productivity vs Privacy2:00 PM – 3:20 PM EDT
    • Prasad AkellaDrishtiFounder and CEO
    • Elizabeth Bramson-BoudreauMIT Technology ReviewCEO and Publisher
    • Will Douglas HeavenMIT Technology ReviewSenior Editor for AI
    • Suzanne KopchaSiemensVice President, Consumer Products & Retai
    • lArun NairRetailNextFounder and CTO

    3:20 PM EDT

    3:50 PM EDT

    • MAINSTAGELeading with Innovation3:50 PM – 5:00 PM EDTWill Douglas HeavenMIT Technology ReviewSenior Editor for AIAdi IgnatiusHarvard Business ReviewEditor in ChiefHubert JolyHarvard UniversityFormer Chairman & CEO, Best Buy; Senior Lecturer, Harvard Business SchoolAndrew McAfeeSloan School of Management, MITCofounder and Co-Director, Initiative on the Digital Economy; Principal Research ScientistMichael ReillyMIT Technology ReviewExecutive EditorDavid RotmanMIT Technology ReviewEditor at LargeJennifer StrongMIT Technology ReviewSenior Editor for Podcasts and Live Journalism

    Read Full Post »


    2021 Virtual World Medical Innovation Forum, Mass General Brigham, Gene and Cell Therapy, VIRTUAL May 19–21, 2021

    The 2021 Virtual World Medical Innovation Forum will focus on the growing impact of gene and cell therapy. Senior healthcare leaders from all over look to shape and debate the area of gene and cell therapy. Our shared belief: no matter the magnitude of change, responsible healthcare is centered on a shared commitment to collaborative innovation–industry, academia, and practitioners working together to improve patients’ lives.

    About the World Medical Innovation Forum

    Mass General Brigham is pleased to present the World Medical Innovation Forum (WMIF) virtual event Wednesday, May 19 – Friday, May 21. This interactive web event features expert discussions of gene and cell therapy (GCT) and its potential to change the future of medicine through its disease-treating and potentially curative properties. The agenda features 150+ executive speakers from the healthcare industry, venture, startups, life sciences manufacturing, consumer health and the front lines of care, including many Harvard Medical School-affiliated researchers and clinicians. The annual in-person Forum will resume live in Boston in 2022. The World Medical Innovation Forum is presented by Mass General Brigham Innovation, the global business development unit supporting the research requirements of 7,200 Harvard Medical School faculty and research hospitals including Massachusetts General, Brigham and Women’s, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Spaulding Rehab and McLean Hospital. Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/@MGBInnovation

    Accelerating the Future of Medicine with Gene and Cell Therapy What Comes Next

    https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/agenda/

    Virtual | May 19–21, 2021

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

    will cover the event in Real Time

    Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

    Founder LPBI 1.0 & LPBI 2.0

    member_60221522 copy

    will be in virtual attendance producing the e-Proceedings

    and the Tweet Collection of this Global event expecting +15,000 attendees

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    LPBI’s Eighteen Books in Medicine

    https://lnkd.in/ekWGNqA

    Among them, books on Gene and Cell Therapy include the following:

    Topics for May 19 – 21 include:

    Impact on Patient Care – Therapeutic and Potentially Curative GCT Developments

    GCT Delivery, Manufacturing – What’s Next

    GCT Platform Development

    Oncolytic Viruses – Cancer applications, start-ups

    Regenerative Medicine/Stem Cells

    Future of CAR-T

    M&A Shaping GCT’s Future

    Market Priorities

    Venture Investing in GCT

    China’s GCT Juggernaut

    Disease and Patient Focus: Benign blood disorders, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases

    Click here for the current WMIF agenda  

    Plus:

    Fireside Chats: 1:1 interviews with industry CEOs/C-Suite leaders including Novartis Gene Therapies, ThermoFisher, Bayer AG, FDA

    First Look: 18 briefings on emerging GCT research from Mass General Brigham scientists

    Virtual Poster Session: 40 research posters and presenters on potential GCT discoveries from Mass General Brigham

    Announcement of the Disruptive Dozen, 12 GCT technologies likely to break through in the next few years

    AGENDA

    Wednesday, May 19, 2021

    8:00 AM – 8:10 AM

    Opening Remarks

    Welcome and the vision for Gene and Cell Therapy and why it is a top Mass General Brigham priority. Introducer: Scott Sperling

    • Co-President, Thomas H. Lee Partners
    • Chairman of the Board of Directors, PHS

    Presenter: Anne Klibanski, MD

    • CEO, Mass General Brigham

    3,000 people joined 5/19 morning

    30 sessions: Lab to Clinic,  academia, industry, investment community

    May 22,23,24, 2022 – in Boston, in-person 2022 WMIF on CGT 8:10 AM – 8:30 AM

    The Grand Challenge of Widespread GCT Patient Benefits

    Co-Chairs identify the key themes of the Forum –  set the stage for top GCT opportunities, challenges, and where the field might take medicine in the future. Moderator: Susan Hockfield, PhD

    • President Emerita and Professor of Neuroscience, MIT

    GCT – poised to deliver therapies

    Inflection point as Panel will present

    Doctors and Patients – Promise for some patients 

    Barriers for Cell & Gene

    Access for patients to therapies like CGT Speakers: Nino Chiocca, MD, PhD

    • Neurosurgeon-in-Chief and Chairman, Neurosurgery, BWH
    • Harvey W. Cushing Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS

    Oncolytic virus triple threat: Toxic, immunological, combine with anti cancer therapies

    Polygenic therapy – multiple genes involved, plug-play, Susan Slaugenhaupt, PhD

    • Scientific Director and Elizabeth G. Riley and Daniel E. Smith Jr., Endowed Chair, Mass General Research Institute
    • Professor, Neurology, HMS

    Ravi Thadhani, MD

    • CAO, Mass General Brigham
    • Professor, Medicine and Faculty Dean, HMS

    Role of academia special to spear head the Polygenic therapy – multiple genes involved, plug-play, 

    Access critical, relations with IndustryLuk Vandenberghe, PhD

    • Grousbeck Family Chair, Gene Therapy, MEE
    • Associate Professor, Ophthalmology, HMS

    Pharmacology Gene-Drug, Interface academic centers and industry

    many CGT drugs emerged in Academic center 8:35 AM – 8:50 AM FIRESIDE

    Gene and Cell Therapy 2.0 – What’s Next as We Realize their Potential for Patients

    Dave Lennon, PhD

    • President, Novartis Gene Therapies

    Hope that CGT emerging, how the therapies work, neuro, muscular, ocular, genetic diseases of liver and of heart revolution for the industry 900 IND application 25 approvals Economic driver Skilled works, VC disease. Modality one time intervention, long duration of impart, reimbursement, ecosystem to be built around CGT

    FDA works by indications and risks involved, Standards and expectations for streamlining manufacturing, understanding of process and products 

    payments over time payers and Innovators relations Moderator: Julian Harris, MD

    • Partner, Deerfield

    Promise of CGT realized, what part?

    FDA role and interaction in CGT

    Manufacturing aspects which is critical Speaker: Dave Lennon, PhD

    • President, Novartis Gene Therapies

    Hope that CGT emerging, how the therapies work, neuro, muscular, ocular, genetic diseases of liver and of heart revolution for the industry 900 IND application 25 approvals Economic driver Skilled works, VC disease. Modality one time intervention, long duration of impart, reimbursement, ecosystem to be built around CGT

    FDA works by indications and risks involved, Standards and expectations for streamlining manufacturing, understanding of process and products 

    payments over time payers and Innovators relations

    • Q&A 8:55 AM – 9:10 AM  

    8:55 AM – 9:20 AM

    The Patient and GCT

    GCT development for rare diseases is driven by patient and patient-advocate communities. Understanding their needs and perspectives enables biomarker research, the development of value-driving clinical trial endpoints and successful clinical trials. Industry works with patient communities that help identify unmet needs and collaborate with researchers to conduct disease natural history studies that inform the development of biomarkers and trial endpoints. This panel includes patients who have received cutting-edge GCT therapy as well as caregivers and patient advocates. Moderator: Patricia Musolino, MD, PhD

    • Co-Director Pediatric Stroke and Cerebrovascular Program, MGH
    • Assistant Professor of Neurology, HMS

    What is the Power of One – the impact that a patient can have on their own destiny by participating in Clinical Trials Contacting other participants in same trial can be beneficial Speakers: Jack Hogan

    • Patient, MEE

    Jeanette Hogan

    • Parent of Patient, MEE

    Jim Holland

    • CEO, Backcountry.com

    Parkinson patient Constraints by regulatory on participation in clinical trial advance stage is approved participation Patients to determine the level of risk they wish to take Information dissemination is critical Barbara Lavery

    • Chief Program Officer, ACGT Foundation

    Advocacy agency beginning of work Global Genes educational content and out reach to access the information 

    Patient has the knowledge of the symptoms and recording all input needed for diagnosis by multiple clinicians Early application for CGTDan Tesler

    • Clinical Trial Patient, BWH/DFCC

    Experimental Drug clinical trial patient participation in clinical trial is very important to advance the state of scienceSarah Beth Thomas, RN

    • Professional Development Manager, BWH

    Outcome is unknown, hope for good, support with resources all advocacy groups, 

    • Q&A 9:25 AM – 9:40 AM  

    9:25 AM – 9:45 AM FIRESIDE

    GCT Regulatory Framework | Why Different?

      Moderator: Vicki Sato, PhD

    • Chairman of the Board, Vir Biotechnology

    Diversity of approaches

    Process at FDA generalize from 1st entry to rules more generalizable  Speaker: Peter Marks, MD, PhD

    • Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA

    Last Spring it became clear that something will work a vaccine by June 2020 belief that enough candidates the challenge manufacture enough and scaling up FDA did not predicted the efficacy of mRNA vaccine vs other approaches expected to work

    Recover Work load for the pandemic will wean & clear, Gene Therapies IND application remained flat in the face of the pandemic Rare diseases urgency remains Consensus with industry advisory to get input gene therapy Guidance  T-Cell therapy vs Regulation best thinking CGT evolve speedily flexible gained by Guidance

    Immune modulators, Immunotherapy Genome editing can make use of viral vectors future technologies nanoparticles and liposome encapsulation 

    • Q&A 9:50 AM – 10:05 AM  

    9:50 AM – 10:15 AM

    Building a GCT Platform for Mainstream Success

    This panel of GCT executives, innovators and investors explore how to best shape a successful GCT strategy. Among the questions to be addressed:

    • How are GCT approaches set around defining and building a platform?
    • Is AAV the leading modality and what are the remaining challenges?
    • What are the alternatives?
    • Is it just a matter of matching modalities to the right indications?

    Moderator: Jean-François Formela, MD

    • Partner, Atlas Venture

    Established core components of the Platform Speakers: Katherine High, MD

    • President, Therapeutics, AskBio

    Three drugs approved in Europe in the Gene therapy space

    Regulatory Infrastructure exists for CGT drug approval – as new class of therapeutics

    Participants investigators, regulators, patients i. e., MDM 

    Hemophilia in male most challenging

    Human are natural hosts for AV safety signals Dave Lennon, PhD

    • President, Novartis Gene Therapies

    big pharma has portfolios of therapeutics not one drug across Tx areas: cell, gene iodine therapy 

    collective learning infrastructure features manufacturing at scale early in development Acquisitions strategy for growth # applications for scaling Rick Modi

    • CEO, Affinia Therapeutics

    Copy, paste EDIT from product A to B novel vectors leverage knowledge varient of vector, coder optimization choice of indication is critical exploration on larger populations Speed to R&D and Speed to better gene construct get to clinic with better design vs ASAP 

    Data sharing clinical experience with vectors strategies patients selection, vector selection, mitigation, patient type specific Louise Rodino-Klapac, PhD

    • EVP, Chief Scientific Officer, Sarepta Therapeutics

    AAV based platform 15 years in development same disease indication vs more than one indication stereotype, analytics as hurdle 1st was 10 years 2nd was 3 years

    Safety to clinic vs speed to clinic, difference of vectors to trust

    • Q&A 10:20 AM – 10:35 AM  

    10:20 AM – 10:45 AM

    AAV Success Studies | Retinal Dystrophy | Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Recent AAV gene therapy product approvals have catalyzed the field. This new class of therapies has shown the potential to bring transformative benefit to patients. With dozens of AAV treatments in clinical studies, all eyes are on the field to gauge its disruptive impact.

    The panel assesses the largest challenges of the first two products, the lessons learned for the broader CGT field, and the extent to which they serve as a precedent to broaden the AAV modality.

    • Is AAV gene therapy restricted to genetically defined disorders, or will it be able to address common diseases in the near term?
    • Lessons learned from these first-in-class approvals.
    • Challenges to broaden this modality to similar indications.
    • Reflections on safety signals in the clinical studies?

    Moderator: Joan Miller, MD

    • Chief, Ophthalmology, MEE
    • Cogan Professor & Chair of Ophthalmology, HMS

    Retina specialist, Luxturna success FMA condition cell therapy as solution

    Lessons learned

    Safety Speakers: Ken Mills

    • CEO, RegenXBio

    Tissue types additional administrations, tech and science, address additional diseases, more science for photoreceptors a different tissue type underlying pathology novelties in last 10 years 

    Cell therapy vs transplant therapy no immunosuppressionEric Pierce, MD, PhD

    • Director, Ocular Genomics Institute, MEE
    • Professor of Ophthalmology, HMS

    Laxterna success to be replicated platform, paradigms measurement visual improved

    More science is needed to continue develop vectors reduce toxicity,

    AAV can deliver different cargos reduce adverse events improve vectorsRon Philip

    • Chief Operating Officer, Spark Therapeutics

    The first retinal gene therapy, voretigene neparvovec-rzyl (Luxturna, Spark Therapeutics), was approved by the FDA in 2017.Meredith Schultz, MD

    • Executive Medical Director, Lead TME, Novartis Gene Therapies

    Impact of cell therapy beyond muscular dystrophy, translational medicine, each indication, each disease, each group of patients build platform unlock the promise

    Monitoring for Safety signals real world evidence remote markers, home visits, clinical trial made safer, better communication of information

    • Q&A 10:50 AM – 11:05 AM  

    10:45 AM – 10:55 AM

    Break

      10:55 AM – 11:05 AM FIRST LOOK

    Control of AAV pharmacology by Rational Capsid Design

    Luk Vandenberghe, PhD

    • Grousbeck Family Chair, Gene Therapy, MEE
    • Associate Professor, Ophthalmology, HMS

    AAV a complex driver in Pharmacology durable, vector of choice, administer in vitro, gene editing tissue specificity, pharmacokinetics side effects and adverse events manufacturability site variation diversify portfolios,

    Pathway for rational AAV rational design, curated smart variant libraries, AAV  sequence screen multiparametric , data enable liver (de-) targeting unlock therapeutics areas: cochlea 

    • Q&A 11:05 AM – 11:25 AM  

    11:05 AM – 11:15 AM FIRST LOOK

    Enhanced gene delivery and immunoevasion of AAV vectors without capsid modification

    Casey Maguire, PhD

    • Associate Professor of Neurology, MGH & HMS

    Virus Biology: Enveloped (e) or not 

    enveloped for gene therapy eAAV platform technology: tissue targets and Indications commercialization of eAAV 

    • Q&A 11:15 AM – 11:35 AM  

    11:20 AM – 11:45 AM HOT TOPICS

    AAV Delivery

    This panel will address the advances in the area of AAV gene therapy delivery looking out the next five years. Questions that loom large are: How can biodistribution of AAV be improved? What solutions are in the wings to address immunogenicity of AAV? Will patients be able to receive systemic redosing of AAV-based gene therapies in the future? What technical advances are there for payload size? Will the cost of manufacturing ever become affordable for ultra-rare conditions? Will non-viral delivery completely supplant viral delivery within the next five years?What are the safety concerns and how will they be addressed? Moderators: Xandra Breakefield, PhD

    • Geneticist, MGH, MGH
    • Professor, Neurology, HMS

    Florian Eichler, MD

    • Director, Center for Rare Neurological Diseases, MGH
    • Associate Professor, Neurology, HMS

    Speakers: Jennifer Farmer

    • CEO, Friedreich’s Ataxia Research Alliance

    Ataxia requires therapy targeting multiple organ with one therapy, brain, spinal cord, heart several IND, clinical trials in 2022Mathew Pletcher, PhD

    • SVP, Head of Gene Therapy Research and Technical Operations, Astellas

    Work with diseases poorly understood, collaborations needs example of existing: DMD is a great example explain dystrophin share placedo data 

    Continue to explore large animal guinea pig not the mice, not primates (ethical issues) for understanding immunogenicity and immune response Manny Simons, PhD

    • CEO, Akouos

    AAV Therapy for the fluid of the inner ear, CGT for the ear vector accessible to surgeons translational work on the inner ear for gene therapy right animal model 

    Biology across species nerve ending in the cochlea

    engineer out of the caspid, lowest dose possible, get desired effect by vector use, 2022 new milestones

    • Q&A 11:50 AM – 12:05 PM  

    11:50 AM – 12:15 PM

    M&A | Shaping GCT Innovation

    The GCT M&A market is booming – many large pharmas have made at least one significant acquisition. How should we view the current GCT M&A market? What is its impact of the current M&A market on technology development? Are these M&A trends new are just another cycle? Has pharma strategy shifted and, if so, what does it mean for GCT companies? What does it mean for patients? What are the long-term prospects – can valuations hold up? Moderator: Adam Koppel, MD, PhD

    • Managing Director, Bain Capital Life Sciences

    What acquirers are looking for??

    What is the next generation vs what is real where is the industry going? Speakers:

    Debby Baron,

    • Worldwide Business Development, Pfizer 

    CGT is an important area Pfizer is active looking for innovators, advancing forward programs of innovation with the experience Pfizer has internally 

    Scalability and manufacturing  regulatory conversations, clinical programs safety in parallel to planning getting drug to patients

    Kenneth Custer, PhD

    • Vice President, Business Development and Lilly New Ventures, Eli Lilly and Company

    Marianne De Backer, PhD

    Head of Strategy, Business Development & Licensing, and Member of the Executive Committee, Bayer

    Absolute Leadership in Gene editing, gene therapy, via acquisition and strategic alliance 

    Operating model of the acquired company discussed , company continue independence

    Sean Nolan

    • Board Chairman, Encoded Therapeutics & Affinia

    Executive Chairman, Jaguar Gene Therapy & Istari Oncology

    As acquiree multiple M&A: How the acquirer looks at integration and cultures of the two companies 

    Traditional integration vs jump start by external acquisition 

    AAV – epilepsy, next generation of vectors 

    • Q&A 12:20 PM – 12:35 PM  

    12:15 PM – 12:25 PM FIRST LOOK

    Gene Therapies for Neurological Disorders: Insights from Motor Neuron Disorders

    Merit Cudkowicz, MD

    • Chief of Neurology, MGH

    ALS – Man 1in 300, Women 1 in 400, next decade increase 7% 

    10% ALS is heredity 160 pharma in ALS space, diagnosis is late 1/3 of people are not diagnosed, active community for clinical trials Challenges: disease heterogeneity cases of 10 years late in diagnosis. Clinical Trials for ALS in Gene Therapy targeting ASO1 protein therapies FUS gene struck youngsters 

    Q&A

    • 12:25 PM – 12:45 PM  

    12:25 PM – 12:35 PM FIRST LOOK

    Gene Therapy for Neurologic Diseases

    Patricia Musolino, MD, PhD

    • Co-Director Pediatric Stroke and Cerebrovascular Program, MGH
    • Assistant Professor of Neurology, HMS

    Cerebral Vascular disease – ACTA2 179H gene smooth muscle cell proliferation disorder

    no surgery or drug exist –

    Cell therapy for ACTA2 Vasculopathy  in the brain and control the BP and stroke – smooth muscle intima proliferation. Viral vector deliver aiming to change platform to non-viral delivery rare disease , gene editing, other mutations of ACTA2 gene target other pathway for atherosclerosis 

    • Q&A 12:35 PM – 12:55 PM  

    12:35 PM – 1:15 PM

    Lunch

      1:15 PM – 1:40 PM

    Oncolytic Viruses in Cancer | Curing Melanoma and Beyond

    Oncolytic viruses represent a powerful new technology, but so far an FDA-approved oncolytic (Imlygic) has only occurred in one area – melanoma and that what is in 2015. This panel involves some of the protagonists of this early success story.  They will explore why and how Imlygic became approved and its path to commercialization.  Yet, no other cancer indications exist for Imlygic, unlike the expansion of FDA-approved indication for immune checkpoint inhibitors to multiple cancers.  Why? Is there a limitation to what and which cancers can target?  Is the mode of administration a problem?

    No other oncolytic virus therapy has been approved since 2015. Where will the next success story come from and why?  Will these therapies only be beneficial for skin cancers or other easily accessible cancers based on intratumoral delivery?

    The panel will examine whether the preclinical models that have been developed for other cancer treatment modalities will be useful for oncolytic viruses.  It will also assess the extent pre-clinical development challenges have slowed the development of OVs. Moderator: Nino Chiocca, MD, PhD

    • Neurosurgeon-in-Chief and Chairman, Neurosurgery, BWH
    • Harvey W. Cushing Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS

    Challenges of manufacturing at Amgen what are they? Speakers: Robert Coffin, PhD

    • Chief Research & Development Officer, Replimune

    2002 in UK promise in oncolytic therapy GNCSF

    Phase III melanoma 2015 M&A with Amgen

    oncolytic therapy remains non effecting on immune response 

    data is key for commercialization 

    do not belief in systemic therapy achieve maximum immune response possible from a tumor by localized injection Roger Perlmutter, MD, PhD

    • Chairman, Merck & Co.

    response rates systemic therapy like PD1, Keytruda, OPTIVA well tolerated combination of Oncolytic with systemic 

    GMP critical for manufacturing David Reese, MD

    • Executive Vice President, Research and Development, Amgen

    Inter lesion injection of agent vs systemic therapeutics 

    cold tumors immune resistant render them immune susceptible 

    Oncolytic virus is a Mono therapy

    addressing the unknown Ann Silk, MD

    • Physician, Dana Farber-Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center
    • Assistant Professor of Medicine, HMS

    Which person gets oncolytics virus if patient has immune suppression due to other indications

    Safety of oncolytic virus greater than Systemic treatment

    series biopsies for injected and non injected tissue and compare Suspect of hot tumor and cold tumors likely to have sme response to agent unknown all potential 

    • Q&A 1:45 PM – 2:00 PM  

    1:45 PM – 2:10 PM

    Market Interest in Oncolytic Viruses | Calibrating

    There are currently two oncolytic virus products on the market, one in the USA and one in China.  As of late 2020, there were 86 clinical trials 60 of which were in phase I with just 2 in Phase III the rest in Phase I/II or Phase II.   Although global sales of OVs are still in the ramp-up phase, some projections forecast OVs will be a $700 million market by 2026. This panel will address some of the major questions in this area:

    What regulatory challenges will keep OVs from realizing their potential? Despite the promise of OVs for treating cancer only one has been approved in the US. Why has this been the case? Reasons such have viral tropism, viral species selection and delivery challenges have all been cited. However, these are also true of other modalities. Why then have oncolytic virus approaches not advanced faster and what are the primary challenges to be overcome?

    • Will these need to be combined with other agents to realize their full efficacy and how will that impact the market?
    • Why are these companies pursuing OVs while several others are taking a pass?

    Moderators: Martine Lamfers, PhD

    • Visiting Scientist, BWH

    Challenged in development of strategies 

    Demonstrate efficacyRobert Martuza, MD

    • Consultant in Neurosurgery, MGH
    • William and Elizabeth Sweet Distinguished Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS

    Modulation mechanism Speakers: Anlong Li, MD, PhD

    • Clinical Director, Oncology Clinical Development, Merck Research Laboratories

    IV delivery preferred – delivery alternative are less aggereable Jeffrey Infante, MD

    • Early development Oncolytic viruses, Oncology, Janssen Research & Development

    oncologic virus if it will generate systemic effects the adoption will accelerate

    What areas are the best efficacious 

    Direct effect with intra-tumor single injection with right payload 

    Platform approach  Prime with 1 and Boost with 2 – not yet experimented with 

    Do not have the data at trial design for stratification of patients 

    Turn off strategy not existing yetLoic Vincent, PhD

    • Head of Oncology Drug Discovery Unit, Takeda

    R&D in collaboration with Academic

    Vaccine platform to explore different payload

    IV administration may not bring sufficient concentration to the tumor is administer  in the blood stream

    Classification of Patients by prospective response type id UNKNOWN yet, population of patients require stratification

    • Q&A 2:15 PM – 2:30 PM  

    2:10 PM – 2:20 PM FIRST LOOK

    Oncolytic viruses: turning pathogens into anticancer agents

    Nino Chiocca, MD, PhD

    • Neurosurgeon-in-Chief and Chairman, Neurosurgery, BWH
    • Harvey W. Cushing Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS

    Oncolytic therapy DID NOT WORK Pancreatic Cancer and Glioblastoma 

    Intra- tumoral heterogeniety hinders success 

    Solution: Oncolytic VIRUSES – Immunological “coldness”

    GADD-34 20,000 GBM 40,000 pancreatic cancer

    • Q&A 2:25 PM – 2:40 PM  

    2:20 PM – 2:45 PM

    Entrepreneurial Growth | Oncolytic Virus

    In 2020 there were a total of 60 phase I trials for Oncolytic Viruses. There are now dozens of companies pursuing some aspect of OV technology. This panel will address:

    •  How are small companies equipped to address the challenges of developing OV therapies better than large pharma or biotech?
    • Will the success of COVID vaccines based on Adenovirus help the regulatory environment for small companies developing OV products in Europe and the USA?
    • Is there a place for non-viral delivery and other immunotherapy companies to engage in the OV space?  Would they bring any real advantages?

    Moderator: Reid Huber, PhD

    • Partner, Third Rock Ventures

    Critical milestones to observe Speakers: Caroline Breitbach, PhD

    • VP, R&D Programs and Strategy, Turnstone Biologics

    Trying Intra-tumor delivery and IV infusion delivery oncolytic vaccine pushing dose 

    translation biomarkers program 

    transformation tumor microenvironment Brett Ewald, PhD

    • SVP, Development & Corporate Strategy, DNAtrix

    Studies gets larger, kicking off Phase III multiple tumors Paul Hallenbeck, PhD

    • President and Chief Scientific Officer, Seneca Therapeutics

    Translation: Stephen Russell, MD, PhD

    • CEO, Vyriad

    Systemic delivery Oncolytic Virus IV delivery woman in remission

    Collaboration with Regeneron

    Data collection: Imageable reporter secretable reporter, gene expression

    Field is intense systemic oncolytic delivery is exciting in mice and in human, response rates are encouraging combination immune stimulant, check inhibitors 

    • Q&A 2:50 PM – 3:05 PM  

    2:45 PM – 3:00 PM

    Break

      3:00 PM – 3:25 PM

    CAR-T | Lessons Learned | What’s Next

    Few areas of potential cancer therapy have had the attention and excitement of CAR-T. This panel of leading executives, developers, and clinician-scientists will explore the current state of CAR-T and its future prospects. Among the questions to be addressed are:

    • Is CAR-T still an industry priority – i.e. are new investments being made by large companies? Are new companies being financed? What are the trends?
    • What have we learned from first-generation products, what can we expect from CAR-T going forward in novel targets, combinations, armored CAR’s and allogeneic treatment adoption?
    • Early trials showed remarkable overall survival and progression-free survival. What has been observed regarding how enduring these responses are?
    • Most of the approvals to date have targeted CD19, and most recently BCMA. What are the most common forms of relapses that have been observed?
    • Is there a consensus about what comes after these CD19 and BCMA trials as to additional targets in liquid tumors? How have dual-targeted approaches fared?
    • Moderator:
    • Marcela Maus, MD, PhD
      • Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program, Cancer Center, MGH
      • Associate Professor, Medicine, HMSIs CAR-T Industry priority
    • Speakers:
    • Head of R&D, Atara BioTherapeutics
    • Phyno-type of the cells for hematologic cancers 
    • solid tumor 
    • inventory of Therapeutics for treating patients in the future 
    • Progressive MS program
    • EBBT platform B-Cells and T-Cells
      • Stefan Hendriks
        • Gobal Head, Cell & Gene, Novartis
        • yes, CGT is a strategy in the present and future
        • Journey started years ago 
        • Confirmation the effectiveness of CAR-T therapies, 1 year response prolonged to 5 years 26 months
        • Patient not responding – a lot to learn
        • Patient after 8 months of chemo can be helped by CAR-T
      • Christi Shaw
        • CEO, Kite
        • CAR-T is priority 120 companies in the space
        • Manufacturing consistency 
        • Patients respond with better quality of life
        • Blood cancer – more work to be done

    Q&A

    • 3:30 PM – 3:45 PM  

    3:30 PM – 3:55 PM HOT TOPICS

    CAR-T | Solid Tumors Success | When?

    The potential application of CAR-T in solid tumors will be a game-changer if it occurs. The panel explores the prospects of solid tumor success and what the barriers have been. Questions include:

    •  How would industry and investor strategy for CAR-T and solid tumors be characterized? Has it changed in the last couple of years?
    •  Does the lack of tumor antigen specificity in solid tumors mean that lessons from liquid tumor CAR-T constructs will not translate well and we have to start over?
    •  Whether due to antigen heterogeneity, a hostile tumor micro-environment, or other factors are some specific solid tumors more attractive opportunities than others for CAR-T therapy development?
    •  Given the many challenges that CAR-T faces in solid tumors, does the use of combination therapies from the start, for example, to mitigate TME effects, offer a more compelling opportunity.

    Moderator: Oladapo Yeku, MD, PhD

    • Clinical Assistant in Medicine, MGH

    window of opportunities studies  Speakers: Jennifer Brogdon

    • Executive Director, Head of Cell Therapy Research, Exploratory Immuno-Oncology, NIBR

    2017 CAR-T first approval

    M&A and research collaborations

    TCR tumor specific antigens avoid tissue toxicity Knut Niss, PhD

    • CTO, Mustang Bio

    tumor hot start in 12 month clinical trial solid tumors , theraties not ready yet. Combination therapy will be an experimental treatment long journey checkpoint inhibitors to be used in combination maintenance Lipid tumor Barbra Sasu, PhD

    • CSO, Allogene

    T cell response at prostate cancer 

    tumor specific 

    cytokine tumor specific signals move from solid to metastatic cell type for easier infiltration

    Where we might go: safety autologous and allogeneic Jay Short, PhD

    • Chairman, CEO, Cofounder, BioAlta, Inc.

    Tumor type is not enough for development of therapeutics other organs are involved in the periphery

    difficult to penetrate solid tumors biologics activated in the tumor only, positive changes surrounding all charges, water molecules inside the tissue acidic environment target the cells inside the tumor and not outside 

    Combination staggered key is try combination

    • Q&A 4:00 PM – 4:15 PM  

    4:00 PM – 4:25 PM

    GCT Manufacturing | Vector Production | Autologous and Allogeneic | Stem Cells | Supply Chain | Scalability & Management

    The modes of GCT manufacturing have the potential of fundamentally reordering long-established roles and pathways. While complexity goes up the distance from discovery to deployment shrinks. With the likelihood of a total market for cell therapies to be over $48 billion by 2027,  groups of products are emerging.  Stem cell therapies are projected to be $28 billion by 2027 and non-stem cell therapies such as CAR-T are projected be $20 billion by 2027. The manufacturing challenges for these two large buckets are very different. Within the CAR-T realm there are diverging trends of autologous and allogeneic therapies and the demands on manufacturing infrastructure are very different. Questions for the panelists are:

    • Help us all understand the different manufacturing challenges for cell therapies. What are the trade-offs among storage cost, batch size, line changes in terms of production cost and what is the current state of scaling naïve and stem cell therapy treatment vs engineered cell therapies?
    • For cell and gene therapy what is the cost of Quality Assurance/Quality Control vs. production and how do you think this will trend over time based on your perspective on learning curves today?
    • Will point of care production become a reality? How will that change product development strategy for pharma and venture investors? What would be the regulatory implications for such products?
    • How close are allogeneic CAR-T cell therapies? If successful what are the market implications of allogenic CAR-T? What are the cost implications and rewards for developing allogeneic cell therapy treatments?

    Moderator: Michael Paglia

    • VP, ElevateBio

    Speakers:

    • Dannielle Appelhans
      • SVP TechOps and Chief Technical Officer, Novartis Gene Therapies
    • Thomas Page, PhD
      • VP, Engineering and Asset Development, FUJIFILM Diosynth Biotechnologies
    • Rahul Singhvi, ScD
      • CEO and Co-Founder, National Resilience, Inc.
    • Thomas VanCott, PhD
      • Global Head of Product Development, Gene & Cell Therapy, Catalent
      • 2/3 autologous 1/3 allogeneic  CAR-T high doses and high populations scale up is not done today quality maintain required the timing logistics issues centralized vs decentralized  allogeneic are health donors innovations in cell types in use improvements in manufacturing

    Ropa Pike, Director,  Enterprise Science & Partnerships, Thermo Fisher Scientific 

    Centralized biopharma industry is moving  to decentralized models site specific license 

    • Q&A 4:30 PM – 4:45 PM  

    4:30 PM – 4:40 PM FIRST LOOK

    CAR-T

    Marcela Maus, MD, PhD

    • Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program, Cancer Center, MGH
    • Assistant Professor, Medicine, HMS 

    Fit-to-purpose CAR-T cells: 3 lead programs

    Tr-fill 

    CAR-T induce response myeloma and multiple myeloma GBM

    27 patents on CAR-T

    +400 patients treaded 40 Clinical Trials 

    • Q&A 4:40 PM – 5:00 PM  

    4:40 PM – 4:50 PM FIRST LOOK

    Repurposed Tumor Cells as Killers and Immunomodulators for Cancer Therapy

    Khalid Shah, PhD

    • Vice Chair, Neurosurgery Research, BWH
    • Director, Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging, HMS

    Solid tumors are the hardest to treat because: immunosuppressive, hypoxic, Acidic Use of autologous tumor cells self homing ThTC self targeting therapeutic cells Therapeutic tumor cells efficacy pre-clinical models GBM 95% metastesis ThTC translation to patient settings

    • Q&A 4:50 PM – 5:10 PM  

    4:50 PM – 5:00 PM FIRST LOOK

    Other Cell Therapies for Cancer

    David Scadden, MD

    • Director, Center for Regenerative Medicine; Co-Director, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Director, Hematologic Malignancies & Experimental Hematology, MGH
    • Jordan Professor of Medicine, HMS

    T-cell are made in bone marrow create cryogel  can be an off-the-shelf product repertoire on T Receptor CCL19+ mesenchymal cells mimic Tymus cells –

    inter-tymic injection. Non human primate validation

    Q&A

     

    5:00 PM – 5:20 PM   5:00 PM – 5:20 PM FIRESIDE

    Fireside with Mikael Dolsten, MD, PhD

      Introducer: Jonathan Kraft Moderator: Daniel Haber, MD, PhD

    • Chair, Cancer Center, MGH
    • Isselbacher Professor of Oncology, HMS

    Vaccine Status Mikael Dolsten, MD, PhD

    • Chief Scientific Officer and President, Worldwide Research, Development and Medical, Pfizer

    Deliver vaccine around the Globe, Israel, US, Europe.

    3BIL vaccine in 2022 for all Global vaccination 

    Bio Ntech in Germany

    Experience with Biologics immuneoncology & allogeneic antibody cells – new field for drug discovery 

    mRNA curative effort and cancer vaccine 

    Access to drugs developed by Pfizer to underdeveloped countries 

    • Q&A 5:25 PM – 5:40 AM  

    5:20 PM – 5:30 PM

    Closing Remarks

    Thursday, May 20, 2021

    8:00 AM – 8:25 AM

    GCT | The China Juggernaut

    China embraced gene and cell therapies early. The first China gene therapy clinical trial was in 1991. China approved the world’s first gene therapy product in 2003—Gendicine—an oncolytic adenovirus for the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer.  Driven by broad national strategy, China has become a hotbed of GCT development, ranking second in the world with more than 1,000 clinical trials either conducted or underway and thousands of related patents.  It has a booming GCT biotech sector, led by more than 45 local companies with growing IND pipelines.

    In late 1990, a T cell-based immunotherapy, cytokine-induced killer (CIK) therapy became a popular modality in the clinic in China for tumor treatment.  In early 2010, Chinese researchers started to carry out domestic CAR T trials inspired by several important reports suggested the great antitumor function of CAR T cells. Now, China became the country with the most registered CAR T trials, CAR T therapy is flourishing in China.

    The Chinese GCT ecosystem has increasingly rich local innovation and growing complement of development and investment partnerships – and also many subtleties.

    This panel, consisting of leaders from the China GCT corporate, investor, research and entrepreneurial communities, will consider strategic questions on the growth of the gene and cell therapy industry in China, areas of greatest strength, evolving regulatory framework, early successes and products expected to reach the US and world market. Moderator: Min Wu, PhD

    • Managing Director, Fosun Health Fund

    What are the area of CGT in China, regulatory similar to the US Speakers: Alvin Luk, PhD

    • CEO, Neuropath Therapeutics

    Monogenic rare disease with clear genomic target

    Increase of 30% in patient enrollment 

    Regulatory reform approval is 60 days no delayPin Wang, PhD

    • CSO, Jiangsu Simcere Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.

    Similar starting point in CGT as the rest of the World unlike a later starting point in other biologicalRichard Wang, PhD

    • CEO, Fosun Kite Biotechnology Co., Ltd

    Possibilities to be creative and capitalize the new technologies for innovating drug

    Support of the ecosystem by funding new companie allowing the industry to be developed in China

    Autologous in patients differences cost challengeTian Xu, PhD

    • Vice President, Westlake University

    ICH committee and Chinese FDA -r regulation similar to the US

    Difference is the population recruitment, in China patients are active participants in skin disease 

    Active in development of transposome 

    Development of non-viral methods, CRISPR still in D and transposome

    In China price of drugs regulatory are sensitive Shunfei Yan, PhD

    • Investment Manager, InnoStar Capital

    Indication driven: Hymophilia, 

    Allogogenic efficiency therapies

    Licensing opportunities 

    • Q&A 8:30 AM – 8:45 AM  

    8:30 AM – 8:55 AM

    Impact of mRNA Vaccines | Global Success Lessons

    The COVID vaccine race has propelled mRNA to the forefront of biomedicine. Long considered as a compelling modality for therapeutic gene transfer, the technology may have found its most impactful application as a vaccine platform. Given the transformative industrialization, the massive human experience, and the fast development that has taken place in this industry, where is the horizon? Does the success of the vaccine application, benefit or limit its use as a therapeutic for CGT?

    • How will the COVID success impact the rest of the industry both in therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines and broader mRNA lessons?
    • How will the COVID success impact the rest of the industry both on therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines and broader mRNA lessons?
    • Beyond from speed of development, what aspects make mRNA so well suited as a vaccine platform?
    • Will cost-of-goods be reduced as the industry matures?
    • How does mRNA technology seek to compete with AAV and other gene therapy approaches?

    Moderator: Lindsey Baden, MD

    • Director, Clinical Research, Division of Infectious Diseases, BWH
    • Associate Professor, HMS

    In vivo delivery process regulatory cooperation new opportunities for same platform for new indication Speakers:

    Many years of mRNA pivoting for new diseases, DARPA, nucleic Acids global deployment of a manufacturing unit on site where the need arise Elan Musk funds new directions at Moderna

    How many mRNA can be put in one vaccine: Dose and tolerance to achieve efficacy 

    45 days for Personalized cancer vaccine one per patient

    1.6 Billion doses produced rare disease monogenic correct mRNA like CF multiple mutation infection disease and oncology applications

    Platform allowing to swap cargo reusing same nanoparticles address disease beyond Big Pharma options for biotech

    WHat strain of Flu vaccine will come back in the future when people do not use masks 

    • Kate Bingham, UK Vaccine Taskforce

    July 2020, AAV vs mRNA delivery across UK local centers administered both types supply and delivery uplift 

    • Q&A 9:00 AM – 9:15 AM  

    9:00 AM – 9:25 AM HOT TOPICS

    Benign Blood Disorders

    Hemophilia has been and remains a hallmark indication for the CGT. Given its well-defined biology, larger market, and limited need for gene transfer to provide therapeutic benefit, it has been at the forefront of clinical development for years, however, product approval remains elusive. What are the main hurdles to this success? Contrary to many indications that CGT pursues no therapeutic options are available to patients, hemophiliacs have an increasing number of highly efficacious treatment options. How does the competitive landscape impact this field differently than other CGT fields? With many different players pursuing a gene therapy option for hemophilia, what are the main differentiators? Gene therapy for hemophilia seems compelling for low and middle-income countries, given the cost of currently available treatments; does your company see opportunities in this market? Moderator: Nancy Berliner, MD

    • Chief, Division of Hematology, BWH
    • H. Franklin Bunn Professor of Medicine, HMS

    Speakers: Theresa Heggie

    • CEO, Freeline Therapeutics

    Safety concerns, high burden of treatment CGT has record of safety and risk/benefit adoption of Tx functional cure CGT is potent Tx relative small quantity of protein needs be delivered 

    Potency and quality less quantity drug and greater potency

    risk of delivery unwanted DNA, capsules are critical 

    analytics is critical regulator involvement in potency definition

    Close of collaboration is excitingGallia Levy, MD, PhD

    • Chief Medical Officer, Spark Therapeutics

    Hemophilia CGT is the highest potential for Global access logistics in underdeveloped countries working with NGOs practicality of the Tx

    Roche reached 120 Counties great to be part of the Roche GroupAmir Nashat, PhD

    • Managing Partner, Polaris Ventures

    Suneet Varma

    • Global President of Rare Disease, Pfizer

    Gene therapy at Pfizer small molecule, large molecule and CGT – spectrum of choice allowing Hemophilia patients to marry 

    1/3 internal 1/3 partnership 1/3 acquisitions 

    Learning from COVID-19 is applied for other vaccine development

    review of protocols and CGT for Hemophelia

    You can’t buy Time

    With MIT Pfizer is developing a model for Hemopilia CGT treatment

    • Q&A 9:30 AM – 9:45 AM  

    9:25 AM – 9:35 AM FIRST LOOK

    Treating Rett Syndrome through X-reactivation

    Jeannie Lee, MD, PhD

    • Molecular Biologist, MGH
    • Professor of Genetics, HMS

    200 disease X chromosome unlock for neurological genetic diseases: Rett Syndromeand other autism spectrum disorders female model vs male mice model

    deliver protein to the brain 

    restore own missing or dysfunctional protein

    Epigenetic not CGT – no exogent intervention Xist ASO drug

    Female model

    • Q&A 9:35 AM – 9:55 AM  

    9:35 AM – 9:45 AM FIRST LOOK

    Rare but mighty: scaling up success in single gene disorders

    Florian Eichler, MD

    • Director, Center for Rare Neurological Diseases, MGH
    • Associate Professor, Neurology, HMS

    Single gene disorder NGS enable diagnosis, DIagnosis to Treatment How to know whar cell to target, make it available and scale up Address gap: missing components Biomarkers to cell types lipid chemistry cell animal biology 

    crosswalk from bone marrow matter 

    New gene discovered that causes neurodevelopment of stagnant genes Examining new Biology cell type specific biomarkers 

    • Q&A 9:45 AM – 10:05 AM  

    9:50 AM – 10:15 AM HOT TOPICS

    Diabetes | Grand Challenge

    The American Diabetes Association estimates 30 million Americans have diabetes and 1.5 million are diagnosed annually. GCT offers the prospect of long-sought treatment for this enormous cohort and their chronic requirements. The complexity of the disease and its management constitute a grand challenge and highlight both the potential of GCT and its current limitations.

    •  Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes has been attempted for decades. Problems like loss of transplanted islet cells due to autoimmunity and graft site factors have been difficult to address. Is there anything different on the horizon for gene and cell therapies to help this be successful?
    • How is the durability of response for gene or cell therapies for diabetes being addressed? For example, what would the profile of an acceptable (vs. optimal) cell therapy look like?

    Moderator: Marie McDonnell, MD

    • Chief, Diabetes Section and Director, Diabetes Program, BWH
    • Lecturer on Medicine, HMS

    Type 1 Diabetes cost of insulin for continuous delivery of drug

    alternative treatments: 

    The Future: neuropotent stem cells 

    What keeps you up at night  Speakers: Tom Bollenbach, PhD

    • Chief Technology Officer, Advanced Regenerative Manufacturing Institute

    Data managment sterility sensors, cell survival after implantation, stem cells manufacturing, process development in manufacturing of complex cells

    Data and instrumentation the Process is the Product

    Manufacturing tight schedules Manasi Jaiman, MD

    • Vice President, Clinical Development, ViaCyte
    • Pediatric Endocrinologist

    continous glucose monitoring Bastiano Sanna, PhD

    • EVP, Chief of Cell & Gene Therapies and VCGT Site Head, Vertex Pharmaceuticals

    100 years from discovering Insulin, Insulin is not a cure in 2021 – asking patients to partner more 

    Produce large quantities of the Islet cells encapsulation technology been developed 

    Scaling up is a challengeRogerio Vivaldi, MD

    • CEO, Sigilon Therapeutics

    Advanced made, Patient of Type 1 Outer and Inner compartments of spheres (not capsule) no immune suppression continuous secretion of enzyme Insulin independence without immune suppression 

    Volume to have of-the-shelf inventory oxegenation in location lymphatic and vascularization conrol the whole process modular platform learning from others

    • Q&A 10:20 AM – 10:35 AM  

    10:20 AM – 10:40 AM FIRESIDE

    Building A Unified GCT Strategy

      Introducer: John Fish

    • CEO, Suffolk
    • Chairman of Board Trustees, Brigham Health

    Moderator: Meg Tirrell

    • Senior Health and Science Reporter, CNBC

    Last year, what was it at Novartis Speaker: Jay Bradner, MD

    • President, NIBR

    Keep eyes open, waiting the Pandemic to end and enable working back on all the indications 

    Portfolio of MET, Mimi Emerging Therapies 

    Learning from the Pandemic – operationalize the practice science, R&D leaders, new collaboratives at NIH, FDA, Novartis

    Pursue programs that will yield growth, tropic diseases with Gates Foundation, Rising Tide pods for access CGT within Novartis Partnership with UPenn in Cell Therapy 

    Cost to access to IP from Academia to a Biotech CRISPR accessing few translations to Clinic

    Protein degradation organization constraint valuation by parties in a partnership 

    Novartis: nuclear protein lipid nuclear particles, tamplate for Biotech to collaborate

    Game changing: 10% of the Portfolio, New frontiers human genetics in Ophthalmology, CAR-T, CRISPR, Gene Therapy Neurological and payloads of different matter

    • Q&A 10:45 AM – 11:00 AM  

    10:40 AM – 10:50 AM

    Break

      10:50 AM – 11:00 AM FIRST LOOK

    Getting to the Heart of the Matter: Curing Genetic Cardiomyopathy

    Christine Seidman, MD

    • Director, Cardiovascular Genetics Center, BWH
    • Smith Professor of Medicine & Genetics, HMS

    The Voice of Dr. Seidman – Her abstract is cited below

    The ultimate opportunity presented by discovering the genetic basis of human disease is accurate prediction and disease prevention. To enable this achievement, genetic insights must enable the identification of at-risk

    individuals prior to end-stage disease manifestations and strategies that delay or prevent clinical expression. Genetic cardiomyopathies provide a paradigm for fulfilling these opportunities. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction with normal or enhanced systolic performance and a unique histopathology: myocyte hypertrophy, disarray and fibrosis. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) exhibits enlarged ventricular volumes with depressed systolic performance and nonspecific histopathology. Both HCM and DCM are prevalent clinical conditions that increase risk for arrhythmias, sudden death, and heart failure. Today treatments for HCM and DCM focus on symptoms, but none prevent disease progression. Human molecular genetic studies demonstrated that these pathologies often result from dominant mutations in genes that encode protein components of the sarcomere, the contractile unit in striated muscles. These data combined with the emergence of molecular strategies to specifically modulate gene expression provide unparalleled opportunities to silence or correct mutant genes and to boost healthy gene expression in patients with genetic HCM and DCM. Many challenges remain, but the active and vital efforts of physicians, researchers, and patients are poised to ensure success.

    Hypertrophic and Dilated Cardiomyopaies ‘

    10% receive heart transplant 12 years survival 

    Mutation puterb function

    TTN: contribute 20% of dilated cardiomyopaty

    Silence gene 

    pleuripotential cells deliver therapies 

    • Q&A 11:00 AM – 11:20 AM  

    11:00 AM – 11:10 AM FIRST LOOK

    Unlocking the secret lives of proteins in health and disease

    Anna Greka, MD, PhD

    • Medicine, BWH
    • Associate Professor, Medicine, HMS

    Cyprus Island, kidney disease by mutation causing MUC1 accumulation and death BRD4780 molecule that will clear the misfolding proteins from the kidney organoids: pleuripotent stem cells small molecule developed for applications in the other cell types in brain, eye, gene mutation build mechnism for therapy clinical models transition from Academia to biotech 

    Q&A

    • 11:10 AM – 11:30 AM  

    11:10 AM – 11:35 AM

    Rare and Ultra Rare Diseases | GCT Breaks Through

    One of the most innovative segments in all of healthcare is the development of GCT driven therapies for rare and ultra-rare diseases. Driven by a series of insights and tools and funded in part by disease focused foundations, philanthropists and abundant venture funding disease after disease is yielding to new GCT technology. These often become platforms to address more prevalent diseases. The goal of making these breakthroughs routine and affordable is challenged by a range of issues including clinical trial design and pricing.

    • What is driving the interest in rare diseases?
    • What are the biggest barriers to making breakthroughs ‘routine and affordable?’
    • What is the role of retrospective and prospective natural history studies in rare disease?  When does the expected value of retrospective disease history studies justify the cost?
    • Related to the first question, what is the FDA expecting as far as controls in clinical trials for rare diseases?  How does this impact the collection of natural history data?

    Moderator: Susan Slaugenhaupt, PhD

    • Scientific Director and Elizabeth G. Riley and Daniel E. Smith Jr., Endowed Chair, Mass General Research Institute
    • Professor, Neurology, HMS

    Speakers: Leah Bloom, PhD

    • SVP, External Innovation and Strategic Alliances, Novartis Gene Therapies

    Ultra rare (less than 100) vs rare difficulty to recruit patients and to follow up after treatment Bobby Gaspar, MD, PhD

    • CEO, Orchard Therapeutics

    Study of rare condition have transfer to other larger diseases – delivery of therapeutics genes, like immune disorders 

    Patient testimonials just to hear what a treatment can make Emil Kakkis, MD, PhD

    • CEO, Ultragenyx

    Do 100 patient study then have information on natural history to develop a clinical trial Stuart Peltz, PhD

    • CEO, PTC Therapeutics

    Rare disease, challenge for FDA approval and after market commercialization follow ups

    Justification of cost for Rare disease – demonstration of Change is IP in value patients advocacy is helpful

    • Q&A 11:40 AM – 11:55 AM  

    11:40 AM – 12:00 PM FIRESIDE

    Partnering Across the GCT Spectrum

      Moderator: Erin Harris

    • Chief Editor, Cell & Gene

    Perspective & professional tenure

    Partnership in manufacturing what are the recommendations?

    Hospital systems: Partnership Challenges  Speaker: Marc Casper

    • CEO, ThermoFisher

    25 years in Diagnostics last 20 years at ThermoFisher 

    products used in the Lab for CAR-T research and manufacture 

    CGT Innovations: FDA will have a high level of approval each year

    How move from research to clinical trials to manufacturing Quicker process

    Best practices in Partnerships: the root cause if acceleration to market service providers to deliver highest standards

    Building capacity by acquisition to avoid the waiting time

    Accelerate new products been manufactured 

    Collaborations with Academic Medical center i.e., UCSF in CGT joint funding to accelerate CGT to clinics’

    Customers are extremely knowledgable, scale the capital investment made investment

    150MIL a year to improve the Workflow 

    • Q&A 12:05 PM – 12:20 PM  

    12:05 PM – 12:30 PM

    • 12:05 PM – 12:20 PM  

    12:05 PM – 12:30 PM

    CEO Panel | Anticipating Disruption | Planning for Widespread GCT

    The power of GCT to cure disease has the prospect of profoundly improving the lives of patients who respond. Planning for a disruption of this magnitude is complex and challenging as it will change care across the spectrum. Leading chief executives shares perspectives on how the industry will change and how this change should be anticipated. Moderator: Meg Tirrell

    • Senior Health and Science Reporter, CNBC

    CGT becoming staple therapy what are the disruptors emerging Speakers: Lisa Dechamps

    • SVP & Chief Business Officer, Novartis Gene Therapies

    Reimagine medicine with collaboration at MGH, MDM condition in children 

    The Science is there, sustainable processes and systems impact is transformational

    Value based pricing, risk sharing Payers and Pharma for one time therapy with life span effect

    Collaboration with FDAKieran Murphy

    • CEO, GE Healthcare

    Diagnosis of disease to be used in CGT

    2021 investment in CAR-T platform 

    Investment in several CGT frontier

    Investment in AI, ML in system design new technologies 

    GE: Scale and Global distributions, sponsor companies in software 

    Waste in Industry – Healthcare % of GDP, work with MGH to smooth the workflow faster entry into hospital and out of Hospital

    Telemedicine during is Pandemic: Radiologist needs to read remotely 

    Supply chain disruptions slow down all ecosystem 

    Production of ventilators by collaboration with GM – ingenuity 

    Scan patients outside of hospital a scanner in a Box Christian Rommel, PhD

    • Head, Pharmaceuticals Research & Development, Bayer AG

    CGT – 2016 and in 2020 new leadership and capability 

    Disease Biology and therapeutics

    Regenerative Medicine: CGT vs repair building pipeline in ophthalmology and cardiovascular 

    During Pandemic: Deliver Medicines like Moderna, Pfizer – collaborations between competitors with Government Bayer entered into Vaccines in 5 days, all processes had to change access innovations developed over decades for medical solutions 

    • Q&A 12:35 PM – 12:50 PM  

    12:35 PM – 12:55 PM FIRESIDE

    Building a GCT Portfolio

    GCT represents a large and growing market for novel therapeutics that has several segments. These include Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, Neurological Diseases, Infectious Disease, Ophthalmology, Benign Blood Disorders, and many others; Manufacturing and Supply Chain including CDMO’s and CMO’s; Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine; Tools and Platforms (viral vectors, nano delivery, gene editing, etc.). Bayer’s pharma business participates in virtually all of these segments. How does a Company like Bayer approach the development of a portfolio in a space as large and as diverse as this one? How does Bayer approach the support of the production infrastructure with unique demands and significant differences from its historical requirements? Moderator:

    Shinichiro Fuse, PhD

    • Managing Partner, MPM Capital

    Speaker: Wolfram Carius, PhD

    • EVP, Pharmaceuticals, Head of Cell & Gene Therapy, Bayer AG

    CGT will bring treatment to cure, delivery of therapies 

    Be a Leader repair, regenerate, cure

    Technology and Science for CGT – building a portfolio vs single asset decision criteria development of IP market access patients access acceleration of new products

    Bayer strategy: build platform for use by four domains  

    Gener augmentation

    Autologeneic therapy, analytics

    Gene editing

    Oncology Cell therapy tumor treatment: What kind of cells – the jury is out

    Of 23 product launch at Bayer no prediction is possible some high some lows 

    • Q&A 1:00 PM – 1:15 PM  

    12:55 PM – 1:35 PM

    Lunch

      1:40 PM – 2:05 PM

    GCT Delivery | Perfecting the Technology

    Gene delivery uses physical, chemical, or viral means to introduce genetic material into cells. As more genetically modified therapies move closer to the market, challenges involving safety, efficacy, and manufacturing have emerged. Optimizing lipidic and polymer nanoparticles and exosomal delivery is a short-term priority. This panel will examine how the short-term and long-term challenges are being tackled particularly for non-viral delivery modalities. Moderator: Natalie Artzi, PhD

    • Assistant Professor, BWH

    Speakers: Geoff McDonough, MD

    • CEO, Generation Bio

    Sonya Montgomery

    • CMO, Evox Therapeutics

    Laura Sepp-Lorenzino, PhD

    • Chief Scientific Officer, Executive Vice President, Intellia Therapeutics

    Doug Williams, PhD

    • CEO, Codiak BioSciences
    • Q&A 2:10 PM – 2:25 PM  

    2:05 PM – 2:10 PM

    Invention Discovery Grant Announcement

      2:10 PM – 2:20 PM FIRST LOOK

    Enhancing vesicles for therapeutic delivery of bioproducts

    Xandra Breakefield, PhD

    • Geneticist, MGH, MGH
    • Professor, Neurology, HMS
    • Q&A 2:20 PM – 2:35 PM  

    2:20 PM – 2:30 PM FIRST LOOK

    Versatile polymer-based nanocarriers for targeted therapy and immunomodulation

    Natalie Artzi, PhD

    • Assistant Professor, BWH
    • Q&A 2:30 PM – 2:45 PM  

    2:55 PM – 3:20 PM HOT TOPICS

    Gene Editing | Achieving Therapeutic Mainstream

    Gene editing was recognized by the Nobel Committee as “one of gene technology’s sharpest tools, having a revolutionary impact on life sciences.” Introduced in 2011, gene editing is used to modify DNA. It has applications across almost all categories of disease and is also being used in agriculture and public health.

    Today’s panel is made up of pioneers who represent foundational aspects of gene editing.  They will discuss the movement of the technology into the therapeutic mainstream.

    • Successes in gene editing – lessons learned from late-stage assets (sickle cell, ophthalmology)
    • When to use what editing tool – pros and cons of traditional gene-editing v. base editing.  Is prime editing the future? Specific use cases for epigenetic editing.
    • When we reach widespread clinical use – role of off-target editing – is the risk real?  How will we mitigate? How practical is patient-specific off-target evaluation?

    Moderator: J. Keith Joung, MD, PhD

    • Robert B. Colvin, M.D. Endowed Chair in Pathology & Pathologist, MGH
    • Professor of Pathology, HMS

    Speakers: John Evans

    • CEO, Beam Therapeutics

    Lisa Michaels

    • EVP & CMO, Editas Medicine
    • Q&A 3:25 PM – 3:50 PM  

    3:25 PM – 3:50 PM HOT TOPICS

    Common Blood Disorders | Gene Therapy

    There are several dozen companies working to develop gene or cell therapies for Sickle Cell Disease, Beta Thalassemia, and  Fanconi Anemia. In some cases, there are enzyme replacement therapies that are deemed effective and safe. In other cases, the disease is only managed at best. This panel will address a number of questions that are particular to this class of genetic diseases:

    • What are the pros and cons of various strategies for treatment? There are AAV-based editing, non-viral delivery even oligonucleotide recruitment of endogenous editing/repair mechanisms. Which approaches are most appropriate for which disease?
    • How can companies increase the speed of recruitment for clinical trials when other treatments are available? What is the best approach to educate patients on a novel therapeutic?
    • How do we best address ethnic and socio-economic diversity to be more representative of the target patient population?
    • How long do we have to follow up with the patients from the scientific, patient’s community, and payer points of view? What are the current FDA and EMA guidelines for long-term follow-up?
    • Where are we with regards to surrogate endpoints and their application to clinically meaningful endpoints?
    • What are the emerging ethical dilemmas in pediatric gene therapy research? Are there challenges with informed consent and pediatric assent for trial participation?
    • Are there differences in reimbursement policies for these different blood disorders? Clearly durability of response is a big factor. Are there other considerations?

    Moderator: David Scadden, MD

    • Director, Center for Regenerative Medicine; Co-Director, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Director, Hematologic Malignancies & Experimental Hematology, MGH
    • Jordan Professor of Medicine, HMS

    Speakers: Samarth Kukarni, PhDNick Leschly

    • Chief Bluebird, Bluebird Bio

    Mike McCune, MD, PhD

    • Head, HIV Frontiers, Global Health Innovative Technology Solutions, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
    • Q&A 3:55 PM – 4:15 PM  

    3:50 PM – 4:00 PM FIRST LOOK

    Gene Editing

    J. Keith Joung, MD, PhD

    • Robert B. Colvin, M.D. Endowed Chair in Pathology & Pathologist, MGH
    • Professor of Pathology, HMS
    • Q&A 4:00 PM – 4:20 PM  

    4:20 PM – 4:45 PM HOT TOPICS

    Gene Expression | Modulating with Oligonucleotide-Based Therapies

    Oligonucleotide drugs have recently come into their own with approvals from companies such as Biogen, Alnylam, Novartis and others. This panel will address several questions:

    How important is the delivery challenge for oligonucleotides? Are technological advancements emerging that will improve the delivery of oligonucleotides to the CNS or skeletal muscle after systemic administration?

    • Will oligonucleotides improve as a class that will make them even more effective?   Are further advancements in backbone chemistry anticipated, for example.
    • Will oligonucleotide based therapies blaze trails for follow-on gene therapy products?
    • Are small molecules a threat to oligonucleotide-based therapies?
    • Beyond exon skipping and knock-down mechanisms, what other roles will oligonucleotide-based therapies take mechanistically — can genes be activating oligonucleotides?  Is there a place for multiple mechanism oligonucleotide medicines?
    • Are there any advantages of RNAi-based oligonucleotides over ASOs, and if so for what use?

    Moderator: Jeannie Lee, MD, PhD

    • Molecular Biologist, MGH
    • Professor of Genetics, HMS

    Speakers: Bob Brown, PhD

    • CSO, EVP of R&D, Dicerna

    Brett Monia, PhD

    • CEO, Ionis

    Alfred Sandrock, MD, PhD

    • EVP, R&D and CMO, Biogen
    • Q&A 4:50 PM – 5:05 PM  

    4:45 PM – 4:55 PM FIRST LOOK

    RNA therapy for brain cancer

    Pierpaolo Peruzzi, MD, PhD

    • Nuerosurgery, BWH
    • Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
    • Q&A 4:55 PM – 5:15 PM  

    Friday, May 21, 2021

    8:30 AM – 8:55 AM

    Venture Investing | Shaping GCT Translation

    What is occurring in the GCT venture capital segment? Which elements are seeing the most activity? Which areas have cooled? How is the investment market segmented between gene therapy, cell therapy and gene editing? What makes a hot GCT company? How long will the market stay frothy? Some review of demographics — # of investments, sizes, etc. Why is the market hot and how long do we expect it to stay that way? Rank the top 5 geographic markets for GCT company creation and investing? Are there academic centers that have been especially adept at accelerating GCT outcomes? Do the business models for the rapid development of coronavirus vaccine have any lessons for how GCT technology can be brought to market more quickly? Moderator: Meredith Fisher, PhD

    • Partner, Mass General Brigham Innovation Fund

    Speakers: David Berry, MD, PhD

    • CEO, Valo Health
    • General Partner, Flagship Pioneering

    Robert Nelsen

    • Managing Director, Co-founder, ARCH Venture Partners

    Kush Parmar, MD, PhD

    • Managing Partner, 5AM Ventures
    • Q&A 9:00 AM – 9:15 AM  

    9:00 AM – 9:25 AM

    Regenerative Medicine | Stem Cells

    The promise of stem cells has been a highlight in the realm of regenerative medicine. Unfortunately, that promise remains largely in the future. Recent breakthroughs have accelerated these potential interventions in particular for treating neurological disease. Among the topics the panel will consider are:

    • Stem cell sourcing
    • Therapeutic indication growth
    • Genetic and other modification in cell production
    • Cell production to final product optimization and challenges
    • How to optimize the final product

    Moderator: Ole Isacson, MD, PhD

    • Director, Neuroregeneration Research Institute, McLean
    • Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience, HMS

    Speakers: Kapil Bharti, PhD

    • Senior Investigator, Ocular and Stem Cell Translational Research Section, NIH

    Joe Burns, PhD

    • VP, Head of Biology, Decibel Therapeutics

    Erin Kimbrel, PhD

    • Executive Director, Regenerative Medicine, Astellas

    Nabiha Saklayen, PhD

    • CEO and Co-Founder, Cellino
    • Q&A 9:30 AM – 9:45 AM  

    9:25 AM – 9:35 AM FIRST LOOK

    Stem Cells

    Bob Carter, MD, PhD

    • Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH
    • William and Elizabeth Sweet, Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
    • Q&A 9:35 AM – 9:55 AM  

    9:35 AM – 10:00 AM

    Capital Formation ’21-30 | Investing Modes Driving GCT Technology and Timing

    The dynamics of venture/PE investing and IPOs are fast evolving. What are the drivers – will the number of investors grow will the size of early rounds continue to grow? How is this reflected in GCT target areas, company design, and biotech overall? Do patients benefit from these trends? Is crossover investing a distinct class or a little of both? Why did it emerge and what are the characteristics of the players?  Will SPACs play a role in the growth of the gene and cell therapy industry. What is the role of corporate investment arms eg NVS, Bayer, GV, etc. – has a category killer emerged?  Are we nearing the limit of what the GCT market can absorb or will investment capital continue to grow unabated? Moderator: Roger Kitterman

    • VP, Venture, Mass General Brigham

    Speakers: Ellen Hukkelhoven, PhD

    • Managing Director, Perceptive Advisors

    Peter Kolchinsky, PhD

    • Founder and Managing Partner, RA Capital Management

    Deep Nishar

    • Senior Managing Partner, SoftBank Investment Advisors

    Oleg Nodelman

    • Founder & Managing Partner, EcoR1 Capital
    • Q&A 10:05 AM – 10:20 AM  

    10:00 AM – 10:10 AM FIRST LOOK

    New scientific and clinical developments for autologous stem cell therapy for Parkinson’s disease patients

    Penelope Hallett, PhD

    • NRL, McLean
    • Assistant Professor Psychiatry, HMS
    • Q&A 10:10 AM – 10:30 AM  

    10:10 AM – 10:35 AM HOT TOPICS

    Neurodegenerative Clinical Outcomes | Achieving GCT Success

    Can stem cell-based platforms become successful treatments for neurodegenerative diseases?

    •  What are the commonalities driving GCT success in neurodegenerative disease and non-neurologic disease, what are the key differences?
    • Overcoming treatment administration challenges
    • GCT impact on degenerative stage of disease
    • How difficult will it be to titrate the size of the cell therapy effect in different neurological disorders and for different patients?
    • Demonstrating clinical value to patients and payers
    • Revised clinical trial models to address issues and concerns specific to GCT

    Moderator: Bob Carter, MD, PhD

    • Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH
    • William and Elizabeth Sweet, Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS

    Speakers: Erwan Bezard, PhD

    • INSERM Research Director, Institute of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Nikola Kojic, PhD

    • CEO and Co-Founder, Oryon Cell Therapies

    Geoff MacKay

    • President & CEO, AVROBIO

    Viviane Tabar, MD

    • Founding Investigator, BlueRock Therapeutics
    • Chair of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering
    • Q&A 10:40 AM – 10:55 AM  

    10:35 AM – 11:35 AM

    Disruptive Dozen: 12 Technologies that Will Reinvent GCT

    Nearly one hundred senior Mass General Brigham Harvard faculty contributed to the creation of this group of twelve GCT technologies that they believe will breakthrough in the next two years. The Disruptive Dozen identifies and ranks the GCT technologies that will be available on at least an experimental basis to have the chance of significantly improving health care. 11:35 AM – 11:45 AM

    Concluding Remarks

    Friday, May 21, 2021

    Computer connection to the iCloud of WordPress.com FROZE completely at 10:30AM EST and no file update was possible. COVERAGE OF MAY 21, 2021 IS RECORDED BELOW FOLLOWING THE AGENDA BY COPY AN DPASTE OF ALL THE TWEETS I PRODUCED ON MAY 21, 2021 8:30 AM – 8:55 AM

    Venture Investing | Shaping GCT Translation

    What is occurring in the GCT venture capital segment? Which elements are seeing the most activity? Which areas have cooled? How is the investment market segmented between gene therapy, cell therapy and gene editing? What makes a hot GCT company? How long will the market stay frothy? Some review of demographics — # of investments, sizes, etc. Why is the market hot and how long do we expect it to stay that way? Rank the top 5 geographic markets for GCT company creation and investing? Are there academic centers that have been especially adept at accelerating GCT outcomes? Do the business models for the rapid development of coronavirus vaccine have any lessons for how GCT technology can be brought to market more quickly? Moderator: Meredith Fisher, PhD

    • Partner, Mass General Brigham Innovation Fund

    Speakers: David Berry, MD, PhD

    • CEO, Valo Health
    • General Partner, Flagship Pioneering

    Robert Nelsen

    • Managing Director, Co-founder, ARCH Venture Partners

    Kush Parmar, MD, PhD

    • Managing Partner, 5AM Ventures
    • Q&A 9:00 AM – 9:15 AM  

    9:00 AM – 9:25 AM

    Regenerative Medicine | Stem Cells

    The promise of stem cells has been a highlight in the realm of regenerative medicine. Unfortunately, that promise remains largely in the future. Recent breakthroughs have accelerated these potential interventions in particular for treating neurological disease. Among the topics the panel will consider are:

    • Stem cell sourcing
    • Therapeutic indication growth
    • Genetic and other modification in cell production
    • Cell production to final product optimization and challenges
    • How to optimize the final product

    Moderator: Ole Isacson, MD, PhD

    • Director, Neuroregeneration Research Institute, McLean
    • Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience, HMS

    Speakers: Kapil Bharti, PhD

    • Senior Investigator, Ocular and Stem Cell Translational Research Section, NIH

    Joe Burns, PhD

    • VP, Head of Biology, Decibel Therapeutics

    Erin Kimbrel, PhD

    • Executive Director, Regenerative Medicine, Astellas

    Nabiha Saklayen, PhD

    • CEO and Co-Founder, Cellino
    • Q&A 9:30 AM – 9:45 AM  

    9:25 AM – 9:35 AM FIRST LOOK

    Stem Cells

    Bob Carter, MD, PhD

    • Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH
    • William and Elizabeth Sweet, Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
    • Q&A 9:35 AM – 9:55 AM  

    9:35 AM – 10:00 AM

    Capital Formation ’21-30 | Investing Modes Driving GCT Technology and Timing

    The dynamics of venture/PE investing and IPOs are fast evolving. What are the drivers – will the number of investors grow will the size of early rounds continue to grow? How is this reflected in GCT target areas, company design, and biotech overall? Do patients benefit from these trends? Is crossover investing a distinct class or a little of both? Why did it emerge and what are the characteristics of the players?  Will SPACs play a role in the growth of the gene and cell therapy industry. What is the role of corporate investment arms eg NVS, Bayer, GV, etc. – has a category killer emerged?  Are we nearing the limit of what the GCT market can absorb or will investment capital continue to grow unabated? Moderator: Roger Kitterman

    • VP, Venture, Mass General Brigham

    Speakers: Ellen Hukkelhoven, PhD

    • Managing Director, Perceptive Advisors

    Peter Kolchinsky, PhD

    • Founder and Managing Partner, RA Capital Management

    Deep Nishar

    • Senior Managing Partner, SoftBank Investment Advisors

    Oleg Nodelman

    • Founder & Managing Partner, EcoR1 Capital
    • Q&A 10:05 AM – 10:20 AM  

    10:00 AM – 10:10 AM FIRST LOOK

    New scientific and clinical developments for autologous stem cell therapy for Parkinson’s disease patients

    Penelope Hallett, PhD

    • NRL, McLean
    • Assistant Professor Psychiatry, HMS
    • Q&A 10:10 AM – 10:30 AM  

    10:10 AM – 10:35 AM HOT TOPICS

    Neurodegenerative Clinical Outcomes | Achieving GCT Success

    Can stem cell-based platforms become successful treatments for neurodegenerative diseases?

    •  What are the commonalities driving GCT success in neurodegenerative disease and non-neurologic disease, what are the key differences?
    • Overcoming treatment administration challenges
    • GCT impact on degenerative stage of disease
    • How difficult will it be to titrate the size of the cell therapy effect in different neurological disorders and for different patients?
    • Demonstrating clinical value to patients and payers
    • Revised clinical trial models to address issues and concerns specific to GCT

    Moderator: Bob Carter, MD, PhD

    • Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH
    • William and Elizabeth Sweet, Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS

    Speakers: Erwan Bezard, PhD

    • INSERM Research Director, Institute of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Nikola Kojic, PhD

    • CEO and Co-Founder, Oryon Cell Therapies

    Geoff MacKay

    • President & CEO, AVROBIO

    Viviane Tabar, MD

    • Founding Investigator, BlueRock Therapeutics
    • Chair of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering
    • Q&A 10:40 AM – 10:55 AM  

    10:35 AM – 11:35 AM

    Disruptive Dozen: 12 Technologies that Will Reinvent GCT

    Nearly one hundred senior Mass General Brigham Harvard faculty contributed to the creation of this group of twelve GCT technologies that they believe will breakthrough in the next two years. The Disruptive Dozen identifies and ranks the GCT technologies that will be available on at least an experimental basis to have the chance of significantly improving health care. 11:35 AM – 11:45 AM

    Concluding Remarks

    The co-chairs convene to reflect on the insights shared over the three days. They will discuss what to expect at the in-person GCT focused May 2-4, 2022 World Medical Innovation Forum.

     

    The co-chairs convene to reflect on the insights shared over the three days. They will discuss what to expect at the in-person GCT focused May 2-4, 2022 World Medical Innovation Forum.Christine Seidman, MD

    Hypertrophic and Dilated Cardiomyopaies ‘

    10% receive heart transplant 12 years survival 

    Mutation puterb function

    TTN: contribute 20% of dilated cardiomyopaty

    Silence gene 

    pleuripotential cells deliver therapies 

    • Q&A 11:00 AM – 11:20 AM  

    11:00 AM – 11:10 AM FIRST LOOK

    Unlocking the secret lives of proteins in health and disease

    Anna Greka, MD, PhD

    • Medicine, BWH
    • Associate Professor, Medicine, HMS

    Cyprus Island, kidney disease by mutation causing MUC1 accumulation and death BRD4780 molecule that will clear the misfolding proteins from the kidney organoids: pleuripotent stem cells small molecule developed for applications in the other cell types in brain, eye, gene mutation build mechnism for therapy clinical models transition from Academia to biotech 

    Q&A

    • 11:10 AM – 11:30 AM  

    11:10 AM – 11:35 AM

    Rare and Ultra Rare Diseases | GCT Breaks Through

    One of the most innovative segments in all of healthcare is the development of GCT driven therapies for rare and ultra-rare diseases. Driven by a series of insights and tools and funded in part by disease focused foundations, philanthropists and abundant venture funding disease after disease is yielding to new GCT technology. These often become platforms to address more prevalent diseases. The goal of making these breakthroughs routine and affordable is challenged by a range of issues including clinical trial design and pricing.

    • What is driving the interest in rare diseases?
    • What are the biggest barriers to making breakthroughs ‘routine and affordable?’
    • What is the role of retrospective and prospective natural history studies in rare disease?  When does the expected value of retrospective disease history studies justify the cost?
    • Related to the first question, what is the FDA expecting as far as controls in clinical trials for rare diseases?  How does this impact the collection of natural history data?

    Moderator: Susan Slaugenhaupt, PhD

    • Scientific Director and Elizabeth G. Riley and Daniel E. Smith Jr., Endowed Chair, Mass General Research Institute
    • Professor, Neurology, HMS

    Speakers: Leah Bloom, PhD

    • SVP, External Innovation and Strategic Alliances, Novartis Gene Therapies

    Ultra rare (less than 100) vs rare difficulty to recruit patients and to follow up after treatment Bobby Gaspar, MD, PhD

    • CEO, Orchard Therapeutics

    Study of rare condition have transfer to other larger diseases – delivery of therapeutics genes, like immune disorders 

    Patient testimonials just to hear what a treatment can make Emil Kakkis, MD, PhD

    • CEO, Ultragenyx

    Do 100 patient study then have information on natural history to develop a clinical trial Stuart Peltz, PhD

    • CEO, PTC Therapeutics

    Rare disease, challenge for FDA approval and after market commercialization follow ups

    Justification of cost for Rare disease – demonstration of Change is IP in value patients advocacy is helpful

    • Q&A 11:40 AM – 11:55 AM  

    11:40 AM – 12:00 PM FIRESIDE

    Partnering Across the GCT Spectrum

      Moderator: Erin Harris

    • Chief Editor, Cell & Gene

    Perspective & professional tenure

    Partnership in manufacturing what are the recommendations?

    Hospital systems: Partnership Challenges  Speaker: Marc Casper

    • CEO, ThermoFisher

    25 years in Diagnostics last 20 years at ThermoFisher 

    products used in the Lab for CAR-T research and manufacture 

    CGT Innovations: FDA will have a high level of approval each year

    How move from research to clinical trials to manufacturing Quicker process

    Best practices in Partnerships: the root cause if acceleration to market service providers to deliver highest standards

    Building capacity by acquisition to avoid the waiting time

    Accelerate new products been manufactured 

    Collaborations with Academic Medical center i.e., UCSF in CGT joint funding to accelerate CGT to clinics’

    Customers are extremely knowledgable, scale the capital investment made investment

    150MIL a year to improve the Workflow 

    • Q&A 12:05 PM – 12:20 PM  

    12:05 PM – 12:30 PM

    CEO Panel | Anticipating Disruption | Planning for Widespread GCT

    The power of GCT to cure disease has the prospect of profoundly improving the lives of patients who respond. Planning for a disruption of this magnitude is complex and challenging as it will change care across the spectrum. Leading chief executives shares perspectives on how the industry will change and how this change should be anticipated. Moderator: Meg Tirrell

    • Senior Health and Science Reporter, CNBC

    CGT becoming staple therapy what are the disruptors emerging Speakers: Lisa Dechamps

    • SVP & Chief Business Officer, Novartis Gene Therapies

    Reimagine medicine with collaboration at MGH, MDM condition in children 

    The Science is there, sustainable processes and systems impact is transformational

    Value based pricing, risk sharing Payers and Pharma for one time therapy with life span effect

    Collaboration with FDAKieran Murphy

    • CEO, GE Healthcare

    Diagnosis of disease to be used in CGT

    2021 investment in CAR-T platform 

    Investment in several CGT frontier

    Investment in AI, ML in system design new technologies 

    GE: Scale and Global distributions, sponsor companies in software 

    Waste in Industry – Healthcare % of GDP, work with MGH to smooth the workflow faster entry into hospital and out of Hospital

    Telemedicine during is Pandemic: Radiologist needs to read remotely 

    Supply chain disruptions slow down all ecosystem 

    Production of ventilators by collaboration with GM – ingenuity 

    Scan patients outside of hospital a scanner in a Box Christian Rommel, PhD

    • Head, Pharmaceuticals Research & Development, Bayer AG

    CGT – 2016 and in 2020 new leadership and capability 

    Disease Biology and therapeutics

    Regenerative Medicine: CGT vs repair building pipeline in ophthalmology and cardiovascular 

    During Pandemic: Deliver Medicines like Moderna, Pfizer – collaborations between competitors with Government Bayer entered into Vaccines in 5 days, all processes had to change access innovations developed over decades for medical solutions 

    • Q&A 12:35 PM – 12:50 PM  

    12:35 PM – 12:55 PM FIRESIDE

    Building a GCT Portfolio

    GCT represents a large and growing market for novel therapeutics that has several segments. These include Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, Neurological Diseases, Infectious Disease, Ophthalmology, Benign Blood Disorders, and many others; Manufacturing and Supply Chain including CDMO’s and CMO’s; Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine; Tools and Platforms (viral vectors, nano delivery, gene editing, etc.). Bayer’s pharma business participates in virtually all of these segments. How does a Company like Bayer approach the development of a portfolio in a space as large and as diverse as this one? How does Bayer approach the support of the production infrastructure with unique demands and significant differences from its historical requirements? Moderator:

    Shinichiro Fuse, PhD

    • Managing Partner, MPM Capital

    Speaker: Wolfram Carius, PhD

    • EVP, Pharmaceuticals, Head of Cell & Gene Therapy, Bayer AG

    CGT will bring treatment to cure, delivery of therapies 

    Be a Leader repair, regenerate, cure

    Technology and Science for CGT – building a portfolio vs single asset decision criteria development of IP market access patients access acceleration of new products

    Bayer strategy: build platform for use by four domains  

    Gener augmentation

    Autologeneic therapy, analytics

    Gene editing

    Oncology Cell therapy tumor treatment: What kind of cells – the jury is out

    Of 23 product launch at Bayer no prediction is possible some high some lows 

    • Q&A 1:00 PM – 1:15 PM  

    12:55 PM – 1:35 PM

    Lunch

      1:40 PM – 2:05 PM

    GCT Delivery | Perfecting the Technology

    Gene delivery uses physical, chemical, or viral means to introduce genetic material into cells. As more genetically modified therapies move closer to the market, challenges involving safety, efficacy, and manufacturing have emerged. Optimizing lipidic and polymer nanoparticles and exosomal delivery is a short-term priority. This panel will examine how the short-term and long-term challenges are being tackled particularly for non-viral delivery modalities. Moderator: Natalie Artzi, PhD

    • Assistant Professor, BWH

    Speakers: Geoff McDonough, MD

    • CEO, Generation Bio

    Sonya Montgomery

    • CMO, Evox Therapeutics

    Laura Sepp-Lorenzino, PhD

    • Chief Scientific Officer, Executive Vice President, Intellia Therapeutics

    Doug Williams, PhD

    • CEO, Codiak BioSciences
    • Q&A 2:10 PM – 2:25 PM  

    2:05 PM – 2:10 PM

    Invention Discovery Grant Announcement

      2:10 PM – 2:20 PM FIRST LOOK

    Enhancing vesicles for therapeutic delivery of bioproducts

    Xandra Breakefield, PhD

    • Geneticist, MGH, MGH
    • Professor, Neurology, HMS
    • Q&A 2:20 PM – 2:35 PM  

    2:20 PM – 2:30 PM FIRST LOOK

    Versatile polymer-based nanocarriers for targeted therapy and immunomodulation

    Natalie Artzi, PhD

    • Assistant Professor, BWH
    • Q&A 2:30 PM – 2:45 PM  

    2:55 PM – 3:20 PM HOT TOPICS

    Gene Editing | Achieving Therapeutic Mainstream

    Gene editing was recognized by the Nobel Committee as “one of gene technology’s sharpest tools, having a revolutionary impact on life sciences.” Introduced in 2011, gene editing is used to modify DNA. It has applications across almost all categories of disease and is also being used in agriculture and public health.

    Today’s panel is made up of pioneers who represent foundational aspects of gene editing.  They will discuss the movement of the technology into the therapeutic mainstream.

    • Successes in gene editing – lessons learned from late-stage assets (sickle cell, ophthalmology)
    • When to use what editing tool – pros and cons of traditional gene-editing v. base editing.  Is prime editing the future? Specific use cases for epigenetic editing.
    • When we reach widespread clinical use – role of off-target editing – is the risk real?  How will we mitigate? How practical is patient-specific off-target evaluation?

    Moderator: J. Keith Joung, MD, PhD

    • Robert B. Colvin, M.D. Endowed Chair in Pathology & Pathologist, MGH
    • Professor of Pathology, HMS

    Speakers: John Evans

    • CEO, Beam Therapeutics

    Lisa Michaels

    • EVP & CMO, Editas Medicine
    • Q&A 3:25 PM – 3:50 PM  

    3:25 PM – 3:50 PM HOT TOPICS

    Common Blood Disorders | Gene Therapy

    There are several dozen companies working to develop gene or cell therapies for Sickle Cell Disease, Beta Thalassemia, and  Fanconi Anemia. In some cases, there are enzyme replacement therapies that are deemed effective and safe. In other cases, the disease is only managed at best. This panel will address a number of questions that are particular to this class of genetic diseases:

    • What are the pros and cons of various strategies for treatment? There are AAV-based editing, non-viral delivery even oligonucleotide recruitment of endogenous editing/repair mechanisms. Which approaches are most appropriate for which disease?
    • How can companies increase the speed of recruitment for clinical trials when other treatments are available? What is the best approach to educate patients on a novel therapeutic?
    • How do we best address ethnic and socio-economic diversity to be more representative of the target patient population?
    • How long do we have to follow up with the patients from the scientific, patient’s community, and payer points of view? What are the current FDA and EMA guidelines for long-term follow-up?
    • Where are we with regards to surrogate endpoints and their application to clinically meaningful endpoints?
    • What are the emerging ethical dilemmas in pediatric gene therapy research? Are there challenges with informed consent and pediatric assent for trial participation?
    • Are there differences in reimbursement policies for these different blood disorders? Clearly durability of response is a big factor. Are there other considerations?

    Moderator: David Scadden, MD

    • Director, Center for Regenerative Medicine; Co-Director, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Director, Hematologic Malignancies & Experimental Hematology, MGH
    • Jordan Professor of Medicine, HMS

    Speakers: Samarth Kukarni, PhDNick Leschly

    • Chief Bluebird, Bluebird Bio

    Mike McCune, MD, PhD

    • Head, HIV Frontiers, Global Health Innovative Technology Solutions, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
    • Q&A 3:55 PM – 4:15 PM  

    3:50 PM – 4:00 PM FIRST LOOK

    Gene Editing

    J. Keith Joung, MD, PhD

    • Robert B. Colvin, M.D. Endowed Chair in Pathology & Pathologist, MGH
    • Professor of Pathology, HMS
    • Q&A 4:00 PM – 4:20 PM  

    4:20 PM – 4:45 PM HOT TOPICS

    Gene Expression | Modulating with Oligonucleotide-Based Therapies

    Oligonucleotide drugs have recently come into their own with approvals from companies such as Biogen, Alnylam, Novartis and others. This panel will address several questions:

    How important is the delivery challenge for oligonucleotides? Are technological advancements emerging that will improve the delivery of oligonucleotides to the CNS or skeletal muscle after systemic administration?

    • Will oligonucleotides improve as a class that will make them even more effective?   Are further advancements in backbone chemistry anticipated, for example.
    • Will oligonucleotide based therapies blaze trails for follow-on gene therapy products?
    • Are small molecules a threat to oligonucleotide-based therapies?
    • Beyond exon skipping and knock-down mechanisms, what other roles will oligonucleotide-based therapies take mechanistically — can genes be activating oligonucleotides?  Is there a place for multiple mechanism oligonucleotide medicines?
    • Are there any advantages of RNAi-based oligonucleotides over ASOs, and if so for what use?

    Moderator: Jeannie Lee, MD, PhD

    • Molecular Biologist, MGH
    • Professor of Genetics, HMS

    Speakers: Bob Brown, PhD

    • CSO, EVP of R&D, Dicerna

    Brett Monia, PhD

    • CEO, Ionis

    Alfred Sandrock, MD, PhD

    • EVP, R&D and CMO, Biogen
    • Q&A 4:50 PM – 5:05 PM  

    4:45 PM – 4:55 PM FIRST LOOK

    RNA therapy for brain cancer

    Pierpaolo Peruzzi, MD, PhD

    • Nuerosurgery, BWH
    • Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
    • Q&A 4:55 PM – 5:15 PM  

    Friday, May 21, 2021

    Computer connection to the iCloud of WordPress.com FROZE completely at 10:30AM EST and no file update was possible. COVERAGE OF MAY 21, 2021 IS RECORDED BELOW FOLLOWING THE AGENDA BY COPY AN DPASTE OF ALL THE TWEETS I PRODUCED ON MAY 21, 2021

    8:30 AM – 8:55 AM

    Venture Investing | Shaping GCT Translation

    What is occurring in the GCT venture capital segment? Which elements are seeing the most activity? Which areas have cooled? How is the investment market segmented between gene therapy, cell therapy and gene editing? What makes a hot GCT company? How long will the market stay frothy? Some review of demographics — # of investments, sizes, etc. Why is the market hot and how long do we expect it to stay that way? Rank the top 5 geographic markets for GCT company creation and investing? Are there academic centers that have been especially adept at accelerating GCT outcomes? Do the business models for the rapid development of coronavirus vaccine have any lessons for how GCT technology can be brought to market more quickly? Moderator:   Meredith Fisher, PhD

    • Partner, Mass General Brigham Innovation Fund

    Strategies, success what changes are needed in the drug discovery process   Speakers:  

    Bring disruptive frontier as a platform with reliable delivery CGT double knock out disease cure all change efficiency and scope human centric vs mice centered right scale of data converted into therapeutics acceleratetion 

    Innovation in drugs 60% fails in trial because of Toxicology system of the future deal with big diseases

    Moderna is an example in unlocking what is inside us Microbiome and beyond discover new drugs epigenetics  

    • Robert Nelsen
      • Managing Director, Co-founder, ARCH Venture Partners

    Manufacturing change is not a new clinical trial FDA need to be presented with new rethinking for big innovations Drug pricing cheaper requires systematization How to systematically scaling up systematize the discovery and the production regulatory innovations

    Responsibility mismatch should be and what is “are”

    Long term diseases Stack holders and modalities risk benefir for populations 

    • Q&A 9:00 AM – 9:15 AM  

    9:00 AM – 9:25 AM

    Regenerative Medicine | Stem Cells

    The promise of stem cells has been a highlight in the realm of regenerative medicine. Unfortunately, that promise remains largely in the future. Recent breakthroughs have accelerated these potential interventions in particular for treating neurological disease. Among the topics the panel will consider are:

    • Stem cell sourcing
    • Therapeutic indication growth
    • Genetic and other modification in cell production
    • Cell production to final product optimization and challenges
    • How to optimize the final product
    • Moderator:
      • Ole Isacson, MD, PhD
        • Director, Neuroregeneration Research Institute, McLean
        • Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience, MGH, HMS

    Opportunities in the next generation of the tactical level Welcome the oprimism and energy level of all Translational medicine funding stem cells enormous opportunities 

    • Speakers:
    • Kapil Bharti, PhD
      • Senior Investigator, Ocular and Stem Cell Translational Research Section, NIH
      • first drug required to establish the process for that innovations design of animal studies not done before
      • Off-th-shelf one time treatment becoming cure 
      •  Intact tissue in a dish is fragile to maintain metabolism
      Joe Burns, PhD
      • VP, Head of Biology, Decibel Therapeutics
      • Ear inside the scall compartments and receptors responsible for hearing highly differentiated tall ask to identify cell for anticipated differentiation
      • multiple cell types and tissue to follow
      Erin Kimbrel, PhD
      • Executive Director, Regenerative Medicine, Astellas
      • In the ocular space immunogenecity
      • regulatory communication
      • use gene editing for immunogenecity Cas1 and Cas2 autologous cells
      • gene editing and programming big opportunities 
      Nabiha Saklayen, PhD
      • CEO and Co-Founder, Cellino
      • scale production of autologous cells foundry using semiconductor process in building cassettes
      • solution for autologous cells
    • Q&A 9:30 AM – 9:45 AM  

    9:25 AM – 9:35 AM FIRST LOOK

    Stem Cells

    Bob Carter, MD, PhD

    • Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH
    • William and Elizabeth Sweet, Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
    • Cell therapy for Parkinson to replace dopamine producing cells lost ability to produce dopamin
    • skin cell to become autologous cells reprograms to become cells producing dopamine
    • transplantation fibroblast cells metabolic driven process lower mutation burden 
    • Quercetin inhibition elimination undifferentiated cells graft survival oxygenation increased 
    • Q&A 9:35 AM – 9:55 AM  

    9:35 AM – 10:00 AM

    Capital Formation ’21-30 | Investing Modes Driving GCT Technology and Timing

    The dynamics of venture/PE investing and IPOs are fast evolving. What are the drivers – will the number of investors grow will the size of early rounds continue to grow? How is this reflected in GCT target areas, company design, and biotech overall? Do patients benefit from these trends? Is crossover investing a distinct class or a little of both? Why did it emerge and what are the characteristics of the players?  Will SPACs play a role in the growth of the gene and cell therapy industry. What is the role of corporate investment arms eg NVS, Bayer, GV, etc. – has a category killer emerged?  Are we nearing the limit of what the GCT market can absorb or will investment capital continue to grow unabated? Moderator: Roger Kitterman

    • VP, Venture, Mass General Brigham
    • Saturation reached or more investment is coming in CGT 

    Speakers: Ellen Hukkelhoven, PhD

    • Managing Director, Perceptive Advisors
    • Cardiac area transduct cells
    • matching tools
    • 10% success of phase 1 in drug development next phase matters more 

    Peter Kolchinsky, PhD

    • Founder and Managing Partner, RA Capital Management
    • Future proof for new comers disruptors 
    • Ex Vivo gene therapy to improve funding products what tool kit belongs to 
    • company insulation from next instability vs comapny stabilizing themselves along few years
    • Company interested in SPAC 
    • cross over investment vs SPAC
    • Multi Omics in cancer early screening metastatic diseas will be wiped out 

    Deep Nishar

    • Senior Managing Partner, SoftBank Investment Advisors
    • Young field vs CGT started in the 80s 
    • high payloads is a challenge
    • cost effective fast delivery to large populations
    • Mission oriented by the team and management  
    • Multi Omics disease modality 

    Oleg Nodelman

    • Founder & Managing Partner, EcoR1 Capital
    • Invest in company next round of investment will be IPO
    • Help company raise money cross over investment vs SPAC
    • Innovating ideas from academia in need for funding 
    • Q&A 10:05 AM – 10:20 AM  

    10:00 AM – 10:10 AM FIRST LOOK

    New scientific and clinical developments for autologous stem cell therapy for Parkinson’s disease patients

    Penelope Hallett, PhD

    • NRL, McLean
    • Assistant Professor Psychiatry, HMS
    • Pharmacologic agent in existing cause another disorders locomo-movement related 
    • efficacy Autologous cell therapy transplantation approach program T cells into dopamine generating neurons greater than Allogeneic cell transplantation 
    • Q&A 10:10 AM – 10:30 AM  

    10:10 AM – 10:35 AM HOT TOPICS

    Neurodegenerative Clinical Outcomes | Achieving GCT Success

    Can stem cell-based platforms become successful treatments for neurodegenerative diseases?

    •  What are the commonalities driving GCT success in neurodegenerative disease and non-neurologic disease, what are the key differences?
    • Overcoming treatment administration challenges
    • GCT impact on degenerative stage of disease
    • How difficult will it be to titrate the size of the cell therapy effect in different neurological disorders and for different patients?
    • Demonstrating clinical value to patients and payers
    • Revised clinical trial models to address issues and concerns specific to GCT

    Moderator: Bob Carter, MD, PhD

    • Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH
    • William and Elizabeth Sweet, Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS
    • Neurogeneration REVERSAL or slowing down 

    Speakers: Erwan Bezard, PhD

    • INSERM Research Director, Institute of Neurodegenerative Diseases
    • Cautious on reversal 
    • Early intervantion versus late

    Nikola Kojic, PhD

    • CEO and Co-Founder, Oryon Cell Therapies
    • Autologus cell therapy placed focal replacing missing synapses reestablishment of neural circuitary

    Geoff MacKay

    • President & CEO, AVROBIO
    • Prevent condition to be manifested in the first place 
    • clinical effect durable single infusion preventions of symptoms to manifest 
    • Cerebral edema – stabilization
    • Gene therapy know which is the abnormal gene grafting the corrected one 
    • More than biomarker as end point functional benefit not yet established  

    Viviane Tabar, MD

    • Founding Investigator, BlueRock Therapeutics
    • Chair of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering
    • Current market does not have delivery mechanism that a drug-delivery is the solution Trials would fail on DELIVERY
    • Immune suppressed patients during one year to avoid graft rejection Autologous approach of Parkinson patient genetically mutated reprogramed as dopamine generating neuron – unknowns are present
    • Circuitry restoration
    • Microenvironment disease ameliorate symptoms – education of patients on the treatment 
    • Q&A 10:40 AM – 10:55 AM  

    10:35 AM – 11:35 AM

    Disruptive Dozen: 12 Technologies that Will Reinvent GCT

    Nearly one hundred senior Mass General Brigham Harvard faculty contributed to the creation of this group of twelve GCT technologies that they believe will breakthrough in the next two years. The Disruptive Dozen identifies and ranks the GCT technologies that will be available on at least an experimental basis to have the chance of significantly improving health care. 11:35 AM – 11:45 AM

    Concluding Remarks

    The co-chairs convene to reflect on the insights shared over the three days. They will discuss what to expect at the in-person GCT focused May 2-4, 2022 World Medical Innovation Forum.

    ALL THE TWEETS PRODUCED ON MAY 21, 2021 INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    • @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Erwan Bezard, PhD INSERM Research Director, Institute of Neurodegenerative Diseases Cautious on reversal

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    • @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Nikola Kojic, PhD CEO and Co-Founder, Oryon Cell Therapies Autologus cell therapy placed focal replacing missing synapses reestablishment of neural circutary

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Bob Carter, MD, PhD Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH William and Elizabeth Sweet, Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS Neurogeneration REVERSAL or slowing down? 

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Penelope Hallett, PhD NRL, McLean Assistant Professor Psychiatry, HMS efficacy Autologous cell therapy transplantation approach program T cells into dopamine genetating cells greater than Allogeneic cell transplantation 

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Penelope Hallett, PhD NRL, McLean Assistant Professor Psychiatry, HMS Pharmacologic agent in existing cause another disorders locomo-movement related 

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Roger Kitterman VP, Venture, Mass General Brigham Saturation reached or more investment is coming in CGT Multi OMICS and academia originated innovations are the most attractive areas

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    1

    3

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Roger Kitterman VP, Venture, Mass General Brigham Saturation reached or more investment is coming in CGT 

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    1

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Oleg Nodelman Founder & Managing Partner, EcoR1 Capital Invest in company next round of investment will be IPO 20% discount

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Peter Kolchinsky, PhD Founder and Managing Partner, RA Capital Management Future proof for new comers disruptors  Ex Vivo gene therapy to improve funding products what tool kit belongs to 

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    4h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Deep Nishar Senior Managing Partner, SoftBank Investment Advisors Young field vs CGT started in the 80s  high payloads is a challenge 

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Bob Carter, MD, PhD MGH, HMS cells producing dopamine transplantation fibroblast cells metabolic driven process lower mutation burden  Quercetin inhibition elimination undifferentiated cells graft survival oxygenation increased 

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, MGH, Professor of Neurosurgery, HMS Cell therapy for Parkinson to replace dopamine producing cells lost ability to produce dopamine skin cell to become autologous cells reprogramed  

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Kapil Bharti, PhD Senior Investigator, Ocular and Stem Cell Translational Research Section, NIH Off-th-shelf one time treatment becoming cure  Intact tissue in a dish is fragile to maintain metabolism to become like semiconductors

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Ole Isacson, MD, PhD Director, Neuroregeneration Research Institute, McLean Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience, MGH, HMS Opportunities in the next generation of the tactical level Welcome the oprimism and energy level of all

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Erin Kimbrel, PhD Executive Director, Regenerative Medicine, Astellas In the ocular space immunogenecity regulatory communication use gene editing for immunogenecity Cas1 and Cas2 autologous cells

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Nabiha Saklayen, PhD CEO and Co-Founder, Cellino scale production of autologous cells foundry using semiconductor process in building cassettes by optic physicists

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Joe Burns, PhD VP, Head of Biology, Decibel Therapeutics Ear inside the scall compartments and receptors responsible for hearing highly differentiated tall ask to identify cell for anticipated differentiation control by genomics

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Kapil Bharti, PhD Senior Investigator, Ocular and Stem Cell Translational Research Section, NIH first drug required to establish the process for that innovations design of animal studies not done before 

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Meredith Fisher, PhD Partner, Mass General Brigham Innovation Fund Strategies, success what changes are needed in the drug discovery process@pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Robert Nelsen Managing Director, Co-founder, ARCH Venture Partners Manufacturing change is not a new clinical trial FDA need to be presented with new rethinking for big innovations Drug pricing cheaper requires systematization

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    1

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Kush Parmar, MD, PhD Managing Partner, 5AM Ventures Responsibility mismatch should be and what is “are”

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    5h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    David Berry, MD, PhD CEO, Valo Health GP, Flagship Pioneering Bring disruptive frontier platform reliable delivery CGT double knockout disease cure all change efficiency scope human centric vs mice centered right scale acceleration

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    6h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Kush Parmar, MD, PhD Managing Partner, 5AM Ventures build it yourself, benefit for patients FIrst Look at MGB shows MEE innovation on inner ear worthy investment  

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    @AVIVA1950_PIcs

    Aviva Lev-Ari

    @AVIVA1950

    6h

    #WMIF2021

    @MGBInnovation

    Robert Nelsen Managing Director, Co-founder, ARCH Venture Partners Frustration with supply chain during the Pandemic, GMC anticipation in advance CGT rapidly prototype rethink and invest proactive investor .edu and Pharma

    @pharma_BI

    @AVIVA1950

    Read Full Post »


    World Leaders to meet during Davos Agenda in a crucial year to rebuild trust

    Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

     

    Davos Agenda

    https://www.weforum.org/events/the-davos-agenda-2021

     

    Adrian Monck, Managing Director, Public Engagement, public.affairs@weforum.org

    日本語 | 中文 | عربي

    World Leaders to Meet During Davos Agenda in a Crucial Year to Rebuild Trust

    • The Davos Agenda 2021 will convene under the theme: A Crucial Year to Rebuild Trust
    • The World Economic Forum will gather the world’s foremost leaders to address the economic, environmental, social and technological challenges following the COVID-19 pandemic 
    • More than 1,500 business, government and civil society leaders from over 70 countries will set the agenda for a critical year ahead and discuss how to catalyse impact in the rapidly advancing Fourth Industrial Revolution
    • The conclusions from the Davos Agenda week will feed into task forces working on global issues for the upcoming Special Annual Meeting in Singapore
    • For more information, please visit http://www.weforum.org; share on social media using the hashtag #DavosAgenda

    Geneva, Switzerland, 18 January 2021 – The World Economic Forum Davos Agenda, taking place virtually on 25-29 January, will bring together the foremost leaders of the world to address the new global situation. Heads of state and government, chief executives and leaders from civil society will convene under the theme: A Crucial Year to Rebuild Trust.

    The meeting will focus on creating impact, rebuilding trust and shaping the policies and partnerships needed in 2021.

    “In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the need to reset priorities and the urgency to reform systems have been growing stronger around the world,” said Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum. “Rebuilding trust and increasing global cooperation are crucial to fostering innovative and bold solutions to stem the pandemic and drive a robust recovery. This unique meeting will be an opportunity for leaders to outline their vision and address the most important issues of our time, such as the need to accelerate job creation and to protect the environment.”

    The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated that no institution or individual alone can address the economic, environmental, social and technological challenges of our complex, interdependent world. The pandemic has accelerated systemic changes that were apparent before its inception. The fault lines that emerged in 2020 now appear as critical crossroads in 2021. The Davos Agenda will help leaders choose innovative and bold solutions to stem the pandemic and drive a robust recovery over the next year.

    The five programme themes are:

    1. Designing cohesive, sustainable, resilient economic systems (25 January)
    2. Driving responsible industry transformation and growth (26 January)
    3. Enhancing stewardship of the global commons (27 January)
    4. Harnessing the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (28 January)
    5. Advancing global and regional cooperation (29 January)

    Special addresses from G20 heads of state and government and international organizations will provide crucial insights into a range of important issues in the year ahead. Participants will hear first-hand how these public figures will demonstrate leadership and drive action in areas such as the environment, jobs, and advances in innovation brought by the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

    Heads of state and government include:

    Xi Jinping, President of the People’s Republic of China; Narendra Modi, Prime Minister of India; Yoshihide Suga, Prime Minister of Japan; Emmanuel Macron, President of France; Angela Merkel, Federal Chancellor of Germany; Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission; Giuseppe Conte, Prime Minister of Italy; Moon Jae-in, President of the Republic of Korea; Alberto Fernández, President of Argentina; Cyril Ramaphosa, President of South Africa; Pedro Sánchez, Prime Minister of Spain; Guy Parmelin, President of the Swiss Confederation and Federal Councillor for Economic Affairs, Education and Research; Ivan Duque, President of Colombia; Carlos Alvarado Quesada, President of Costa Rica; Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo, President of the Republic of Ghana; Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Prime Minister of Greece; Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel; Abdullah II ibn Al Hussein, King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan; Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda; Lee Hsien Loong, Prime Minister of Singapore, the host of the World Economic Forum Special Annual Meeting 2021.

    Other world leaders are expected to confirm.

    Leaders from international organizations, government agencies and central banks include:

    António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations (UN); Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO); Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund (IMF); Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, United Nations (UN); Achim Steiner, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP); Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Undersecretary-General and Executive Director, United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN WOMEN); Dongyu Qu, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO); Inger Andersen, Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); Henrietta Fore, Executive Director, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF); David Beasley, Executive Director, United Nations World Food Programme (WFP); Fang Liu, Secretary-General, International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO); Anthony Fauci, Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, USA; Angel Gurría, Secretary-General, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD); Mauricio Claver-Carone, President, Inter-American Development Bank (IDB); Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO); Jürgen Stock, Secretary-General, International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL); Fatih Birol, Executive Director, International Energy Agency (IEA); Rebecca Fatima Sta Maria, Executive Director, APEC Secretariat (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation).

    Christine Lagarde, President, European Central Bank; François Villeroy de Galhau, Governor of the Central Bank of France; Andrew Bailey, Governor of the Bank of England.

    The private sector will be represented by more than 1,000 leaders from the Forum’s member and partner organizations. Seven of the top ten companies by market capitalization are engaged year-round with the Forum and many will participate in The Davos Agenda week. As a working meeting to advance ongoing project work, more than 500 chief executives and chairpersons will take part in sessions throughout the week.

    Leaders from civil society are a critical voice in shaping the agenda. Those taking part in the meeting include:

    Seth Berkley, Chief Executive Officer, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; Gabriela Bucher, Executive Director, Oxfam International; Sharan Burrow, General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC); Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim, President, Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad (AFPAT); Marco Lambertini, Director-General, WWF International; Laura Liswood, Secretary-General, Council of Women World Leaders; Delia Ferreira Rubio, Chair, Transparency International; Peter Sands, Executive Director, Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GF). 

    Drawn from over 10,000 civic-minded young leaders, members of the World Economic Forum’s Global Shapers, Young Global Leaders, Technology Pioneers and Social Entrepreneurs communities will bring unique perspectives to The Davos Agenda.

    Flagship reports, initiatives, and the latest book on Stakeholder Capitalism 

    On January 25, Professor Schwab will release his latest book, titled “Stakeholder Capitalism: A Global Economy that Works for Progress, People and Planet.” It explores how societies can build the future post-COVID, and builds on the Forum’s 50-year-old advocacy of the stakeholder approach.

    The World Economic Forum will release its Global Risks Report 2021 on 19 January. The flagship report is an important marker for prioritizing action in public and private sectors in the year ahead.

    The Davos Agenda will also mark the launch of several World Economic Forum initiatives to accelerate the race to net-zero emissions, to champion new standards for racial justice, to ensure artificial intelligence is developed ethically and in the global public interest and to close the digital divide. More details on these initiatives and others will be disclosed at the meeting.

    Opening Event and Crystal Awards

    The meeting will be preceded by the Opening Event, available on YouTube on Sunday 24 January at 19.00 CET, featuring a welcome from Klaus Schwab and a special address by Guy Parmelin, President of the Swiss Confederation, just before the 27th Crystal Awards hosted by Hilde Schwab, Chairperson and Co-founder, Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship, and the photographer Platon.

    The awards will be followed by the world premiere of “See Me: A Global Concert.” The official programme of The Davos Agenda will begin on 25 January.

    Notes to editors

    Media registration and sign-up

    Explore the guide on how to follow and embed sessions on your website here

    Watch the livestreamed sessions here

    Follow the Forum on Twitter via @wef@davos and join the conversation using #DavosAgenda | Instagram | LinkedIn | TikTok | Weibo | Podcasts

    Become a fan of the Forum on Facebook

    Read the Forum Agenda also in French | Spanish | Mandarin | Japanese

    Check out the Forum’s Strategic Intelligence Platform and Transformation Maps

    Watch Forum videos

    Learn about the Forum’s impact

    Subscribe to Forum news releases and Podcasts

    SOURCE

    From: “<Adrian Monck>”, World Economic Forum <Public.Affairs@weforum.org>

    Reply-To: “<Adrian Monck>”, World Economic Forum <Public.Affairs@weforum.org>

    Date: Monday, January 18, 2021 at 9:37 AM

    To: “Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN” <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

    Subject: World Leaders to meet during Davos Agenda in a crucial year to rebuild trust

    Read Full Post »


    REUTERS NEXT (Jan 11-14) kicks off 2021 by gathering global leaders and forward thinkers to reimagine solutions to the challenges the new year brings

    Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

     

    The Virtual Summit Rethinking the Future

    REUTERS NEXT kicks off 2021 by gathering global leaders and forward thinkers to reimagine solutions to the challenges the new year brings.

    After the extraordinary upheavals of 2020, we will come together to look ahead at opportunities for change and growth, as well as how to deal with the rifts and problems that our world and our societies face.

    No country, company or community can tackle the future alone. To build a better world, thinkers and doers must come together to share ideas, collaborate and act.

    REUTERS NEXT draws on Reuters global reach to host diverse voices from around the world who will examine topics from different perspectives, bringing their passion, experience and expertise to find new ways forward.

    Join the conversation at REUTERS NEXT as we look ahead, together.

    https://reutersevents.com/events/next/#about

    https://reutersevents.app.swapcard.com/event/reuters-next

    Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

    Announcing Strategic Transition from 1.0 LPBI to 2.0 LPBI on 1/1/2021: New Management, Marketing Communication and New Scientific/Technical Opportunities

     

    Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Founder, LPBI Group: 1.0 & 2.0

    will attend REUTERS NEXT on January 13 & 14, 2021 and

    will cover these days in real time

    AGENDA

    https://reutersevents.com/events/next/conference-agenda.php

     

    Day 1: January 11

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    5:30am GMT
    Capturing a Slice of the Boom in High-Net-Worth Banking

    The private banking arm of OCBC Bank is among a handful of Asian banks that have emerged among the biggest serving the region’s growing legion of billionaires. Boasting assets under management of $116 billion, Bank of Singapore has expanded into Europe, India and Dubai as it seeks to serve the family offices of the rich. The private bank, part of Southeast Asia’s second-largest lender, is also exploring setting up an onshore presence in China, the top market for wealth creation.

     

    Bahren Shaari

    Bahren ShaariChief Executive OfficerBank of Singapore

     

    Anshuman Daga

    Anshuman DagaSenior Financial CorrespondentReuters

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    6:00am GMT
    Interview

     

    Dr Reza Baqir

    Dr Reza BaqirGovernorState Bank Pakistan

     

    Simon Robinson

    Simon RobinsonGlobal Managing EditorReuters

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    6:30am GMT
    Interview

     

    Tae Yong-ho

    Tae Yong-hoThe Member of the National Assembly of The Republic of Korea

     

    Jack Kim

    Jack KimCorrespondentReuters

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    7:00am GMT
    Asia’s COVID-19 journey: Swifter Response But Slower Return to Normality?

    Asia has managed to control the spread of the new coronavirus more swiftly and effectively than the rest of the world, but many countries in the region are still battling with a persistent resurgence of new cases and the initial amount of vaccines Asia will receive will be limited. Is Asia likely to lag other regions in ending the pandemic and when will things go back to normal?

     

    Dr. Pandu Riono

    Dr. Pandu RionoEpidemiologist & Senior StaffUniversity of Indonesia, Faculty of Public Health

     

    Irma Hidayana

    Irma HidayanaCo-Founder & Co-LeaderLaporCovid19

     

    Dale Fisher

    Dale FisherProfessor of MedicineNational University of Singapore

     

    Miyoung Kim

    Moderator: Miyoung KimBreaking News Editor, AsiaReuters

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    7:30am GMT
    Interview

     

    Edward Yau Tang-wah

    Edward Yau Tang-wahSecretary for Commerce and Economic DevelopmentHong Kong Special Administrative Region Government

     

    Anne-Marie Roantree

    Anne-Marie RoantreeBureau ChiefReuters

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    9:00am GMT
    Recovering the Travel Bug post-Covid

     

    Deep Kalra

    Deep KalraFounder & Group Executive ChairmanMakeMyTrip Limited

     

    Sabina Fluxa

    Sabina FluxaChief Executive OfficerIberostar

     

    Tony Fernandes

    Tony FernandesChief Executive OfficerAirAsia

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    9:30am GMT
    Urban Mining: Recycling on a Mass Scale

     

    Steve Fisher

    Steve FisherPresident and Chief Executive OfficerNovelis

     

    Yash Lohia

    Yash LohiaChief Sustainability OfficerIndorama Ventures

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    10:00am GMT
    The Measurement Challenge of Carbon Accounting

    How can we cut emissions if we can’t count them?

     

    David Hone

    David HoneChief Climate Change AdviserShell

     

    Nick Stansbury

    Nick StansburyHead of Commodity ResearchLegal & General Investment Management (LGIM)

     

    Sean Kidney

    Sean KidneyChief Executive OfficerClimate Bonds Initiative

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    10:30am GMT
    Powering Economic Growth in Africa

    Look at different investment strategies – infrastructure, digital and trade.

     

    Fola Fagbule

    Fola FagbuleSenior Vice PresidentAfrica Finance Corporation

     

    Juliana Rotich

    Juliana RotichVenture PartnerAtlantica Ventures

     

    Silver Ojakol

    Silver OjakolCommissioner External TradeGhana

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    11:00am GMT
    Interview

     

    Vera Daves de Sousa

    Vera Daves de SousaFinance MinisterMinistry of Finance of Angola

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    11:30am GMT
    Ethnic Diversity at Work: Putting Words into Action

     

    Lanaya Irvin

    Lanaya IrvinPresidentCoqual

     

    John Rice

    John RiceFounder & Chief Executive OfficerManagement Leadership for Tomorrow

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    12:00pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Waad al-Kateab

    Waad al-KateabFilmmaker, Activist & FounderAction For Sama

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    12:30pm GMT
    Ethnic Diversity at Work: Putting Words into Action

    Companies lurched into diversity policies after Floyd’s death. Will they stick?

     

    soon

    Speakers TBC

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    1:00pm GMT
    How to Rebuild Trust in Media

    In a polarised world, news media need to rebuild trust. Impartiality, transparency, representation and listening all play a part. What other strategies are top media executives planning?

     

    Tim Davie

    Tim DavieDirector GeneralBBC

     

    Michael Friedenberg

    Michael FriedenbergPresidentReuters

     

    Jane Barrett

    Moderator: Jane BarrettGlobal Editor Media News StrategyReuters

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    3:00pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Professor Jeffrey Sachs

    Professor Jeffrey SachsEconomist & DirectorCenter for Sustainable Development at Columbia University

     

    soon

    Ann SaphirFinancial ReporterReuters

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    3:20pm GMT
    Nuclear Energy and its Future

     

    Sama Bilbao y Leon

    Sama Bilbao y LeonDirector GeneralWorld Nuclear Association

     

    Dan Poneman

    Dan PonemanPresident & Chief Executive OfficerCentrus Energy Corp.

     

    Jay Wileman

    Jay WilemanPresident & Chief Executive OfficerGE Hitachi

     

    George Borovas

    George BorovasHead of Nuclear and Tokyo Office Managing PartnerHunton Andrews Kurth

     

    soon

    Moderator: Nina ChestneyHead of EMEA Power, Gas, Coal and CarbonReuters

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    4:00pm GMT
    Trade, Doing Business Globally, Challenges

     

    Joe Kaeser

    Joe KaeserPresident & Chief Executive OfficerSiemens AG

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    4:30pm GMT
    Edtech: Making the Most of Online Learning Beyond Covid

     

    Dwayne Matthews

    Dwayne MatthewsEducation Strategist & FounderTomorrowNow Learning Labs

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    5:00pm GMT
    The Arctic Frontier

    Climate change is warming the Arctic faster than the rest of the world, opening long-frozen region to exploration, tourism, mining and shipping. Those crowds and commerce have an impact on the environment and indigenous communities.

     

    Ann Daniels

    Ann DanielsPolar Explorer

     

    Ilarion Merculieff

    Ilarion MerculieffPresidentGlobal Center for Indigenous Leadership and Lifeways

     

    Neil Roberts

    Neil RobertsHead of Marine and AviationLloyd’s of London Market Association

     

    Clare Baldwin

    Moderator: Clare BaldwinSpecial CorrespondentReuters

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    5:30pm GMT
    Managing the Energy Transition from Within

    Top players in the oil industry discuss the challenges and opportunities for their businesses in a transition away from fossil fuels.

     

    Lorenzo Simonelli

    Lorenzo SimonelliChief Executive OfficerBaker Hughes

     

    Jennifer Hiller

    Moderator: Jennifer HillerOil & Gas ReporterReuters

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    6:00pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Salman Khan

    Salman KhanFounder and CEOKhan Academy

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    6:20pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Sheryl Sandberg

    Sheryl SandbergChief Operating OfficerFacebook

    Day 2: January 12

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    5:30am GMT
    India’s Place in a Divided World

     

    Dr. S. Jaishankar

    Dr. S. JaishankarExternal Affairs Minister of India

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    6:00am GMT
    Philippines: On the Road to Recovery?

     

    Benjamin Diokno

    Benjamin DioknoGovernorBangko Sentral ng Pilipinas

     

    Karen Lema

    Karen LemaBureau Chief PhilippinesReuters

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    6:30am GMT
    Where Asia’s Smart Money is Going in 2021

     

    Hugh Young

    Hugh YoungManaging DirectorAberdeen Standard Investments

     

    Elizabeth Allen

    Elizabeth AllenHead of Asian Fixed IncomeHSBC Global Asset Management

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    7:00am GMT
    Political journalism in Asia: new media, old values

     

    Steve Gan

    Steve GanEditor-in-chiefMalaysiakini.com

     

    Najwa Shihab

    Najwa ShihabNewscaster & AnchorMetro TV Indonesia

     

    Cherian George

    Cherian GeorgeProfessor of Media StudiesHong Kong Baptist University

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    7:30am GMT
    Interview

     

    K Shanmugam

    K ShanmugamMinister for Home Affairs & Minister for Law

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    9:00am GMT
    Australia vs Big Tech

    The ACCC’s Sims is spearheading potential changes to Australia’s merger laws early in 2021, putting the country at the front of a global crackdown on antitrust violations from “Big Tech.” The ACCC is due to deliver a report on the app marketplace, with a focus on the market power of Apple and Google, by the end of March. The regulator has already taken legal action against Google twice – for misleading consumers about how much personal information it was tracking and for misleading consumers about its collection of personal location data.

     

    Rod Sims

    Rod SimsChairAustralian Competition and Consumer Commission

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    10:10am GMT
    Interview

     

    Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao

    Nguyen Thi Phuong ThaoPresident & CEOVietJet

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    10:30am GMT
    A New Economy: Africa’s Digital Engine

     

    Jihan Abass

    Jihan AbassFounder & Chief Executive OfficerLami

     

    Iyinoluwa Aboyeji

    Iyinoluwa AboyejiTech Entrepreneur Co-FounderAndela

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    11:00am GMT
    Interview

     

    Sir Tim Berners-Lee

    Sir Tim Berners-LeeInventor of World Wide Web and CTOInrupt

     

    John Bruce

    John BruceChief Executive OfficerInrupt

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    12:00pm GMT
    Banking the Unbanked with New Technology

    Digital taking barriers down and making banking more possible – but also making digital a requirement?

     

    Vijay Shekar Sharma

    Vijay Shekar SharmaChief Executive Officer & FounderPaytm

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    12:30pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Olaf Scholz

    Olaf ScholzFederal Minister of Finance and Vice ChancellorGerman Federal Ministry of Finance

     

    Mark Bendeich

    Mark BendeichEurope News EditorReuters

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    3:00pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Patricia Espinosa

    Patricia EspinosaExecutive SecretaryUnited Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

     

    Matthew Green

    Matthew GreenClimate Change CorrespondentReuters

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    3:30pm GMT
    Misinformation and New Narratives

    Conspiracy theories and misinformation have spewed out of social media to mainstream narratives. Where does it all come from? How do they proliferate and what can we do about it?

     

    Graham Brookie

    Graham BrookieDirector and Managing Editor, Digital Forensic Research Lab (DFRLab)Atlantic Council

     

    Claire Wardle

    Claire WardleCo-FounderFirst Draft

     

    Christina Anagnostopoulos

    Christina AnagnostopoulosSenior Producer, Reuters Fact CheckReuters

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    4:00pm GMT
    Batteries – Lithium as the New Oil

     

    Eric Norris

    Eric NorrisPresident – Lithium GBUAlbemarle Corporation

     

    Ernest Scheyder

    Ernest ScheyderCorrespondentReuters

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    4:30pm GMT
    The Future of Fossil Fuels in A Green World

    Unlike Shell or BP, Chevron has been unabashed about its commitment to fossil fuels. It’s been smarter than others though, has a stronger balance sheet, and has made more calculated decisions. This has shown up in its market value, which last week surpassed Exxon Mobil for the first time ever. Wirth will have a lot to say about global economies, too, and the global rebound from the Covid-19 crisis.

     

    Michael Wirth

    Michael WirthChief Executive OfficerChevron

     

    Lauren Silva Laughlin

    Lauren Silva LaughlinGlobal Deals EditorReuters

     

    Rob Cox

    Rob CoxGlobal EditorReuters Breakingviews

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    5:00pm GMT
    Rich World, Poor World. How to Close the Gap

    What are the best ways to help the poorer countries of the world and their societies? Is the age of foreign aid over? What about debt relief and keeping more tax in country?

     

    Dambisa Moyo

    Dambisa MoyoGlobal Economist & AuthorVersaca Investments

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    5:30pm GMT
    Keep It In The Ground: A Radical Solution to Climate Change

    Is the best way to lower emissions to keep fossil fuels in the ground? Why environmentalists believe not tapping new oil and gas deposits, and plugging abandoned wells, would benefit investors and society.

     

    Janet Redman

    Janet RedmanClimate Campaign DirectorGreenpeace USA

     

    Kassie Siegel

    Kassie SiegelSenior Counsel and DirectorThe Climate Law Institute

     

    Peter Erickson

    Peter EricksonSenior ScientistStockholm Environment Institute

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    6:00pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Stephen Pagliuca

    Stephen PagliucaCo-chairBain

     

    Lauren Silva Laughlin

    Lauren Silva LaughlinGlobal Deals EditorReuters

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    6:20pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Calvin McDonald

    Calvin McDonaldChief Executive OfficerLululemon

    Day 3: January 13

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    5:30am GMT
    Asia Aviation in a Post-Pandemic World

    The once fast-growing Asian aviation industry has been hit hard by the pandemic, with the region among the slowest to reopen international travel, though domestic travel has begun to rebound. How will the pandemic shape future travel patterns for leisure and business travel? How can airlines like Qantas adapt their product, fleet and route networks for the future passenger mix? How will they restore confidence in international travel before and after a vaccine?

     

    Alan Joyce

    Alan JoyceChief Executive OfficerQantas

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    6:00am GMT
    How to Sell Drinks in a Socially-Distanced World

    Suntory, like all global drinks makers, has been hit hard by the pandemic which has dented sales of its popular beer and global whiskies. Even with the eventual arrival of vaccines, consumers are expected to remain wary of crowding together at bars and restaurants as they used to. How is Suntory riding out the slump? Are there any new growth opportunities in post-pandemic trends (drinking at home, non-alcohol beers etc.)? Has the pandemic, and the global political landscape, changed his views on globalization? Do Japanese companies including Suntory need to be more wary of large-scale, international acquisitions now?

     

    Takeshi Niinami

    Takeshi NiinamiChief Executive OfficerSuntory

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    6:30am GMT
    Silencing the Messenger: The Struggle for Free Speech in Asia

    Over the past three decades, more journalists have been killed in Asia Pacific than any other region on earth, with the Philippines, India, and Afghanistan consistently ranked among the deadliest places to be a journalist. Overall press freedom has worsened in more than a dozen countries across the continent since 2018, according to watchdog Reporters Without Borders, and in a time of pandemic, pervasive online misinformation, and rising authoritarianism, news organizations are facing unprecedented challenges.

     

    Khin Omar

    Khin OmarBurmese Democracy Activist

     

    Nidhi Razdan

    Nidhi RazdanAssociate Professor of JournalismHarvard University

     

    Vergel O. Santos

    Vergel O. SantosMember, Board of TrusteesCenter for Media Freedom and Responsibility

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    7:00am GMT
    China Private Equity: Navigating volatilities and capturing new growth post-COVID (3)

     

    Dr. Fred Hu

    Dr. Fred HuChairmanPrimavera Capital Group

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    7:20am GMT
    China Private Equity: Navigating volatilities and capturing new growth post-COVID (1)

     

    Shan Weijian

    Shan WeijianChairman and Chief Executive OfficerPAG

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    9:00am GMT
    The EU economy post-COVID, post-Brexit, in debt…

     

    Christine Lagarde

    Christine LagardePresidentEuropean Central Bank

     

    Alessandra Galloni

    Alessandra GalloniGlobal Managing EditorReuters

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    9:45am GMT
    How and Why to Fight Threats to Press Freedom Around the World

    A global panel on press freedom around the world. Is it getting generally worse?

     

    Maria Ressa

    Maria RessaFounder, Rapplercompany

     

    Sonny Swe

    Sonny SweCo-Founder & Chief Executive OfficerFrontier Myanmar

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    10:30am GMT
    Telling Africa Stories

    How African storytellers are reshaping the way the world sees the continent.

     

    Bibi Bakare-Yusuf

    Bibi Bakare-YusufFounder & PublisherCassava Republic Press

     

    Mo Abudu

    Mo AbuduChief Executive OfficerEbonylife Media & Ebonylife Place

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    12:00pm GMT
    Managing the Masses and Politicians through the Fog of Covid

     

    Dr. Anders Tegnell

    Dr. Anders TegnellState EpidemiologistSweden

     

    Dr. Chikwe Ihekweazu

    Dr. Chikwe IhekweazuDirector GeneralNigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC)

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    1:00pm GMT
    Precious Cargo: Transporting Vaccines and Looking for Recovery

     

    John Pearson

    John PearsonChief Executive OfficerDHL Express

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    1:30pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Alan Jope

    Alan JopeChief Executive OfficerUnilever

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    3:00pm GMT
    Pets and the pandemic: The future of animal science

     

    Kristin Peck

    Kristin PeckChief Executive OfficerZoetis

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    3:30pm GMT
    Public Health Lessons from COVID and Vaccinations

    COVID-19 has laid bare many failings in the public health system. What lessons are there to learn around the world and what are the biggest challenges beyond COVID?

     

    Heidi J Larson

    Heidi J LarsonProfessor of AnthropologyRisk and Decision Science Vaccine Confidence Project

     

    Professor Michelle Williams

    Professor Michelle WilliamsDean of the FacultyHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    4:00pm GMT
    Interview

     

    soon

    Speaker TBC

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    4:30pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Sandeep Mathrani

    Sandeep MathraniChief Executive OfficerWeWork

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    5:00pm GMT
    The Edelman Trust Barometer 2021

    Richard Edelman discusses the new Trust Barometer for 2021. To discuss trust in journalism, politicians, tech companies etc.

     

    Richard Edelman

    Richard EdelmanChief Executive OfficerEdelman

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    5:30pm GMT
    Climate and Environmental Justice

    What do we do about the unequal impact of climate change?

     

    Dr Friederike Otto

    Dr Friederike OttoAssociate Director, Environmental Change InstituteUniversity of Oxford

     

    Osprey Orielle Lake

    Osprey Orielle LakeFounder and Executive DirectorWomen’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

     

    Mohamed Adow

    Mohamed AdowDirectorPower Shift Africa

     

    Valerie Volcovici

    Valerie VolcoviciCorrespondentReuters

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    6:00pm GMT
    The Changing Nature of Philanthropy in the 2020s

     

    Darren Walker

    Darren WalkerPresidentFord Foundation

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    6:30pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Sundar Pichai

    Sundar PichaiChief Executive OfficerGoogle and Alphabet

    Day 4: January 14

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    5:30am GMT
    Interview

    Mahathir bin Mohamad served twice as Malaysia’s prime minister, from July 1981 to October 2003 and from May 2018 to March 2020. Forming the new Homeland Fighters Party, Mahathir remains a prominent voice in the Southeast Asian nation’s politics.

     

    Mahathir Mohamad

    Mahathir MohamadFormer Prime Minister of Malaysia

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    6:00am GMT
    Interview

     

    soon

    Speaker TBC

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    6:30am GMT
    Palm Oil Production in Asia: Looking For a Sustainable Future

    Global sales of palm oil, used in everything from cookies to soap, reached $43 billion last year, with Southeast Asia responsible for the bulk of production. The industry has come under fire in recent years, including consumer boycotts, for clearing biodiversity-rich tropical rainforests in the region. Yet it also provides hundreds of thousands of jobs as well as substantial foreign income. The major players, Indonesia and Malaysia, are looking at ways to expand coveted green credentials, even as they push for consumer companies to step up purchases of the more expensive sustainable palm oil.

     

    Ravi Muthayah

    Ravi MuthayahSecretary-GeneralMalaysia Plantation & Commodities Ministry

     

    Olivier Tichit

    Olivier TichitLeader of SustainabilityMusim Mas

     

    Mohd Haris Mohd Arshad

    Mohd Haris Mohd ArshadManaging DirectorSime Darby Oils

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    7:10am GMT
    Tech Innovation in China

    Nowhere else in the world has seen more rapid digitization in the past decade than in China, where technological innovation driven by the private sector has transformed all aspects of society, from the way people socialize to how business is done. The commercial outlook for innovators in China is positive, with a ready market of 1.4 billion people, but any new technological offerings and innovation remain beholden to sudden shifts in the mood in Beijing.

     

    Ma Baoli

    Ma BaoliFounder, Chairman & Chief Executive OfficerBlueCity

     POLICY & PROGRESS
    7:30am GMT
    Interview

     

    Taro Kono

    Taro KonoJapan Minister of State for Special Missions

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    9:00am GMT
    The business of vaccinating the world against COVID-19

    India’s Serum Institute is one of the biggest vaccine makers by volume in the world. CEO Poonawalla’s early bet on the AstraZeneca-University of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine candidate during first phase trials appears to have paid off. The institute plans to prioritize distribution in India before providing doses to the COVAX facility, an international initiative aimed at ensuring almost 100 low and middle income economies have access to a vaccine.

     

    Adar Poonawalla

    Adar PoonawallaChief Executive OfficerIndia’s Serum Institute

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    10:00am GMT
    Interview

     

    N Chandrasekaran

    N ChandrasekaranChairmanTata Group

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    10:30am GMT
    The Future of Further Education post-Covid

    How has Covid changed universities and which changes will stick.

     

    Sebastian Thrun

    Sebastian ThrunFounder, President & Executive ChairmanUdacity

     

    Louise Richardson

    Louise RichardsonVice-ChancellorUniversity of Oxford

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    11:30am GMT
    The Amazon and Business. A Delicate Coexistence

    The Amazon rainforest is being destroyed for business but are the two incompatible? Can we save the Amazon and profit from it?

     

    João Paulo Ferreira

    João Paulo FerreiraChief Executive OfficerNatura & Co Latin America

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    12:00pm GMT
    Interview

     

    Peter Wennink

    Peter WenninkPresident & Chief Executive OfficerASML

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    1:00pm GMT
    Break the Mould: Diversity in Tech and Finance

     

    soon

    Speaker TBC

     SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
    3:00pm GMT
    ESG: Should We Really Divest Energy Stocks?

    If big investors dump stocks, there may be less accountability. What to do?

     

    John Flint

    John FlintFormer Group Chief ExecutiveHSBC

     

    Adam Matthews

    Adam MatthewsDirector of Ethics and EngagementChurch of England Pensions Board

     MEDIA & FREE SPEECH
    4:00pm GMT
    Interview

     

    soon

    Speaker TBC

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    5:00pm GMT
    Diversity in Law

    How the US legal profession is pushing greater diversity and where the blockers still are.

     

    Justice Goodwin Liu

    Justice Goodwin LiuAssociate JusticeCalifornia Supreme Court

     

    Anne Robinson

    Anne RobinsonManaging Director, General Counsel and Corporate SecretaryVanguard

     

    Dev Stahlkopf

    Dev StahlkopfCorporate Vice President and General Counsel, Legal AffairsMicrosoft

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    5:30pm GMT
    Equality in Law and the Push for Diversity

     

    Jitse Groen

    Jitse GroenChief Executive OfficerJustEat

     

    Brian Niccol

    Brian NiccolChairman & Chief Executive OfficerChipotle

     RADICAL REDESIGN
    6:00pm GMT
    The Future of Travel – How Airbnb is Changing Post-COVID

    Off the back of its successful IPO, Airbnb’s CEO Brian Chesky shares lessons from the pandemic and how he sees travel returning in 2021.

     

    Brian Chesky

    Brian CheskyChief Executive OfficerAirbnb

     RECOVERING GROWTH
    6:30pm GMT
    The Next Frontiers of Venture Capitalism

    Interview with Y Combinator on where they are putting their trend-setting bets in 2021.

     

    Michael Seibel

    Michael SeibelGroup Partner and Managing DirectorY-Combinator

     

    Jared Friedman

    Jared FriedmanGroup PartnerY-Combinator

     

    Read Full Post »


    Virtual Discover Brigham, November 12, 11AM EST – 3:45PM EST

     

    2020 AGENDA

    http://www.discoverbrigham.org/

    11:00 – 11:45 AM EST

    Poster Session & Demos

    11:45 AM – 12:15 PM EST

    Rock the Mic: Postdoc Fast Pitch

    12:30 – 1:05 PM EST

    What We Know About COVID-19

    1:10 – 1:40 PM EST

    Hey Briggie: The Use of Artificial Intelligence to Improve Patient Safety and Experience

    1:45 – 2:15 PM EST

    Committing to Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity in Clinical Research: The Time is Now

    2:25 – 2:55 PM EST

    Getting Ahead: Advances in Food and Drug Allergy

    3:00 – 3:30 PM EST

    What’s Sex Got to Do with It: Risk and Management of Autoimmune Disease

    3:35 – 3:45 PM EST

    Closing Remarks

    “Kicking off with a keynote, the day-long event featured seven interactive demos, eight scientific sessions, 99 poster presentations, 37 speakers and the announcement of the winner of the $100,000 BRIght Futures Prize.”READ MORE

    SESSION
    SPOTLIGHTS

    Read Full Post »


    Open Data Science Conference, Virtual and In-Person | October 27th – 30th, 2020, Natural Language Processing Track

    Virtual and In-Person | October 27th – 30th, 2020

    Natural Language Processing Track

    Learn the latest models, advancements, and trends from the top practitioners and researchers behind NLP

    Conference Website

    AGENDA

    https://live.odsc.com/

    Thursday – 10/29/2020

    09:00 AM – 10:30 AM – ODSC Keynotes

    10:30 AM – 5:30 PM – ODSC Hands-on Trainings and Workshops

    10:00 AM – 4:30 PM – Partner Demo Talks

    10:30 AM – 5:00 PM – Breakout Talk Sessions

    09:30 AM – 4:30 PM – Applied AI Free Virtual Event

    12:00 PM – 2:00 PM – Woman Ignite Session

    1:00 PM – 1:45 PM – Virtual Networking Event

    4:00 PM – 5:30 PM         – AI Investors Reverse Pitch

    3:30 PM – 4:30 PM – Meet the Expert

     

    Friday – 10/30/2020 

    09:00 AM – 10:30 AM – ODSC Keynotes

    10:30 AM – 5:30 PM – ODSC Hands-on Trainings and Workshops

    10:30 AM – 5:00 PM – Breakout Talk Sessions

    10:30 AM – 5:00 PM – Career Mentor Talks

    11:30 AM – 12:00 PM – Meet the Speaker

    4:00 PM – 5:30 PM –  Learning from Failure

    Are We Ready for the Era of Analytics Heterogeneity? Maybe… but the Data Says No

     

    Wed, October 28, 9:00 AM
    (PDT)

    Marinela Profi | Global Strategist AI & Model Management | Data Science Evangelist | SAS | WOMEN TECH NETWORK

     

    Type: Keynote

     

    Session Details & Prerequisites Q&A Slack Channel

    Keynote Session – Suchi Saria

     

    Wed, October 28, 9:30 AM
    (PDT)

    Suchi Saria, PhD | Director, Machine Learning & Healthcare Lab | Johns Hopkins University

     

    Type: Keynote

     

    Q&A Slack Channel

    A Secure Collaborative Learning Platform

     

    Wed, October 28, 10:00 AM

    Raluca Ada Popa, PhD | Assistant Professor | Co-Founder | Berkeley | PreVeil

     

    Type: Keynote

     

    Session Details & Prerequisites Q&A Slack Channel

    OCTOBER 29TH

    Data for Good: Ensuring the Responsible Use of Data to Benefit Society

     

    Thu, October 29, 9:00 AM
    (PDT)

    Jeannette M. Wing, PhD | Avanessians Director of the Data Science Institute and Professor of Computer Science | Columbia University

    • Causal INFERENCE Effects – estimate effects
    • Over and under estimation of instrumental variables
    • Confounders: Model assigned causes – Over and under estimation
    • De-Confounder: Estimate substitute confounders – Over and under estimation
    • Convolutional Neuro-networks model
    • Economics: Monopsony, Robo-Advising
    • History: Topic modeling with NLP,
    • Trustworthy Computing vs Trustworthy AI: Safety, Fairness, Robustness
    • Classifiers: Fair/Unfair make then more robust to a class of distributions
    • Image recognition system: DeepXplore: Semantic perturbation
    • DP and ML: PixelDP – STOP sign vs Yield sign
    • HealthCare @Columbia University: 600 Million EHR
    1. The Medical De-confounder: Treatment Effects on A1c DM2

    Type: Keynote, Level: All Levels, Focus Area: AI for Good, Machine Learning

    Session Details & Prerequisites Q&A Slack Channel

    Keynote Session – Ben Taylor

    Thu, October 29, 9:30 AM
    (PDT)

    Ben Taylor, PhD | Chief AI Evangelist | DataRobot

    • Convolution NN – Clustering of Countries: Latin America, Asia
    • Story telling
    • Acceleration:
    1. GPT-3 from OpenAI – Q&A, Translation, grammar
    2. Image GPT
    • Can AI Predict

    Type: Keynote, Level: All Levels, Focus Area: Data Science Track

    Q&A Slack Channel

    Applying AI to Real World Use Cases

    Thu, October 29, 10:00 AM
    (PDT)

    John Montgomery | Corporate Vice President, Program Management, AI Platform | Microsoft

    Type: Keynote

    • Machine comprehension
    • Massive ML Models: Vision Model – Reznet
    • Alternative to Azure, OpenAI (Partner of Microsoft) released –>>>>> GPT-3 1758
    • AZURE ML: create models, operationalize models, build models responsibly
    • Model interpretability – Data Science, gov’t regulation: Features importance dashdourd
    • USE CASES
    • Building accurate models
    1. Little Ceasar’s Pizza: “Hot N-Ready” – Demand forecasting of Pizza Supply by combination of ingredients

    Predict: X Quantity by Auto ML

    • Deploy and Manage Many Models: MMM Accelerator: Ten Models at AGL – Australia renewal energy

    Model for Responsible ML: Fairness & Interpretability

    • EY – Bank denies a LOAN
    • Mitigation of Bias detection for Men and Women in Loan Applications

    Loan Approval

    • Explanation dashboard – Aggregate model: Top feature in loan approval: Education Level
    • Fairness – Hazard performance for Accuracy: Disparity in prediction by Gender

    ML is part of AZURE Platform

    Bonsai – is Reinforcement Learning: Simulation Scenarios

    AutoML – do know standard algorithms vs when you do not know

    Session Details & Prerequisites Q&A Slack Channel

    TALKS on 10/29/2020

    NLP

    Thu, October 29, 10:30 AM
    (PDT)

    Join

    Tian Zheng, PhD | Chair, Department of Statistics | Associate Director | Columbia University | Data Science Institute

    Type: Track Keynote, Level: Intermediate, Focus Area: NLP

    • Stochastic variability inference
    • Case-control likelihood approximation
    • Sampling node system

    TEXT

    • LDA – Latent Distribution Modeling Dirichlet

    Probability distribution over the vocabulary of words: Topic assignment

    LINKS

    • MMSB – Mixed Membership

    Detect communities in networks

    blockmodel – profile of social interaction in different nodes

    • LMV – Pairwise-Link-LDA – same topic proportions have equal % for citing

    Pair-wise-Link-LDA

    1. Draw topic
    2. Draw Beta
    3. For each document
    4. For each document pair

    Variational Inference – fully factored model

    • article visibility

    Stochastic Variation Inference

    • local (specific to each node) & global (across nodes)
    • At each iteration minibatch of nodes

    Sampling Document pairs

    • Stratified sampling scheme – shorter link
    • Informative set sampling [informative vs non-imformative sets]
    • these scheme – Mean estimation problem: Inclusion probability: All links are included
    • Stochastic gradient updates for global parameters
    • Comparison with alternative Approaches
    1. LDA + Regression
    2. Relational topic model
    3. Pairwise-Link-LDA combine LDA and MMB [Same priors]
    • Predictive ranks (random guessing) and Runtimes (compact id distinct no overalp)
    1. evaluate model fit: average predictive rank of held-out documents – Top articles

    Cora dataset

    LMVS – better predictive performance than

    KDD Dataset

    Citation trends in HEP: Relevance of Topics vs Visibility

    Article recommendation by Rank Topic Proportions

    Visibility as a topic-adjusted measure

    More recent are more visible

    CItation is not a strong indicator for visibility

    Visibility as a topic-adjusted measure

    Making Deep Learning Efficient

    Thu, October 29, 11:20 AM
    (PDT)

    Join

    Kurt Keutzer, PhD | Professor, Co-founder, Investor | UC Berkeley, DeepScale

    Type: Track Keynote

    • ML – SubSets
    1. Deep Learning – TRAINING for Clssification – Neuralnets – LeNet vs AlexNet – 7 layers 140x flops – using parallelism
    2. Shallow learning – deterministic and linear classifier used
    3. ML algorithms: Core ML, Audio analysis (Speech and audio recognition) , Multimedia
    4. NLP: translation,
    5. McKinsey & Co. – AI as a Service (AIasS)

    PROBLEMS to Solve

    Image Classification

    • Object Detection
    • Semantic Segmentation
    • Convolutional NN

    Audio Enhancement at BabbleLabs 

    Video Sentiment Analysis – Recommendations to Watch or to search

    Natural Language Processing & Speech

    • Translation
    • Document understanding
    • Question answering
    • general language understanding evaluation (GLUE)

    BerkeleyDeepDrive (BDD)

    BERT – Transformer – 7 seconds per sentence

    • BERT-base
    • Q-BERT
    • Transformer

    Computational Patterns of Deep NN (DNN) – TRAINING required for DNN

    PLATFORMS OF CLOUD

    • GRADIANT DESCENT (GD)
    • Stochastic GRADIANT DESCENT (SGD)

    Recommendation Models – DNN – Parallelism

    • Facebook – 80% is recommendation = Advertisement
    • No sharing of data by Collector: Alibaba, Facebook, twitter

     Considerations

    • Latency – NETWORK WIFI
    • Energy
    • Computation power
    • Privacy
    • Quantization: Fewer Memory Accesses
    • Lower Precision implies higher
    • Flat Loss Landscape – Precision Layer by Layer
    • Move computation to the EDGE

     

    Language Complexity and Volatility in Financial Markets: Using NLP to Further our Understanding of Information Processing

    Thu, October 29, 12:10 PM
    (PDT)

    Join

    Ahmet K. Karagozoglu, Ph.D. | C.V. Starr Distinguished Professor of Finance | Visiting Scholar, Volatility and Risk Institute | Hofstra University | New York University Stern School of Business

    Type: Track Keynote, Level: All Levels, Focus Area: NLP

     

    Intelligibility Throughout the Machine Learning Life Cycle

    Thu, October 29, 2:00 PM
    (PDT)

    Join

    Jenn Wortman Vaughan, PhD | Senior Principal Researcher | Microsoft Research

    Type: Talk, Level: Beginner-Intermediate, Focus Area: Machine Learning

    • A Human-centered Agenda for Intelligibility
    • Beyond the model: Data, objectives, performance metrics
    • context of relevant stakeholders
    • Properties of system design vs Properties of Human behavior

    Learning with Limited Labels

    Thu, October 29, 3:05 PM
    (PDT)

    Join

    Shanghang Zhang, PhD | Postdoc Researcher | University of California, Berkeley

    Type: Talk, Level: Intermediate-Advanced, Focus Area: Deep Learning, Research frontiers

     

    How AI is Changing the Shopping Experience

    Thu, October 29, 3:05 PM
    (PDT)

    Join

    Sveta Kostinsky | Director of Sales Engineering | Samasource
    Marcelo Benedetti | Senior Account Executive | Samasource

    Type: Talk, Level: Intermediate, Focus Area: Machine Learning, Deep Learning

    • quality rubric
    • Internal QA Sampling
    • Client QA Sampling
    • Auto QA

    Transfer Learning in NLP

    Thu, October 29, 3:40 PM
    (PDT)

    00:
    03:
    30

    Joan Xiao, PhD | Principal Data Scientist | Linc Global

    Type: Talk, Level: Intermediate, Focus Area: NLP, Deep Learning

    Transfer learning enables leveraging knowledge acquired from related data to improve performance on a target task. The advancement of deep learning and large amount of labelled data such as ImageNet has made high performing pre-trained computer vision models possible. Transfer learning, in particular, fine-tuning a pre-trained model on a target task, has been a far more common practice than training from scratch in computer vision.

    In NLP, starting from 2018, thanks to the various large language models (ULMFiT, OpenAI GPT, BERT family, etc) pre-trained on large corpus, transfer learning has become a new paradigm and new state of the art results on many NLP tasks have been achieved.

    In this session we’ll learn the different types of transfer learning, the architecture of these pre-trained language models, and how different transfer learning techniques can be used to solve various NLP tasks. In addition, we’ll also show a variety of problems that can be solved using these language models and transfer learning.

    •  Transfer learning: Computer Vision – ImageNet Classification
    •  ResNet, GoogleNet, ILSVRC – VGG, ILSVRC’12 – AlexNet
    •   Feature Extrator vs Fine-tune
    •  Transfer learning: NLP
    • Transfer Transformer: Text-to-Text Transfer Transformer 
    1. Word embeddings: No context is taken into account – Word2vec, Glove
    2. ELMo – embedding from language models: Contextual,
    3. BERT – Bi-directional Encoder Representations fro Transformers
    4. MLM – Masked Language Model: Forward, Backward, Masked
    5. Next Sentence Prediction
    6. Achieved SOTA – 11 tasks: GLUE, SQuAD 1.0
    • Predisction models;
    • Input
    • Label – IsNext vs NotNext

     GLUE Test score

    BERT BASE vs BERT LARGE

    • Featured-based approach

    BERT Variants – TinyBert, Albert, RoBETa, DistilBert

    Multi-lingual BERT, BERT other languages

    A Primer in BERTology: How BERT Works

     OpenAI built a text generator – too dangerous to release

    OpenAI GPT-3 – Trained on 300B tokens – THREE models:

    1. Zero-shot – English to French – no training
    2. one-shots
    3. Few-shot – the GOAL – GPT-3
    4. GRT-3 is large scale NLP

    Examples – Feature extraction

    • English to SQL
    • English to CSS
    • English to LaTex

    Semantic textual similarity

    NL inference 

    ULMFiT – Fine tuning – the larger the # of Training examples – the better the performance 

    1. LM pre-training – start from scratch: BART, Big Bird, ELECTRA, Longformer
    2. LM fine-tuning
    3. Classifier fine-tuning

    Data augmentation

    Contextual Augmentation

    1. Original sentence
    2. masked
    3. augmented

    Test generation

    1. boolean questions
    2. from structured data, i.e.,  RDF – Resource Description Framework

    OCTOBER 30TH

    Generalized Deep Reinforcement Learning for Solving Combinatorial Optimization Problems

     

    Fri, October 30, 9:00 AM
    (PDT)

    Azalia Mirhoseini, PhD | Senior Research Scientist | Google Brain

    Type: Keynote

    Abstract: 

    Many problems in systems and chip design are in the form of combinatorial optimization on graph structured data. In this talk, I will motivate taking a learning based approach to combinatorial optimization problems with a focus on deep reinforcement learning (RL) agents that generalize. I will discuss our work on a new domain-transferable reinforcement learning methodology for optimizing chip placement, a long pole in hardware design. Our approach is capable of learning from past experience and improving over time, resulting in more optimized placements on unseen chip blocks as the RL agent is exposed to a larger volume of data. Our objective is to minimize PPA (power, performance, and area), and we show that, in under 6 hours, our method can generate placements that are superhuman or comparable on modern accelerator chips, whereas existing baselines require human experts in the loop and can take several weeks.

    Bio: 

    Azalia Mirhoseini is a Senior Research Scientist at Google Brain. She is the co-founder/tech-lead of the Machine Learning for Systems Team in Google Brain where they focus on deep reinforcement learning based approaches to solve problems in computer systems and metal earning. She has a Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Rice University. She has received a number of awards, including the MIT Technology Review 35 under 35 award, the Best Ph.D. Thesis Award at Rice and a Gold Medal in the National Math Olympiad in Iran. Her work has been covered in various media outlets including MIT Technology Review, IEEE Spectrum, and Wired.

    Session Details & Prerequisites Q&A Slack Channel
    • Learning Based Approaches vs branch & Bound, Hill climbing, ILP
    • scale on distributed platforms
    • Device Placement – too big to fit – PARTITION among multiple devices – evaluate run time per alternative placements
    • Learn Placement on NMT – Profiling Placement on NMT
    • CPU + layers encoder and decoders – overhead tradeoffs – parallelization for work balancing
    • RL-based placement vs Expert placement
    • Memory copying task
    • Generalization to be achieved forr Device Placement Architecture
    • Embeddings that transfer knowledge across graphs
    • Graph Partitioning: Normalized cuts objective: Volume , Cuts,
    • Learning based approach Train NN on nodes of graph assign Probability of node belonging to a given partition
    • Continuous relaxation of Normalized cuts
    • Optimize expected normalized Cuts
    • Generalized Graph Partitioning Framework
    Chip Placement Problem (Floor planning) – Chip Design – resource optimization, canonical reimforcement learning
    • Placement Optimmization using AGENTS to place the nodes
    • Train Policy to be using for placement of ALL chips
    • Compiling a Dataset of Chip Placements
    • Policy/Value Model Architecture to save wire length used
    • RISC-V: Placement Visualization: Training from Scratch (Human) 6-8 weeks vs Pre-Trained 24 hours

    Keynote Session – Zoubin Ghahramani

    Fri, October 30, 9:30 AM
    (PDT)

    Zoubin Ghahramani, PhD | Distinguished Scientist and Sr Research Director | Professor of Information Engineering | ex-Chief Scientist and VP of AI | Google | University of Cambridge | Uber

    Type: Keynote

    Q&A Slack Channel

    • Data- models predictiona decisions Understanding
    • AI & Games
    • AI + ML
    • Deep Learning! (DL)
    1. NN  – tunable nonlinear functions with many parameters
    2. Parameters are weights of NN
    3. Optimization + Statistics
    4. DL – New-branding of NN
    5. Many layers – ReLUs attention
    6. Cloud resources
    7. SW – TensorFloe, JAX
    8. Industry investment in DL

    DL – very successful

    • non-parametric statistics
    • use huge data – simulated data
    • automatic differentiation
    • stay close to identity – makes models deeps ReLU, LSTMs GRUs, ResNets
    • Symmentry parameter tieying

    Limitations of DL

    • data hungry
    • adversarial examples
    • black-boxes – difficult to trust
    • uncertainty – not easily incorporated

    Beyond DL

    • ML as Probabilistic Modeling: Data observed from a system
    • uncertainty
    • inverse probability
    • Bayes rule Priors from measured quantities inference for posterior
    • learning and predicting can be seen as forms of inference – likelihood
    • approximations from estimation of Likelihoods
    1. Learning
    2. Prediction
    3. Model Comparison
    4. Sum rule: Product rule

    Why do probabilities matter in AI and DS?

    • COmplexity control and structure learning
    • exploration-exlpoitations trade-offs
    • Building prior knowledge algorithms for small and large data sets
    • BDP – Bayesian DL
    • Gaussian Processes – Linear and logistics regressions SVMs
    • BDL – Baysian NN/ GP Hybrids
    • Deep Sum=Product Networks – deescrimitive programming

    Probabilistic Programming Languagues

    Languages: Tensors, Turing,

    Automatic Statistician –

    • model discovery from data and explain the results

    Probabilistic ML

    • Learn from Data  decision theory Prob AI BDL, Prob Prog,

    Zoubin Ghahramani, 2015, Probabilistic machine learning and AI, Nature 521; 452-459

     

    The Future of Computing is Distributed

    Fri, October 30, 10:00 AM

    (PDT)
    Ion Stoica, PhD | Professor of Computer Science Division | Co-Founder | Berkeley | Anyscale | Databricks | Conviva Networks
    • 1970 – ARPA net 1970 – distributed
    • 1980 – High performance computing – HPC 1980s
    • 1990 – WEB – Amazon
    • 2000 – Big data – Google

    Distributed computing – Few courses at universities

    • Rise of deep learning (DL)
    • Application becomes AI centered: Healthcare, FIN, Manufacturing
    • Morse law – is dead: Memory and Processors
    • Specialized hardware: CPU, GPU, TPU
    • Memory dwarfed by demand
    • Memory: Tutring Project 17B
    • GPT-2 8.3B
    • GPT-1
    • Micro-services: Clusters of clouds – integrating with distributed workloads
    • AI is overlapping with HPC
    • AI and Big Data

    AI Applications

    • MPI,
    • Stitching several existing systems

    RAY riselab @Berkeley – Universal framework for distributed computing (Python and JAVA) across different Libraries

    • Asynchronous execution enable parallelism
    • Function -> Task (API)
    • Object ID – every task scheduled
    • Library Ecosystem – Native Libraries 3rd Party Libraries
    • Amazon and AZURE SPARK, MARS (Tensor)

    ADOPTIONS

    • Number of contributors increase fast N=300

     

    TALKS on 10/30/2020

     

    Advances and Frontiers in Auto AI & Machine Learning – Lisa Amini



    Lisa Amini, Director | IBM Research – Cambridge
    • Auto AI – holistic approach
    • Auto ML – Models: Feature creation, modeling, training & testing

    AI AUTOmation for Enterprise

    • Feature Preprocessor ->>Feature Transformer Feature selector Estimator
    • Joint-optimization problem
    1. Method selection
    2. Hyper-parameter Optimization
    3. Black-box constraints
    • Bias Mitigation Algorithms
    1. Pre-processing algo
    2. In-processing Algo
    3. Post-processing algo
    • Automation for Data – READINESS for ML
    • relational data –
    • knowledge augmentation
    • Data readiness reporting
    • Labeling Automation: Enhance

    Knowledge augmentation – Federated Learning

    • External data sources
    • existing data
    • documents containing domain knowledge
    • Automating Augmenting Data with knowledge: feature-concept mapping

    Modeling

    • Time Series Forecasting

    AI to decision Optimization

    • Demand forecasting from Standard AutoAI by ADDING Historical Decisions and Historical Business Impact__>> reinforced learning – Automatically created model from past and Auto AI

    Validation

    • Meta-learning for performance prediction
    • Train the META data
    • Score production data with AI

    Deployment

    • staged deployment with contextual bandits

    Monitoring

    • Performance prediction meta model applied over windows of production traffic

    INNOVATIONS;

    • End-to-end AI life cycle
    • expanding scope of automation; Domain knowledge and decision optimization

     

    The State of Serverless and Applications to AI

     

    Fri, October 30, 11:20 AM
    (PDT)

    Joe Hellerstein, PhD | Chief Strategy Officer, Professor of Computer Science | Trifacta, Berkeley

    The Cloud and practical AI have evolved hand-in-hand over the last decade. Looking forward to the next decade, both of these technologies are moving toward increased democratization, enabling the broad majority of developers to gain access to the technology.

    Serverless computing is a relatively new abstraction for democratizing the task of programming the cloud at scale. In this talk I will discuss the limitations of first-generation serverless computing from the major cloud vendors, and ongoing research at Berkeley’s RISELab to push forward toward “”””stateful”””” serverless computing. In addition to system infrastructure, I will discuss and demonstrate applications including data science, model serving for machine learning, and cloud-bursted computing for robotics.

    Bio: 

    Joseph M. Hellerstein is the Jim Gray Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley, whose work focuses on data-centric systems and the way they drive computing. He is an ACM Fellow, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and the recipient of three ACM-SIGMOD “Test of Time” awards for his research. Fortune Magazine has included him in their list of 50 smartest people in technology , and MIT’s Technology Review magazine included his work on their TR10 list of the 10 technologies “most likely to change our world”. Hellerstein is the co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Trifacta, a software vendor providing intelligent interactive solutions to the messy problem of wrangling data. He has served on the technical advisory boards of a number of computing and Internet companies including Dell EMC, SurveyMonkey, Captricity, and Datometry, and previously served as the Director of Intel Research, Berkeley.

    Type: Talk, Level: Intermediate, Focus Area: AI for Good, Machine Learning

    Session Details & Prerequisites Q&A Slack Channel
    • What happened with the Cloud – no app
    • Parallelism – distributed computers – scale up or down, consistency and partial failure
    • Serverless Computing: Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS)
    • Developers OUTSIDE AWS, AZURE< Google to program the CLoud
    • Python for the Cloud
    • AutoScaling – yes
    • Limitations of FaaS: AWS Lambda: I/O Bottlenecks, lifetine 15 min, No Inbound Network COmmunication
    • Program State: local data – managed across invocations
    • Data Gravity – expensive to move

    Distributed consistency – data replication: Agree on data  value mutable variable x [undate took place]

    • Two-Phase commit [ Consensus – Paxos]
    • coordination avoidance: waiting for control TALL LATENCY- DISTRIBUTION OF PERFORMANCE
    • Slowdown cascades: I/O
    • Application semantics: Programs requires coordination
    • Program must have property of Monotonic
    • MONOTONICITY: Input grows/output grows – wait on information not on Coordination

    CALM – infinitely-scalable systems – no coordination ->> parallelism and smooth scalability

    Monotonicity syntactically in a logic language

    Hydro: a Platform for Programming the Cloud

    Anna Serverless KVS – Hydro Project

    • shared-nothing at all scales (even across Threads)
    • Fast under contention: 90% request handling

    Cloudburst: A stateful Serverless Platform: CACHE close to compute: Cache consistency

    Latency Python, Cloudburst, AWS, AWS Lambda:

    • AWS Lambda is SLOW for AI vs Python, Cloudburst

    Scalable AWS Lambda simultaneously

    • Motion planning compute
    • Cloudburst + Anna requirement

    @joe_hellerstein

    Bloom Lab

    RiseLab

    Hydro

     

    Just Machine Learning

    Fri, October 30, 1:10 PM
    (PDT)

    Join

    Tina Eliassi-Rad, PhD | Professor | Core Faculty | Northeastern University | Network Science Institute

    Type: Talk, Level: All Levels, Focus Area: Machine Learning

    In 1997, Tom Mitchell defined the well-posed learning problem as follows: “A computer program is said to learn from experience E with respect to some task T and some performance measure P, if its performance on T, as measured by P, improves with experience E.” In this talk, I will discuss current tasks, experiences, and performance measures as they pertain to fairness in machine learning. The most popular task thus far has been risk assessment. We know this task comes with impossibility results (e.g., see Kleinberg et al. 2016, Chouldechova 2016). I will highlight new findings in terms of these impossibility results. In addition, most human decision-makers seem to use risk estimates for efficiency purposes and not to make fairer decisions. I will present an alternative task definition whose goal is to provide more context to the human decision-maker. The problems surrounding experience have received the most attention. Joy Buolamwini (MIT Media Lab) refers to these as the “under-sampled majority” problem. The majority of the population is non-white, non-male; however, white males are overrepresented in the training data. Not being properly represented in the training data comes at a cost to the under-sampled majority when machine learning algorithms are used to aid human decision-makers. In terms of performance measures, a variety of definitions exist from group- to individual- to procedural-fairness. I will discuss our null model for fairness and demonstrate how to use deviations from this null model to measure favoritism and prejudice in the data.

    Tasks:

    • Assessing risk
    • Ranking
    • Statistical parity: among classifier

    PARITY vs imperfect classifier – can’t satisfy all the three conditions

    • Precision
    • Tru positive
    • False parity

    All classifier do not consider context or allow for uncertainty

    • Learning to Place within existing cases
    • Incentives/values of Human decision maker which incorporate in the decision external factors
    • Game-theoretical framework
    • How human exemplars make decision
    • Are algorithms value free?

    Computational Ethics

    • Logically consistent principle
    • Camouflage – machine did not learn on the task but on the cloudiness of the sky
    • Model Cards for Model Reporting
    • The “undersampled majority”
    • Experience: Demonstration: Should we learn from demonstrations or from simulations?
    • Complex networks: guilt by association vs privilege and prejudice, individual fairness
    • Datasheets for Datasets
    • Algorithms are like prescription drug: Adverse events

    Human vs Machine judgement

    • Performance measure – FAIRNESS: Group, individual
    • Normativity throughout the entire well-posed learning problem
    • Incentive/values
    • Human or machines to make decisions?
    • Laws are needed if algorithms are used as expert witness

     

    Machine Learning for Biology and Medicine

    Fri, October 30, 2:00 PM

    Sriram Sankararaman, PhD | Professor, Computer Science | University of California – Los Angeles

    Type: Talk, Focus Area: Machine Learning

    Abstract: 

    Biology and medicine are deluged with data so that techniques from machine learning and statistics will increasingly play a key role in extracting insights from the vast quantities of data being generated. I will provide an overview of the modeling and inferential challenges that arise in these domains.

    In the first part of my talk, I will focus on machine learning problems arising in the field of genomics. The cost of genome sequencing has decreased by over 100,000 fold over the last decade. Availability of genetic variation data from millions of individuals has opened up the possibility of using genetic information to identifying the cause of diseases, developing effective drugs, predicting disease risk and personalizing treatment. While genome-wide association studies offer a powerful paradigm to discovering disease-causing genes, the hidden genetic structure of human populations can confound these studies. I will describe statistical models that can infer this hidden structure and show how these inferences lead to novel insights into the genetic basis of diseases.

    In the second part of my talk, I will discuss how the availability of large-scale electronic medical records is opening up the possibility of using machine learning in clinical settings. These electronic medical records are designed to capture a wide range of data associated with a patient including demographic information, laboratory tests, images, medications and clinical notes. Using electronic records from around 60,000 surgeries over five years in the UCLA hospital, I will describe efforts to use machine learning algorithms to predict mortality after surgery. Our results reveal that these algorithms can accurately predict mortality from information available prior to surgery indicating that automated predictive systems have great potential to augment clinical care.

    Bio: 

    Sriram Sankararaman is an assistant professor in the Departments of Computer Science, Human Genetics, and Computational Medicine at UCLA where he leads the machine learning and genomic lab. His research interests lie at the interface of computer science, statistics and biology and is interested in developing statistical machine learning algorithms to make sense of large-scale biomedical data and in using these tools to understand the interplay between evolution, our genomes and traits. He received a B.Tech. in Computer Science from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, a Ph.D. in Computer Science from UC Berkeley and was a post-doctoral fellow in Harvard Medical School before joining UCLA. He is a recipient of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellowship (2017), Okawa Foundation grant (2017), the UCLA Hellman fellowship (2017), the NIH Pathway to Independence Award (2014), a Simons Research fellowship (2014), and a Harvard Science of the Human Past fellowship (2012) as well as the Northrop-Grumman Excellence in Teaching Award at UCLA (2019).

    • ML & BioMedicine

    BioMedical data: high D, heterogeneous, noisy data

    1. Clinical Data & DL
    • Predict death after surgery – 1000 dealth complication, sepsis acout kidney injury
    • Mortality during and after surgery
    • collaboration: Anesthesiology, PeriOps, UCLA Health
    • Data warehouse – EMR 4/2013 – 12/2018
    • 60,000 patients in data: Age, height, weight, gender,ASA Status- input from physician

    Pre-operative mortality risk prediction – False positive, missing data: Lab data was collected, what were the values

    2% of admission associate with mortality

    SMOTE: over-sampling of associate with risk

    Learning setup: Temporal training-testing split, hyper parameter

    Models: Logistics, Random forest, gradient-boosted trees

    Feature sets: ASA status, surrugate-ASA

    • ASA Status – did not contribute  with it and without it the same
    • Lab values and timing of lab – is the most important festure.
    • RANDOM FOREST model was selected
    • Precision/recall curve
    • The model reduced number of patients flagged by around 20x

    Open problemsL Interoperability, Learning over private data

    2. Epidemiological dat and ML – Social distancing in COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Effectiveness of social distancing
    • SEIR
    • Average duration of infection
    • Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Removed (SEIR) model
    • R-naught applied to social distancing the ratio of Susceptible /Exposed is compared to Infectious/Removed the lowe the better
    • Social distancing-relaxation – Relaxation in 2022
    • COVID spread – estimate when SOcial distabcing need to END
    • UK, NY, Spain, France, Germany, Denmark
    • Hierarchical Bayesian model: Shared Global parameters, Location-specific, Observations
    • Hierarchical Bayesian model SEIR Model: Data generation process
    • Empirical Bayes: Maximize likelihood of the global parameters
    • Trajectory based on Model Fit
    • Estimation of uncertainty
    • End of Social distancing – time distribution around a mean
    • No seasonality, no infinite immunity, No vaccine
    • Quantify Uncertainty
    • Work with domain knowledge experts is great

    The Bayesians are Coming! The Bayesians are Coming, to Time Series – Aric LaBarr


    Fri, Oct 30, 2020 5:50 PM – 6:35 PM EDT


    Aric LaBarr, Associate Professor of Analytics | Institute for Advanced Analytics at NC State University
    With the computational advances over the past few decades, Bayesian analysis approaches are starting to be fully appreciated. Forecasting and time series also have Bayesian approaches and techniques, but most people are unfamiliar with them due to the immense popularity of Exponential Smoothing and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) classes of models. However, Bayesian modeling and time series analysis have a lot in common! Both are based on using historical information to help inform future modeling and decisions. Using past information is key to any time series analysis because the data typically evolves over time in a correlated way. Bayesian techniques rely on new data updating their models from previous instances for better estimates of posterior distributions. This talk will briefly introduce the differences between classical frequentist approaches of statistics to their Bayesian counterparts as well as the difference between time series data made for forecasting compared to traditional cross-sectional data. From there, it will compare the classical Exponential Smoothing and ARIMA class models of time series to Bayesian models with autoregressive components. Comparing the results of these models across the same data set allows the audience to see the potential benefits and disadvantages of using each of the techniques. This talk aims to allow people to update their own skill set in forecasting with these potentially Bayesian techniques. At the end, the talk explores the technique of model ensembling in a time series context. From these ensembles, the benefits of all types of models are potentially blended together. These models and their respective outputs will be displayed in R
    • Single Exponential Smoothing
    • ARIMA – long-memory models – Autoregressive AR
    • Moving Average (MA) model – short memory
    • Intergrated AR+MA = ARIMA

    Learning Intended Reward Functions: Extracting all the Right Information from All the Right Places

    Fri, October 30, 3:45 PM

    (PDT)

    00:04:42
    Anca Dragan, PhD | Assistant Professor, EECS | Head | UC Berkeley | InterACT lab

    Type: Talk, Focus Area: Deep Learning

    Learning Intended Reward Functions: Extracting all the Right Information from All the Right Places

    Abstract: 

    Content: AI work tends to focus on how to optimize a specified reward function, but rewards that lead to the desired behavior consistently are not so easy to specify. Rather than optimizing specified reward, which is already hard, robots have the much harder job of optimizing intended reward. While the specified reward does not have as much information as we make our robots pretend, the good news is that humans constantly leak information about what the robot should optimize. In this talk, we will explore how to read the right amount of information from different types of human behavior — and even the lack thereof.
    Learning outcomes: After participating, you should be able to articulate the common pitfalls we face in defining an AI reward, loos, or objective function. You should also develop a basic understanding of the main algorithmic tools we have for avoiding these pitfalls.

    Target audience: Participants with some AI experience, be in supervised or reinforcement learning.

    Bio: 

    Anca Dragan is an Assistant Professor in EECS at UC Berkeley, where she runs the InterACT lab. Her goal is to enable robots to work with, around, and in support of people. She works on algorithms that enable robots to a) coordinate with people in shared spaces, and b) learn what people want them to do. Anca did her PhD in the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University on legible motion planning. At Berkeley, she helped found the Berkeley AI Research Lab, is a co-PI for the Center for Human-Compatible AI, and has been honored by the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the Sloan fellowship, the NSF CAREER award, the Okawa award, MIT’s TR35, and an IJCAI Early Career Spotlight.

    • Sequential decision making
    • defining what robots goal is
    • Autonomous car
    • AI = optimize intended rewards vs specified reward
    • parametrization of the reward function
    • Agent over-learn from specified rewards but under-learn from other sources
    • observing feedback and express the human feedback in observation (human) model
    • How can we model reward design/specification as a noisy and suboptiman process
    • Development vs deployment environment
    • Robot trust the development environment
    • good behavior incentivized reward
    • maximize winning, maximizing score, minimize winning, minimize score
    • model the demo as a reward-rational implicit
    • Human feedback as a reward-rational implicit choice
    • The state of the environment as a reward-rational implicit choice
    • task specification –>> reward

     

    KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

    ODSC West Keynotes

    Suchi Saria, PhD
    Suchi Saria, PhD

    Director Of The Machine Learning And Healthcare Lab, John C. Malone Endowed Chair, Founder Of Bayesian Health, MIT Technology Review’s 35 Innovators Under 35, And A World Economic Forum Young Global Leader

    Johns Hopkins University

    Jeannette M. Wing, PhD
    Jeannette M. Wing, PhD

    Avanessians Director Of The Data Science Institute, Professor Of Computer Science Columbia University, Former Corporate Vice President Microsoft, Former Assistant Director, National Science Foundation

    Columbia University

    Ion Stoica, PhD
    Ion Stoica, PhD

    Professor Of Computer Science, Head Of RISELab. Co-Founder Of Anyscale, Databricks, And Conviva Networks, ACM Fellow, SIGOPS Hall Of Fame Award (2015), SIGCOMM Test Of Time Award (2011)

    UC Berkeley

    Raluca Ada Popa, PhD
    Raluca Ada Popa, PhD

    Cybersecurity & Applied Cryptography Professor, MIT Technology Review’s 35 Under 35, Recipient Of Intel Early Career Faculty Honor Award, George M. Sprowls Award For Best MIT CS Doctoral Thesis, Co-Founder Of PreVeil

    UC Berkeley

    Zoubin Ghahramani, PhD
    Zoubin Ghahramani, PhD

    Chief Scientist, Founding Director Of The AlanTuring Institute, Prof. Of Information Engineering & Deputy Director Of The Leverhulme Centre For The Future Of Intelligence, Fellow Of St John’s College Cambridge And Of The Royal Society

    Uber | The University of Cambridge

    Azalia Mirhoseini, PhD
    Azalia Mirhoseini, PhD

    Senior Research Scientist At Google Brain. Advisor At Cmorq. Co-Founder Machine Learning For Systems Moonshot At Brain Focusing On Deep RL. MIT Technology Review 35 Under 35 Award

    Google Brain

    Marinela Profi
    Marinela Profi

    Global Strategist For AI, Global Ambassador For The Women Tech Network, Author Of “Mastering Model Lifecycle Orchestration: An Interactive Guide”

    SAS

    John Montgomery
    John Montgomery

    Corporate Vice President, Visual Studio, Microsoft Azure AI Lead, Former Chief Information Office At Imagine Publishing, Author At Visual Studio

    Microsoft

    Ben Taylor,PhD
    Ben Taylor,PhD

    Chief AI Evangelist, Deep Learning & HPC Expert, Co-Founder & Chief Scientist At Zeff.Ai, Former Chief Scientist At HireVue, ProductCraft Contributor

    DataRobot

    SCHEDULE

    Open Data Science

    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 27TH

    Pre-conference Day

    ODSC BootCamp

    BOOTCAMP KICKOFF WEST VIRTUAL
    10:00 am

    Fundamentals | Morning Sessions

     – 

    Choose from 6 foundation sessions in Programming, Mathematics for Data Science, and Statistics

    Virtual break

     – 

    11:00 am
    12:00 pm
    1:00 pm
    2:00 pm

    Fundamentals | Afternoon Sessions

     – 

    Choose from 6 foundation sessions in Programming, Mathematics for Data Science, and Statistics

    3:00 pm
    4:00 pm
    5:00 pm

     

    Open Data Science

    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28TH

    Day 1

    ODSC Trainings, Workshops & AI Expo, Ai x and Ai x Keynotes

    VIRTUAL HANDS-ON TRAINING WEST VIRTUAL VIRTUAL AI X EXPO & DEMO HALL WEST VIRTUAL EVENTS WEST VIRTUAL
    10:00 am

    Hands-on Training and Workshops

     – 

    Choose from Five 3.5 hours Training Sessions and Six 90 minute Workshop Sessions

    Networking break

     – 

    Morning Partners Demo Talks

     – 

    Choose from 12 Partners Sessions

    11:00 am

    Virtual Exhibitor Showcase

     – 

    Visit 30+ Virtual Partners booth

    12:00 pm
    1:00 pm

    Networking break

     – 

    2:00 pm

    Hands-on Training and Workshops

     – 

    Choose from Five 3.5 hours Training Sessions and Six 90 minute Workshop Sessions

    Afternoon Partners Demo Talks

     – 

    Choose from 12 Partners Sessions

    3:00 pm
    4:00 pm
    5:00 pm

     

    Open Data Science

    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29TH

    Day 2

    ODSC Keynotes, Talks, Trainings, Workshops, AI Expo & Events

    VIRTUAL HANDS-ON TRAINING WEST VIRTUAL VIRTUAL AI X EXPO & DEMO HALL WEST VIRTUAL VIRTUAL PRESENTATIONS WEST VIRTUAL
    9:00 am

    ODSC Keynote

     – 

    10:00 am

    Morning Hands-on Training and Workshops

     – 

    Choose from Five 3.5 hours Training Sessions and Six 90 minute Workshop Sessions

    Networking break

     – 

    Virtual Exhibitor Showcase & Partners Demo Talks

     – 

    Choose from 12 Morning Partners Sessions & Visit 25+ Virtual Partners booth

    11:00 am

    Breakout Talk Sessions

     – 

    Choose from 7 talk presentations

    12:00 pm
    1:00 pm

    Networking break

     – 

    2:00 pm

    Afternoon Hands-on Training and Workshops

     – 

    Choose from Five 3.5 hours Training Sessions and Six 90 minute Workshop Sessions

    Virtual Exhibitor Showcase & Partners Demo Talks

     – 

    Choose from 12 Afternoon Partners Sessions & Visit 25+ Virtual Partners booth

    Breakout Talk Sessions

     – 

    Choose from 7 talk presentations

    3:00 pm
    4:00 pm
    5:00 pm

     

    Open Data Science

    FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30TH

    Day 3

    ODSC Keynotes, Talks, Trainings, Workshops, Events, & Career Expo

    VIRTUAL HANDS-ON TRAINING WEST VIRTUAL VIRTUAL PRESENTATIONS WEST VIRTUAL CAREER LAB AND EXPO & POSTER SESSIONS WEST VIRTUAL
    9:00 am

    ODSC Keynote

     – 

    10:00 am

    Morning Hands-on Training and Workshops

     – 

    Choose from Five 3.5 hours Training Sessions and Six 90 minute Workshop Sessions

    Virtual Lunch & Networking break

     – 

    Virtual Career Expo

     – 

    Get n touch with 30+ Hiring Partners and choose from 12 Mentor Talks

    11:00 am

    Breakout Talk Sessions

     – 

    Choose from 7 talk presentations

    12:00 pm
    1:00 pm

    Virtual Lunch & Networking break

     – 

    2:00 pm

    Afternoon Hands-on Training and Workshops

     – 

    Choose from Five 3.5 hours Training Sessions and Six 90 minute Workshop Sessions

    Breakout Talk Sessions

     – 

    Choose from 7 talk presentations

    3:00 pm
    4:00 pm
    5:00 pm

     


    SPEAKERS

    Click for
    more info

    Nadja Herger, PhD

    DATA SCIENTISTTHOMSON REUTERS

    Click for
    more info

    Viktoriia Samatova

    HEAD OF TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATIONTHOMSON REUTERS

    Click for
    more info

    Nina Hristozova

    JUNIOR DATA SCIENTISTTHOMSON REUTERS

    Click for
    more info

    Daniel Whitenack, PhD

    INSTRUCTOR, DATA SCIENTISTDATA DAN

    David Talby: NLP for healthcare
    Click for
    more info

    David Talby, PhD

    CTOPACIFIC AI, JOHN SNOW LABS

    Click for
    more info

    Tian Zheng, PhD

    CHAIR, DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICSCOLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    Click for
    more info

    Phoebe Liu

    SENIOR DATA SCIENTISTAPPEN

    Click for
    more info

    Frank Zhao

    SENIOR DIRECTOR, QUANTAMENTAL RESEARCHS&P GLOBAL MARKET INTELLIGENCE

    TOPICS – trends in NLP, including pre-trained models, with use-cases focusing on deep learning, speech-to text, and semantic search.

    • Natural Language Processing
    • NLP Transformers
    • Pre-trained Models
    • Text Analytics
    • Natural Language Understanding
    • Sentiment Analysis
    • Natural Language Generation
    • Speech Recognition
    • Named Entity Extraction

    MODELS

    • BERT
    • XLNet
    • GPT-2
    • Transformers
    • Word2Vec
    • Deep Learning Models
    • RNN & LSTM
    • Machine Learning Models
    • ULMFiT
    • Transfer Learning

    TOOLS

    • Tensorflow 2.0
    • Hugging Face Transformers
    • PyTorch
    • Theano
    • SpaCy
    • NLTK
    • AllenNLP
    • Stanford CoreNLP
    • Keras
    • FLAIR

    Read Full Post »


    Tweets & Retweets by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 at #BioIT20, 19th Annual Bio-IT World 2020 Conference, October 6-8, 2020 in Boston

     

    Virtual Conference coverage in Real Time: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

     

    Amazing conference ended at 2PM on October 8, 2020

    e-Proceedings 19th Annual Bio-IT World 2020 Conference, October 6-8, 2020 Boston

    Virtual Conference coverage in Real Time: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/03/26/19th-annual-bio-it-world-2020-conference-october-6-8-2020-in-boston/

    Review Tweets and Retweets

    and 2 others liked your Tweet

    #BioIT20 Plenary Keynote: cutting innovative approach to #Science #Game On: How #AI, #CitizenScience #HumanComputation are facilitating the next leap forward in #Genomics and in #Biology may be in #PrecisionMedicine in the Future @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 pic.twitter.com/L52qktkeYc

    Retweeted your Tweet
    #BioIT20 Plenary Keynote: cutting innovative approach to #Science #Game On: How #AI, #CitizenScience #HumanComputation are facilitating the next leap forward in #Genomics and in #Biology may be in #PrecisionMedicine in the Future @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 pic.twitter.com/L52qktkeYc

    and

    liked your Tweet

    #BioIT20 Plenary Keynote: cutting innovative approach to #Science #Game On: How #AI, #CitizenScience #HumanComputation are facilitating the next leap forward in #Genomics and in #Biology may be in #PrecisionMedicine in the Future @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 pic.twitter.com/L52qktkeYc

    NIH Office of Data Science Strategy
    @NIHDataScience

    We’ve made progress with #FAIRData, but we still have a ways to go and our future is bright. #BioIT20 #NIHData

    Image

    3

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #BioIT20

    Driving Scientific Discovery with Data Digitization great ideas shared by moderator Timothy Gardner

    #CEO Inspiration from History Total Quality Implementation is key for BioScience Data #AI won’t solve the problem #Data #Quality will

    Image

    Rob Lalonde
    @HPC_Cloud_Rob

    My #BioIT20 talk, “#Bioinformatics in the #Cloud Age,” is tomorrow at 3:30pm. I discuss cloud migration trends in life sciences and #HPC. Join us! A panel with

    and

    follows the talk.

    1
    16

    Jean Marois
    @JeanMarois

    My team is participating in Bio-IT World Virtual 2020, October 6-8. Join me! Use discount code 20NUA to save 20%! invt.io/1tdbae9s8lp

    #BioIT20

    I’m going to Bio-IT World 2020, Oct 6-8, from home! Its a virtual event. Join me!
    My team is participating in Bio-IT World Virtual 2020, October 6-8. Join me! Use discount code 20NUA to save 20%! @bioitworld #BioIT20
    invt.io
    2

    NIH Office of Data Science Strategy
    @NIHDataScience

    One of the challenges we face today: we need an algorithm that can search across the 36+ PB of Sequence Read Archive (SRA) data now in the cloud. Imagine what we could do! #BioIT20 #NIHdata #SRAdata

    Image

    2

    NCBI Staff
    @NCBI

    NCBI’s virtual #BioIT20 booth will open in 15 minutes. There, you can watch videos, grab some flyers and even speak with an expert! bio-itworld.pathable.co/organizations/ The booth will close at 4:15 PM, but we’ll be back tomorrow, Oct 7 and Thursday, Oct 8 at 9AM.
    Bio-IT World
    Welcome to Bio-IT World Virtual
    bio-itworld.pathable.co
    1
    6
    Show this thread

    PERCAYAI
    @percayai

    Happening soon at #BioIT20: Join our faculty inventor Professor Rich Head’s invited talk “CompBio: An Augmented Intelligence System for Comprehensive Interpretation of Biological Data.”
    4

    Wendy Anne Warr
    @WendyAnneWarr

    This was a good discussion
    Quote Tweet
    Cambridge Innovation
    @CIInstitute
    ·
    RT percayai: We’ve put together what’s sure to be a thought-provoking discussion group for #BioIT20 “Why Current Approaches Using #AI in #…
    1
    2

    Cambridge Innovation
    @CIInstitute

    RT VishakhaSharma_: Excited to speak and moderate a panel on Emerging #AI technologies bioitworld #BioIT20
    1

    Titian Software
    @TitianSoftware

    Meet Titian at #BioIT20 on 6-8th October and discover the latest research, science and solutions for exploring the world of precision medicine and the technologies that are powering it: bit.ly/2GjCj4B

    Image

    1

    PERCAYAI
    @percayai

    Thanks for joining us, Wendy! You’ve done a great job summing up key points from the discussion. #BioIT20
    1

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #NIHhealthInitiative #BioItWorld20

    Out standing Plenary Keynote on #DataScience

    CONNECTED DATA ECOSYSTEM FAIR Foundable, Accessible, Interoperable, reusable

    Image

    2

    Read Full Post »


    Tweet Collection by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 and Re-Tweets for e-Proceedings 14th Annual BioPharma &amp; Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020, 8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

    Real Time Press Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

     

    e-Proceedings 14th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Friday, September 4, 2020, 8 AM EST to 3-30 PM EST – Virtual Edition

    Real Time Press Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

    Founder & Director, LPBI Group

    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/07/28/14th-annual-biopharma-healthcare-summit-friday-september-4-2020-8-am-est-to-3-30-pm-est-virtual-edition/

     

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Hal Barron, Chief Scientific Officer and President R&D, GlaxoSmithKline GWAS not easy to find which gene drives the association  Functional Genomics gene by gene with phenotypes using machine learning significant help

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Hal Barron, Chief Scientific Officer and President R&D, GSK GWAS not easy to find which gene drives the association  Functional Genomics gene by gene with phenotypes using machine learning significant help

    Srihari Gopal
    @sgopal2

    Enjoyed hearing enthusiasm for Neuroscience R&D by Roy Vagelos at #USAIC20. Wonderful interview by Mathai Mammen

    Image

    1
    2
    Show this thread

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Nina Kjellson, General Partner, Canaan Data science is a winner in Healthcare Women – Data Science is an excellent match

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Arpa Garay, President, Global Pharmaceuticals, Commercial Analytics, Merck & Co. Data on Patients and identification who will benefit fro which therapy  cultural bias risk aversion

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Najat Khan, Chief Operating Officer, Janssen R&D Data Sciences, Johnson & Johnson Data Validation  Deployment of algorithms embed data by type early on in the crisis to understand the disease

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Sastry Chilukuri, President, Acorn AI- Medidata Opportunities in Data Science in Paharma COVID-19 and Data Science

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Maya Said, Chief Executive Officer, Outcomes4Me Cancer patients taking change of their care Digital Health – consumerization of Health, patient demand to be part of the decision, part the information FDA launched a Program Project Patient Voice

    USAIC
    @USAIC

    We’re taking a quick break at #USAIC20 before our next panel on rare diseases starts at 12:20pm EDT. USAIC would like to thank our Sponsors and Partners for supporting this year’s digital event.

    Image

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Roy Vagelos, Chairman of the Board, Regeneron HIV-AIDS: reverse transcriptase converted a lethal disease to a chronic disease, tried hard to make vaccine – the science was not there

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Roy Vagelos, Chairman of the Board, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Congratulates Big Pharma for taking the challenge on COVID-19 Vaccine, Antibody and anti-viral Government funding Merck was independent from Government – to be able to set the price

    1

    Dr Kapil Khambholja
    @kapilmk

    Christopher Viehbacher, Gurnet Point Capital touches very sensitive topic at #USAIC20 He claims that we are never going to have real innovation out of big pharma! Well this isn’t new but not entirely true either… any more thoughts?
    1
    1
    Show this thread

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Daphne Zohar, Founder & CEO, PureTech Health Disease focus, best science is the decision factors

    1

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Christopher Viehbacher, Managing Partner, Gurnet Point Capital Dream of every Biotech – get Big Pharma coming to acquire and pay a lot Morph and adapt

    anju ghangurde
    @scripanjug

    Biogen’s chair Papadopoulos big co mergers is an attempt to solve problems; typically driven by patent expirations.. #usaic20

    2

    anju ghangurde
    @scripanjug

    Chris Viehbacher/Gurnet Point Capital on US election: industry will work with whoever wins; we’ll have to ‘morph & adapt’ #usaic20

    1

    Dr Kapil Khambholja
    @kapilmk

    of

    talks about various philosophies and key reasons why certain projects/molecules are killed early. My counter questions- What are chances of losing hope little early? Do small #biopharma publish negative results to aid to the knowledge pool? #USAIC20

    Image

    2
    2
    Show this thread

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute DNA repair and epignetics are the future of medicine

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute COlonorectal cancer is increasing immuno therapy 5 drugs marketed 30% cancer patients are treated early detection key vs metastatic 10% of cancer are inherited treatment early

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Rehan Verjee, President, EMD Serono Charities funding cancer research – were impacted and resources will come later and in decreased amount New opportunities support access to Medicine improve investment across the board

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Philip Larsen, Global Head of Research, Bayer AG Repurposing drugs as antiviral from drug screening innovating methods Cytokine storm in OCVID-19 – kinase inhibitors may be antiviral data of tested positive allows research of pathway in new ways

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber 3,000 Telemedicine session in the first week of the Pandemic vs 300 before – patient come back visits patient happy with Telemedicine team virtually need be reimbursed same rate working remotely

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Raju Kucherlapati, Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School New normal as a result of the pandemic role of personalized medicine

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Rehan Verjee, President, EMD Serono entire volume of clinical trials at Roche went down same at EMD delay of 6 month, some were to be initiated but was put on hold Charities funding cancer research were impacted and resources will come later smaller

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Laurie Glimcher, President & CEO, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Dana Farber saw impact of COVID-19 on immunosuppressed patients coming in for Cancer Tx – switch from IV Tx to Oral 96% decrease in screenings due to Pandemic – increase with Cancer

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Kenneth Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co. Pharma’s obligation for next generations requires investment in R&D vs Politicians running for 4 years Patients must come first vs shareholders vs R&D investment in 2011

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Kenneth Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co. Antibiotic research at Merck – no market incentives on pricing for Merck to invest in antibiotics people will die from bacterial resistance next pandemic be bacterial

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Kenneth Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co. Strategies of Merck = “Medicine is for the People not for Profit” – Ketruda in India is not reembureable in India and million are in need it Partnership are encouraged

    Dr Kapil Khambholja
    @kapilmk

    Chairman Stelios Papadopoulos asks #KennethFrazier if wealthy nations will try to secure large proportion of #COVID19 drugs/vaccines. #KennethFrazie rightly mentions: pharma industry’s responsibility to balance the access to diff countries during pandemic. #USAIC20

    1
    3
    Show this thread

    Dr Kapil Khambholja
    @kapilmk

    Almost 60% participants at #USAIC20 feel that MNCs are more likely to run their #clinicalTrials in #INDIA seeing changing environment here, reveals the poll. Exciting time ahead for scientific fraternity as this can substantially increase the speed of #DrugDevelopment globally

    Clapping hands sign

    Image

    1
    1
    Show this thread

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Barry Bloom, Professor & former Dean, Harvard School of Public Health Vaccine in clinical trials, public need to return for 2nd shot, hesitancy Who will get the Vaccine first in the US  most vulnerable of those causing transmission Pharma’s risk

    4

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr. Barry Bloom, Professor & former Dean, Harvard School of Public Health Testing – PCR expensive does not enable quick testing is expensive result come transmission occurred Antibody testing CRISPR test based Vaccine in clinical trials

    1

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    #USAIC20 Dr Andrew Plump, President of R&D, Takeda Pharmaceuticals COllaboration effort around the Globe in the Pandemic therapy solutions including Vaccines

    Read Full Post »


    Tweets by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 @ 2020 State of Possible Conference, MassBio’s VIRTUAL Annual Meeting, August 26 – 27, 2020

    Real Time press coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

     

    2020 State of Possible Conference, MassBio’s VIRTUAL Annual Meeting, August 26 – 27, 2020

    Real Time press coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

    https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/02/21/2020-state-of-possible-conference-massbios-annual-meeting-march-25-26-2020-sonesta-hotel-cambridge-ma/

     

    Aviva Lev-Ari
    @AVIVA1950

    2020 State of Possible Conference, MassBio’s VIRTUAL Annual Meeting, August 26 – 27, 2020
    2020 State of Possible Conference, MassBio’s VIRTUAL Annual Meeting, August 26 – 27, 2020 Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group will cover this event in REAL TIME…
    pharmaceuticalintelligence.com
    2