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Archive for the ‘Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC)’ Category


Pharmacotyping Pancreatic Cancer Patients in the Future: Two Approaches – ORGANOIDS by David Tuveson and Hans Clevers and/or MICRODOSING Devices by Robert Langer

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

This curation provides the resources for edification on Pharmacotyping Pancreatic Cancer Patients in the Future

 

  • Professor Hans Clevers at Clevers Group, Hubrecht University

https://www.hubrecht.eu/onderzoekers/clevers-group/

  • Prof. Robert Langer, MIT

http://web.mit.edu/langerlab/langer.html

Langer’s articles on Drug Delivery

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=Langer+on+Drug+Delivery&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixsd2w88TTAhVG4iYKHRaIAvEQgQMIJDAA

organoids, which I know you’re pretty involved in with Hans Clevers. What are your plans for organoids of pancreatic cancer?

Organoids are a really terrific model of a patient’s tumour that you generate from tissue that is either removed at the time of surgery or when they get a small needle biopsy. Culturing the tissue and observing an outgrowth of it is usually successful and when you have the cells, you can perform molecular diagnostics of any type. With a patient-derived organoid, you can sequence the exome and the RNA, and you can perform drug testing, which I call ‘pharmacotyping’, where you’re evaluating compounds that by themselves or in combination show potency against the cells. A major goal of our lab is to work towards being able to use organoids to choose therapies that will work for an individual patient – personalized medicine.

Organoids could be made moot by implantable microdevices for drug delivery into tumors, developed by Bob Langer. These devices are the size of a pencil lead and contain reservoirs that release microdoses of different drugs; the device can be injected into the tumor to deliver drugs, and can then be carefully dissected out and analyzed to gain insight into the sensitivity of cancer cells to different anticancer agents. Bob and I are kind of engaged in a friendly contest to see whether organoids or microdosing devices are going to come out on top. I suspect that both approaches will be important for pharmacotyping cancer patients in the future.

From the science side, we use organoids to discover things about pancreatic cancer. They’re great models, probably the best that I know of to rapidly discover new things about cancer because you can grow normal tissue as well as malignant tissue. So, from the same patient you can do a comparison easily to find out what’s different in the tumor. Organoids are crazy interesting, and when I see other people in the pancreatic cancer field I tell them, you should stop what you’re doing and work on these because it’s the faster way of studying this disease.

SOURCE

Other related articles on Pancreatic Cancer and Drug Delivery published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Pancreatic Cancer: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/26/pancreatic-cancer-articles-of-note-pharmaceuticalintelligence-com/

Keyword Search: “Pancreatic Cancer” – 275 Article Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Pancreatic+Cancer&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

Keyword Search: Drug Delivery: 542 Articles Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Drug+Delivery&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

Keyword Search: Personalized Medicine: 597 Article Titles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.wordpress.com/wp-admin/edit.php?s=Personalized+Medicine&post_status=all&post_type=post&action=-1&m=0&cat=0&paged=1&action2=-1

  • Cancer Biology & Genomics for Disease Diagnosis, on Amazon since 8/11/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K

 

 

VOLUME TWO WILL BE AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM ON MAY 1, 2017

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One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers: R&D at WPI

Curator: Marzan Khan, B.Sc

 

A team of mechanical engineers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) have developed a fascinating technology – a liquid biopsy chip that captures and detects metastatic cancer cells, just from a small blood sample of cancer patients(1). This device is a recent development in the scientific field and holds tremendous potential that will allow doctors to spot signs of metastasis for a variety of cancers at an early stage and initiate an appropriate course of treatment(1).

Metastasis occurs when cancer cells break away from their site of origin and spread to other parts of the body via the lymph or the bloodstream, where they give rise to secondary tumors(2). By this time, the cancer is at an advanced stage and it becomes increasingly difficult to fight the disease. The cells that are shed by primary and metastatic cancers are called circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their numbers lie in the range of 1–77,200/m(3). The basis of the liquid biopsy chip test is to capture these circulating tumor cells in the patient’s blood and identify the cell type through specific interaction with antibodies(4).

The chip is comprised of individual test units or small elements, about 3 millimeters wide(4). Each small element contains a network of carbon nanotube sensors in a well which are functionalized with antibodies(4). These antibodies will bind cell-surface antigens or protein markers unique for each type of cancer cell. Specific interaction between a cell surface protein and its corresponding antibody is a thermodynamic event that causes a change in free energy which is transduced into electricity(3). This electrical signature is picked up by the semi-conducting carbon nanotubes and can be seen as electrical spikes(4). Specific interactions create an increase in electrical signal, whereas non-specific interactions cause a decrease in signal or no change at all(4). Capture efficiency of cancer cells with the chip has been reported to range between 62-100%(4).

The liquid biopsy chip is also more advanced than microfluidics for several reasons. Firstly, the nanotube-chip arrays can capture as well as detect cancer cells, while microfluidics can only capture(4). Samples do not need to be processed for labeling or fixation, so the cell structures are preserved(4). Unlike microfluidics, these nanotubes will also capture tiny structures called exosomes spanning the nanometer range that are produced from cancer cells and carry the same biomarkers(4).

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-associated deaths in the United states, with a survival window of 5 years in only 6% of the cases with treatment(5). In most patients, the disease has already metastasized at the time of diagnosis due to the lack of early-diagnostic markers, affecting some of the major organs such as liver, lungs and the peritoneum(5,6). Despite surgical resection of the primary tumor, the recurrence of local and metastatic tumors is rampant(5). Metastasis is the major cause of mortality in cancers(5). The liquid biopsy chip, that identifies CTCs can thus become an effective diagnostic tool in early detection of cancer as well as provide information into the efficacy of treatment(3). At present, ongoing experiments with this device involve testing for breast cancers but Dr. Balaji Panchapakesan and his team of engineers at WPI are optimistic about incorporating pancreatic and lung cancers into their research.

REFERENCES

1.Nanophenotype. Researchers build liquid biopsy chip that detects metastatic cancer cells in blood: One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers. 27 Dec 2016. Genesis Nanotechnology,Inc

https://genesisnanotech.wordpress.com/2016/12/27/researchers-build-liquid-biopsy-chip-that-detects-metastatic-cancer-cells-in-blood-one-blood-sample-can-be-tested-for-a-comprehensive-array-of-cancer-cell-markers/

2.Martin TA, Ye L, Sanders AJ, et al. Cancer Invasion and Metastasis: Molecular and Cellular Perspective. In: Madame Curie Bioscience Database [Internet]. Austin (TX): Landes Bioscience; 2000-2013.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK164700/

3.F Khosravi, B King, S Rai, G Kloecker, E Wickstrom, B Panchapakesan. Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells. 23 Dec 2013. IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine 7 (4), 20-26

Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells

4.Farhad Khosravi, Patrick J Trainor, Christopher Lambert, Goetz Kloecker, Eric Wickstrom, Shesh N Rai and Balaji Panchapakesan. Static micro-array isolation, dynamic time series classification, capture and enumeration of spiked breast cancer cells in blood: the nanotube–CTC chip. 29 Sept 2016. Nanotechnology. Vol 27, No.44. IOP Publishing Ltd

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0957-4484/27/44/44LT03/meta

5.Seyfried, T. N., & Huysentruyt, L. C. (2013). On the Origin of Cancer Metastasis. Critical Reviews in Oncogenesis18(1-2), 43–73.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3597235/

6.Deeb, A., Haque, S.-U., & Olowoure, O. (2015). Pulmonary metastases in pancreatic cancer, is there a survival influence? Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology6(3), E48–E51. http://doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2078-6891.2014.114

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397254/

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Liquid Biopsy Chip detects an array of metastatic cancer cell markers in blood – R&D @Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Reporters: Tilda Barliya, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/28/liquid-biopsy-chip-detects-an-array-of-metastatic-cancer-cell-markers-in-blood-rd-worcester-polytechnic-institute-micro-and-nanotechnology-lab/

 

Trovagene’s ctDNA Liquid Biopsy urine and blood tests to be used in Monitoring and Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer

Reporters: David Orchard-Webb, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/06/trovagenes-ctdna-liquide-biopsy-urine-and-blood-tests-to-be-used-in-monitoring-and-early-detection-of-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/06/liquid-biopsy-assay-may-predict-drug-resistance/


New insights in cancer, cancer immunogenesis and circulating cancer cells

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/15/new-insights-in-cancer-cancer-immunogenesis-and-circulating-cancer-cells/

 

Prognostic biomarker for NSCLC and Cancer Metastasis

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curato

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/24/prognostic-biomarker-for-nsclc-and-cancer-metastasis/

 

Monitoring AML with “cell specific” blood test

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/23/monitoring-aml-with-cell-specific-blood-test/

 

Diagnostic Revelations

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/02/diagnostic-revelations/

 

Circulating Biomarkers World Congress, March 23-24, 2015, Boston: Exosomes, Microvesicles, Circulating DNA, Circulating RNA, Circulating Tumor Cells, Sample Preparation

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/03/circulating-biomarkers-world-congress-march-23-24-2015-boston-exosomes-microvesicles-circulating-dna-circulating-rna-circulating-tumor-cells-sample-preparation/

 

 

 

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Liquid Biopsy Chip detects an array of metastatic cancer cell markers in blood – R&D @Worcester Polytechnic Institute,  Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Reporters: Tilda Barliya, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
bold face added by ALA

Static micro-array isolation, dynamic time series classification, capture and enumeration of spiked breast cancer cells in blood: the nanotube–CTC chip

Farhad Khosravi1, Patrick J Trainor2, Christopher Lambert3, Goetz Kloecker4, Eric Wickstrom5, Shesh N Rai2,6 and Balaji Panchapakesan1

Published 29 September 2016© 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd
Nanotechnology, Volume 27, Number 44

Nanotechnology (2016). DOI: 10.1088/0957-4484/27/44/44LT03

Researchers build liquid biopsy chip that detects metastatic cancer cells in blood: One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell markers.

“Imagine going to the doctor for your yearly physical,” he said. “You have blood drawn and that one can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell markers. Cancers would be caught at their earliest stage and other stages of development, and doctors would have the necessary protein or genetic information from these captured to customize your treatment based on the specific markers for your cancer. This would really be a way to put your health in your own hands.”

[T]he WPI device is also highly effective in separating cancer cells from the other cells and material in the blood through differential settling.

“White blood cells, in particular, are a problem, because they are quite numerous in blood and they can be mistaken for cancer cells,” he said. “Our device uses what is called a passive leukocyte depletion strategy. Because of density differences, the tend to settle to the bottom of the wells (and this only happens in a narrow window), where they encounter the antibodies. The remainder of the blood contents stays at the top of the wells and can simply be washed away.”

In addition to capturing tumor cells, Panchapakesan says the chip will also latch on to tiny structures called exosomes, which are produced by cancers cells and carry the same markers. “These highly elusive 3-nanometer structures are too small to be captured with other types of liquid biopsy devices, such as microfluidics, due to shear forces that can potentially destroy them,” he noted. “Our chip is currently the only device that can potentially capture circulating tumor cells and exosomes directly on the chip, which should increase its ability to detect metastasis. This can be important because emerging evidence suggests that tiny proteins excreted with exosomes can drive reactions that may become major barriers to effective cancer drug delivery and treatment.”

The device developed by Panchapakesan’s team includes an array of tiny elements, each about a tenth of an inch (3 millimeters) across. Each element has a well, at the bottom of which are antibodies attached to carbon nanotubes. Each well holds a specific antibody that will bind selectively to one type of cancer cell type, based on genetic markers on its surface. By seeding elements with an assortment of antibodies, the device could be set up to capture several different cancer cells types using a single blood sample. In the lab, the researchers were able to fill a total of 170 wells using just under 0.3 fluid ounces (0.85 milliliter) of blood. Even with that small sample, they captured between one and a thousand cells per device, with a capture efficiency of between 62 and 100 percent.

The carbon nanotubes used in the device act as semiconductors. When a cancer cell binds to one of the attached antibodies, it creates an electrical signature that can be detected. These signals can be used to identify which of the elements in the array have captured cancer cells. Those individual arrays can then be removed and taken to a lab, where the captured cells can be stained and identified under a microscope. In the lab, the binding and electrical signature generation process took just a few minutes, suggesting the possibility of getting same-day results from a blood test using the chip, Panchapakesan says.

SOURCE

https://genesisnanotech.wordpress.com/2016/12/27/researchers-build-liquid-biopsy-chip-that-detects-metastatic-cancer-cells-in-blood-one-blood-sample-can-be-tested-for-a-comprehensive-array-of-cancer-cell-markers/

Balaji Panchapakesan – List of Recent Publications

 

Static micro-array isolation, dynamic time series classification, capture and enumeration of spiked breast cancer cells in blood: the nanotube–CTC chip

F Khosravi, PJ Trainor, C Lambert, G Kloecker, E Wickstrom, SN Rai, …
Nanotechnology 27 (44), 44LT03
  2016
A Thermoacoustic Model for High Aspect Ratio Nanostructures

MS Loeian, RW Cohn, B Panchapakesan
Actuators 5 (4), 23
  2016
Spatially Nonuniform Heating and the Nonlinear Transient Response of Elastomeric Photomechanical Actuators

RW Cohn, B Panchapakesan
Actuators 5 (2), 16
  2016
Ultraflexible nanostructures and implications for future nanorobots

RW Cohn, B Panchapakesan
SPIE Commercial+ Scientific Sensing and Imaging, 98590B-98590B-7
  2016
Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays

F Khosravi, P Trainor, SN Rai, G Kloecker, E Wickstrom, …
Nanotechnology 27 (13), 13LT02
2 2016
Chromatic Mechanical Response in 2-D Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenide (TMDs) based Nanocomposites

V Rahneshin, F Khosravi, DA Ziolkowska, JB Jasinski, B Panchapakesan
Scientific Reports 6
  2016
Classification of biosensor time series using dynamic time warping: applications in screening cancer cells with characteristic biomarkers

SN Rai, PJ Trainor, F Khosravi, G Kloecker, B Panchapakesan
Open access medical statistics 2016 (6), 21
1 2016
STIMULI-RESPONSIVE POLYMER COMPOSITES

J Loomis, B Panchapakesan
US Patent 20,150,361,241
  2015
MoS2 actuators: reversible mechanical responses of MoS2-polymer nanocomposites to photons

X Fan, F Khosravi, V Rahneshin, M Shanmugam, M Loeian, J Jasinski, …
Nanotechnology 26 (26), 261001
6 2015
Programmable Skins based on Core-Shell Microsphere/Nanotube/Polymer Composites

B Panchapakesan, C Onal, J Loomis
MRS Proceedings 1800, mrss15-2136299
  2015
Photothermal nanopositioners based on graphene nanocomposites

J Loomis, B Panchapakesan
SPIE NanoScience+ Engineering, 91700B-91700B-9
  2014
Nanotube liquid crystal elastomers: photomechanical response and flexible energy conversion of layered polymer composites

X Fan, BC King, J Loomis, EM Campo, J Hegseth, RW Cohn, E Terentjev, …
Nanotechnology 25 (35), 355501
6 2014
Vacuum filtration based formation of liquid crystal films of semiconducting carbon nanotubes and high performance transistor devices

B King, B Panchapakesan
Nanotechnology 25 (17), 175201
15 2014
2013 Index IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine Vol. 7

C Chen, H Chen, L Chen, C Chng, M Chua, C Chui, J Gao, V Gau, …
  2014
Nanotube Devices for Digital Profiling: A focus on cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells.

F Khosravi, B King, S Rai, G Kloecker, E Wickstrom, B Panchapakesan
IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine 7 (4), 20-26
4 2013
Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells

F Khosravi, B King, B Panchapakesan, S Rai, G Kloecker, E Wickstrom
The 7th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Molecular Medicine and …
1 2013
Graphene/elastomer composite-based photo-thermal nanopositioners

J Loomis, X Fan, F Khosravi, P Xu, M Fletcher, RW Cohn, …
Scientific reports 3
32 2013
Methods for fabricating polymer composites

B Panchapakesan
US Patent App. 13/889,121
1 2013
Stimuli-responsive transformation in carbon nanotube/expanding microsphere? polymer composites

J Loomis, P Xu, B Panchapakesan
Nanotechnology 24 (18), 185703
9 2013
Synergism in Binary (MWNT, SLG) Nano-carbons in Polymer Nano-composites: A Raman Study

P Xu, J Loomis, B King, B Panchapakesan
MRS Proceedings 1505, mrsf12-1505-w17-01
  2013
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Evaluating the Genetic Profiles of Tumor Cells circulating in the Bloodstream could transform Cancer Care: A Blood Test for managing Lung Cancer @Stanford University Medical School

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

A Legacy of Innovation @Stanford University Medical School

  1. 1967

    First synthesis of biologically active DNA in test tube

  2. 1968

    First adult human heart transplant in the United States

    Norman Shumway successfully transplants a heart into 54-year-old steelworker Mike Kasperak, who survives for 14 days.

     

  3. 1973

    First expression of a foreign gene implanted in bacteria by recombinant DNA methods

  4. 1981

    First successful human combined heart/lung transplant in the world (fourth attempted worldwide)

  5. 1984

    Isolation of a gene coding for part of the T-cell receptor, a key to the immune system’s function

  6. 1988

    Isolation of pure hematopoietic stem cells from mice

  7. 2002

    First use of gene expression profiling to predict cancer outcomes

  8. 2007

    Application and expansion of optogenetics, a technique to control brain cell activity with light

SOURCE

Evaluating the Genetic Profiles of Tumor Cells circulating in the Bloodstream could transform Cancer Care: A Blood Test for managing Lung Cancer @Stanford University Medical School

The approach that the team developed could be used to look at mutations in three or four genes, and it requires no more than 2 milliliters of blood — about half a teaspoon. The test can be completed in about five hours, the researcher said, and costs less than $30. For comparison, a single state-of-the art biopsy of lung tissue with DNA sequencing costs about $18,000 and takes as long as three weeks to furnish results. Johnson & Johnson’s CellSearch — another blood test, already approved by the FDA — costs about $900 and takes a week to deliver results.

The researchers created a system for isolating circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients and reading a handful of genes from inside each tumor cell. Thus, they were able to obtain genetic information about the original cancer tumor that resides deep in the lungs without doing a biopsy, which can be dangerous for the patient.

“We are trying to make minimally invasive technology that allows us to continuously monitor one person’s health over time,” said radiology instructor Seung-min Park, PhD, a lead author of the new study, which was published online Dec. 12 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Park shares lead authorship of the study with former Stanford graduate students Dawson Wong, PhD, and Chin Chun Ooi.

A MagSifter chip, shown here fastened to an acrylic holder, can purify circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients.

The MagSifter is an electromagnetic sieve that can be turned on and off. When the MagSifter is on, it pulls the nanoparticle-labeled CTCs from the blood sample and allows the rest of the blood to flow through the sifter. The CTCs pulled from the blood are then deposited into a flat array of tiny wells, each large enough for only one cell. Now the tumor cells are ready for genetic analysis. Each flat of 25,600 wells looks like a miniature muffin tin, with room for a lot of tiny muffins.

SOURCE

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/12/blood-test-could-provide-cheaper-way-to-evaluate-lung-tumors.html

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