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Archive for the ‘Cancer Surgery of the Heart’ Category

Immunoediting can be a constant defense in the cancer landscape


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

There are many considerations in the cancer immunoediting landscape of defense and regulation in the cancer hallmark biology. The cancer hallmark biology in concert with key controls of the HLA compatibility affinity mechanisms are pivotal in architecting a unique patient-centric therapeutic application. Selection of random immune products including neoantigens, antigens, antibodies and other vital immune elements creates a high level of uncertainty and risk of undesirable immune reactions. Immunoediting is a constant process. The human innate and adaptive forces can either trigger favorable or unfavorable immunoediting features. Cancer is a multi-disease entity. There are multi-factorial initiators in a certain disease process. Namely, environmental exposures, viral and / or microbiome exposure disequilibrium, direct harm to DNA, poor immune adaptability, inherent risk and an individual’s own vibration rhythm in life.

 

When a human single cell is crippled (Deranged DNA) with mixed up molecular behavior that is the initiator of the problem. A once normal cell now transitioned into full threatening molecular time bomb. In the modeling and creation of a tumor it all begins with the singular molecular crisis and crippling of a normal human cell. At this point it is either chop suey (mixed bit responses) or a productive defensive and regulation response and posture of the immune system. Mixed bits of normal DNA, cancer-laden DNA, circulating tumor DNA, circulating normal cells, circulating tumor cells, circulating immune defense cells, circulating immune inflammatory cells forming a moiety of normal and a moiety of mess. The challenge is to scavenge the mess and amplify the normal.

 

Immunoediting is a primary push-button feature that is definitely required to be hit when it comes to initiating immune defenses against cancer and an adaptation in favor of regression. As mentioned before that the tumor microenvironment is a “mixed bit” moiety, which includes elements of the immune system that can defend against circulating cancer cells and tumor growth. Personalized (Precision-Based) cancer vaccines must become the primary form of treatment in this case. Current treatment regimens in conventional therapy destroy immune defenses and regulation and create more serious complications observed in tumor progression, metastasis and survival. Commonly resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is observed. These personalized treatments will be developed in concert with cancer hallmark analytics and immunocentrics affinity and selection mapping. This mapping will demonstrate molecular pathway interface and HLA compatibility and adaptation with patientcentricity.

References:

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/immunoediting-cancer-landscape-john-catanzaro/

 

https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(16)31609-9

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309432057_Circulating_tumor_cell_clusters_What_we_know_and_what_we_expect_Review

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190561/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840207/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593672/

 

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2018.00414/full

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593672/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190561/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4388310/

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cancer-hallmark-analytics-omics-data-pathway-studio-review-catanzaro/

 

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Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

This article appeared on the website of Cardiovascular Business

‘Patient No. 1’ from a Hep C heart transplant study shares his story

By the time three transplant physicians approached Tom Giangiulio Jr. about being the first patient in a new clinical trial to accept a heart from a Hepatitis C-positive donor, Giangiulio didn’t have much of a choice.

He had already been on the heart transplant waitlist for more than two years, he was a live-in at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and he had a body size (6-foot-2, 220 pounds) and blood type (O-positive) that was difficult to match to a donor.

It took Giangiulio less than 24 hours to speak to his previous cardiologist and his family and decide to enroll in the program. The doctors at Penn explained to him that because of new medications that can cure Hepatitis C, they were confident the virus could be eradicated post-transplant.

“There was no hesitation at all, not with me,” said Carin Giangiulio, Tom’s wife of 33 years. “Because I knew what the alternative was and we didn’t have too much choice except for going on a VAD (ventricular assist device) … and he didn’t want to do that. I said, ‘If they have a cure, then it’s a no-brainer. Let’s just do it.’ And I’m glad we did because I don’t think he would’ve been here today.”

Tom, 59, is set to celebrate his second anniversary with his new heart in June. He received the heart the day after Father’s Day in 2017 and subsequently contracted Hepatitis C, which was promptly wiped out with a 12-week regimen of elbasvir/grazoprevir (Zepatier).

Some of Giangiulio’s doctors at Penn published in February their experience with the first 10 patients in the clinical trial, called USHER, in the American Journal of Transplantation. All nine patients who survived were cured of Hepatitis C thanks to the antiviral therapy.

The implications of the research are massive, said Rhondalyn McLean, MD, MHS, the medical director of Penn’s heart transplant program and lead author of the recently published study. For the past two decades, the U.S. has struggled to increase the number of heart transplants above about 3,000 per year. And every year, patients die waiting for a heart transplant or become too sick to handle a transplant surgery.

McLean estimated 700 hearts from donors with Hepatitis C are discarded each year in the U.S. If even half of those are suitable for transplant, it would increase by 10 percent the number of organs that are available for implantation.

“There are so many people who have end-stage heart failure who die waiting for transplant, so anytime that we can increase our access to organs then I think we’re all going to be happy about that,” McLean said. “I think the people believe in the medicine, they believe that Hepatitis C is curable, so the risk to these folks is low. With the results of the study, I think we’ve proven that we can do this safely and the medications have great efficacy.”

Transplanting Hepatitis C-positive hearts isn’t a new idea, McLean explained.

“We used to do this all the time (with) the thinking that Hepatitis C usually doesn’t cause a problem for many, many years, so if hearts are only going to last 13 years or so and Hepatitis C doesn’t usually cause a problem for 30 years in someone, it should be an OK thing to do,” she said.

But then a study published in the 1990s found Hepatitis C-negative patients who accepted a heart from a donor with Hepatitis C actually had an increased risk of death compared to those who received normal hearts, and the practice of using these organs ceased.

However, with the new medications—the first commercially available treatment for Hepatitis C was approved by the FDA in 2014—McLean and her team are systematically studying the safety of implanting these hearts and then wiping out the virus once it’s contracted. And they’re optimistic about the program, which showed the first 10 patients had no evidence of the virus after their 12-week medication regimens.

“That met the criteria for sustained virologic response and those patients are deemed to be cured,” she said. “There’s no reason to think that this population would be any different than your normal, nontransplant population (in terms of Hepatitis C reappearing) so I think it was a pretty successful study.”

Penn researchers are also studying a similar approach in kidney and lung transplant candidates, which could help patients stuck on waitlists for those organs as well.

McLean described the increasing availability of these organs as an “unfortunate benefit” of the opioid epidemic. Through sharing needles, many opioid users are contracting Hepatitis C and dying young. Organs from young donors tend to perform better and often have no other problems, so solving the Hep C issue through medication could have a huge impact if this strategy is eventually rolled out on a broader scale.

“It’s hard when you have single-center studies,” McLean said. “They’re always promising, but in order to get a better assessment of what we’re doing and how the drug is doing I think you need to combine numbers so there has to be a registry that looks at all of the patients who have received these drugs and then using numbers to determine whether this is a successful strategy for us. And I believe that it will be.”

Those are the large-scale implications of this research. Tom Giangiulio can share the personal side.

Patient No. 1

Giangiulio said he feels “extremely gifted” to be Patient No. 1 in the USHER program. He knows he may not be alive if he wasn’t.

He recalls going into ventricular tachycardia about a week before his transplant and said it “scared the daylights” out of him.

“The amount of red tape, meetings and research, technology, and things that had to happen at a very precise moment in time for me to be the first … it’s mind-boggling to think about it,” he said. “But for all that to happen and for it to happen when it happened—and for me to get the heart when I got it—there was a lot of divine intervention along with a lot of people that were involved.”

Giangiulio has also experienced some powerful moments since receiving the transplant. After a bit of written correspondence with his donor’s family, he met the young man’s family one weekend in December of 2018.

He said riding over to the meeting was probably the most tense he’s ever been, but once he arrived the experience far exceeded his expectations.

“We were there for 2 ½ hours and nobody wanted to leave,” Giangiulio said.

The donor’s mother got Giangiulio a gift, a ceramic heart with a photograph of her son. A fellow transplant patient had told Giangiulio about a product called Enso, a kidney-shaped object you can hold in your hand which plays a recording of a user’s heartbeat.

Giangiulio decided to give it to her.

“I was very cautious at the advice of the people here at Penn,” he said. “Nobody knew how she would react to it. It might bother her, she could be thrilled to death. And she was, she was thrilled to death with it and she sleeps with it every night. She boots up the app and she listens to my heartbeat on that app every night.”

Another moment that sticks out to Giangiulio is meeting Patient No. 7 in the USHER program, who he remains in touch with. They ran into each other while waiting to get blood work done, and began talking about their shared experience as transplant recipients.

The clinical trial came up and Giangiulio slow-played his involvement, asking Patient No. 7 about the trial and not letting on that he was ultra-familiar with the program.

When Giangiulio finally told him he was Patient No. 1, Patient No. 7 “came launching out of his chair” to hug him.

“He said, ‘I owe you my life,’” Giangiulio recalled.

After Giangiulio responded that it was the doctors he really owed, Patient No. 7 said he had specifically asked how Patient No. 1 was doing when McLean first offered the program to him.

“She explained that I was going to be No. 7. … I didn’t care about 6, 5, 4, 3 or 2. I wanted to know how No. 1 was doing,” Giangiulio recalled of the conversation. “He said, ‘That was you. … They told me how well you were doing and that if I wanted you’d come here and talk to me, so I owe you.’”

Giangiulio feels strongly about giving back and reciprocating the good fortune he’s had. That’s why he talks to fellow patients and the media to share his story—because it could save other people’s lives, too.

He can’t do as much physical labor as he used to, but he remains involved in the excavating company he owns with his brothers and is the Emergency Management Coordinator for Waterford Township, New Jersey. He also serves on the township’s planning board and was previously Director of Public Safety.

“To me, he’s Superman,” Carin Giangiulio said. “It was insane, completely insane what the human body can endure and still survive.”

That now includes being given a heart with Hepatitis C and then wiping out the virus with the help of modern medicine.

“I would tell (other transplant candidates) to not fear it, especially if you’re here at Penn,” Giangiulio said. “I know there’s a lot of good hospitals across the country, but my loyalty kind of lies here for understandable reasons.”

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

2016

People with blood type O have been reported to be protected from coronary heart disease, cancer, and have lower cholesterol levels.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/11/people-with-blood-type-o-have-been-reported-to-be-protected-from-coronary-heart-disease-cancer-and-have-lower-cholesterol-levels/

2015

A Patient’s Perspective: On Open Heart Surgery from Diagnosis and Intervention to Recovery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/05/10/a-patients-perspective-on-open-heart-surgery-from-diagnosis-and-intervention-to-recovery/

No evidence to change current transfusion practices for adults undergoing complex cardiac surgery: RECESS evaluated 1,098 cardiac surgery patients received red blood cell units stored for short or long periods

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/08/no-evidence-to-change-current-transfusion-practices-for-adults-undergoing-complex-cardiac-surgery-recess-evaluated-1098-cardiac-surgery-patients-received-red-blood-cell-units-stored-for-short-or-lon/

2013

ACC/AHA Guidelines for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/05/accaha-guidelines-for-coronary-artery-bypass-graft-surgery/

On Devices and On Algorithms: Arrhythmia after Cardiac SurgeryPrediction and ECG Prediction of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Onset

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/07/on-devices-and-on-algorithms-arrhythmia-after-cardiac-surgery-prediction-and-ecg-prediction-of-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation-onset/

 

Editor’s note:

I wish to encourage the e-Reader of this Interview to consider reading and comparing the experiences of other Open Heart Surgery Patients, voicing their private-life episodes in the ER that are included in this recently published volume, The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, Health Care Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/11/21/the-voices-of-patients-hospital-ceos-health-care-providers-caregivers-and-families-personal-experience-with-critical-care-and-invasive-medical-procedures/

 

I also wish to encourage the e-Reader to consider, if interested, reviewing additional e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases from the same Publisher, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, on Amazon.com.

  • Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms, on Amazon since 6/2/12013

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DINFFYC

  • Cardiovascular, Volume Two: Cardiovascular Original Research: Cases in Methodology Design for Content Co-Curation, on Amazon since 11/30/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018Q5MCN8

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Three: Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics, on Amazon since 11/29/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four: Regenerative and Translational Medicine: The Therapeutics Promise for Cardiovascular Diseases, on Amazon since 12/26/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019UM909A

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Tommy King Memorial Cardiovascular Symposium

Saturday CEUs in Boston, May 20

St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

Boston, MA

May 20

7:30am – 3pm

PROGRAM SCHEDULE & SESSIONS

07:30am | Registration & Continental Breakfast

08:00am | Hemodynamics; Faisal Khan, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

09:00am | Radiation Protection; Satish Nair, PhD, F.X. Masse Associates

10:00am | Break & Exhibits

10:15am | Structural Heart – TAVR Updates and Watchman

Joseph Carrozza, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

11:15am | Road to the Cath Lab — Triggers for STEMI Activation 

Lawrence Garcia, MD, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

12:15pm | Lunch

01:00pm | HF Program including Cardiomems

Lana Tsao, MD & Jaclyn Mayer, NP, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

02:00pm | Cath Lab Pharmacology

Mirembe Reed, Pharm.D, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center

Register now »

SOURCE

From: <acvp@getresponse.com> on behalf of “Kurt, ACVP” <kurt@acp-online.org>

Reply-To: <kurt@acp-online.org>

Date: Monday, April 24, 2017 at 2:26 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: cardiovascular symposium in Boston, May 20

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Chest Radiation Therapy causes Collateral Damage to the Human Heart

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

“Radiation therapy for some forms of cancer involves a large dose of radiation to the chest,” says Milind Desai, MD, Director of Cardiovascular Imaging Research at Cleveland Clinic. “The heart can suffer collateral damage as a result.”

Guideposts for identification

The key to identifying true radiation-associated heart disease, says Dr. Desai, is later injury — whether constrictive pericarditis, coronary artery disease, valvular disease or conduction abnormalities. He adds that the prevalence of radiation-associated heart disease is difficult to ascertain, due in part to its considerable latency, although it appears to be increasing.

Risk factors for radiation-associated heart disease include:

  • Total radiation dose > 20-35 Gy
  • Doses > 2 Gy/day
  • Increased volume of heart irradiated
  • Younger age
  • Time since exposure
  • Concomitant cardiotoxic chemotherapy
  • Other cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, smoking)
  • Radiation source (cobalt)

SOURCE

Radiation Heart Disease: A Few Learnings on a Diverse, Daunting Entity

Heart Surgery to a Damaged Heart by Radiation

Patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery at Cleveland Clinic over a three-year period had a 2.5-fold elevated mortality risk if they had a history of malignancy requiring chest irradiation compared with matched controls who underwent the same surgery but did not have a history of malignancy or chest irradiation. Most of the patients with the cancer history had had either

  • Breast cancer (53 percent) or
  • Hodgkin lymphoma (27 percent).
Long-Term Survival of Patients With Radiation Heart Disease Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

A Cohort Study

Willis Wu, Ahmad Masri, Zoran B. Popovic, Nicholas G. Smedira, Bruce W. Lytle, Thomas H. Marwick, Brian P. Griffin and Milind Y. Desai

Alternative treatment approaches, including transcatheter aortic valve replacement or other percutaneous interventions, may be more appropriate after identifying risk.

 

Other related articles published on this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

Cardio-oncology and Onco-Cardiology Programs: Treatments for Cancer Patients with a History of Cardiovascular Disease

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/08/cardio-oncology-and-onco-cardiology-programs-treatments-for-cancer-patients-with-a-history-of-cardiovascular-disease/

 

Series A: e-Books on Cardiovascular Diseases

Series A Content Consultant: Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC

VOLUME THREE

Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases:

Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

by  

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Senior Editor, Author and Curator

and

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor and Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-a-e-books-on-cardiovascular-diseases/volume-three-etiologies-of-cardiovascular-diseases-epigenetics-genetics-genomics/

 

  • Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Three: Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics, on Amazon since 11/29/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B018PNHJ84

onepagecvdseriesaflyervol1-4

 

 

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Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis (Vol. I) Now Available for Amazon Kindle


Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis (Vol. I) Now Available for Amazon Kindle

Reporter: Stephen J Williams, PhD

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence would like to announce the First volume of their BioMedical E-Book Series C: e-Books on Cancer & Oncology

Volume One: Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis

CancerandOncologyseriesCcoverwhich is now available on Amazon Kindle at                          http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K.

This e-Book is a comprehensive review of recent Original Research on Cancer & Genomics including related opportunities for Targeted Therapy written by Experts, Authors, Writers. This ebook highlights some of the recent trends and discoveries in cancer research and cancer treatment, with particular attention how new technological and informatics advancements have ushered in paradigm shifts in how we think about, diagnose, and treat cancer. The results of Original Research are gaining value added for the e-Reader by the Methodology of Curation. The e-Book’s articles have been published on the Open Access Online Scientific Journal, since April 2012.  All new articles on this subject, will continue to be incorporated, as published with periodical updates.

We invite e-Readers to write an Article Reviews on Amazon for this e-Book on Amazon. All forthcoming BioMed e-Book Titles can be viewed at:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence, launched in April 2012 an Open Access Online Scientific Journal is a scientific, medical and business multi expert authoring environment in several domains of  life sciences, pharmaceutical, healthcare & medicine industries. The venture operates as an online scientific intellectual exchange at their website http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com and for curation and reporting on frontiers in biomedical, biological sciences, healthcare economics, pharmacology, pharmaceuticals & medicine. In addition the venture publishes a Medical E-book Series available on Amazon’s Kindle platform.

Analyzing and sharing the vast and rapidly expanding volume of scientific knowledge has never been so crucial to innovation in the medical field. WE are addressing need of overcoming this scientific information overload by:

  • delivering curation and summary interpretations of latest findings and innovations
  • on an open-access, Web 2.0 platform with future goals of providing primarily concept-driven search in the near future
  • providing a social platform for scientists and clinicians to enter into discussion using social media
  • compiling recent discoveries and issues in yearly-updated Medical E-book Series on Amazon’s mobile Kindle platform

This curation offers better organization and visibility to the critical information useful for the next innovations in academic, clinical, and industrial research by providing these hybrid networks.

Table of Contents for Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis

Preface

Introduction  The evolution of cancer therapy and cancer research: How we got here?

Part I. Historical Perspective of Cancer Demographics, Etiology, and Progress in Research

Chapter 1:  The Occurrence of Cancer in World Populations

Chapter 2.  Rapid Scientific Advances Changes Our View on How Cancer Forms

Chapter 3:  A Genetic Basis and Genetic Complexity of Cancer Emerge

Chapter 4: How Epigenetic and Metabolic Factors Affect Tumor Growth

Chapter 5: Advances in Breast and Gastrointestinal Cancer Research Supports Hope for Cure

Part II. Advent of Translational Medicine, “omics”, and Personalized Medicine Ushers in New Paradigms in Cancer Treatment and Advances in Drug Development

Chapter 6:  Treatment Strategies

Chapter 7:  Personalized Medicine and Targeted Therapy

Part III.Translational Medicine, Genomics, and New Technologies Converge to Improve Early Detection

Chapter 8:  Diagnosis                                     

Chapter 9:  Detection

Chapter 10:  Biomarkers

Chapter 11:  Imaging In Cancer

Chapter 12: Nanotechnology Imparts New Advances in Cancer Treatment, Detection, &  Imaging                                 

Epilogue by Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FACP: Envisioning New Insights in Cancer Translational Biology

 

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Ablation Techniques in Interventional Oncology

Author and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

“Ablation is removal of material from the surface of an object by vaporization, chipping, or other erosive processes.”; WikipediA.

The use of ablative techniques in medicine is known for decades. By the late 90s, the ability to manipulate ablation sources and control their application to area of interest improved to a level that triggered their adaptation to cancer treatment. To date, ablation  is still a controversial treatment, yet steadily growing in it’s offerings to very specific cancer patients’ population.

The attractiveness in ablation as a form of cancer treatment is in the promise of minimal invasiveness, focused tissue destruction and better quality of life due to the ability to partially maintain viability of affected organs.  The main challenges preventing wider adaptation of ablative treatments are: the inability to noninvasively assess the level of cancerous tissue destruction during treatment; resulting in metastatic recurrence of the disease and the insufficient isolation of the treatment area from its surrounding.   This frequently results In addition, post-ablation salvage treatments are much more complicated. Since failed ablative treatment represents a lost opportunity to apply effective treatment to the primary tumor the current trend is to apply such treatments to low-grade cancers.

Nevertheless, the attractiveness of treating cancer in a focused way that preserves the long-term quality of life continuously feeds the development efforts and investments related to introduction of new and improved ablative treatments giving the hope that sometime in the future focused ablative treatment will reach its full potential.

The following paper reviews the main ablation techniques that are available for use today: Percutaneous image-guided ablation of bone and soft tissue tumours: a review of available techniques and protective measures.

Abstract

Background

Primary or metastatic osseous and soft tissue lesions can be treated by ablation techniques.

Methods

These techniques are classified into chemical ablation (including ethanol or acetic acid injection) and thermal ablation (including laser, radiofrequency, microwave, cryoablation, radiofrequency ionisation and MR-guided HIFU). Ablation can be performed either alone or in combination with surgical or other percutaneous techniques.

Results

In most cases, ablation provides curative treatment for benign lesions and malignant lesions up to 3 cm. Furthermore, it can be a palliative treatment providing pain reduction and local control of the disease, diminishing the tumor burden and mass effect on organs. Ablation may result in bone weakening; therefore, whenever stabilization is undermined, bone augmentation should follow ablation depending on the lesion size and location.

Conclusion

Thermal ablation of bone and soft tissues demonstrates high success and relatively low complication rates. However, the most common complication is the iatrogenic thermal damage of surrounding sensitive structures. Nervous structures are very sensitive to extremely high and low temperatures with resultant transient or permanent neurological damage. Thermal damage can cause normal bone osteonecrosis in the lesion’s periphery, surrounding muscular atrophy and scarring, and skin burns. Successful thermal ablation requires a sufficient ablation volume and thermal protection of the surrounding vulnerable structures.

Teaching points

Percutaneous ablations constitute a safe and efficacious therapy for treatment of osteoid osteoma.

Ablation techniques can treat painful malignant MSK lesions and provide local tumor control.

Thermal ablation of bone and soft tissues demonstrates high success and low complication rates.

Nerves, cartilage and skin are sensitive to extremely high and low temperatures.

Successful thermal ablation occasionally requires thermal protection of the surrounding structures.

For the purpose of this chapter we picked up three techniques:

Radiofrequency ablation

Straight or expandable percutaneously placed electrodes deliver a high-frequency alternating current, which causes ionic agitation with resultant frictional heat (temperatures of 60–100 ˚C) that produces protein denaturation and coagulation necrosis [8]. Concerning active protective techniques, all kinds of gas dissection can be performed. Hydrodissection is performed with dextrose 5 % (acts as an insulator as opposed to normal saline, which acts as a conductor). All kinds of skin cooling, thermal and neural monitoring can be performed.

 

Microwave ablation

Straight percutaneously placed antennae deliver electromagnetic microwaves (915 or 2,450 MHz) with resultant frictional heat (temperatures of 60–100 ˚C) that produces protein denaturation and coagulation necrosis [8]. Concerning active protective techniques, all kinds of gas dissection can be performed, whilst hydrodissection is usually avoided (MWA is based on agitation of water molecules for energy transmission). All kinds of skin cooling, thermal and neural monitoring can be performed.

Percutaneous ablation of malignant metastatic lesions is performed under imaging guidance, extended local sterility measures and antibiotic prophylaxis. Whenever the ablation zone is expected to extend up to 1 cm close to critical structures (e.g. the nerve root, skin, etc.), all the necessary thermal protection techniques should be applied (Fig. 3).

13244_2014_332_Fig3_HTML

a Painful soft tissue mass infiltrating the left T10 posterior rib. b A microwave antenna is percutaneously inserted inside the mass. Due to the proximity to the skin a sterile glove filled with cold water is placed over the skin. c CT axial scan 3 months

Irreversible Electroporation (IRE)

Each cell membrane point has a local transmembrane voltage that determines a dynamic phenomenon called electroporation (reversible or irreversible) [16]. Electroporation is manifested by specific transmembrane voltage thresholds related to a given pulse duration and shape. Thus, a threshold for an electronic field magnitude is defined and only cells with higher electric field magnitudes than this threshold are electroporated. IRE produces persistent nano-sized membrane pores compromising the viability of cells [16]. On the other hand, collagen and other supporting structures remain unaffected. The IRE generator produces direct current (25–45 A) electric pulses of high voltage (1,500–3,000 V).

Lastly we wish to highlight a method that is mostly used on patients diagnosed at intermediate or advanced clinical stages of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC); transarterial chemoembolization  (TACE)

“Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (also called transarterial chemoembolization or TACE) is a minimally invasive procedure performed in interventional radiology  to restrict a tumor’s blood supply. Small embolic particles coated with chemotherapeutic agents are injected selectively into an artery directly supplying a tumor. TACE derives its beneficial effect by two primary mechanisms. Most tumors within the liver are supplied by the proper hepatic artery, so arterial embolization preferentially interrupts the tumor’s blood supply and stalls growth until neovascularization. Secondly, focused administration of chemotherapy allows for delivery of a higher dose to the tissue while simultaneously reducing systemic exposure, which is typically the dose limiting factor. This effect is potentiated by the fact that the chemotherapeutic drug is not washed out from the tumor vascular bed by blood flow after embolization. Effectively, this results in a higher concentration of drug to be in contact with the tumor for a longer period of time. Park et al. conceptualized carcinogenesis of HCC as a multistep process involving parenchymal arterialization, sinusoidal capillarization, and development of unpaired arteries (a vital component of tumor angiogenesis). All these events lead to a gradual shift in tumor blood supply from portal to arterial circulation. This concept has been validated using dynamic imaging modalities by various investigators. Sigurdson et al. demonstrated that when an agent was infused via the hepatic artery, intratumoral concentrations were ten times greater compared to when agents were administered through the portal vein. Hence, arterial treatment targets the tumor while normal liver is relatively spared. Embolization induces ischemic necrosis of tumor causing a failure of the transmembrane pump, resulting in a greater absorption of agents by the tumor cells. Tissue concentration of agents within the tumor is greater than 40 times that of the surrounding normal liver.”; WikipediA

A recent open access research paper: Conventional transarterial chemoembolization versus drug-eluting bead transarterial chemoembolization for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma is discussing recent clinical approaches  related to this techniques.

Abstract

Background

To compare the overall survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who were treated with lipiodol-based conventional transarterial chemoembolization (cTACE) with that of patients treated with drug-eluting bead transarterial chemoembolization (DEB-TACE).

Methods

By an electronic search of our radiology information system, we identified 674 patients that received TACE between November 2002 and July 2013. A total of 520 patients received cTACE, and 154 received DEB-TACE. In total, 424 patients were excluded for the following reasons: tumor type other than HCC (n = 91), liver transplantation after TACE (n = 119), lack of histological grading (n = 58), incomplete laboratory values (n = 15), other reasons (e.g., previous systemic chemotherapy) (n = 114), or were lost to follow-up (n = 27). Therefore, 250 patients were finally included for comparative analysis (n = 174 cTACE; n = 76 DEB-TACE).

Results

There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding sex, overall status (Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification), liver function (Child-Pugh), portal invasion, tumor load, or tumor grading (all p > 0.05). The mean number of treatment sessions was 4 ± 3.1 in the cTACE group versus 2.9 ± 1.8 in the DEB-TACE group (p = 0.01). Median survival was 409 days (95 % CI: 321–488 days) in the cTACE group, compared with 369 days (95 % CI: 310–589 days) in the DEB-TACE group (p = 0.76). In the subgroup of Child A patients, the survival was 602 days (484–792 days) for cTACE versus 627 days (364–788 days) for DEB-TACE (p = 0.39). In Child B/C patients, the survival was considerably lower: 223 days (165–315 days) for cTACE versus 226 days (114–335 days) for DEB-TACE (p = 0.53).

Conclusion

The present study showed no significant difference in overall survival between cTACE and DEB-TACE in patients with HCC. However, the significantly lower number of treatments needed in the DEB-TACE group makes it a more appealing treatment option than cTACE for appropriately selected patients with unresectable HCC.

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SACHS FLYER 2014 CVD Title

Please see Further Titles at

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Please see Further Information on the Sachs Associates 14th Annual Biotech in Europe Forum for Global Investing & Partnering at:

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/03/25/14th-annual-biotech-in-europe-forum-for-global-partnering-investment-930-1012014-%E2%80%A2-congress-center-basel-sachs-associates-london/

AND

http://www.sachsforum.com/basel14/index.html

why-is-twitter-s-logo-named-after-larry-bird--b8d70319daON TWITTER Follow at

@SachsAssociates

#Sachs14thBEF

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950 

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MedTech (Cardiac Imaging) and Medical Devices for Cardiovascular Repair – Curations, Co-Curations and Reporting by Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN


MedTech (Cardiac Imaging) and Medical Devices for Cardiovascular Repair – Curations, Co-Curations and Reporting by Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Cardiac Imaging and Cardiovascular Medical Devices in use for

Cardiac Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgical Procedures and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) / Coronary Angioplasty

List of Publications updated on 8/13/2018

 

Single-Author Curation by Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

42c       Experimental Therapy (Left inter-atrial shunt implant device) for Heart Failure: Expert Opinion on a Preliminary Study on Heart Failure with preserved Ejection Fraction

Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/05/09/experimental-therapy-left-inter-atrial-shunt-implant-device-for-heart-failure-expert-opinion-on-a-preliminary-study-on-heart-failure-with-preserved-ejection-fraction/

 

41c       Spectranetics, a Technology Leader in Medical Devices for Coronary Intervention, Peripheral Intervention, Lead Management to be acquired by Philips for 1.9 Billion Euros

Reporter and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/06/28/spectranetics-a-technology-leader-in-medical-devices-for-coronary-intervention-peripheral-intervention-lead-management-to-be-acquired-by-philips-for-1-9-billion-euros/

 

40c       Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation: Outcomes of Surgical Treatment during CABG vs CABG without Mitral Valve Repair

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/04/moderate-ischemic-mitral-regurgitation-outcomes-of-surgical-treatment-during-cabg-vs-cabg-without-mitral-valve-repair/

 

39c       Patients with Heart Failure & Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Life Expectancy Increased by coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery: Medical Therapy alone and had Poor Outcomes

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/04/patients-with-heart-failure-left-ventricular-dysfunction-life-expectancy-increased-by-coronary-artery-bypass-graft-cabg-surgery/

 

38c       Mapping the Universe of Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence: The Model developed by LPBI and the Model of Best Practices LLC

Author and Curator of Model A: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN and Reporter on Model B: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/13/mapping-the-universe-of-pharmaceutical-business-intelligence-the-model-developed-by-lpbi-and-the-model-of-best-practices-llc/

 

37c     MedTech & Medical Devices for Cardiovascular Repair – Curations by

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/17/medtech-medical-devices-for-cardiovascular-repair-curation-by-aviva-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

36c     Stem Cells and Cardiac Repair: Scientific Reporting by: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/17/stem-cells-and-cardiac-repair-content-curation-scientific-reporting-aviva-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

35c       CVD Prevention and Evaluation of Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities: Coronary Calcium Score by CT Scan Screening to justify or not the Use of Statin

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/03/03/cvd-prevention-and-evaluation-of-cardiovascular-imaging-modalities-coronary-calcium-score-by-ct-scan-screening-to-justify-or-not-the-use-of-statin/

 

34c       “Sudden Cardiac Death,” SudD is in Ferrer inCode’s Suite of Cardiovascular Genetic Tests to be Commercialized in the US

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/10/sudden-cardiac-death-sudd-is-in-ferrer-incodes-suite-of-cardiovascular-genetic-tests-to-be-commercialized-in-the-us/

 

33c       Transcatheter Valve Competition in the United States: Medtronic CoreValve infringes on Edwards Lifesciences Corp. Transcatheter Device Patents

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/26/transcatheter-valve-competition-in-the-united-states-medtronic-corevalve-infringes-on-edwards-lifesciences-corp-transcatheter-device-patents/

 

32c       Developments on the Frontier of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Devices

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/26/developments-on-the-frontier-of-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-tavr-devices/

 

31c       Market Impact on Global Suppliers of Renal Denervation Systems by Pivotal US Trial: Metronics’ Symplicity Renal Denervation System FAILURE at Efficacy Endpoint

Curator and Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/09/market-impact-on-global-suppliers-of-renal-denervation-systems-by-pivotal-us-trial-metronics-symplicity-renal-denervation-system-failure-at-efficacy-endpoint/

 

30c     Stenting for Proximal LAD Lesions

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/18/stenting-for-proximal-lad-lesions/

 

29c       Stent Design and Thrombosis:  Bifurcation Intervention, Drug Eluting Stents (DES) and Biodegrable Stents

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/06/stent-design-and-thrombosis-bifurcation-intervention-drug-eluting-stents-des-and-biodegrable-stents/

 

28c       Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/01/calcium-molecule-in-cardiac-gene-therapy-inhalable-gene-therapy-for-pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-and-percutaneous-intra-coronary-artery-infusion-for-heart-failure-contributions-by-roger-j-hajjar/

 

27c       Call for the abandonment of the Off-pump CABG surgery (OPCAB) in the On-pump / Off-pump Debate, +100 Research Studies

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/31/call-for-the-abandonment-of-the-off-pump-cabg-surgery-opcab-in-the-on-pump-off-pump-debate-100-research-studies/

 

26c       3D Cardiovascular Theater – Hybrid Cath Lab/OR Suite, Hybrid Surgery, Complications Post PCI and Repeat Sternotomy

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/19/3d-cardiovascular-theater-hybrid-cath-labor-suite-hybrid-surgery-complications-post-pci-and-repeat-sternotomy/

 

25c       Vascular Surgery: International, Multispecialty Position Statement on Carotid Stenting, 2013 and Contributions of a Vascular Surgeon at Peak Career – Richard Paul Cambria, MD

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/14/vascular-surgery-position-statement-in-2013-and-contributions-of-a-vascular-surgeon-at-peak-career-richard-paul-cambria-md-chief-division-of-vascular-and-endovascular-surgery-co-director-thoracic/

 

24c       Heart Transplant (HT) Indication for Heart Failure (HF): Procedure Outcomes and Research on HF, HT @ Two Nation’s Leading HF & HT Centers

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/09/research-programs-george-m-linda-h-kaufman-center-for-heart-failure-cleveland-clinic/

 

23c       Becoming a Cardiothoracic Surgeon: An Emerging Profile in the Surgery Theater and through Scientific Publications 

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/08/becoming-a-cardiothoracic-surgeon-an-emerging-profile-in-the-surgery-theater-and-through-scientific-publications/

 

22c       Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) & Instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR): An Evaluation of Catheterization Lab Tools (Software Validation) for Endovascular Lower-extremity Revascularization Effectiveness: Vascular Surgeons (VSs), Interventional Cardiologists (ICs) and Interventional Radiologists (IRs)

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/01/endovascular-lower-extremity-revascularization-effectiveness-vascular-surgeons-vss-interventional-cardiologists-ics-and-interventional-radiologists-irs/

 

21c       No Early Symptoms – An Aortic Aneurysm Before It Ruptures – Is There A Way To Know If I Have it?

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/10/no-early-symptoms-an-aortic-aneurysm-before-it-ruptures-is-there-a-way-to-know-if-i-have-it/

 

20c       Synthetic Biology: On Advanced Genome Interpretation for Gene Variants and Pathways: What is the Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/17/synthetic-biology-on-advanced-genome-interpretation-for-gene-variants-and-pathways-what-is-the-genetic-base-of-atherosclerosis-and-loss-of-arterial-elasticity-with-aging/

 

19c       Revascularization: PCI, Prior History of PCI vs CABG

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/25/revascularization-pci-prior-history-of-pci-vs-cabg/

 

18c       Minimally Invasive Structural CVD Repairs: FDA grants 510(k) Clearance to Philips’ EchoNavigator – X-ray and 3-D Ultrasound Image Fused.

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/21/minimally-invasive-structural-cvd-repairs-fda-grants-510k-to-philips-echonavigator-x-ray-and-3-d-ultrasound-image-fused/

 

17c       Acute Chest Pain/ER Admission: Three Emerging Alternatives to Angiography and PCI

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/10/acute-chest-painer-admission-three-emerging-alternatives-to-angiography-and-pci/

 

16c       Clinical Trials on Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) to be conducted by American College of Cardiology and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/12/american-college-of-cardiologys-and-the-society-of-thoracic-surgeons-entrance-into-clinical-trials-is-noteworthy-read-more-two-medical-societies-jump-into-clinical-trial-effort-for-tavr-tech-f/

 

15c       FDA Pending 510(k) for The Latest Cardiovascular Imaging Technology

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/28/fda-pending-510k-for-the-latest-cardiovascular-imaging-technology/

 

14c       The ACUITY-PCI score: Will it Replace Four Established Risk Scores — TIMI, GRACE, SYNTAX, and Clinical SYNTAX

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN   https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/03/the-acuity-pci-score-will-it-replace-four-established-risk-scores-timi-grace-syntax-and-clinical-syntax/

13c       Renal Sympathetic Denervation: Updates on the State of Medicine

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/31/renal-sympathetic-denervation-updates-on-the-state-of-medicine/

 

12c       Coronary artery disease in symptomatic patients referred for coronary angiography: Predicted by Serum Protein Profiles

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/29/coronary-artery-disease-in-symptomatic-patients-referred-for-coronary-angiography-predicted-by-serum-protein-profiles/

 

11c       CABG or PCI: Patients with Diabetes – CABG Rein Supreme

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/05/cabg-or-pci-patients-with-diabetes-cabg-rein-supreme/

 

10c       Clinical Trials Results for Endothelin System: Pathophysiological role in Chronic Heart Failure, Acute Coronary Syndromes and MI – Marker of Disease Severity or Genetic Determination?

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/19/clinical-trials-results-for-endothelin-system-pathophysiological-role-in-chronic-heart-failure-acute-coronary-syndromes-and-mi-marker-of-disease-severity-or-genetic-determination/

 

9c         Imbalance of Autonomic Tone: The Promise of Intravascular Stimulation of Autonomics

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/02/imbalance-of-autonomic-tone-the-promise-of-intravascular-stimulation-of-autonomics/

 

8c         New Drug-Eluting Stent Works Well in STEMI

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/22/new-drug-eluting-stent-works-well-in-stemi/

 

7c         Coronary Artery Disease – Medical Devices Solutions: From First-In-Man Stent Implantation, via Medical Ethical Dilemmas to Drug Eluting Stents

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/13/coronary-artery-disease-medical-devices-solutions-from-first-in-man-stent-implantation-via-medical-ethical-dilemmas-to-drug-eluting-stents/

 

6c         DELETED, identical to 7r

 

5c         Percutaneous Endocardial Ablation of Scar-Related Ventricular Tachycardia

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/18/percutaneous-endocardial-ablation-of-scar-related-ventricular-tachycardia/

 

4c         Global Supplier Strategy for Market Penetration &amp; Partnership Options (Niche Suppliers vs. National Leaders) in the Massachusetts Cardiology &amp; Vascular Surgery Tools and Devices Market for Cardiac Operating Rooms and Angioplasty Suites

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/22/global-supplier-strategy-for-market-penetration-partnership-options-niche-suppliers-vs-national-leaders-in-the-massachusetts-cardiology-vascular-surgery-tools-and-devices-market-for-car/

 

3c         Competition in the Ecosystem of Medical Devices in Cardiac and Vascular Repair: Heart Valves, Stents, Catheterization Tools and Kits for Open Heart and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/22/competition-in-the-ecosystem-of-medical-devices-in-cardiac-and-vascular-repair-heart-valves-stents-catheterization-tools-and-kits-for-open-heart-and-minimally-invasive-surgery-mis/

 

2c         Executive Compensation and Comparator Group Definition in the Cardiac and Vascular Medical Devices Sector: A Bright Future for Edwards Lifesciences Corporation in the Transcatheter Heart Valve Replacement Market

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/19/executive-compensation-and-comparator-group-definition-in-the-cardiac-and-vascular-medical-devices-sector-a-bright-future-for-edwards-lifesciences-corporation-in-the-transcatheter-heart-valve-replace/

 

1c         Treatment of Refractory Hypertension via Percutaneous Renal Denervation

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/13/treatment-of-refractory-hypertension-via-percutaneous-renal-denervation/

 

Lev-Ari, A. (2006b). First-In-Man Stent Implantation Clinical Trials & Medical Ethical Dilemmas.

Bouve College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115

 

Co-Curation Articles on MedTech and Cardiac Medical Devices by LPBI Group’s Team Members and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

67co     ATP – the universal energy carrier in the living cell: Reflections on the discoveries and applications in Medicine

Curators: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/27/atp-the-universal-energy-carrier-in-the-living-cell-reflections-on-the-discoveries-and-applications-in-medicine/

66co     Eric Topol, M.D.

Curators: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/09/22/eric-topol-m-d/

 

65co     Summary of Translational Medicine – e-Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four – Part 1

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/28/summary-of-translational-medicine-cardiovascular-diseases-part-1/

 

64co     Introduction to e-Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases, Volume Four Part 2: Regenerative Medicine

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/27/larryhbernintroduction_to_cardiovascular_diseases-translational_medicine-part_2/

 

63co     Epilogue: Volume 4 – Translational, Post-Translational and Regenerative Medicine in Cardiology

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Author and Curator, Consultant for Series B,C,D,E

Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC, Content Consultant for Series A: Cardiovascular Diseases

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Co-Editor and Editor-in-Chief, BioMed e-Series

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/05/12/epilogue-volume-4-post-translational-and-transformative-cardiology/

 

62co     Introduction to Translational Medicine (TM) – Part 1: Translational Medicine

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/25/introduction-to-translational-medicine-tm-part-1/

 

61co     Acute Myocardial Infarction: Curations of Cardiovascular Original Research A Bibliography

Curators: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN and Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/22/acute-myocardial-infarction-curations-of-cardiovascular-original-research-a-bibliography/

60co     Mitral Valve Repair: Who is a Patient Candidate for a Non-Ablative Fully Non-Invasive Procedure?

Author, and Content Consultant to e-SERIES A: Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/04/mitral-valve-repair-who-is-a-candidate-for-a-non-ablative-fully-non-invasive-procedure/

 

59co     Coronary Circulation Combined Assessment: Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) – Detection of Lipid-Rich Plaque and Prevention of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS)

Author, and Content Consultant to e-SERIES A: Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/25/coronary-circulation-combined-assessment-optical-coherence-tomography-oct-near-infrared-spectroscopy-nirs-and-intravascular-ultrasound-ivus-detection-of-lipid-rich-plaque-and-prevention-of-a/

 

58co     Normal and Anomalous Coronary Arteries: Dual Source CT in Cardiothoracic Imaging

Reporters: Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/18/normal-and-anomalous-coronary-arteries-dual-source-ct-in-cardiothoracic-imaging/

 

57co     Alternative Designs for the Human Artificial Heart: Patients in Heart Failure –  Outcomes of Transplant (donor)/Implantation (artificial) and Monitoring Technologies for the Transplant/Implant Patient in the Community

Authors and Curators: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Article Curator and Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/05/alternative-designs-for-the-human-artificial-heart-the-patients-in-heart-failure-outcomes-of-transplant-donorimplantation-artificial-and-monitoring-technologies-for-the-transplantimplant-pat/

 

56co     Cardiovascular Complications: Death from Reoperative Sternotomy after prior CABG, MVR, AVR, or Radiation; Complications of PCI; Sepsis from Cardiovascular Interventions

Author, Introduction and Summary: Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC, and Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/23/cardiovascular-complications-of-multiple-etiologies-repeat-sternotomy-post-cabg-or-avr-post-pci-pad-endoscopy-andor-resultant-of-systemic-sepsis/

 

55co     The Cardiorenal Syndrome in Heart Failure: Cardiac? Renal? syndrome?

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/the-cardiorenal-syndrome-in-heart-failure/

 

54co     Mechanical Circulatory Assist Devices as a Bridge to Heart Transplantation or as “Destination Therapy“: Options for Patients in Advanced Heart Failure

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/advanced-heart-failure/

 

53co     Heart Transplantation: NHLBI’s Ten year Strategic Research Plan to Achieving Evidence-based Outcomes

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/heart-transplantation-research-in-the-next-decade-a-goal-to-achieving-evidence-based-outcomes/

 

52co     After Cardiac Transplantation: Sirolimus acts as immunosuppressant Attenuates Allograft Vasculopathy

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/sirolimus-as-primary-immunosuppression-attenuates-allograft-vasculopathy/

51co     Orthotropic Heart Transplant (OHT): Effects of Autonomic Innervation / Denervation on Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Genesis and Maintenance

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/decreased-postoperative-atrial-fibrillation-following-cardiac-transplantation/

 

50co     CABG Survival in Multivessel Disease Patients: Comparison of Arterial Bypass Grafts vs Saphenous Venous Grafts

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/multiple-arterial-grafts-improve-late-survival-of-patients-with-multivessel-disease/

49co     Coronary Reperfusion Therapies: CABG vs PCI – Mayo Clinic preprocedure Risk Score (MCRS) for Prediction of in-Hospital Mortality after CABG or PCI

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/mayo-risk-score-for-percutaneous-coronary-intervention/

 

48co     Pre-operative Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes Associated with Vasoplegia in Recipients of Orthotopic Heart Transplantation in the Contemporary Era

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/30/vasoplegia-in-orthotopic-heart-transplants/

 

47co     Carotid Endarterectomy (CEA) vs. Carotid Artery Stenting (CAS): Comparison of CMMS high-risk criteria on the Outcomes after Surgery:  Analysis of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Vascular Registry Data

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/28/effect-on-endovascular-carotid-artery-repair-outcomes-of-the-cmms-high-risk-criteria/

 

46co     Improved Results for Treatment of Persistent type 2 Endoleak after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Onyx Glue Embolization

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/28/onyx-glue-for-the-treatment-of-persistent-type-2-endoleak/

 

45co     DELETED, was identical to 47co

 

44co     Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) repair (OAR) vs. Endovascular AAA Repair (EVAR) in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Patients – Comparison of Surgery Outcomes

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/28/the-effect-of-chronic-kidney-disease-on-outcomes-after-abdominal-aortic-aneurysm-repair/

 

43co     Effect of Hospital Characteristics on Outcomes of Endovascular Repair of Descending Aortic Aneurysms in US Medicare Population

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/27/effect-of-hospital-characteristics-on-outcomes-of-endovascular-repair-of-descending-aortic-aneurysms-in-us-medicare-population/

 

42co     First case in the US: Valve-in-Valve (Aortic and  Mitral) Replacements with Transapical Transcatheter Implants – The Use of Transfemoral Devices

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/23/valve-in-valve-replacements-with-transapical-transcatheter-implants/

 

41co     Survivals Comparison of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) / Coronary Angioplasty

Curators: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/23/comparison-of-cardiothoracic-bypass-and-percutaneous-interventional-catheterization-survivals/

 

40co     Ventricular Assist Device (VAD): A Recommended Approach to the Treatment of Intractable Cardiogenic Shock

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/18/a-recommended-approach-to-the-treatmnt-of-intractable-cardiogenic-shock/

39co     Trans-apical Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Patient with Severe and Complex Left Main Coronary Artery Disease (LMCAD)

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/17/management-of-difficult-trans-apical-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-in-a-patient-with-severe-and-complex-arterial-disease/

 

38co     Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR): Postdilatation to Reduce Paravalvular Regurgitation During TAVR with a Balloon-expandable Valve

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/17/postdilatation-to-reduce-paravalvular-regurgitation-during-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement/

 

37co     Acute and Chronic Myocardial Infarction: Quantification of Myocardial Perfusion Viability – FDG-PET/MRI vs. MRI or PET alone

Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/22/acute-and-chronic-myocardial-infarction-quantification-of-myocardial-viability-fdg-petmri-vs-mri-or-pet-alone/

 

36co     On Devices and On Algorithms: Arrhythmia after Cardiac SurgeryPrediction and ECG Prediction of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Onset

Author, and Content Consultant to e-SERIES A: Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/07/on-devices-and-on-algorithms-arrhythmia-after-cardiac-surgery-prediction-and-ecg-prediction-of-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation-onset/

 

35co     Vascular Repair: Stents and Biologically Active Implants

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/04/stents-biologically-active-implants-and-vascular-repair/

 

34co     Drug Eluting Stents: On MIT‘s Edelman Lab’s Contributions to Vascular Biology and its Pioneering Research on DES

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/25/contributions-to-vascular-biology/

 

33co     Mitral Valve Repair: Who is a Patient Candidate for a Non-Ablative Fully Non-Invasive Procedure?

Author, and Content Consultant to e-SERIES A: Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Article Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/04/mitral-valve-repair-who-is-a-candidate-for-a-non-ablative-fully-non-invasive-procedure/

 

32co     Source of Stem Cells to Ameliorate Damaged Myocardium (Part 2)

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/10/29/source-of-stem-cells-to-ameliorate-damaged-myocardium/

 

31co     State of Cardiology on Wall Stress, Ventricular Workload and Myocardial Contractile Reserve: Aspects of Translational Medicine (TM)

Curators: Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/09/30/state-of-cardiology-on-wall-stress-ventricular-workload-and-myocardial-contractile-reserve-aspects-of-translational-medicine/

 

30co  DELETED identical to 58co

 

29co  DELETED identical to 58co

 

28co  DELETED identical to 57co

 

27co  DELETED identical to 47co

 

26co     Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) to Arrhythmias: Pacemaker/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) Insertion

Curators: Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/22/cardiac-resynchronization-therapy-crt-to-arrhythmias-pacemakerimplantable-cardioverter-defibrillator-icd-insertion/

 

25co     Emerging Clinical Applications for Cardiac CT: Plaque Characterization, SPECT Functionality, Angiogram’s and Non-Invasive FFR

Curators: Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/17/emerging-clinical-applications-for-cardiac-ct-plaque-characterization-spect-functionality-angiograms-and-non-invasive-ffr/

 

24co     Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) & Instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR): An Evaluation of Catheterization Lab Tools (Software Validation) for Ischemic Assessment (Diagnostics) – Change in Paradigm: The RIGHT vessel not ALL vessels

Reporters: Justin D Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/04/fractional-flow-reserve-ffr-instantaneous-wave-free-rario-ifr-an-evaluation-of-catheterization-lab-tools-for-ischemic-assessment/

 

23co  DELETED identical to 24co

 

22co  DELETED identical to 49co

 

21co  DELETED identical to 52co

 

20co  DELETED identical to 50co

 

19co  DELETED identical to 57co

 

18co     Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) repair (OAR) vs. Endovascular AAA Repair (EVAR) in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Patients – Comparison of Surgery Outcomes

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/28/the-effect-of-chronic-kidney-disease-on-outcomes-after-abdominal-aortic-aneurysm-repair/

 

17co     Improved Results for Treatment of Persistent type 2 Endoleak after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Onyx Glue Embolization

Author & Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/28/onyx-glue-for-the-treatment-of-persistent-type-2-endoleak/

16co     Effect of Hospital Characteristics on Outcomes of Endovascular Repair of Descending Aortic Aneurysms in US Medicare Population

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/27/effect-of-hospital-characteristics-on-outcomes-of-endovascular-repair-of-descending-aortic-aneurysms-in-us-medicare-population/

 

15co     Comparison of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) / Coronary Angioplasty

Curators: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/23/comparison-of-cardiothoracic-bypass-and-percutaneous-interventional-catheterization-survivals/

 

14co     First case in the US: Valve-in-Valve (Aortic and Mitral) Replacements with Transapical Transcatheter Implants – The Use of Transfemoral Devices.

Curators: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/23/valve-in-valve-replacements-with-transapical-transcatheter-implants/

 

13co     Phrenic Nerve Stimulation in Patients with Cheyne-Stokes Respiration and Congestive Heart Failure

Curators: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/20/phrenic-nerve-stimulation-in-patients-with-cheyne-stokes-respiration-and-congestive-heart-failure/

 

12co  DELETED identical to 40co

11co  DELETED identical to 38co

10co  DELETED identical to 39co

 

9co       Imaging Biomarker for Arterial Stiffness: Pathways in Pharmacotherapy for Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia Management

Curators: Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/24/imaging-biomarker-for-arterial-stiffness-pathways-in-pharmacotherapy-for-hypertension-and-hypercholesterolemia-management/

 

8co       DELETED identical to 37co

 

7co       Treatment, Prevention and Cost of Cardiovascular Disease: Current & Predicted Cost of Care and the Potential for Improved Individualized Care Using Clinical Decision Support Systems

Author, and Content Consultant to e-SERIES A: Cardiovascular Diseases: Justin Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC, Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/15/diagnosis-of-cardiovascular-disease-treatment-and-prevention-current-predicted-cost-of-care-and-the-promise-of-individualized-medicine-using-clinical-decision-support-systems-2/

 

6co       Hypertension and Vascular Compliance: 2013 Thought Frontier – An Arterial Elasticity Focus

Curators: Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/11/arterial-elasticity-in-quest-for-a-drug-stabilizer-isolated-systolic-hypertension-caused-by-arterial-stiffening-ineffectively-treated-by-vasodilatation-antihypertensives/

 

5co       DELETED identical to 36co

 

4co       Biomaterials Technology: Models of Tissue Engineering for Reperfusion and Implantable Devices for Revascularization

Author and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FACP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/05/bioengineering-of-vascular-and-tissue-models/

 

3co       Cardiovascular Diseases: Decision Support Systems for Disease Management Decision Making

Curators: Justin D. Pearlman, MD, PhD, FACC and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/04/cardiovascular-diseases-decision-support-systems-for-disease-management-decision-making/

 

2co    DELETED identical to 35co

 

1co    DELETED identical to 34co

 

Single-Author Reporting on MedTech and Cardiac Medical Devices by

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

162r Rhythm Management Device Hardware (Dual-chamber Pacemaker) coupled with BackBeat’s Cardiac Neuromodulation Therapy (CNT) bioelectronic therapy for Lowering Systolic Blood Pressure for patients with Pacemakers

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/10/03/rhythm-management-device-hardware-dual-chamber-pacemaker-coupled-with-backbeats-cardiac-neuromodulation-therapy-cnt-bioelectronic-therapy-for-lowering-systolic-blood-pressure-for-patients-w/

 

161r Pulmonary Valve Replacement and Repair: Valvuloplasty Device – Tissue (bioprosthetic) or mechanical valve;  Surgery type – Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement (TPVR) vs Open Heart, Valve Repair – Commissurotomy, Valve-ring Annuloplasty

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/09/30/pulmonary-valve-replacement-and-repair-valvuloplasty-device-tissue-bioprosthetic-or-mechanical-valve-surgery-type-transcatheter-pulmonary-valve-replacement-tpvr-vs-open-heart-valve-re/

 

160r Are TAVR volume requirements limiting rural and minority access to this life-saving procedure, or are they still necessary for patient safety?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/09/20/are-tavr-volume-requirements-limiting-rural-and-minority-access-to-this-life-saving-procedure-or-are-they-still-necessary-for-patient-safety/

159r Top 100 of 415 articles published on PubMed in 2018 on TAVR

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/08/14/top-100-of-415-articles-published-on-pubmed-in-2018-on-tavr/

158r Aortic Stenosis (AS): Managed Surgically by Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) – Search Results for “TAVR” on NIH.GOV website, Top 16 pages

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/08/14/aortic-stenosis-as-managed-surgically-by-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-tavr-search-results-for-tavr-on-nih-gov-website-top-16-pages/

 

157r Comparison of four methods in diagnosing acute myocarditis: The diagnostic performance of native T1, T2, ECV to LLC

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/08/08/comparison-of-four-methods-in-diagnosing-acute-myocarditis-the-diagnostic-performance-of-native-t1-t2-ecv-to-llc/

 

156r   Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction (LVOTO): The Role of CT in TAVR and in TMVR

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/07/25/left-ventricular-outflow-tract-lvot-obstruction-lvoto-the-role-of-ct-in-tavr-and-in-tmvr/

 

155r   CABG: a Superior Revascularization Modality to PCI in Patients with poor LVF, Multivessel disease and Diabetes, Similar Risk of Stroke between 31 days and 5 years, post intervention

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/07/25/cabg-a-superior-revascularization-modality-to-pci-in-patients-with-poor-lvf-multivessel-disease-and-diabetes-similar-risk-of-stroke-between-31-days-and-5-years-post-intervention/

 

154r   Stanford University researchers have developed a scanner that unites optical, radioluminescence, and photoacoustic imaging to evaluate for Thin-Cap Fibro Atheroma (TCFA)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/07/23/stanford-university-researchers-have-developed-a-scanner-that-unites-optical-radioluminescence-and-photoacoustic-imaging-to-evaluate-for-thin-cap-fibro-atheroma-tcfa/

 

153r   An Overview of the Heart Surgery Specialty: heart transplant, lung transplant, heart-lung transplantation, aortic valve surgery, bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, heart valve surgery, removal of cardiac tumors, reoperation valve surgery

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/07/11/the-heart-surgery-specialty-heart-transplant-lung-transplant-heart-lung-transplantation-aortic-valve-surgery-bypass-surgery-minimally-invasive-cardiac-surgery-heart-valve-surgery-removal-of-ca/

 

152r   PCI, CABG, CHF, AMI – Two Payment Methods: Bundled payments (hospitalization costs, up to 90 days of post-acute care, nursing home care, complications, and rehospitalizations) vs Diagnosis-related groupings cover only what happens in the hospital.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/07/10/pci-cabg-chf-ami-two-payment-methods-bundled-payments-hospitalization-costs-up-to-90-days-of-post-acute-care-nursing-home-care-complications-and-rehospitalizations-vs-diagnosis-related-gro/

 

151r   Expanded Stroke Thrombectomy Guidelines: FDA expands treatment window for use (Up to 24 Hours Post-Stroke) of clot retrieval devices (Stryker’s Trevo Stent) in certain stroke patients

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/02/27/expanded-stroke-thrombectomy-guidelines-fda-expands-treatment-window-for-use-up-to-24-hours-post-stroke-of-clot-retrieval-devices-strykers-trevo-stent-in-certain-stroke-patients/

 

150r   What is the Role of Noninvasive Diagnostic Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) CT vs Invasive FFR for PCI?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/02/27/what-is-the-role-of-noninvasive-diagnostic-fractional-flow-reserve-ffr-ct-vs-invasive-ffr-for-pci/

 

149r   Renowned Electrophysiologist Dr. Arthur Moss Died on February 14, 2018 at 86

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/02/27/renowned-electrophysiologist-dr-arthur-moss-died-on-february-14-2018-at-86/

 

148r   Mitral Valve Repair Global Leader: Edwards LifeSciences acquired Harpoon Medical for $250 in 12/2017 followed by $690 million buyout of Valtech Cardio 1/2017 and $400 million acquisition of CardiAQ Valve Technologies in 8/2017

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/12/08/mitral-valve-repair-global-leader-edwards-lifesciences-acquired-harpoon-medical-for-250-in-12-2017-followed-by-690-million-buyout-of-valtech-cardio-1-2017-and-400-million-acquisitio/

 

147r   2017 American Heart Association Annual Meeting: Sunday’s Science at #AHA17 – Presidential Address

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/11/13/2017-american-heart-association-annual-meeting-sundays-science-at-aha17-presidential-address/

 

146r   Medical Devices Early Feasibility FDA’s Pathway – Accelerated Recruitment for Randomized Clinical Trials: Replacement and Repair of Mitral Valves

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/11/13/medical-devices-early-feasibility-fdas-pathway-accelerated-recruitment-for-randomized-clinical-trials-replacement-and-repair-of-mitral-valves/

 

145r   Arrhythmias Detection: Speeding Diagnosis and Treatment – New deep learning algorithm can diagnose 14 types of heart rhythm defects by sifting through hours of ECG data generated by some REMOTELY iRhythm’s wearable monitors

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/07/10/arrhythmias-detection-speeding-diagnosis-and-treatment-new-deep-learning-algorithm-can-diagnose-14-types-of-heart-rhythm-defects-by-sifting-through-hours-of-ecg-data-generated-by-some-remotely-irhy/

 

144r   Cleveland Clinic: Change at the Top, Tomislav “Tom” Mihaljevic, M.D., as its next CEO and President to succeed Toby Cosgrove, M.D., effective Jan. 1, 2018

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/09/01/cleveland-clinic-change-at-the-top-tomislay-tom-mihaljevic-m-d-as-its-next-ceo-and-president-to-succeed-toby-cosgrove-m-d-effective-jan-1-2018/

 

143r   Off-Label TAVR Procedures: 1 in 10 associated with higher in-hospital 30-day mortality, 1-year mortality was similar in the Off-Label and the On-Label groups

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/06/22/off-label-tavr-procedures-1-in-10-associated-with-higher-in-hospital-30-day-mortality-1-year-mortality-was-similar-in-the-off-lavel-and-the-on-label-groups/

 

142r   Right Internal Carotid Artery Clot Aspiration: 4.5 Minute Thrombectomy Using the ADAPT-FAST Technique and the ACE68 Catheter

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/05/17/right-internal-carotid-artery-clot-aspiration-4-5-minute-thrombectomy-using-the-adapt-fast-technique-and-the-ace68-catheter/

 

141r   Less is More: Minimalist Mitral Valve Repair: Expert Opinion of Prem S. Shekar, MD, Chief, Division of Cardiac Surgery, BWH – #7, 2017 Disruptive Dozen at #WMIF17

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/05/17/less-is-more-minimalist-mitral-valve-repair-expert-opinion-of-prem-s-shekar-md-chief-division-of-cardiac-surgery-bwh-7-2017-disruptive-dozen-at-wmif17/

140r   What is the history of STEMI? What is the current treatment for Cardiogenic Shock? The Case Study of Detroit Cardiogenic Shock Initiative

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/05/07/what-is-the-history-of-stemi-what-is-the-current-treatment-for-cardiogenic-shock-the-case-study-of-detroit-cardiogenic-shock-initiative/

 

139r   ACC 2017, 3/30/2017 – Poor Outcomes for Bioresorbable Stents in Small Coronary Arteries

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/04/02/acc-2017-3302017-poor-outcomes-for-bioresorbable-stents-in-small-coronary-arteries/

 

138r   Edwards Lifesciences closes $690m a buy of Valtech Cardio and most of the heart valve repair technologies it’s developing

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/01/25/edwards-lifesciences-closes-690m-a-buy-of-valtech-cardio-and-most-of-the-heart-valve-repair-technologies-its-developing/

 

137r   First U.S. TAVR Patients Treated With Temporary Pacing Lead (Tempo Lead)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/21/first-u-s-tavr-patients-treated-with-temporary-pacing-lead-tempo-lead/

 

136r   2017 World Medical Innovation Forum: Cardiovascular, May 1-3, 2017, Partners HealthCare, Boston, at the Westin Hotel, Boston

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/14/2017-world-medical-innovation-forum-cardiovascular-may-1-3-2017-partners-healthcare-boston-at-the-westin-hotel-boston/

 

135r   Advanced Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD): Axillary Artery PCI for Insertion and Removal of Impella Device

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/13/advanced-peripheral-artery-disease-pad-axillary-pci-for-insertion-and-removal-of-impella-device/

 

134r   CorPath robotic system for bifurcation lesions with placement of the Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (BVS) (Abbott Vascular)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/07/corpath-robotic-system-for-bifurcation-lesions-with-placement-of-the-absorb-gt1-bioresorbable-vascular-scaffold-bvs-abbott-vascular/

 

133r   Hadassah Opens Israel’s First Heart Valve Disease Clinic

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/06/hadassah-opens-israels-first-heart-valve-disease-clinic/

 

132r   Left Main Coronary Artery Disease (LMCAD): Stents vs CABG – The less-invasive option is Equally Safe and Effective

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/06/left-main-coronary-artery-disease-lmcad-stents-vs-cabg-the-less-invasive-option-is-equally-safe-and-effective/

 

131r   Advances and Future Directions for Transcatheter Valves – Mitral and tricuspid valve repair technologies now in development

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/06/advances-and-future-directions-for-transcatheter-valves-mitral-and-tricuspid-valve-repair-technologies-now-in-development/

 

130r   New method for performing Aortic Valve Replacement: Transmural catheter procedure developed at NIH, Minimally-invasive tissue-crossing – Transcaval access, abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/31/new-method-for-performing-aortic-valve-replacement-transmural-catheter-procedure-developed-at-nih-minimally-invasive-tissue-crossing-transcaval-access-abdominal-aorta-and-the-inferior-vena-cava/

 

129r   Robot-assisted coronary intervention program @MGH – The first CorPath Vascular Robotic System, lets Interventional Cardiologists position the right stent in the right place at reduces radiation exposure by 95%

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/17/robot-assisted-coronary-intervention-program-mgh-the-first-corpath-vascular-robotic-system-lets-interventional-cardiologists-position-the-right-stent-in-the-right-place-at-reduces-radiation-exposu/

 

128r   Second in the United States to implant Edwards Newly FDA-Approved Aortic Valve “Intuity Elite” Sutureless Valve at Northwestern Medicine

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/13/second-in-the-united-states-to-implant-edwards-newly-fda-approved-aortic-valve-intuity-elite-sutureless-valve-at-northwestern-medicine/

 

127r   First-in-Man Mitral Valve Repairs Device used for Tricuspid Valve Repair: Cardioband used by University Hospital Zurich Heart Team

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/13/first-in-man-mitral-valve-repairs-device-used-for-tricuspid-valve-repair-cardioband-used-by-university-hospital-zurich-heart-team/

 

126r   Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Device for Prevention of Pulmonary Embolism and Thrombosis

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/04/vena-caval-filters-device-for-prevention-of-pulmonary-embolism-and-thrombosis/

 

125r   Chest Radiation Therapy causes Collateral Damage to the Human Heart

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/28/chest-radiation-therapy-causes-collateral-damage-to-the-human-heart/

 

124r   Clinical Trials for Transcatheter Mitral Valves Annulus Repairs and TAVR: CT Structural Software for Procedural Planning and Anatomical Assessments

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/15/clinical-trials-for-transcatheter-mitral-valves-annulus-repairs-and-tavr-ct-structural-software-for-procedural-planning-and-anatomical-assessments/

 

123r   Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) gene missense mutation causes Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection (TAAD) in Humans because of inadequate cross-linking of collagen and elastin in the aortic wall

Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/19/lysyl-oxidase-lox-gene-missense-mutation-causes-thoracic-aortic-aneurysm-and-dissection-taad-in-humans-because-of-inadequate-cross-linking-of-collagen-and-elastin-in-the-aortic-wall/

 

122r   SAPIEN 3 Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in High-Risk and Inoperable Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis: One-Year Clinical Outcomes

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/14/sapien-3-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-in-high-risk-and-inoperable-patients-with-severe-aortic-stenosis-one-year-clinical-outcomes/

 

121r   Entire Family of Impella Abiomed Impella® Therapy Left Side Heart Pumps: FDA Approved To Enable Heart Recovery

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/06/entire-family-of-impella-abiomed-impella-therapy-left-side-heart-pumps-fda-approved-to-enable-heart-recovery/

 

120r   DELETED identical to 121r

 

119r   FDA approved Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System (BVS), Everolimus releasing and Absorbed by the body in 3 years

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/05/fda-approved-absorb-gt1-bioresorbable-vascular-scaffold-system-bvs-everolimus-releasing-and-absorbed-by-the-body-in-3-years/

 

118r   TAVR with Sapien 3: combined all-cause death & disabling stroke rate was 8.4% and 16.6% for the surgery arm

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/05/tavr-with-sapien-3-combined-all-cause-death-disabling-stroke-rate-was-8-4-and-16-6-for-the-surgery-arm/

 

117r   Boston Scientific implant designed to occlude the heart’s left atrial appendage implicated with embolization – Device Sales in Europe halts

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/05/boston-scientific-implant-designed-to-occlude-the-hearts-left-atrial-appendage-implicated-with-embolization-device-sales-in-europe-halts/

 

116r   Issue with Delivery System Deployment Process: MitraClip Clip Recalled by Abbott Vascular

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/21/issue-with-delivery-system-deployment-process-mitraclip-clip-recalled-by-abbott-vascular/

 

115r   Prospects for First-in-man Implantation of Transcatheter Mitral Valve by Direct Flow Medical

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/03/prospects-for-first-in-man-implantation-of-transcatheter-mitral-valve-by-direct-flow-medical/

 

114r   Steps to minimise replacement of cardiac implantable electronic devices

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/04/steps-to-minimise-replacement-of-cardiac-implantable-electronic-devices/

 

113r Atrial Fibrillation Surgery Market worth $1.73 Billion by 2020

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/12/15/atrial-fibrillation-surgery-market-worth-1-73-billion-by-2020/

 

112r   Abbott’s Bioabsorbable Stent met its Primary Endpoint in a U.S. Clinical Trial, applications for FDA Approval follows

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/10/13/abbotts-bioabsorbable-stent-met-its-primary-endpoint-in-a-u-s-clinical-trial-applications-for-fda-approval-follows/

 

111r   Low-dose and High-resolution Cardiac Imaging with Revolution™ CT

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/08/23/low-dose-and-high-resolution-cardiac-imaging-with-revolution-ct/

 

110r   Hybrid Imaging 3D Model of a Human Heart by Cardiac Imaging Techniques: CT and Echocardiography

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/08/03/hybrid-imaging-3d-model-of-a-human-heart-by-cardiac-imaging-techniques-ct-and-echocardiography/

 

109r   Premature Ventricular Contraction percentage predicts new Systolic Dysfunction and clinically diagnosed CHF and overall Mortality

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/07/14/premature-ventricular-contraction-percentage-predicts-new-systolic-dysfunction-and-clinically-diagnosed-chf-and-overall-mortality/

 

108r   ‘Mammogram for the heart’ can predict heart attack by Dr. James Min, Director of the Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging at New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/07/07/mammogram-for-the-heart-can-predict-heart-attack-by-dr-james-min-director-of-the-dalio-institute-of-cardiovascular-imaging-at-new-york-presbyterian-hospital-and-weill-cornell-medic/

 

107r   Abbott’s percutaneous MitraClip mitral valve repair device SUPERIOR to Pacemaker or Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) for reduction of Ventricular Tachyarrhythmia (VT) episodes

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/05/19/abbotts-percutaneous-mitraclip-mitral-valve-repair-device-superior-to-pacemaker-or-implantable-cardioverter-defibrillator-for-reduction-of-ventricular-tachyarrhythmia-vt-episodes/

 

106r   No evidence to change current transfusion practices for adults undergoing complex cardiac surgery: RECESS evaluated 1,098 cardiac surgery patients received red blood cell units stored for short or long periods

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/08/no-evidence-to-change-current-transfusion-practices-for-adults-undergoing-complex-cardiac-surgery-recess-evaluated-1098-cardiac-surgery-patients-received-red-blood-cell-units-stored-for-short-or-lon/

 

105r   3-D BioPrinting in use to create Cardiac Living Tissue: Print Your Heart Out

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/16/3-d-bioprinting-in-use-to-create-cardiac-living-tissue-print-your-heart-out/

 

104r   Fractional Flow Reserve vs. Angiography in Non-ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/02/24/fractional-flow-reserve-vs-angiography-in-non-st-segment-elevation-myocardial-infarction/

 

103r   Transradial PCI Bests Transfemoral PCI in UK Analysis, regardless of Patient’s Age

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/02/24/transradial-pci-bests-transfemoral-pci-in-uk-analysis-regardless-of-patients-age/

 

102r   DELETED, identical to 101r

 

101r   Protein Clue to Sudden Cardiac Death: Research @Oxford University

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/02/19/protein-clue-to-sudden-cardiac-death-research-oxford-university/

 

100r   Culprit-Lesion Over Multivessel PCI in STEMI Patients

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/11/07/culprit-lesion-over-multivessel-pci-in-stemi-patients/

 

99r     Convergent Procedure addresses the progressive nature of A-Fib

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/29/convergent-procedure-addresses-the-progressive-nature-of-a-fib/

 

98r     Paul Zoll, MD: Originator of Modern Electrocardiac Therapy – A Biography by Stafford Cohen, MD, BIDMC

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/16/paul-zoll-md-originator-of-modern-electrocardiac-therapy-a-biography-by-stafford-cohen-md-bidmc/

 

 

97r     Surgical Options for Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Removal for A-Fib Patients without Indication for Anticoagulant Therapy

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/15/surgical-options-for-left-atrial-appendage-laa-removal-for-a-fib-patients-without-indication-for-anticoagulant-therapy/

 

96r     Intracranial Vascular Stenosis: Comparison of Clinical Trials: Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting (PTAS) vs. Clot-inhibiting Drugs: Aspirin and Clopidogrel (dual antiplatelet therapy) – more Strokes if Stenting

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/15/intracranial-vascular-stenosis-comparison-of-clinical-trials-percutaneous-transluminal-angioplasty-and-stenting-ptas-vs-clot-inhibiting-drugs-aspirin-and-clopidogrel-dual-antiplatelet-therapy/

95r     New Era for PAD as FDA approval in the US of 1st Drug-coated Balloon (DCB) for PDA – CAD Indication for DCB will follow

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/15/new-era-for-pad-as-fda-approval-in-the-us-of-1st-drug-coated-balloon-dcb-for-pda-cad-indication-for-dcb-will-follow/

 

94r     Tethered–Liquid Perfluorocarbon surface (TLP): Biocoating Prevents Blood from Clotting on Implantables

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/10/13/tethered-liquid-perfluorocarbon-surface-tlp-biocoating-prevents-blood-from-clotting-on-implantables/

 

93r     Medtronic’s CoreValve System Sustains Positive Outcomes Through Two Years in Extreme Risk Patients

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/09/15/medtronics-corevalve-system-sustains-positive-outcomes-through-two-years-in-extreme-risk-patients/

 

92r     Thrombus Aspiration for Myocardial Infarction: What are the Outcomes One Year After

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/09/04/thrombus-aspiration-for-myocardial-infarction-what-are-the-outcomes-one-year-after/

 

91r     Fractional Flow Reserve–Guided PCI vs Drug Therapy for Stable Coronary Artery Disease

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/09/04/fractional-flow-reserve-guided-pci-vs-drug-therapy-for-stable-coronary-artery-disease/

90r     Capillaries: A Mapping Geometrical Method using Organ 3D Printing

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/22/capillaries-a-mapping-geometrical-method-using-organ-3d-printing/

 

89r     One year Post-Intervention Mortality Rate: TAVR and AVR – Aortic Valve Procedures 6.7% in AVR, 11.0% in AVR with CABG, 20.7 in Transvascular (TV-TAVT) and 28.0% in Transapical (TA-TAVR) Patients

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/04/one-year-post-intervention-mortality-rate-tavr-and-avr-aortic-valve-procedures-6-7-in-avr-11-0-in-avr-with-cabg-20-7-in-transvascular-tv-tavt-and-28-0-in-transapical-ta-tavr-patients/

 

88r     CEO of PolyNova: The Paradigm Shift in Heart Valve

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/16/ceo-of-polynova-the-paradigm-shift-in-heart-valve/

 

87r     An FDA advisory committee unanimously recommended approval of the Lutonix drug-coated balloon PTA catheter for the treatment of patients with femoropopliteal occlusive disease.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/16/an-fda-advisory-committee-unanimously-recommended-approval-of-the-lutonix-drug-coated-balloon-pta-catheter-for-the-treatment-of-patients-with-femoropopliteal-occlusive-disease/

 

86r     Patent Dispute over Heart Defect Repair Technology: Appeals court Upholds Gore win over St. Jude Medical – Helex septal occluder competes with the Amplatzer device made by AGA/St. Jude

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/12/patent-dispute-over-heart-defect-repair-technology-appeals-court-upholds-gore-win-over-st-jude-medical-helex-septal-occluder-competes-with-the-amplatzer-device-made-by-agast-jude/

85r     Chest Pain: Cardiac MRI provides the Picture of MI

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/03/chest-pain-cardiac-mri-provides-the-picture-of-mi/

 

84r     CardioMEMS sold to St. Jude Medical: Boston Millennia Partners announced that St. Jude Medical (NYSE: STJ) is acquiring the remaining 81 percent of CardioMEMS, Inc. it does not own for $375 million

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari,  PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/02/implantable-device-cardiomems-hf-system-for-heart-failure-patients-fda-approved/

 

83r     Cardiovascular Biology  – A Bibliography of Research @Technion

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/05/27/cardiovascular-biology-a-bibliography-of-research-technion/

 

82r     Asymptomatic Patients After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Low Yield of Stress Imaging – Population-Based Study

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/05/27/asymptomatic-patients-after-percutaneous-coronary-intervention-low-yield-of-stress-imaging-population-based-study/

 

 

81r     Transcatheter Mitral Valve (TMV) Procedures: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposes to cover Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair (TMVR)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/05/19/transcatheter-mitral-valve-tmv-procedures-centers-for-medicare-medicaid-services-cms-proposes-to-cover-transcatheter-mitral-valve-repair-tmvr/

 

80r     Minimally Invasive Valve Therapy Programs: Recommendations by SCAI, AATS, ACC, STS

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/05/19/minimally-invasive-valve-therapy-programs-recommendations-by-scai-aats-acc-sts/

 

79r     Among those 26 exams deemed low-value, 12 involve medical imaging, in tests that range from preoperative chest radiography to carotid artery screening for asymptomatic patients, imaging for back pain, and CT for headache and rhinosinusitis (JAMA Internal Medicine, May 12, 2014)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/05/13/among-26-exams-deemed-low-value-12-involve-medical-imaging-preoperative-chest-radiography-carotid-artery-screening-imaging-for-back-pain-and-ct-for-headache-and-rhinosinusitis-jama-im-may-12-2/

 

78r     FDA on Medical Devices: Part 1 – User Fee Act (MDUFA) III and Part 2 – Expedited Access Program for Medical Devices that Address Unmet Medical Needs

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/28/fda-on-medical-devices-part-1-user-fee-act-mdufa-iii-and-part-2-expedited-access-program-for-medical-devices-that-address-unmet-medical-needs/

 

77r     Settled Heart Valve Lawsuit: Medtronic to Pay Edwards: Edwards Lifesciences’ Sapien XT beat out Medtronic’s CoreValve

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/16/first-head-to-head-trial-finds-edwards-tavr-superior-to-medtronics/

 

76r     Replacement of the Mitral Valve: Using the Edwards’ Sapien Aortic Valve Device

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/10/replacement-of-the-mitral-valve-using-the-edwards-sapien-aortic-valve-device/

 

75r     Stem-Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Failure: Clinical Trial MSC Demonstrates Efficacy

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/08/stem-cell-therapy-for-ischemic-heart-failure-clinical-trial-msc-demonstrates-efficacy/

 

 

74r     ATVB (Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology) 2014 Conference  5/1 – 5/3/2014, Sheraton Centre Toronto – Toronto, Ontario

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/03/05/atvb-arteriosclerosis-thrombosis-and-vascular-biology-2014-conference-51-532014-sheraton-centre-toronto-toronto-ontario/

 

73r     Endovascular Aortic Repair: A New Tool for Procedure Planning

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/25/endovascular-aortic-repair-a-new-tool-for-procedure-planning/

 

72r     Females and Non-Atherosclerotic Plaque: Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection – New Insights from Research and DNA Ongoing Study

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/12/female-and-non-atherosclerotic-plaque-spontaneous-coronary-artery-dissection-new-insights-from-research-and-dna-ongoing-study/

71r     Of the Cardiac-specific Deaths, Deaths from Heart Attack and Sudden Heart Rhythm Disturbances declined steeply, no decline in Deaths from Heart Failure in a 20,000 PCI patients Study @ Mayo Clinic

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/12/of-the-cardiac-specific-deaths-deaths-from-heart-attack-and-sudden-heart-rhythm-disturbances-declined-steeply-but-there-was-no-decline-in-deaths-from-heart-failure-in-a-20000-pci-patients-study/

 

70r     Cardiac Perfusion Exam, Rapid Heart Scanner, CT, MRI and PET imaging – Innovations in Radiology @ Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/12/cardiac-perfusion-exam-rapid-heart-scanner-ct-mri-and-pet-imaging-innovations-in-radiology-beth-israel-deaconess-medical-center/

 

69r     Maladaptive Vascular Remodeling found by four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI: Outflow Patterns, Wall Shear Stress, and Expression of Aortopathy are caused by Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) Cusp Fusion

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/12/maladaptive-vascular-remodeling-found-by-four-dimensional-4d-flow-mri-outflow-patterns-wall-shear-stress-and-expression-of-aortopathy-are-caused-by-congenital-bicuspid-aortic-valve-bav-cusp-fus/

 

68r     “Medicine Meets Virtual Reality” – NextMed-MMVR21 Conference 2/19 – 2/22/2014, Manhattan Beach Marriott, Manhattan Beach, CA

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/09/medicine-meets-virtual-reality-nextmed-mmvr21-conference-219-2222014-manhattan-beach-marriott-manhattan-beach-ca/

 

67r     Preserved vs Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available and Needed Therapies

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/03/preserved-vs-reduced-ejection-fraction-available-and-needed-therapies/

 

66r     Developments on the Frontier of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Devices

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/26/developments-on-the-frontier-of-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-tavr-devices/

 

65r     On-Hours vs Off-Hours: Presentation to ER with Acute Myocardial Infarction – Lower Survival Rate if Off-Hours

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/01/22/on-hours-vs-off-hours-presentation-to-er-with-acute-myocardial-infarction-lower-survival-rate-if-off-hours/

 

64r     Elastin Arteriopathy: The Genetics of Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/30/elastin-arteriopathy-the-genetics-of-supravalvular-aortic-stenosis/

 

63r     Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Genotype as a Potential Genetic Marker

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/30/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm-matrix-metalloproteinase-9-genotype-as-a-potential-genetic-marker/

 

62r     Genetics of Aortic and Carotid Calcification: The Role of Serum Lipids

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/12/genetics-of-aortic-and-carotid-calcification-the-role-of-serum-lipids/

 

61r     St. Jude’s CEO is still betting on EnligHTN IV Study Renal Denervation System, despite Medtronic’s setback related to SYMPLICITY Phase IV

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/10/renal-denervation-enlightn-iv-study-called-off-and-potential-novel-indications-diastolic-heart-failure/

 

60r     Ischemic Stable CAD: Medical Therapy and PCI no difference in End Point: Meta-Analysis of Contemporary Randomized Clinical Trials

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/03/ischemic-stable-cad-ffr-in-5000-patients-medical-therapy-and-pci-no-difference-in-end-point-meta-analysis-of-contemporary-randomized-clinical-trials/

 

59r     Resistance Hypertension: Renal Artery Intervention using Stenting

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/12/02/pad-and-resistance-hypertension-renal-artery-intervention-using-stenting/

 

58r   For Accomplishments in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Diseases: 2015 The Arrigo Recordati International Prize for Scientific Research

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/22/for-accomplishments-in-cardiology-and-cardiovascular-diseases-the-arrigo-recordati-international-prize-for-scientific-research/

 

57r   Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging @ NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/12/dalio-institute-of-cardiovascular-imaging-newyork-presbyterian-hospital-and-weill-cornell-medical-college/

 

56r   ACC/AHA Guidelines for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/11/05/accaha-guidelines-for-coronary-artery-bypass-graft-surgery/

 

55r     Risks for Patients’ and Physician’s Health in the Cath Lab

Reporter and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/10/17/risks-for-patients-contrast-induced-nephropathy-and-physicians-health-radiation-exposure-in-the-cath-lab/

 

54r     Myocardial Infarction: The New Definition After Revascularization

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/10/15/myocardial-infarction-the-new-definition-after-revascularization/

53r     Echocardiogram Quantification: Quest for Reproducibility and Dependability

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/10/12/echocardiogram-quantification-quest-for-reproducibility-and-dependability/

52r     Myocardial Strain and Segmental Synchrony: Age and Gender in Speckle-tracking-based Echocardiographic Study

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/05/myocardial-strain-and-segmental-synchrony-age-and-gender-in-speckle-tracking-based-echocardiographic-study/

51r   Hybrid Cath Lab/OR Suite’s da Vinci Surgical Robot of Intuitive Surgical gets FDA Warning Letter on Robot Track Record

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/07/19/hybrid-cath-labor-suites-da-vinci-surgical-robot-of-intuitive-surgical-gets-fda-warning-letter-on-robot-track-record/

 

50r     Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA): Albert Einstein’s Operation by Dr. Nissen

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/11/abdominal-aortic-aneurysms-aaa-albert-einsteins-operation-by-dr-nissen/

49r     Transposon-mediated Gene Therapy improves Pulmonary Hemodynamics and attenuates Right Ventricular Hypertrophy: eNOS gene therapy reduces Pulmonary vascular remodeling and Arterial wall hyperplasia

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/31/transposon-mediated-gene-therapy-improves-pulmonary-hemodynamics-and-attenuates-right-ventricular-hypertrophy-enos-gene-therapy-reduces-pulmonary-vascular-remodeling-and-arterial-wall-hyperplasia/

 

48r   First-of-Its-Kind FDA Approval for ‘AUI’ Device with Endurant II AAA Stent Graft: Medtronic Expands in Endovascular Aortic Repair in the United States

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/30/first-of-its-kind-fda-approval-for-aui-device-with-endurant-ii-aaa-stent-graft-medtronic-expands-in-endovascular-aortic-repair-in-the-united-states/

 

47r     Bioabsorbable Drug Coating Scaffolds, Stents and Dual Antiplatelet Therapy

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/29/bioabsorbable-drug-coating-scaffolds-stents-and-dual-antiplatelet-therapy/

 

46r     Svelte Medical Systems’ Drug-Eluting Stent: 0% Clinically-Driven Events Through 12-Months in First-In-Man Study

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/28/svelte-medical-systems-drug-eluting-stent-0-clinically-driven-events-through-12-months-in-first-in-man-study/

 

45r   Echo vs Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI): CMRI may be a useful adjunct in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) family screening in higher risk

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/20/echo-vs-cardiac-magnetic-resonance-imaging-cmri-cmri-may-be-a-useful-adjunct-in-hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy-hcm-family-screening-in-higher-risk/

 

44r   iElastance: Calculates Ventricular Elastance, Arterial Elastance and Ventricular-Arterial Coupling using Echocardiographic derived values in a single beat determination

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/19/ielastance-calculates-ventricular-elastance-arterial-elastance-and-ventricular-arterial-coupling-using-echocardiographic-derived-values-in-a-single-beat-determination/

 

43r   CT Angiography (CCTA) Reduced Medical Resource Utilization compared to Standard Care reported in JACC

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/16/ct-angiography-ccta-reduced-medical-resource-utilization-compared-to-standard-care-reported-in-jacc/

 

42r   Texas Heart Institute: 50 Years of Accomplishments

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/04/texas-heart-institute-50-years-of-accomplishments/

 

41r   Economic Toll of Heart Failure in the US: Forecasting the Impact of Heart Failure in the United States – A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/25/economic-toll-of-heart-failure-in-the-us-forecasting-the-impact-of-heart-failure-in-the-united-states-a-policy-statement-from-the-american-heart-association/

 

40r   Sudden Cardiac Death invisible at Autopsy: Forensic Power of Postmortem MRI

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/18/sudden-cardiac-death-invisible-at-autopsy-forensic-power-of-postmortem-mri/

 

39r   Advanced CT Reconstruction: Plaque Estimation Algorithm for Fewer Errors and Semiautomation

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/18/advanced-ct-reconstruction-plaque-estimation-algorithm-for-fewer-errors-and-semiautomation/

 

38r     Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Decisions on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) using left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and Midwall Fibrosis: Decisions on Replacement using late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular MR (LGE-CMR)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/10/dilated-cardiomyopathy-decisions-on-implantable-cardioverter-defibrillators-icds-using-left-ventricular-ejection-fraction-lvef-and-midwall-fibrosis-decisions-on-replacement-using-late-gadolinium/

 

37r     Clinical Trials on transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to be conducted by American College of Cardiology and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/12/american-college-of-cardiologys-and-the-society-of-thoracic-surgeons-entrance-into-clinical-trials-is-noteworthy-read-more-two-medical-societies-jump-into-clinical-trial-effort-for-tavr-tech-f/

 

36r     Direct Flow Medical Wins European Clearance for Catheter Delivered Aortic Valve

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/29/direct-flow-medical-wins-european-clearance-for-catheter-delivered-aortic-valve/

 

35r     DELETED, identical to 15c

 

34r     PCI Outcomes, Increased Ischemic Risk associated with Elevated Plasma Fibrinogen not Platelet Reactivity

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/10/pci-outcomes-increased-ischemic-risk-associated-with-elevated-plasma-fibrinogen-not-platelet-reactivity/

 

33r     Cardiac Surgery Theatre in China vs. in the US: Cardiac Repair Procedures, Medical Devices in Use, Technology in Hospitals, Surgeons’ Training and Cardiac Disease Severity

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/08/cardiac-surgery-theatre-in-china-vs-in-the-us-cardiac-repair-procedures-medical-devices-in-use-technology-in-hospitals-surgeons-training-and-cardiac-disease-severity/

 

32r     DELETED, identical to 14c

31r     DELETED, identical to 12c

 

30r     Heart Renewal by pre-existing Cardiomyocytes: Source of New Heart Cell Growth Discovered

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/23/heart-renewal-by-pre-existing-cardiomyocytes-source-of-new-heart-cell-growth-discovered/

 

29r     Ablation Devices Market to 2016 – Global Market Forecast and Trends Analysis by Technology, Devices & Applications

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/23/ablation-devices-market-to-2016-global-market-forecast-and-trends-analysis-by-technology-devices-applications/

 

28r     Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Endovascular repair and open repair resulted in similar long-term survival

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/12/03/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm-endovascular-repair-and-open-repair-resulted-in-similar-long-term-survival/

 

27r     Renal Denervation Technology of Vessix Vascular, Inc. been acquired by Boston Scientific Corporation (BSX) to pay up to $425 Million

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/08/renal-denervation-technology-of-vessix-vascular-inc-been-acquired-by-boston-scientific-corporation-bsx-to-pay-up-to-425-million/

 

26r     DELETED, identical to 11c

 

25r     To Stent or Not? A Critical Decision

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/23/to-stent-or-not-a-critical-decision/

 

24r     FDA Approval for Under-Skin Defibrillator goes to Boston Scientific Corporation

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/10/01/fda-approval-for-under-skin-defibrillator-goes-to-boston-scientific-corporation/

 

23r     Absorb™ Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold: An International Launch by Abbott Laboratories

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/29/absorb-bioresorbable-vascular-scaffold-an-international-launch-by-abbott-laboratories/

 

22r     Carotid Stenting: Vascular surgeons have pointed to more minor strokes in the stenting group and cardiologists to more myocardial infarctions in the CEA cohort.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/21/carotid-stenting-vascular-surgeons-have-pointed-to-more-minor-strokes-in-the-stenting-group-and-cardiologists-to-more-myocardial-infarctions-in-the-cea-cohort/

 

21r     FDA: Strengthening Our National System for Medical Device Post-market Surveillance

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/07/fda-strengthening-our-national-system-for-medical-device-post-market-surveillance/

 

20r     Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement for Inoperable Severe Aortic Stenosis

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/03/transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-for-inoperable-severe-aortic-stenosis/

 

19r     Evidence for Overturning the Guidelines in Cardiogenic Shock

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/03/evidence-for-overturning-the-guidelines-in-cardiogenic-shock/

 

18r     Imbalance of Autonomic Tone: The Promise of Intravascular Stimulation of Autonomics

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/02/imbalance-of-autonomic-tone-the-promise-of-intravascular-stimulation-of-autonomics/

17r     Intravascular Stimulation of Autonomics: A Letter from Dr. Michael Scherlag

Letter received by Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN on September 1, 2012

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/09/02/intravascular-stimulation-of-autonomics-a-letter-from-dr-michael-scherlag/

 

16r     New Definition of MI Unveiled, Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR)CT for Tagging Ischemia

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/27/new-definition-of-mi-unveiled-fractional-flow-reserve-ffrct-for-tagging-ischemia/

 

15r     DELETED, identical to 8c

 

14r     Expected New Trends in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medical Devices

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/17/expected-new-trends-in-cardiology-and-cardiovascular-medical-devices/

 

13r     Patient Access to Medical Devices — A Comparison of U.S. and European Review Processes

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/09/patient-access-to-medical-devices-a-comparison-of-u-s-and-european-review-processes/

 

12r   Coronary CT Angiography versus Standard Evaluation in Acute Chest Pain

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/09/coronary-ct-angiography-versus-standard-evaluation-in-acute-chest-pain/

 

11r     Updated Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): risk for stroke and suitability for surgery

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/07/transcatheter-aortic-valve-implantation-tavi-risky-and-costly-2/

 

10r     Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): FDA approves expanded indication for two transcatheter heart valves for patients at intermediate risk for death or complications associated with open-heart surgery

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/02/transcatheter-aortic-valve-implantation-tavi-risky-and-costly/

 

9r      Early Surgery May Benefit Some With Heart Infection

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/02/early-surgery-may-benefit-some-with-heart-infection/

 

8r      Gaps, Tensions, and Conflicts in the FDA Approval Process: Implications for Clinical Practice

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/31/gaps-tensions-and-conflicts-in-the-fda-approval-process-implications-for-clinical-practice/

 

7r      Heart Remodeling by Design – Implantable Synchronized Cardiac Assist Device: Abiomed’s Symphony

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/23/heart-remodeling-by-design-implantable-synchronized-cardiac-assist-device-abiomeds-symphony/

 

6r      Percutaneous Endocardial Ablation of Scar-Related Ventricular Tachycardia

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/18/percutaneous-endocardial-ablation-of-scar-related-ventricular-tachycardia/

 

5r      Implantable Synchronized Cardiac Assist Device Designed for Heart Remodeling: Abiomed’s Symphony

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/11/implantable-synchronized-cardiac-assist-device-designed-for-heart-remodeling-abiomeds-symphony/

 

4r      Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting (PTAS) – Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/07/05/percutaneous-transluminal-angioplasty-and-stenting-ptas-stenting-versus-aggressive-medical-therapy-for-intracranial-arterial-stenosis/

 

3r      The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) covers transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) under Coverage with Evidence Development (CED)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/19/the-centers-for-medicare-medicaid-services-cms-covers-transcatheter-aortic-valve-replacement-tavr-under-coverage-with-evidence-development-ced/

 

2r     Investigational Devices: Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Replacement Transfemoral Deployment

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/10/investigational-devices-edwards-sapien-transcatheter-aortic-heart-valve-replacement-transfemoral-deployment/

 

1r     Investigational Devices: Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Valve Transapical Deployment

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/06/04/investigational-devices-edwards-sapien-transcatheter-heart-valve/

 

 

 

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CVD Core


When this post will be ready it needs be place

under below link 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/cardiovascular-diseases-causes-risks-and-management/introduction-to-the-three-volume-series-core-research-on-cardiovascular-diseases/

See in red my comments, below

Cardiovascular Diseases: Causes, Risks and Management

Justin D. Pearlman MD PhD MA FACC, Editor

Cardiovascular diseases comprise problems of the heart and blood vessels, including rhythm, blood supply, blood pressure, birth defects, or damage from cholesterol, tobacco, street drugs, radiation, viruses, bacteria, or fungi.

Thus the category includes heart failure (inadequate pump function), heart or vessel infection (endocarditis, vasculitis), birth defects (congenital heart disease)

Cardiovascular Diseases: Causes, Risks and Management

Justin D. Pearlman MD ME PhD MA FACC, Editor

 

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Director and Founder

Editor-in-Chief

Other e-Books  in the  BioMedicine Series

Perspectives on Nitric Oxide in Disease Mechanisms

Human Immune System in Health and in Disease

Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics

Infectious Disease & New Antibiotic Targets

Cancer Biology and Genomics for Disease Diagnosis

Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery

Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine 

This book is a comprehensive review of Innovations in Cardiovascular Medicine, including the latest discoveries in

  • Cardiac Medical Imaging,
  • Regenerative Medicine,
  • Pharmacotherapy,
  • Medical Devices for Cardiac Repair,
  • Genomics, and opportunities for Targeted Therapy.

It is written by experts in their respective subspecialties. The e-Book’s articles have been published on the Open Access Online Scientific Journal, since April 2012.  All new articles on this subject will continue to be incorporated with periodical updates.

http://www.pharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

The Journal is a scientific, medical and business, multi-expert authoring environment for information syndication in domains of Life Sciences, Medicine, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Industries, BioMedicine, Medical Technologies & Devices. Scientific critical interpretations and original articles are written by PhDs, MDs, MD/PhDs, PharmDs, Technical MBAs as Experts, Authors, Writers (EAWs) on an Equity Sharing basis.

The Editor, Justin D. Pearlman MD ME PhD MA FACC, has many different perspectives developed during the years, including:

  • Chief of Cardiology,
  • non-invasive imaging,
  • molecular biology,
  • mathematics,
  • imaging research

contributed a number of firsts:

  • non-endemic Chagas diagnosis,
  • intensity projection angiography,
  • magnetization tagging,
  • myocardial injury mapping by magnetic resonance contrast retention,
  • myocardial viability by MRI,
  • atheroma lipid liquid crystal characterization,
  • outpatient inotropic infusion therapy,
  • angiogenesis imaging,
  • multimodal in vivo stem cell imaging,
  • real-time velocity beam MRI,
  • in vivo microscopic MRI,
  • dobutamine stress echocardiography for low gradient valve disease,
  • alternative stress tests,
  • diagnostic electrocardiography in magnetic environments,
  • statistical methods to solve error propagation of large array genomics,
  • discovery of monocyte role in native coronary collateral development,
  • image tracked stem cell treatment of  heart attacks,
  • singularity editing in differential topology.

 

Preface to the Three Volume Series

Cardiovascular disease has been a leading cause of death and disability and so it has also been a major focus for intense research, development, and progress. Knowledge of the causes, risks, and best practices for management continually change. That is why a dynamic electronic living textbook presents an exciting opportunity to help you keep current with the ephemeral leading edge. This book is an outgrowth of the commitment of Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence to present the most exciting timely and pertinent advances of our day, in a continual medium to stay fresh and up to date. We hope diverse multispecialty perspectives will help you in your quest to understand, adapt and advance the leading edge of cardiovascular disease causes, risks and best practices management.

On the Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease: causes, manifestations, consequences and priorities

Doctors aim to spend their time on prevention, diagnosis, and disease management. More and more the time is diverted to expanding demands for documentation and bureaucratic navigation. This article focuses on the art of diagnosis, with examples based on cardiovascular diseases. Diagnosis cannot be achieved without a knowledge of the causes (etiology) of ailments, a necessary but not sufficient component of diagnosis. The causes broadly relate to nature and nurture, how our biological system develops and functions (nature), and its interactions with the outside world driven in part by behavior, diet, exposures, and activities (nurture). The nature of our individuality has been traced to the human genome, a map of code for protein products that build our structures and mediate our body part functions. Numerous blood tests have been devised to check the expression and activity level of such genomic products to identify disease and characterize its stage. The role of diet, behavior, exposures, activities or lack thereof is well established as a complicit factor in disease development and progression.

The art of diagnosis is designed to find out what is wrong. Literally, it is a flow of knowing, based on knowledge of causes of ailments, probabilities (prevalence), consequences, manifestations, priorities (which would be most urgent) and tests: CPCMPT. Review of those elements generates a list of concerns, often expressed as a “differential diagnosis” which is  a prioritized list of plausible explanations for the observations, patient’s report of symptoms and findings from patient examination. The second stage of diagnosis, called the “work-up,” selects and applies tests to stratify the list of possibilities further as well as to characterize the manifestations and stage of disease. Technically, analysis of biological samples, imaging studies and intervention trials each represent tests; however, they are often viewed as distinct tools with just the former labeled as tests (biological samples include blood tests, urine tests, sputum or saliva samples, and biopsies). The primary goal of the work-up is to establish one or more specific diagnoses as the cause of ailment. The secondary goal of the work-up is to characterize the manifestations and stage of disease to define expectations and clarify options for the disease management. The third goal is to develop a management a plan to slow or stop the ailment, decrease risks of complications, slow or stop progression of disease manifestations or otherwise minimize functional impairment.

The manifestations of disease are categorized as signs and symptoms.

  • Signs are observable evidence of consequences,
  • Symptoms are subjective complaints.

A major component of diagnostic skill is the ability to identify and characterize correctly signs and symptoms of all relevant disease conditions. A second major component of diagnostic skill is the ability to select appropriate tests and interpret their significance in context, in keeping with the patient’s presentation.

When someone sees a doctor about chest pain, coronary artery disease is a prominent consideration. The most common causes of chest pain are mechanical (muscle and bone, e.g., muscle spasms, muscle and bone inflammation), but those conditions are not generally life-threatening. The consequences of blocked arteries – arrhythmia, permanent weakness of the heart, blood clots, pulmonary emboli, stroke, cardiogenic shock, death – raise the stakes and push coronary disease high in priority even when the probabilities are low. The prioritization of the differential diagnosis list has multiple considerations: urgency (how quickly it can worsen), severity of consequences, and the probabilities of a macrovascualar event (prevalence, risk factors). A ten percent risk of coronary disease typically takes precedence over a 70% likelihood of muscle spasm in terms of diagnostic testing.

The road map for the construction of our individuality as humans has been fully mapped: the human genome. Genetic variation means we are not fully determined by the mix of genes inherited from our parents. In addition to the genetic material on our 48 chromosomes, and the genetic material in mitochondria inherited from the mother, there are spontaneous changes in the genetic code, and there are modifications that affect gene expression (which codes produce gene products, quantities, rates, and post-production modifications).

The causes of cardiovascular disease are defined by Murphy’s law: what can go wrong will. However, on the nature side, most malfunctions are too severe to reach the light of day, so there is a limited list of disease mechanisms associated with sufficient viability to reach medical attention. Those mechanisms can be summarized by a mnemonic: diseases can develop new metals in-flame, a-fact externs generated (disease mechanisms: congenital, developmental, neoplastic, metabolic, inflammatory, infectious, extrinsic (e.g. stab wound), and degenerative). A taxonomy of cardiovascular diseases can be constructed in various ways: (1) itemize the major cardiovascular functions and subclassify the dysfunctions, (2) itemize by principle anatomic involvement and subclassify by pathology, (3) classify by mechanism of disease, etiology. Compendiums of cardiovascular disease may be found in: (1) French’s Differential Diagnosis, (2) Robbins and Angel Pathology, (3) Guyton’s Textbook of Physiology, as well as cardiovascular disease textbooks such as Hurst, Braunwald, Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic…

Diagnosis takes many forms. The paranoid inclusive approach, manifested as “medical student syndrome”, considers any semblance of a sign or symptom vaguely similar to a disease manifestation as a frightening prospect worthy of detailed pursuit. The minimalist pragmatic approach commonly attributed to general practitioners focuses on reassurance, and pursuit of persisting complaints that match a common ailment. That approach has been summarized by the advice: when you hear hoof beats think of horses, not zebras. Specialists, on the other hand, are taught to consider all possibilities, with due consideration to urgency and treatability, so that zebras are not punished.

The healthcare system promotes the idea of generalists serving as the front line, identifying who can be managed simply, with specialists serving as finishers for more complex cases or cases requiring special skills. A flaw in that model is the need for detailed knowledge of zebras and subtle findings that may represent an urgent issue at the front line for triage. If the generalist does not know that mild symptoms from mitral valve disease or aortic valve disease may require urgent detailed assessment, patients may be referred to a specialist too late to prevent consequences that requires an earlier intervention.

Parsimony in diagnosis refers to identifying the fewest number of diagnoses that explain all the findings. The concept has been attributed to Osler, and it builds on a guiding procedure voiced in the middle ages by Occum, known as Occum’s razor: when deciding between two explanations, favor the one that requires the fewest assumptions. Parsimony is a useful guide for diagnosis of a previously healthy patient who develops a number of findings that are temporally coherent. After age 65 (official geriatrics age), physicians are taught to abandon parsimony and expect more diagnoses than findings.

A study of difficult diagnoses lead to the concept of a pivotal finding as one that has a narrow differential list. The diagnostic process is prone to errors, including cognitive biases, which may benefit from computer assistance. Intuition and analytics can be applied to reduce cognitive bias. The author developed a just-in-time social networking system within a software package called Missive(c) that enables rapid access to such tools, combining efficiency in documentation with improved quality of analysis and reports (faster and better).

Among older Americans, more are hospitalized for heart failure than for any other medical condition (diastolic failure=stiff heart, systolic failure= inadequate pumping).

Genomics – the study of the genetic basis for disease – is rapidly expanding knowledge about etiology (cause of disease), and it helps identify opportunities for accurate diagnosis and treatment. The American Heart Association journal CIRCULATION has published 348 relevant articles related to cardiovascular genomics from 2010-2013.  For example, just on the subtopic of atherosclerosis (hardening of arteries), genomics offers major progress. The genetic factors that affect arterial stiffness are strongly related to a very common underlying health concern, hypertension (high blood pressure). The counterpart to genetics is environment (nature versus nurture), but genetics carries the trump cards because it determines the sensitivities to environment.

anatomy

physiology

laboratory tests

interventional trials

Boundaries of the Domain: Cardiovascular Diseases: Causes, Risks and Management – Volume 1,2,3

 

The scope of cardiovascular disease scholarly contributions will grow to include: anatomy, surgery, molecular biology, ethics, imaging (echo, nuclear, PET, MRI, OCT, CT), congenital, stress tests, ECG, electrophysiology/rhythm/channelopathies, pacing, resynchronizing, AICD, cardiomyopathies, syncope, valve disease, aorta, renal artery, thrombosis, venous diseases, vasculitis, endothelium, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, risk factors, biomarkers, hypertension, embolism, pulmonary hypertension, cardiac tumors, women’s health, CAD, Angina,  Stem cells, complications of MI, thrombolysis, rehabilitation, reflexes, hormones, diastology, pharmaceuticals, myocarditis, hypertrophy, failure, shock, hemodynamics, interventions, contrast nephropathy, and contrast systemic fibrosis, as well as other relevant topics you may suggest.

An overview of the Core Research on Cardiovascular Diseases is based on the following NINE articles: 

Have only the article title as a live link of the following 9 [originally were on CVD Zero, title and links, now only links]

  1. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/15/diagnosis-of-cardiovascular-disease-treatment-and-prevention-current-predicted-cost-of-care-and-the-promise-of-individualized-medicine-using-clinical-decision-support-systems-2/ 
  2. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/04/cardiovascular-diseases-decision-support-systems-for-disease-management-decision-making/ 
  3. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/07/genomics-genetics-of-cardiovascular-disease-diagnoses-a-literature-survey-of-ahas-circulation-cardiovascular-genetics-32010-32013/
  4. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/17/synthetic-biology-on-advanced-genome-interpretation-for-gene-variants-and-pathways-what-is-the-genetic-base-of-atherosclerosis-and-loss-of-arterial-elasticity-with-aging/ 
  5. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/11/arterial-elasticity-in-quest-for-a-drug-stabilizer-isolated-systolic-hypertension-caused-by-arterial-stiffening-ineffectively-treated-by-vasodilatation-antihypertensives/ 
  6. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/24/imaging-biomarker-for-arterial-stiffness-pathways-in-pharmacotherapy-for-hypertension-and-hypercholesterolemia-management/ 
  7. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/28/genetics-of-conduction-disease-atrioventricular-av-conduction-disease-block-gene-mutations-transcription-excitability-and-energy-homeostasis/
  8. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/07/on-devices-and-on-algorithms-arrhythmia-after-cardiac-surgery-prediction-and-ecg-prediction-of-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation-onset/ 
  9. https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/22/acute-and-chronic-myocardial-infarction-quantification-of-myocardial-viability-fdg-petmri-vs-mri-or-pet-alone

The main points are

[bring here ONLY the INTRODUCTION and the Summary of each, THEN The EDITOR will provide perspective on the Research and the current STate of Cardiology in the US in 2013/2014]

A. Now you provide ONLY links to 

Volume #

Contributors to Volume #

eTOCS in Volume #

REPEAT A. for each Volume

Volume One: Causes of Cardiovascular Diseases

Table of Contents

Hardening of the arteries is described as atherosclerosis, or porridge-like wall changes with scarring, which leads to heart attacks, high blood pressure, stroke, and organ injury mediated by ischemia (insufficient nutrient blood supply). The causes are both nature (genetic) and nurture (behavior, diet). Specifics of the causes guide diagnosis and management.

Chapter 1.2: Genomics

The completion of the human genome map was a major accomplishment, as gene products make signals, receptors and building blocks that establish health and disease. However, it is just a stepping stone, not explaining why, where, or how the gene products are regulated and  interact.

Chapter 1.3: Cardiovascular Imaging

Imaging applies a principle of physics (light transmission, sound transmission, xray transmission, magnetic resonance, radioactivity) to provide a map of interior structures and/or activities. Image processing (computing) derives further information than simple display of an observed tissue-sensitive parameter. In the case of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MRI), positron-emission tomography (PET), and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT),  computer reformatting of image data is essential.

Volume Two: Risk Assessment of Cardiovascular Diseases

Contributors

Table of Contents

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability, affecting more than four times as many people as all forms of cancer combined.

Chapter  2.2: Testing for cardiovascular risk

The volunteer population of Framingham Massachusetts provided decades of data clarifying determinants of risk for cardiovascular diseases. That data helped establish the usefulness of cholesterol screening, and lead to the search for additional tests to identify risk and guide management.

Chapter 2.3: Biomarkers

Biomarkers are chemistry levels (concentrations in the blood) that identify injury or risk for injury.

Volume Three: Management of Cardiovascular Diseases

Contributors

Chapter  3.1: Therapeutic Genomics

As the mysteries of the human genome products are unraveled, we get closer to identifying key components. One of them is Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) , which plays an essential role in cardiac and blood vessel development and regeneration. It may lead to breakthroughs in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, or new vessel development, mimicking the behavior of the lucky few who develop new vessels, or collaterals, as a natural bypass system, without requiring a surgeon to provide a blood supply to avoid or limit heart attacks.

Chapter 3.2: Image guidance of Therapy

The US government is helping to sponsor new imaging methods, while they also inhibit it by adding new taxes.

Chapter 3.3: Drug therapy

Emerging new therapies are presented, along with the biological basis.

Chapter 3.4: Cardiovascular Interventions

Technological advances enable minimally invasive solutions to problems previously addressed by surgery or autopsy.

Introduction 

 

Contributors above, need a LINK to the appropriate contributors in each volume. Table of Contents of each volume above need a LINK to the eTOCS of each volume.  

Please UPDATE all links ABOVE to the appropriate locations in the respective volumes, after implementing the carry over, remove links below EXCEPT CVD1,2,3 and remove this comment of mine in RED, here

REFERENCES for CVD CORE

A.  Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease and Cost of Care

Bernstein, HL and A. Lev-Ari 5/15/2013 Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease, Treatment and Prevention: Current & Predicted Cost of Care and the Promise of Individualized Medicine Using Clinical Decision Support Systems

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/15/diagnosis-of-cardiovascular-disease-treatment-and-prevention-current-predicted-cost-of-care-and-the-promise-of-individualized-medicine-using-clinical-decision-support-systems-2/ 

B. Cardiovascular DiseasesDisease Management Decision Making – use of CDSS

Pearlman, JD and A. Lev-Ari 5/4/2013 Cardiovascular Diseases: Decision Support Systems for Disease Management Decision Making

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/04/cardiovascular-diseases-decision-support-systems-for-disease-management-decision-making/ 

C. Genomics & Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease Diagnoses

Lev-Ari, A. and L H Bernstein 3/7/2013 Genomics & Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease Diagnoses: A Literature Survey of AHA’s Circulation Cardiovascular Genetics, 3/2010 – 3/2013

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/07/genomics-genetics-of-cardiovascular-disease-diagnoses-a-literature-survey-of-ahas-circulation-cardiovascular-genetics-32010-32013/

D.  Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

Lev-Ari, A. 5/17/2013 Synthetic Biology: On Advanced Genome Interpretation for Gene Variants and Pathways: What is the Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/17/synthetic-biology-on-advanced-genome-interpretation-for-gene-variants-and-pathways-what-is-the-genetic-base-of-atherosclerosis-and-loss-of-arterial-elasticity-with-aging/ 

E.  Hypertension and Vascular Compliance: 2013 Thought Frontier – An Arterial Elasticity Focus

Pearlman, JD and A. Lev-Ari 5/11/2013 Hypertension and Vascular Compliance: 2013 Thought Frontier – An Arterial Elasticity Focus

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/11/arterial-elasticity-in-quest-for-a-drug-stabilizer-isolated-systolic-hypertension-caused-by-arterial-stiffening-ineffectively-treated-by-vasodilatation-antihypertensives/ 

F.  Arterial Stiffness: Pharmacotherapy for Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia Management

Pearlman, JD and A. Lev-Ari 5/24/2013 Imaging Biomarker for Arterial Stiffness: Pathways in Pharmacotherapy for Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia Management

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/24/imaging-biomarker-for-arterial-stiffness-pathways-in-pharmacotherapy-for-hypertension-and-hypercholesterolemia-management/ 

G. Genetics of Conduction Disease

Lev-Ari, A. 4/28/2013 Genetics of Conduction Disease: Atrioventricular (AV) Conduction Disease (block): Gene Mutations – Transcription, Excitability, and Energy Homeostasis

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/28/genetics-of-conduction-disease-atrioventricular-av-conduction-disease-block-gene-mutations-transcription-excitability-and-energy-homeostasis/

H.  Arrhythmia after Cardiac Surgery Prediction and ECG Prediction of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Onset

Pearlman, JD and A. Lev-Ari 5/7/2013 On Devices and On Algorithms: Arrhythmia after Cardiac Surgery Prediction and ECG Prediction of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Onset

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/07/on-devices-and-on-algorithms-arrhythmia-after-cardiac-surgery-prediction-and-ecg-prediction-of-paroxysmal-atrial-fibrillation-onset/ 

I.  Myocardial Infarction: Quantification of Myocardial Perfusion Viability

Pearlman, JD and A. Lev-Ari 5/22/2013 Acute and Chronic Myocardial Infarction: Quantification of Myocardial Perfusion Viability – FDG-PET/MRI vs. MRI or PET alone

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/05/22/acute-and-chronic-myocardial-infarction-quantification-of-myocardial-viability-fdg-petmri-vs-mri-or-pet-alone/

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Imaging of Non-tumorous and Tumorous Human Brain Tissues

Reporter and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

The point of interest in the article I feature below is that it represents a potential building block in a future system that will use full-field optical coherence tomography during brain surgery to improve the accuracy of cancer lesions resection. The article is featuring promising results for differentiating tumor from normal brain tissue in large samples (order of 1–3 cm2) by offering images with spatial resolution comparable to histological analysis, sufficient to distinguish microstructures of the human brain parenchyma.  Easy to say, and hard to make…:) –> Intraoperative apparatus to guide the surgeon in real time during resection of brain tumors.

 

Imaging of non-tumorous and tumorous human brain tissues with full-field optical coherence tomography 

Open Access Article

Osnath Assayaga1Kate Grievea1Bertrand DevauxbcFabrice HarmsaJohan Palludbc,Fabrice ChretienbcClaude BoccaraaPascale Varletbc;  a Inserm U979 “Wave Physics For Medicine” ESPCI -ParisTech – Institut Langevin, 1 rue Jussieu, 75005, b France, Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, 1 rue Cabanis 75014 Paris, France

c University Paris Descartes, France.

Abstract

A prospective study was performed on neurosurgical samples from 18 patients to evaluate the use of full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) in brain tumor diagnosis.

FF-OCT captures en face slices of tissue samples at 1 μm resolution in 3D to a penetration depth of around 200 μm. A 1 cm2 specimen is scanned at a single depth and processed in about 5 min. This rapid imaging process is non-invasive and requires neither contrast agent injection nor tissue preparation, which makes it particularly well suited to medical imaging applications.

Temporal chronic epileptic parenchyma and brain tumors such as meningiomas, low-grade and high-grade gliomas, and choroid plexus papilloma were imaged. A subpopulation of neurons, myelin fibers and CNS vasculature were clearly identified. Cortex could be discriminated from white matter, but individual glial cells such as astrocytes (normal or reactive) or oligodendrocytes were not observable.

This study reports for the first time on the feasibility of using FF-OCT in a real-time manner as a label-free non-invasive imaging technique in an intraoperative neurosurgical clinical setting to assess tumorous glial and epileptic margins.

Abbreviations

  • FF-OCT, full field optical coherence tomography;
  • OCT, optical coherence tomography

Keywords

Optical imaging; Digital pathology; Brain imaging; Brain tumor; Glioma

1. Introduction

1.1. Primary CNS tumors

Primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors represent a heterogeneous group of tumors with benign, malignant and slow-growing evolution. In France, 5000 new cases of primary CNS tumors are detected annually (Rigau et al., 2011). Despite considerable progress in diagnosis and treatment, the survival rate following a malignant brain tumor remains low and 3000 deaths are reported annually from CNS tumors in France (INCa, 2011). Overall survival from brain tumors depends on the complete resection of the tumor mass, as identified through postoperative imaging, associated with updated adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy regimen for malignant tumors (Soffietti et al., 2010). Therefore, there is a need to evaluate the completeness of the tumor resection at the end of the surgical procedure, as well as to identify the different components of the tumor interoperatively, i.e. tumor tissue, necrosis, infiltrated parenchyma (Kelly et al., 1987). In particular, the persistence of non-visible tumorous tissue or isolated tumor cells infiltrating brain parenchyma may lead to additional resection.

For low-grade tumors located close to eloquent brain areas, a maximally safe resection that spares functional tissue warrants the current use of intraoperative techniques that guide a more complete tumor resection. During awake surgery, speech or fine motor skills are monitored, while cortical and subcortical stimulations are performed to identify functional areas (Sanai et al., 2008). Intraoperative MRI provides images of the surgical site as well as tomographic images of the whole brain that are sufficient for an approximate evaluation of the abnormal excised tissue, but offers low resolution (typically 1 to 1.5 mm) and produces artifacts at the air-tissue boundary of the surgical site.

Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of neurosurgical samples remain the current gold standard method used to analyze tumorous tissue due to advantages of sub-cellular level resolution and high contrast. However, these methods require lengthy (12 to 72 h), complex multiple steps, and use of carcinogenic chemical products that would not be technically possible intra-operatively. In addition, the number of histological slides that can be reviewed and analyzed by a pathologist is limited, and it defines the number and size of sampled locations on the tumor, or the surrounding tissue.

To obtain histology-like information in a short time period, intraoperative cytological smear tests are performed. However tissue architecture information is thereby lost and the analysis is carried out on only a limited area of the sample (1 mm × 1 mm).

Intraoperative optical imaging techniques are recently developed high resolution imaging modalities that may help the surgeon to identify the persistence of tumor tissue at the resection boundaries. Using a conventional operating microscope with Xenon lamp illumination gives an overall view of the surgical site, but performance is limited by the poor discriminative capacity of the white light illumination at the surgical site interface. Better discrimination between normal and tumorous tissues has been obtained using fluorescence properties of tumor cells labeled with preoperatively administered 5-ALA. Tumor tissue shows a strong ALA-induced PPIX fluorescence at 635 nm and 704 nm when the operative field is illuminated with a 440 nm-filtered lamp. More complete resections of high-grade gliomas have been demonstrated using 5-ALA fluorescence guidance (Stummer et al., 2000), however brain parenchyma infiltrated by isolated tumor cells is not fluorescent, reducing the interest of this technique when resecting low-grade gliomas.

Refinement of this induced fluorescence technique has been achieved using a confocal microscope and intraoperative injection of sodium fluorescein. A 488 nm laser illuminates the operative field and tissue contact analysis is performed using a handheld surgical probe (field of view less than 0.5 × 0.5 mm) which scans the fluorescence of the surgical interface at the 505–585 nm band. Fluorescent isolated tumor cells are clearly identified at depths from 0 to 500 μm from the resection border (Sanai et al., 2011), demonstrating the potential of this technique in low-grade glioma resection.

Reviewing the state-of-the-art, a need is identified for a quick and reliable method of providing the neurosurgeon with architectural and cellular information without the need for injection or oral intake of exogenous markers in order to guide the neurosurgeon and optimize surgical resections.

1.2. Full-field optical coherence tomography

Introduced in the early 1990s (Huang et al., 1991), optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses interference to precisely locate light deep inside tissue. The photons coming from the small volume of interest are distinguished from light scattered by the other parts of the sample by the use of an interferometer and a light source with short coherence length. Only the portion of light with the same path length as the reference arm of the interferometer, to within the coherence length of the source (typically a few μm), will produce interference. A two-dimensional B-scan image is captured by scanning. Recently, the technique has been improved, mainly in terms of speed and sensitivity, through spectral encoding (De Boer et al., 2003Leitgeb et al., 2003 and Wojtkowski et al., 2002).

A recent OCT technique called full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) enables both a large field of view and high resolution over the full field of observation (Dubois et al., 2002 and Dubois et al., 2004). This allows navigation across the wide field image to follow the morphology at different scales and different positions. FF-OCT uses a simple halogen or light-emitting diode (LED) light source for full field illumination, rather than lasers and point-by-point scanning components required for conventional OCT. The illumination level is low enough to maintain the sample integrity: the power incident on the sample is less than 1 mW/mm2 using deep red and near infrared light. FF-OCT provides the highest OCT 3D resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 1 μm3 (X × Y × Z) on unprepared label-free tissue samples down to depths of approximately 200 μm–300 μm (tissue-dependent) over a wide field of view that allows digital zooming down to the cellular level. Interestingly, it produces en face images in the native field view (rather than the cross-sectional images of conventional OCT), which mimic the histology process, thereby facilitating the reading of images by pathologists. Moreover, as for conventional OCT, it does not require tissue slicing or modification of any kind (i.e. no tissue fixation, coloration, freezing or paraffin embedding). FF-OCT image acquisition and processing time is less than 5 min for a typical 1 cm2 sample (Assayag et al., in press) and the imaging performance has been shown to be equivalent in fresh or fixed tissue (Assayag et al., in press and Dalimier and Salomon, 2012). In addition, FF-OCT intrinsically provides digital images suitable for telemedicine.

Numerous studies have been published over the past two decades demonstrating the suitability of OCT for in vivo or ex vivo diagnosis. OCT imaging has been previously applied in a variety of tissues such as the eye (Grieve et al., 2004 and Swanson et al., 1993), upper aerodigestive tract (Betz et al., 2008Chen et al., 2007 and Ozawa et al., 2009), gastrointestinal tract (Tearney et al., 1998), and breast tissue and lymph nodes (Adie and Boppart, 2009Boppart et al., 2004Hsiung et al., 2007Luo et al., 2005Nguyen et al., 2009Zhou et al., 2010 and Zysk and Boppart, 2006).

In the CNS, published studies that evaluate OCT (Bizheva et al., 2005Böhringer et al., 2006Böhringer et al., 2009Boppart, 2003 and Boppart et al., 1998) using time-domain (TD) or spectral domain (SD) OCT systems had insufficient resolution (10 to 15 μm axial) for visualization of fine morphological details. A study of 9 patients with gliomas carried out using a TD-OCT system led to classification of the samples as malignant versus benign (Böhringer et al., 2009). However, the differentiation of tissues was achieved by considering the relative attenuation of the signal returning from the tumorous zones in relation to that returning from healthy zones. The classification was not possible by real recognition of CNS microscopic structures. Another study showed images of brain microstructures obtained with an OCT system equipped with an ultra-fast laser that offered axial and lateral resolution of 1.3 μm and 3 μm respectively (Bizheva et al., 2005). In this way, it was possible to differentiate malignant from healthy tissue by the presence of blood vessels, microcalcifications and cysts in the tumorous tissue. However the images obtained were small (2 mm × 1 mm), captured on fixed tissue only and required use of an expensive large laser thereby limiting the possibility for clinical implementation.

Other studies have focused on animal brain. In rat brain in vivo, it has been shown that optical coherence microscopy (OCM) can reveal neuronal cell bodies and myelin fibers (Srinivasan et al., 2012), while FF-OCT can also reveal myelin fibers (Ben Arous et al., 2011), and movement of red blood cells in vessels (Binding et al., 2011).

En face images captured with confocal reflectance microscopy can closely resemble FF-OCT images. For example, a prototype system used by Wirth et al. (2012) achieves lateral and axial resolution of 0.9 μm and 3 μm respectively. However small field size prevents viewing of wide-field architecture and slow acquisition speed prohibits the implementation of mosaicking. In addition, the poorer axial resolution and lower penetration depth of confocal imaging in comparison to FF-OCT limit the ability to reconstruct cross-sections from the confocal image stack.

This study is the first to analyze non-tumorous and tumorous human brain tissue samples using FF-OCT.

2. Materials and methods

2.1. Instrument

The experimental arrangement of FF-OCT (Fig. 1A) is based on a configuration that is referred to as a Linnik interferometer (Dubois et al., 2002). A halogen lamp is used as a spatially incoherent source to illuminate the full field of an immersion microscope objective at a central wavelength of 700 nm, with spectral width of 125 nm. The signal is extracted from the background of incoherent backscattered light using a phase-shifting method implemented in custom-designed software. This study was performed on a commercial FF-OCT system (LightCT, LLTech, France).

 

Fig 1

Capturing “en face” images allows easy comparison with histological sections. The resolution, pixel number and sampling requirements result in a native field of view that is limited to about 1 mm2. The sample is moved on a high precision mechanical platform and a number of fields are stitched together (Beck et al., 2000) to display a significant field of view. The FF-OCT microscope is housed in a compact setup (Fig. 1B) that is about the size of a standard optical microscope (310 × 310 × 800 mm L × W × H).

2.2. Imaging protocol

All images presented in this study were captured on fresh brain tissue samples from patients operated on at the Neurosurgery Department of Sainte-Anne Hospital, Paris. Informed and written consent was obtained in all cases following the standard procedure at Sainte-Anne Hospital from patients who were undergoing surgical intervention. Fresh samples were collected from the operating theater immediately after resection and sent to the pathology department. A pathologist dissected each sample to obtain a 1–2 cm2 piece and made a macroscopic observation to orientate the specimen in order to decide which side to image. The sample was immersed in physiological serum, placed in a cassette, numbered, and brought to the FF-OCT imaging facility in a nearby laboratory (15 min distant) where the FF-OCT images were captured. The sample was placed in a custom holder with a coverslip on top (Fig. 1C, D). The sample was raised on a piston to rest gently against the coverslip in order to flatten the surface and so optimize the image capture. The sample is automatically scanned under a 10 × 0.3 numerical aperture (NA) immersion microscope objective. The immersion medium is a silicone oil of refractive index close to that of water, chosen to optimize index matching and slow evaporation. The entire area of each sample was imaged at a depth of 20 μm beneath the sample surface. This depth has been reported to be optimal for comparison of FF-OCT images to histology images in a previous study on breast tissue (Assayag et al., in press). There are several reasons for the choice of imaging depth: firstly, histology was also performed at approximately 20 μm from the edge of the block, i.e. the depth at which typically the whole tissue surface begins to be revealed. Secondly, FF-OCT signal is attenuated with depth due to multiple scattering in the tissue, and resolution is degraded with depth due to aberrations. The best FF-OCT images are therefore captured close to the surface, and the best matching is achieved by attempting to image at a similar depth as the slice in the paraffin block. It was also possible to capture image stacks down to several hundred μm in depth (where penetration depth is dependent on tissue type), for the purpose of reconstructing a 3D volume and imaging layers of neurons and myelin fibers. An example of such a stack in the cerebellum is shown as a video (Video 2) in supplementary material. Once FF-OCT imaging was done, each sample was immediately fixed in formaldehyde and returned to the pathology department where it underwent standard processing in order to compare the FF-OCT images to histology slides.

2.3. Matching FF-OCT to histology

The intention in all cases was to match as closely as possible to histology. FF-OCT images were captured 20 μm below the surface. Histology slices were captured 20 μm from the edge of the block. However the angle of the inclusion is hard to control and so some difference in the angle of the plane always exists when attempting matching. Various other factors that can cause differences stem from the histology process — fixing, dehydrating, paraffin inclusion etc. all alter the tissue and so precise correspondence can be challenging. Such difficulties are common in attempting to match histology to other imaging modalities (e.g. FF-OCT Assayag et al., in press; OCT Bizheva et al., 2005; confocal microscopy Wirth et al., 2012).

An additional parameter in the matching process is the slice thickness. Histology slides were 4 μm in thickness while FF-OCT optical slices have a 1 μm thickness. The finer slice of the FF-OCT image meant that lower cell densities were perceived on the FF-OCT images (in those cases where individual cells were seen, e.g. neurons in the cortex). This difference in slice thickness affects the accuracy of the FF-OCT to histology match. In order to improve matching, it would have been possible to capture four FF-OCT slices in 1 μm steps and sum the images to mimic the histology thickness. However, this would effectively degrade the resolution, which was deemed undesirable in evaluating the capacities of the FF-OCT method.

3. Results

18 samples from 18 adult patients (4 males, 14 females) of age range 19–81 years have been included in the study: 1 mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and 1 cerebellum adjacent to a pulmonary adenocarcinoma metastasis (serving as the non-tumor brain samples), 7 diffuse supratentorial gliomas (4 WHO grade II, 3 WHO grade III), 5 meningiomas, 1 hemangiopericytoma, and 1 choroid plexus papilloma. Patient characteristics are detailed in Table 1.

 

Table 1

3.1. FF-OCT imaging identifies myelinated axon fibers, neuronal cell bodies and vasculature in the human epileptic brain and cerebellum

The cortex and the white matter are clearly distinguished from one another (Fig. 2). Indeed, a subpopulation of neuronal cell bodies (Fig. 2B, C) as well as myelinated axon bundles leading to the white matter could be recognized (Fig. 2D, E). Neuronal cell bodies appear as dark triangles (Fig. 2C) in relation to the bright surrounding myelinated environment. The FF-OCT signal is produced by backscattered photons from tissues of differing refractive indices. The number of photons backscattered from the nuclei in neurons appears to be too few to produce a signal that allows their differentiation from the cytoplasm, and therefore the whole of the cell body (nucleus plus cytoplasm) appears dark.

Fig 2

 

Myelinated axons are numerous, well discernible as small fascicles and appear as bright white lines (Fig. 2E). As the cortex does not contain many myelinated axons, it appears dark gray. Brain vasculature is visible (Fig. 2F and G), and small vessels are distinguished by a thin collagen membrane that appears light gray. Video 1 in supplementary material shows a movie composed of a series of en face 1 μm thick optical slices captured over 100 μm into the depth of the cortex tissue. The myelin fibers and neuronal cell bodies are seen in successive layers.

The different regions of the human hippocampal formation are easily recognizable (Fig. 3). Indeed, CA1 field and its stratum radiatum, CA4 field, the hippocampal fissure, the dentate gyrus, and the alveus are easily distinguishable. Other structures become visible by zooming in digitally on the FF-OCT image. The large pyramidal neurons of the CA4 field (Fig. 3B) and the granule cells that constitute the stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus are visible, as black triangles and as small round dots, respectively (Fig. 3D).

 

Fig 3

In the normal cerebellum, the lamellar or foliar pattern of alternating cortex and central white matter is easily observed (Fig. 4A). By digital zooming, Purkinje and granular neurons also appear as black triangles or dots, respectively (Fig. 4C), and myelinated axons are visible as bright white lines (Fig. 4E). Video 2 in supplementary material shows a fly-through movie in the reconstructed axial slice orientation of a cortex region in cerebellum. The Purkinje and granular neurons are visible down to depths of 200 μm in the tissue.

 

Fig 4

3.2. FF-OCT images distinguish meningiomas from hemangiopericytoma in meningeal tumors

The classic morphological features of a meningioma are visible on the FF-OCT image: large lobules of tumorous cells appear in light gray (Fig. 5A), demarcated by collagen-rich bundles (Fig. 5B) which are highly scattering and appear a brilliant white in the FF-OCT images. The classic concentric tumorous cell clusters (whorls) are very clearly distinguished on the FF-OCT image (Fig. 5D). In addition the presence of numerous cell whorls with central calcifications (psammoma bodies) is revealed (Fig. 5F). Collagen balls appear bright white on the FF-OCT image (Fig. 5H). As the collagen balls progressively calcify, they are consumed by the black of the calcified area, generating a target-like image (Fig. 5H). Calcifications appear black in FF-OCT as they are crystalline and so allow no penetration of photons to their interior.

Fig 5

Mesenchymal non-meningothelial tumors such as hemangiopericytomas represent a classic differential diagnosis of meningiomas. In FF-OCT, the hemangiopericytoma is more monotonous in appearance than the meningiomas, with a highly vascular branching component with staghorn-type vessels (Fig. 6A, C).

Fig 6

3.3. FF-OCT images identify choroid plexus papilloma

The choroid plexus papilloma appears as an irregular coalescence of multiple papillas composed of elongated fibrovascular axes covered by a single layer of choroid glial cells (Fig. 7). By zooming in on an edematous papilla, the axis appears as a black structure covered by a regular light gray line (Fig. 7B). If the papilla central axis is hemorrhagic, the fine regular single layer is not distinguishable (Fig. 7C). Additional digital zooming in on the image reveals cellular level information, and some nuclei of plexus choroid cells can be recognized. However, cellular atypia and mitosis are not visible. These represent key diagnosis criteria used to differentiate choroid plexus papilloma (grade I) from atypical plexus papilloma (grade II).

Fig 7

3.4. FF-OCT images detect the brain tissue architecture modifications generated by diffusely infiltrative gliomas

Contrary to the choroid plexus papillomas which have a very distinctive architecture in histology (cauliflower-like aspect), very easily recognized in the FF-OCT images (Fig. 7A to G), diffusely infiltrating glioma does not present a specific tumor architecture (Fig. 8) as they diffusely permeate the normal brain architecture. Hence, the tumorous glial cells are largely dispersed through a nearly normal brain parenchyma (Fig. 8E). The presence of infiltrating tumorous glial cells attested by high magnification histological observation (irregular atypical cell nuclei compared to normal oligodendrocytes) is not detectable with the current generation of FF-OCT devices, as FF-OCT cannot reliably distinguish the individual cell nuclei due to lack of contrast (as opposed to lack of resolution). In our experience, diffuse low-grade gliomas (less than 20% of tumor cell density) are mistaken for normal brain tissue on FF-OCT images. However, in high-grade gliomas (Fig. 8G–K), the infiltration of the tumor has occurred to such an extent that the normal parenchyma architecture is lost. This architectural change is easily observed in FF-OCT and is successfully identified as high-grade glioma, even though the individual glial cell nuclei are not distinguished.

Fig 8

4. Discussion

We present here the first large size images (i.e. on the order of 1–3 cm2) acquired using an OCT system that offer spatial resolution comparable to histological analysis, sufficient to distinguish microstructures of the human brain parenchyma.

Firstly, the FF-OCT technique and the images presented here combine several practical advantages. The imaging system is compact, it can be placed in the operating room, the tissue sample does not require preparation and image acquisition is rapid. This technique thus appears promising as an intraoperative tool to help neurosurgeons and pathologists.

Secondly, resolution is sufficient (on the order of 1 μm axial and lateral) to distinguish brain tissue microstructures. Indeed, it was possible to distinguish neuron cell bodies in the cortex and axon bundles going towards white matter. Individual myelin fibers of 1 μm in diameter are visible on the FF-OCT images. Thus FF-OCT may serve as a real-time anatomical locator.

Histological architectural characteristics of meningothelial, fibrous, transitional and psammomatous meningiomas were easily recognizable on the FF-OCT images (lobules and whorl formation, collagenous-septae, calcified psammoma bodies, thick vessels). Psammomatous and transitional meningiomas presented distinct architectural characteristics in FF-OCT images in comparison to those observed in hemangiopericytoma. Thus, FF-OCT may serve as an intraoperative tool, in addition to extemporaneous examination, to refine differential diagnosis between pathological entities with different prognoses and surgical managements.

Diffuse glioma was essentially recognized by the loss of normal parenchyma architecture. However, glioma could be detected on FF-OCT images only if the glial cell density is greater than around 20% (i.e. the point at which the effect on the architecture becomes noticeable). The FF-OCT technique is therefore not currently suitable for the evaluation of low tumorous infiltration or tumorous margins. Evaluation at the individual tumor cell level is only possible by IDH1R132 immunostaining in IDH1 mutated gliomas in adults (Preusser et al., 2011). One of the current limitations of the FF-OCT technique for use in diagnosis is the difficulty in estimating the nuclear/cytoplasmic boundaries and the size and form of nuclei as well as the nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio of cells. This prevents precise classification into tumor subtypes and grades.

To increase the accuracy of diagnosis of tumors where cell density measurement is necessary for grading, perspectives for the technique include development of a multimodal system (Harms et al., 2012) to allow simultaneous co-localized acquisition of FF-OCT and fluorescence images. The fluorescence channel images in this multimodal system show cell nuclei, which increase the possibility of diagnosis and tumor grading direct from optical images. However, the use of contrast agents for the fluorescence channel means that the multimodal imaging technique is no longer non-invasive, and this may be undesirable if the tissue is to progress to histology following optical imaging. This is a similar concern in confocal microscopy where use of dyes is necessary for fluorescence detection (Wirth et al., 2012).

In its current form therefore, FF-OCT is not intended to serve as a diagnostic tool, but should rather be considered as an additional intraoperative aid in order to determine in a short time whether or not there is suspicious tissue present in a sample. It does not aim to replace histological analyses but rather to complement them, by offering a tool at the intermediary stage of intraoperative tissue selection. In a few minutes, an image is produced that allows the surgeon or the pathologist to assess the content of the tissue sample. The selected tissue, once imaged with FF-OCT, may then proceed to conventional histology processing in order to obtain the full diagnosis (Assayag et al., in press and Dalimier and Salomon, 2012).

Development of FF-OCT to allow in vivo imaging is underway, and first steps include increasing camera acquisition speed. First results of in vivo rat brain imaging have been achieved with an FF-OCT prototype setup, and show real-time visualization of myelin fibers (Ben Arous et al., 2011) and movement of red blood cells in vessels (Binding et al., 2011). To respond more precisely to surgical needs, it would be preferable to integrate the FF-OCT system into a surgical probe. Work in this direction is currently underway and preliminary images of skin and breast tissue have been captured with a rigid probe FF-OCT prototype (Latrive and Boccara, 2011).

In conclusion, we have demonstrated the capacity of FF-OCT for imaging of human brain samples. This technique has potential as an intraoperative tool for determining tissue architecture and content in a few minutes. The 1 μm3 resolution and wide-field down to cellular-level views offered by the technique allowed identification of features of non-tumorous and tumorous tissues such as myelin fibers, neurons, microcalcifications, tumor cells, microcysts, and blood vessels. Correspondence with histological slides was good, indicating suitability of the technique for use in clinical practice for tissue selection for biobanking for example. Future work to extend the technique to in vivo imaging by rigid probe endoscopy is underway.

The following are the supplementary data related to this article.

Video 1.  Shows a movie composed of a series of en face 1 μm thick optical slices captured over 100 μm into the depth of the cortex tissue. The myelin fibers and neuronal cell bodies are seen in successive layers. Field size is 800 μm × 800 μm.

Video 2.  Shows a fly-through movie in the reconstructed cross-sectional orientation showing 1 μm steps through a 3D stack down to 200 μm depth in cerebellum cortical tissue. Purkinje and granular neurons are visible as dark spaces. Field size is 800 μm × 200 μm.

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank LLTech SAS for use of the LightCT Scanner.

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