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Archive for the ‘Monoclonal Immunotherapy’ Category

Immunoediting can be a constant defense in the cancer landscape


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

There are many considerations in the cancer immunoediting landscape of defense and regulation in the cancer hallmark biology. The cancer hallmark biology in concert with key controls of the HLA compatibility affinity mechanisms are pivotal in architecting a unique patient-centric therapeutic application. Selection of random immune products including neoantigens, antigens, antibodies and other vital immune elements creates a high level of uncertainty and risk of undesirable immune reactions. Immunoediting is a constant process. The human innate and adaptive forces can either trigger favorable or unfavorable immunoediting features. Cancer is a multi-disease entity. There are multi-factorial initiators in a certain disease process. Namely, environmental exposures, viral and / or microbiome exposure disequilibrium, direct harm to DNA, poor immune adaptability, inherent risk and an individual’s own vibration rhythm in life.

 

When a human single cell is crippled (Deranged DNA) with mixed up molecular behavior that is the initiator of the problem. A once normal cell now transitioned into full threatening molecular time bomb. In the modeling and creation of a tumor it all begins with the singular molecular crisis and crippling of a normal human cell. At this point it is either chop suey (mixed bit responses) or a productive defensive and regulation response and posture of the immune system. Mixed bits of normal DNA, cancer-laden DNA, circulating tumor DNA, circulating normal cells, circulating tumor cells, circulating immune defense cells, circulating immune inflammatory cells forming a moiety of normal and a moiety of mess. The challenge is to scavenge the mess and amplify the normal.

 

Immunoediting is a primary push-button feature that is definitely required to be hit when it comes to initiating immune defenses against cancer and an adaptation in favor of regression. As mentioned before that the tumor microenvironment is a “mixed bit” moiety, which includes elements of the immune system that can defend against circulating cancer cells and tumor growth. Personalized (Precision-Based) cancer vaccines must become the primary form of treatment in this case. Current treatment regimens in conventional therapy destroy immune defenses and regulation and create more serious complications observed in tumor progression, metastasis and survival. Commonly resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is observed. These personalized treatments will be developed in concert with cancer hallmark analytics and immunocentrics affinity and selection mapping. This mapping will demonstrate molecular pathway interface and HLA compatibility and adaptation with patientcentricity.

References:

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/immunoediting-cancer-landscape-john-catanzaro/

 

https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(16)31609-9

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309432057_Circulating_tumor_cell_clusters_What_we_know_and_what_we_expect_Review

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190561/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840207/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593672/

 

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2018.00414/full

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593672/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190561/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4388310/

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cancer-hallmark-analytics-omics-data-pathway-studio-review-catanzaro/

 

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Immunotherapy may help in glioblastoma survival


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is associated with poor survival. But, in a glimmer of hope, a recent study found that a drug designed to unleash the immune system helped some patients live longer. Glioblastoma powerfully suppresses the immune system, both at the site of the cancer and throughout the body, which has made it difficult to find effective treatments. Such tumors are complex and differ widely in their behavior and characteristics.

 

A small randomized, multi-institution clinical trial was conducted and led by researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles involved patients who had a recurrence of glioblastoma, the most common central nervous system cancer. The aim was to evaluate immune responses and survival following neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy with pembrolizumab (checkpoint inhibitor) in 35 patients with recurrent, surgically resectable glioblastoma. Patients who were randomized to receive neoadjuvant pembrolizumab, with continued adjuvant therapy following surgery, had significantly extended overall survival compared to patients that were randomized to receive adjuvant, post-surgical programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade alone.

 

Neoadjuvant PD-1 blockade was associated with upregulation of T cell– and interferon-γ-related gene expression, but downregulation of cell-cycle-related gene expression within the tumor, which was not seen in patients that received adjuvant therapy alone. Focal induction of programmed death-ligand 1 in the tumor microenvironment, enhanced clonal expansion of T cells, decreased PD-1 expression on peripheral blood T cells and a decreasing monocytic population was observed more frequently in the neoadjuvant group than in patients treated only in the adjuvant setting. These findings suggest that the neoadjuvant administration of PD-1 blockade enhanced both the local and systemic antitumor immune response and may represent a more efficacious approach to the treatment of this uniformly lethal brain tumor.

 

Immunotherapy has not proved to be effective against glioblastoma. This small clinical trial explored the effect of PD-1 blockade on recurrent glioblastoma in relation to the timing of administration. A total of 35 patients undergoing resection of recurrent disease were randomized to either neoadjuvant or adjuvant pembrolizumab, and surgical specimens were compared between the two groups. Interestingly, the tumoral gene expression signature varied between the two groups, such that those who received neoadjuvant pembrolizumab displayed an INF-γ gene signature suggestive of T-cell activation as well as suppression of cell-cycle signaling, possibly consistent with growth arrest. Although the study was not powered for efficacy, the group found an increase in overall survival in patients receiving neoadjuvant pembrolizumab compared with adjuvant pembrolizumab of 13.7 months versus 7.5 months, respectively.

 

In this small pilot study, neoadjuvant PD-1 blockade followed by surgical resection was associated with intratumoral T-cell activation and inhibition of tumor growth as well as longer survival. How the drug works in glioblastoma has not been totally established. The researchers speculated that giving the drug before surgery prompted T-cells within the tumor, which had been impaired, to attack the cancer and extend lives. The drug didn’t spur such anti-cancer activity after the surgery because those T-cells were removed along with the tumor. The results are very important and very promising but would need to be validated in much larger trials.

 

References:

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2019/02/11/immunotherapy-may-help-patients-with-kind-cancer-that-killed-john-mccain/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.e1b2e6fffccc

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30742122

 

https://www.practiceupdate.com/content/neoadjuvant-anti-pd-1-immunotherapy-promotes-immune-responses-in-recurrent-gbm/79742/37/12/1

 

https://www.esmo.org/Oncology-News/Neoadjuvant-PD-1-Blockade-in-Glioblastoma

 

https://neurosciencenews.com/immunotherapy-glioblastoma-cancer-10722/

 

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Original Tweets Re-Tweets and Likes by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 at #kisymposium for 17th annual Summer Symposium: Breakthrough Cancer Nanotechnologies: Koch Institute, MIT Kresge Auditorium, June 15, 2018, 9AM-4PM

 

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CHI’s 5th ImmunoModulatory Therapeutic Antibodies for Cancer Conference, August 28-29, 2017 Sheraton Boston Hotel | Boston, MA

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

ANNOUNCEMENT

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group will cover the event in

REAL TIME

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN will be streaming live from the floor of the Sheraton Hotel in Boston on August 28 and August 29, 2017

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

 

Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s 5th Annual

Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies for Cancer

Scientific Strategies for Discovering and Developing Novel Immunotherapies and Agents to Improve the Efficacy and Toxicology Profiles of T Cell-Targeted Biotherapeutics
August 28-29, 2017 Sheraton Boston Hotel | Boston, MA

http://www.immuno-oncologysummit.com/Immunomodulatory-Antibodies-Cancer/

 

MONDAY, AUGUST 28

7:30 am Registration & Morning Coffee

8:25 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Yan Qu, Ph.D., Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer

 

8:30 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Enabling Effective Immuno-Oncology

Greg_AdamsGregory Adams, Ph.D., CSO, Eleven Biotherapeutics

Checkpoint inhibitors and other immune-oncology agents have shown significant promise in the treatment of a variety of cancers. However, many of these agents are only effective when an existing host immune response has already been induced by other therapeutic approaches. I will discuss strategies that may be used to effectively set the stage for immune-oncology treatments including Eleven BioTherapeutics’ Targeted Protein Therapeutics.

9:00 Immunomodulatory Antibodies – Potentiation by Fc Receptor Engagement

Rony_DahanRony Dahan, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

Immunomodulatory mAbs are revolutionizing cancer treatment due to their clinical effective stimulation of therapeutic anti-cancer immunity. Recent studies demonstrated the importance of the Fc domain of these types of mAbs. Their optimal activity can be critically depended on their ability to engage defined FcgR pathways. I will discuss our recent characterization of these FcgR-dependent mechanisms, and how they can be exploited for introducing second generation Fc-optimized immunomodulatory mAbs.

TD2 tagline9:30 Coffee Break

 

MECHANISMS OF ACTION

10:00 The Role of Metabolism in Immune Response in Tumors: Merging the Past and the Present of Tumor Microenvironment

Allison_BetofAllison S. Betof, M.D., Ph.D., Medical Oncology Fellow, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Tumors are not simply collections of cancer cells that arise in a vacuum; they are instead complex structures composed of blood vessels, immune cells, and other supporting structures that interact, consume oxygen and other nutrients, and produce waste. Tumor metabolism has long been viewed as a therapeutic target. I will discuss recent data on how metabolism influences immunobiology and our group’s approach to harness these interactions to improve therapeutic outcomes.

10:30 PI3Kgamma Is a Molecular Switch that Controls Immune Suppression

Megan_KanedaMegan M. Kaneda, Ph.D., Assistant Project Scientist, University of California, San Diego

Macrophages play critical but opposite roles in inflammation and cancer. We have found that the predominant isoform of PI3K in myeloid cells, PI3Kgamma, controls the switch between immune stimulation and immune suppression. Inhibition of macrophage PI3Kgamma activity promotes an immunostimulatory transcriptional program that restores CD8+ T cell activation and cytotoxicity and synergizes with checkpoint inhibitor therapy to promote tumor regression and extend survival in mouse models of cancer.

11:00 Avelumab (hIgG1 Anti-human PD-L1) Mediates the anti-Tumor Efficacy via Multiple Pathways in Preclinical Models

Yan_QuYan Qu, Ph.D., Senior Principal Scientist, Pfizer

Analysis of PD-L1 expression on various immune subpopulations in human patient samples showed that PD-L1 is enriched on non-T cells. In tumor-bearing mice, the percentage of splenic NK cells was increased with WT avelumab treatment but not with the Fc isotype variant. Avelumab-induced tumor shrinkage, tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cell increase, and tumor PD-L1+ immature myeloid cell decrease appear to require NK cells, as such changes were abolished upon NK depletion.

ProImmune11:30 Epitope Identification and Clinical Immune Monitoring in Immune Oncology Programs

Emilee KnowltonEmilee Knowlton, Ph.D., Immunology Sales Specialist, ProImmune

 

12:00 pm Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Enjoy Lunch on Your Own

12:30 Session Break

TARGET DISCOVERY FOR NEXT GENERATION IMMUNOTHERAPIES

1:25 Chairperson’s Remarks

Stephen Beers, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, University of Southampton, United Kingdom

1:30 Functional Characterization of Macaque Fcr and IgG Subtypes

Margie Ackerman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Engineering, Dartmouth College

A number of antibody therapies rely on Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated effector functions for optimal activity, prompting the need to understand how native and IgG domains engineered to differentially bind to the human receptors translate in non-human primate (NHP) models. We report characterization of the affinity between an IgG Fc variant panel (including subclass, Fc mutants and glycosylation) and major human and rhesus FcR allotypic variants.

2:00 Utilizing Patient-Derived Organoids and High-Content Imaging for Screening and Characterization of Bispecific Antibodies

Mark_ThrosbyMark Throsby, Ph.D., EVP & CSO, Merus N.V., The Netherlands

This presentation will provide a case study on how panels of patient-derived organoids grown ex-vivo in 3D culture combined with high-content imaging can be applied to bispecific antibody screening. Lead candidate bispecifics were selected targeting the wnt pathway with novel modes of action including immunomodulation.

 

2:30 Discovery and Development Strategies for New Small Molecule Immunotherapies

Nicola_WallisNicola Wallis, Ph.D., Senior Director, Biology, Astex Therapeutics, Ltd.

Small molecules are of interest as immunotherapies as both single agent and combinations, offering the possibility of modulating different aspects of the immune system to biologics. We are exploring targeting a number of different immunomodulatory mechanisms with small molecules derived using fragment-based drug design and will describe examples in this presentation.

TD2 tagline3:00 Refreshment Break

 

IMMUNE SYSTEM PRIMING AND ACTIVATION

3:30 STING Adjuvants for Immune System Priming for Antibody Therapy

Stephen_BeersStephen Beers, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, University of Southampton, United Kingdom

Successful tumor-targeting antibody approaches appear to rely predominantly on the effector function of Fcγ receptor (FcγR) expressing macrophages. Unfortunately, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are frequently poorly cytotoxic, contribute to immune suppression and have suboptimal FcγR expression making treatment less effective. Here we show that STING agonists are able to overcome immunosuppression in the tumour microenvironment effectively reversing the TAM inhibitory FcγR profile and provided strong adjuvant effects to antibody therapy.

4:00 Next-Generation Cancer Vaccines

Daniel_LeveyDaniel L. Levey, Ph.D., Senior Director, Vaccine Research, Agenus

Agenus is advancing two fully synthetic cancer vaccine platforms. The first is based on identification of mutations encoded in the tumor genome while the second relates to a novel class of tumor specific neo-epitopes arising from inappropriate phosphorylation of various proteins in malignant cells. The platforms support the manufacture of both individualized and off-the-shelf cancer vaccines against a range of tumor antigens, increasing the likelihood of immune recognition of tumors.

4:30 Oral T Cell Vaccines Targeting Immune Organs of the Gut for Generating Systemic Antigen Specific T Cells

Marc_MansourMarc Mansour, Ph.D., Chief Business Officer, Vaximm AG

We use attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21 as a vector to deliver a plasmid encoding antigens of interest via the oral route to Peyer’s patches. The bacteria have built in adjuvant properties and induce cross presentation to produce a systemic T cell response. Monotherapy with a candidate targeting VEGFR2 produced clinical responses in GBM, highlighting the unique properties of this T cell vaccine approach.

5:00 End of Day

 

 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 29

7:25 am Breakout Discussion Groups with Continental Breakfast

Join a breakout discussion group. These are informal, moderated discussions with brainstorming and interactive problem solving, allowing participants from diverse backgrounds to exchange ideas and experiences and develop future collaborations around a focused topic. Details on the topics and moderators are below.

New Understandings of the Mechanisms of Action for Immunomodulatory Antibodies

Moderator: Stephen Beers, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, University of Southampton, United Kingdom

  • What are we learning about MOA from clinical trial data?
  • Optimizing MOA in next generation immunomodulators
  • The role of effector and receptor engagement
  • MOA and bispecific antibody design
  • Overcoming resistance mechanisms

Target Discovery for Next Generation Immunotherapies

Marc Mansour, Ph.D., Chief Business Officer, Vaximm AG

  • Tumor antigen identification: strengths and weaknesses of different methodologies
  • Drugable IO targets- using macromolecules versus small molecule
  • Novel targets in the tumor microenvironment

NON-RESPONDERS, SIDE EFFECTS AND TOXICOLOGY

8:25 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Adam J. Adler, Ph.D., Professor, Immunology, University of Connecticut

8:30 Cancer Immunotherapy with Live-attenuated, Double Deleted Listeria Monocytogenes (LADD) Combination Strategies for the Treatment of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

Chan_WhitingChan C. Whiting, Ph.D., Director, Immune Monitoring and Biomarker Development, Aduro Biotech

We are advancing CRS-207, a clinical LADD strain engineered to express mesothelin, in combinations with various modalities for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.  Data from a Phase 1b study combining CRS-207 with standard chemotherapy demonstrating encouraging clinical and immune responses will be discussed.  An overview of the Phase 2 study design and progress of the CRS-207/Pembrolizumab combination study will also be highlighted.

9:00 Tumor and Class-Specific Patterns of Immune-Related Adverse Events of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: A Systematic Review

Aaron_HansenAaron Hansen, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto; Medical Oncologist, Princess Margaret Cancer Center

Through a systematic review, we identified distinct immune related adverse event (irAE) profiles based on tumor type and immune checkpoint inhibitor class (CTLA-4 and PD-1). CTLA-4 inhibitors have a higher frequency of grade 3/4 irAEs. Furthermore, for patients treated with PD-1 inhibitors, those with melanoma had a higher frequency of gastrointestinal and skin irAEs, and lower rate of pneumonitis compared with patients with NSCLC and RCC. Different immune microenvironments may drive histology-specific irAE patterns.

PROTEIN ENGINEERING

9:30 Combination Therapy with PD-1 Blockade Enhances the Antitumor Potency of T Cells Redirected by Novel Bispecific Antibodies

Ken_ChangKen Chang, Ph.D., Vice President, Research and Development, Immunomedics

Novel bispecific antibodies that bind bivalently to tumor antigens and monovalently to CD3 can redirect T cells to kill Trop-2- or CEACAM5-expressing solid cancer cells grown in monolayer cultures at low picomolar concentrations. The antitumor efficacy was demonstrated also in a humanized mouse model and in 3D spheroids generated with cells from TNBC and colonic cancers. Combining anti-PD-1 increased cell death in 3D spheroids and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing animals.

MaxCyte no tagline10:00 Accelerated Production of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies & Bispecific Molecules Using Scalable Cell Engineering

James_BradyJames Brady, Ph.D., Vice President, Technical Applications & Customer Support, MaxCyte

Antibodies and antibody-like molecules are a proven means of modulating effective anti-tumor immune responses. MaxCyte’s delivery platform facilitates rapid, fully scalable, high quality transient protein production in the cell line-of-choice, as well as streamlined stable pool and cell line generation enabling accelerated development of relevant immunomodulatory candidates. Case studies will illustrate the identification and development of antibodies, tribodies & bi-specific T cell engaging molecules (BiTEs) using the MaxCyte platform.

10:30 Grand Opening Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

11:15 A Novel, Dual-Specific Antibody Conjugate Targeting CD134 and CD137 Costimulates T Cells and Elicits Antitumor Immunity

Adam_AdlerAdam J. Adler, Ph.D., Professor, Immunology, University of Connecticut

Combining agonists to different costimulatory receptors can be more effective in controlling tumors compared to individual agonists, but presents logistical challenges and increases the potential for adverse events. We developed a novel immunotherapeutic agent by fusing agonists to CD134 and CD137 into a single biologic, OrthomAb, that potentiates cytokine secretion from TCR-stimulated T cells more potently than non-conjugated CD134 + CD137 agonists in vitro, and reduces tumor growth in vivo.

11:45 Targeted Tissue Delivery Using Caveolae Technology Improves Drug Efficacy

Ruchi_GuptaRuchi Gupta, Ph.D., Team Lead Scientist, MedImmune

Current biotherapeutics focus on the molecular targets expressed on cells/tumors. However, less than 10% of the IV administrated biologics can reach the diseased tissues. Tissue targeting using caveolae proteins can allow for specific delivery to organs of interest. This talk will focus on caveolae technology that shows specific delivery to lungs and kidneys and improves drug efficacy. This targeting holds potential for several diseases including fibrosis, COPD, Infections as well as tumors.

12:15 pm Close of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies for Cancer

 

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LIVE 9/21 3:20PM to 6:40PM KINASE INHIBITORS FOR CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY COMBINATIONS & KINASE INHIBITORS FOR AUTOIMMUNE AND INFLAMMATORY DISEASES at CHI’s 14th  Discovery On Target, 9/19 – 9/22/2016, Westin Boston Waterfront, Boston

http://www.discoveryontarget.com/

http://www.discoveryontarget.com/crispr-therapies/

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group is a

Media Partner of CHI for CHI’s 14th Annual Discovery on Target taking place September 19 – 22, 2016 in Boston.

In Attendance, streaming LIVE using Social Media

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Editor-in-Chief

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

#BostonDOT16

@BostonDOT

 

KINASE INHIBITORS FOR CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY COMBINATIONS

3:20 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Guido J.R. Zaman, Ph.D., Managing Director & Head of Biology, Netherlands Translational Research Center B.V. (NTRC)

3:25 FEATURED PRESENTATION: Inhibition of PI3K and Tubulin

Doriano_Fabbro

Doriano Fabbro, Ph.D., CSO, PIQUR Therapeutics

The PI3K signaling pathway is frequently activated in tumors. PQR309 is a selective dual inhibitor of PI3K and mTOR (currently in Phase I) in cancer patients. The preclinical pharmacology and toxicology of PQR309 is presented, including its activity in lymphoma preclinical models. In addition, we elucidate structural factors defining the PI3K inhibitory activity and tubulin-binding of PQR309 derivatives.

  • PQR309 & GDC0941 arrest cells i G1/S (typical for PI3K/mTOR Inhibitor)
  • What drives Antiproliferative Activity of BKM120: PI3K or MT or both?
  • BKM120 Binds to beta-Tubulin/alpha -Tubulin Interfere
  • T2R-TTL complex
  • Orientation of BKM120 in PI3K
  • PQR309 – is a brain penetrating, PK and BAV by PO, good metabolic stability
  • PQR309 ANti-proliferative in Lymphoma
  • Clinical efficacy – Now in Phase II

4:05 Design and Development of a Novel PI3K-p110β/δ Inhibitor, KA2237 with Combined Tumor Immunotherapeutic, Growth Inhibition and Anti-Metastatic Activity

Stephen_Shuttleworth

Stephen Shuttleworth, Ph.D., FRSC, CChem, CSO, Karus Therapeutics Ltd.

The design and development of KA2237, a novel and selective inhibitor of PI3K-p110β/δ, will be described. This molecule has clinical potential in the treatment of solid and hematological malignancies, through its direct inhibition of tumor growth and metastatic spread, and through immunotherapeutic mechanisms. Phase I studies for KA2237 are scheduled to commence in Q2 2016 at the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

  • Design & Development of Novel, Oral, selective PI3K enzyme family: CLass I,II, III, IV based upon:
  • Class I IA IB
  • KA2237: DUal PI3K – p110beta/delta-selective inhibitor: CTL, Treg, p1 106 T sell response
  • Molecular signature in the tumor
  • WT p110delta, WT 1 10beta+, Mutant p1 10Beta+, PTEN-null, Ibrutinib-resistance, Growth inhibition; suppression of metastesis (p110beta
  • small molecule combination agents: potential aided by selectivity over p110
  • KA2237: clinical Pi3K-p110beta/delta Inhibitor- ATP -comtetitive
  • Doxorubicin -cytotoxic control
  • KA2237 superior activity to Idelasib
  • KA2237 – suppression of micro-metastasis in 4T1 synergenic model
  • Tumor Growth inhibition Pre-Surgery
  • Tumor Re-Growth Inhibition Post-Surgery
  • metastasis post surgery
  • Tumor-free mice post-surgery
  • CHemistry: IHC -pAKT; IHC – FOxp3+
  • KA2237 inhibits HGF-stimulated 4T1 tumor
  • 2004 – Preclinical develpemnt PI3K is reported
  • 2006 First PI#K is enter Clinical Trials
  • Targeting p1110Beta (PIKeCB) mutations in cancer with KA2237
  • DIscovery of the mutations lead drug discovery
  • KA@@#&: Potential in treatment of B-Cell Lymphom AS IN TARGETING IBRUTINIB RESISTENCE
  • GROWTH INHIBITION IN HEMATOLOGICAL CANCERS TUMOE CELL LINE PANEL
  • KA2237 – differentiated from competing Pi3K is Superior efficacy cf. p110delta
  • Combination: Not histone deacetylase but a tubulin deacetylase – Hsp90 ans Hsp70
  • T cell exhausion: Tumor growth inhibition vs Suppression of lung metastasis
  • Tumor BiologyRationale vs Clinical Agents
  • Oncogenic mutants, solid tumor supression magrophage, combination PD-1, CTLA$
  • FDA -approved kinase inhibitors

Summary

  1. phase I clinical study commenced in pathients with B cell Lymphoma
  2. Potential for treatment of solid and hematological malignancies

4:35 InCELL Pulse: A Novel Cellular Target Engagement Assay Platform for Drug Discovery

Treiber_Daniel

Daniel Treiber, Ph.D., Vice President, KINOMEscan, DiscoverX Corporation

InCELL Pulse is a quantitative and rapid method for measuring cellular target engagement potencies for small molecule inhibitors. InCELL Pulse capitalizes on two novel DiscoverX technologies, Enzyme Fragment Complementation (EFC) and Pulse Denaturation, which overcome the limitations of related target engagement methods. Examples across multiple target classes will be described.

  • InCELL Pulse – cellular Target ENgagement Assays
  • cellular thermal stabilization-based approach
  • simple, rapid and generig cellular alternative to CETSa
  • Thermal melting Curves vs Isothermal Inhibitor EC50 curves
  • Pulse Denaturation compound binding, or not binding
  • ABL1 Tyrosine Kinase – dose response curve – allosteric Inhibitor
  • MTH1 Hydrolase: InCELL Pulseassay validated for multiple substrate-competitive inhibitors
  • Validated InCELL Pulse Assays for Diverse Kinases
  • Kinase targets; BRAF, MEC1

Summary

  1. validation across proteins

TTP Labtech4:50 Potential Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Assays to Enable Robust, Rapid Protein Binding Assays

Wylie_Paul

Paul Wylie, Ph.D., Head, Applications, TTP Labtech

Current methods to screen protein binding interactions often have limitations due to the reliance on antibodies, but also interference from fluorescent molecules. Fluorescence lifetime has the potential to overcome these problems through directly labelled proteins and lifetime measurements that are independent of total fluorescence intensity.

  • Protein binding as a target class
  • protein-protein interactions (PPIs)
  1. FRET/HTRF
  2. FP
  3. AlphaScreen

What new in FLT?

  • long lifetime fluorophores, economical reagent platform
  • directly labelled reagents – no antibodies
  • independent of total intensity – reduced interference
  • robustness screen vs nuisance screen – caspase-3
  • productive; reduction false positives: FRET
  • protein-binding assays & FLT formats:
  1. protein – small molecule binding – CECR2
  2. protein – peptide binding: long and sholt lifetime
  3. Site-specific labelling vs Non-selective labelling
  4. Toolbox for PoC
  5. Detection reagents
  6. Further develop technology

5:05 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

 

6:40 End of Day

 

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Pioneers of Cancer Cell Therapy:  Turbocharging the Immune System to Battle Cancer Cells — Success in Hematological Cancers vs. Solid Tumors

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: Players in Basic & Translational Research and Biotech/Pharma

The companies are teamed with academic pioneers:

  • Novartis with University of Pennsylvania;
  • Kite Pharma with the National Cancer Institute; 
  • Juno Therapeutics with Sloan Kettering,
  • the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and Seattle Children’s Hospital.

cancer33

IMAGE SOURCE: National Cancer Institute

 

 “CAR-T cell immunotherapy” –  genetically modified T cells that are engineered to target specific tumor antigens and/or genes that are involved in survival, proliferation, and the enhancement of effector functions have been under intense research.

 

CAR technology was originally reported by Zelig Eshhar in 1993.

https://www.weizmann.ac.il/immunology/sci/EshharPage.html

Prof. Zelig Eshhar, Ph.D., served as Chairman of the Department of Immunology at the Weizmann Institute. Prof. Eshhar has been Chair of Scientific Advisory Board at TxCell S.A. since April 2016. Prof. Eshhar has been a Member of Scientific Advisory Board at Kite Pharma, Inc. since August 8, 2013. Prof. Eshhar served as a Member of Scientific Advisory Board at Intellect Neurosciences, Inc. since April 2006.

Prof. Eshhar pioneered the CAR approach (or T-Body as he termed it) to redirect T cells to recognize, engage and kill patient’s tumor cells by engineering them with a construct that combines the anti-target specificity of an antibody with T cell activation domains. Prof. Eshhar serves on several editorial boards, including Cancer Gene Therapy, Human Gene Therapy, Gene Therapy, Expert Opinion on Therapeutics, European Journal of Immunology and the Journal of Gene Medicine. He was a Research Fellow in the Department of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and in the Department of Chemical Immunology at the Weizmann Institute in Israel. His achievements were recognized by several international awards, most recently the CAR Pioneering award by the ATTACK European Consortium. Prof. Eshhar obtained his B.Sc. in Biochemistry and Microbiology and his M.Sc. in Biochemistry from the Hebrew University, and his Ph.D. in the Department of Immunology from the Weizmann Institute of Science.

http://www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/people/person.asp?personId=32720993&privcapId=32390485

 

Zelig Eshhar and Carl H. June honored for research on T cell engineering for cancer immunotherapy

New Rochelle, NY, November 11, 2014–Zelig Eshhar, PhD, The Weizmann Institute of Science and Sourasky Medical Center, and Carl H. June, MD, PhD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, are co-recipients of the Pioneer Award, recognized for lentiviral gene therapy clinical trials and for their leadership and contributions in engineering T-cells capable of targeting tumors with antibody-like specificity through the development of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, is commemorating its 25th anniversary by bestowing this honor on the leading Pioneers in the field of cell and gene therapy selected by a blue ribbon panel* and publishing a Pioneer Perspective by the award recipients. The Perspectives by Dr. Eshhar and Dr. June are available free on the Human Gene Therapy website at http://www.liebertpub.com/hgt until December 11, 2014.

In his Pioneer Perspective entitled “From the Mouse Cage to Human Therapy: A Personal Perspective of the Emergence of T-bodies/Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells” Professor Eshhar chronicles his team’s groundbreaking contributions to the development of the CAR T-cell immunotherapeutic approach to treating cancer. He describes the method’s conceptual development including initial proof-of-concept, and the years of experimentation in mouse models of cancer. They first tested the CAR T-cells on tumors transplanted into mice then progressed to spontaneously developing cancers in immune-competent mice, which Dr. Eshhar describes as “a more suitable model that faithfully mimics cancer patients.” He recounts successful antitumor effects in mice with CAR modified T-cells injected directly into tumors, with effects seen at the injection site and at sites of metastasis, and even the potential of the CAR T-cells to prevent tumor development.

Dr. Carl H. June has led one of the clinical groups that has taken the CAR therapeutic strategy from the laboratory to the patients’ bedside, pioneering the use of CD19-specific CAR T-cells to treat patients with leukemia. In his Pioneer Perspective, “Toward Synthetic Biology with Engineered T Cells: A Long Journey Just Begun” Dr. June looks back on his long, multi-faceted career and describes how he combined his knowledge and research on immunology, cancer, and HIV to develop successful T-cell based immunotherapies. Among the lessons Dr. June has embraced throughout his career are to follow one’s passions. He also says that “accidents can be good: embrace the unexpected results and follow up on these as they are often times more scientifically interesting than predictable responses from less imaginative experiments.”

“These two extraordinary scientists made seminal contributions at key steps of the journey from bench to bedside for CAR T-cells,” says James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Human Gene Therapy, and Director of the Gene Therapy Program, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

SOURCE

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-11/mali-ze111114.php

The General procedure of CAR-T cell therapy involves the follwoing steps:

1) Separate T cells from patient;

2) Engineer these T cells to express an artificial receptor, which is called “CAR” that usually targets tumor-specific antigen;

3) Expand the CAR T cells to a sufficient amount;

4) Re-introduce the CAR T cells to patient.

There are two major components that are critical to the CAR-T cell immunotherapy:

  • the design of CAR itself and
  • the choice of the targeted tumor specific antigen.

SOURCE

http://www.ochis.org/node/209

 

First publication on Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells is an attractive approach for generating antitumor immune responses

Eradication of B-lineage cells and regression of lymphoma in a patient treated with autologous T cells genetically engineered to recognize CD19

James N. Kochenderfer, Wyndham H. Wilson, John E. Janik, Mark E. Dudley, Maryalice Stetler-Stevenson, Steven A. Feldman, Irina Maric, Mark Raffeld, Debbie-Ann N. Nathan, Brock J. Lanier, Richard A. Morgan, Steven A. Rosenberg

Abstract

Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells is an attractive approach for generating antitumor immune responses. We treated a patient with advanced follicular lymphoma by administering a preparative chemotherapy regimen followed by autologous T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that recognized the B-cell antigen CD19. The patient’s lymphoma underwent a dramatic regression, and B-cell precursors were selectively eliminated from the patient’s bone marrow after infusion of anti–CD19-CAR-transduced T cells. Blood B cells were absent for at least 39 weeks after anti–CD19-CAR-transduced T-cell infusion despite prompt recovery of other blood cell counts. Consistent with eradication of B-lineage cells, serum immunoglobulins decreased to very low levels after treatment. The prolonged and selective elimination of B-lineage cells could not be attributed to the chemotherapy that the patient received and indicated antigen-specific eradication of B-lineage cells. Adoptive transfer of anti–CD19-CAR-expressing T cells is a promising new approach for treating B-cell malignancies. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00924326.

SOURCE

According to Setting the Body’s ‘Serial Killers’ Loose on Cancer

After a long, intense pursuit, researchers are close to bringing to market a daring new treatment: cell therapy that turbocharges the immune system to fight cancer.

By ANDREW POLLACK  AUG. 1, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/02/health/cancer-cell-therapy-immune-system.html?_r=0

Dr. June’s 2011 publications did not cite Dr. Rosenberg’s paper [Blood, 2010] from the previous year, prompting Dr. Rosenberg to write a letter to The New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. June’s publications also did not acknowledge that the genetic construct he had used was the one he had obtained from Dr. Campana of St. Jude.

From the Lab to the bedside to the Out Patient Clinic

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CHI’s NK Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapy Symposium, September 19 in Boston

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Announcement from LPBI Group: key code LPBI16 for Exclusive Discount to attend Boston’s Discovery on Target (September 2016)

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/13/announcement-from-lpbi-group-key-code-lpbi16-for-exclusive-discount-to-attend-bostons-discovery-on-target-september-2016/

DOT-150x150

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FEATURED SESSION:

Natural killer (NK) cells have been known to have advantages over T cells, yet their therapeutic potential in the clinic has been largely unexplored.

Cambridge Healthtech Institute’s NK Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapy Symposium, September 19 in Boston, is dedicated to the exploration of utilizing NK cells for new adoptive cell therapies, including updates from ongoing clinical studies.

NK CELL IMMUNO-ONCOLOGY AND CLINICAL STUDIES

Harnessing Adaptive NK Cells in Cancer Therapy

Karl-Johan Malmberg, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Department of Cancer Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital

  • We have recently completed a Phase I/II clinical trial with transfer of haploidentical NK cells to patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Six of the 16 treated patients achieved morphological complete remission and five of these underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation resulting in long-term survival in four patients. The quality and number of infused NK cells as well as their transient engraftment in the recipient correlated with decrease in mutational burden and clinical outcomes. These results suggest that adoptive transfer of allogeneic NK cells may hold utility as a bridge to transplant in patients who are refractory to induction therapy. Current efforts to selectively expand metabolically optimized adaptive NK cells for the next generation NK cell cancer immunotherapy will be discussed.

Update on Systemic and Locoregional Cancer Immunotherapy with IL-21-Expanded NK Cells

Dean Anthony Lee, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Pediatrics; Director, Cellular Therapy and Cancer Immunotherapy Program, Nationwide Children’s Hospital; James Comprehensive Cancer Center/Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University

  • The ability to generate clinical-grade NK cell products of sufficient purity, number, and function has enabled broader application of adoptive NK cell therapy in clinical trials. We translated our IL-21-based NK cell expansion platform to clinical grade and scale and initiated 7 clinical trials that administer NK cell immunotherapy with high cell doses or repeated dosing in transplant, adjuvant, or stand-alone settings. These trials have collectively delivered approximately 150 infusions to over 60 patients at doses of up to 10e8/kg. We will discuss the importance of STAT3 signaling in this setting, describe early outcome and correlative data from these studies, and present preclinical data supporting future clinical trials that build on this platform.

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NK Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapy

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Antibodies Against Membrane Protein Targets (Part One)

SEPT. 20-21

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Antibodies Against Membrane Protein Targets (Part Two)

SEPT. 21-22

The exhibit hall was sold out in 2015, so please contact us early to reserve your place. To customize your sponsorship or exhibit package for 2016, contact:

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Cambridge Healthtech Institute | 250 First Avenue, Suite 300, Needham, MA 02494 | www.healthtech.com | 781-972-5400

SOURCE

From: NK Cell Symposium <heidio@healthtech.com>

Date: Tuesday, August 9, 2016 at 1:40 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: NK Cells for Adoptive Therapies: The Future of Cancer Immunotherapy?

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