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Archive for the ‘Artificial Intelligence – Breakthroughs in Theories and Technologies’ Category


Developing Machine Learning Models for Prediction of Onset of Type-2 Diabetes

Reporter: Amandeep Kaur, B.Sc., M.Sc.

A recent study reports the development of an advanced AI algorithm which predicts up to five years in advance the starting of type 2 diabetes by utilizing regularly collected medical data. Researchers described their AI model as notable and distinctive based on the specific design which perform assessments at the population level.

The first author Mathieu Ravaut, M.Sc. of the University of Toronto and other team members stated that “The main purpose of our model was to inform population health planning and management for the prevention of diabetes that incorporates health equity. It was not our goal for this model to be applied in the context of individual patient care.”

Research group collected data from 2006 to 2016 of approximately 2.1 million patients treated at the same healthcare system in Ontario, Canada. Even though the patients were belonged to the same area, the authors highlighted that Ontario encompasses a diverse and large population.

The newly developed algorithm was instructed with data of approximately 1.6 million patients, validated with data of about 243,000 patients and evaluated with more than 236,000 patient’s data. The data used to improve the algorithm included the medical history of each patient from previous two years- prescriptions, medications, lab tests and demographic information.

When predicting the onset of type 2 diabetes within five years, the algorithm model reached a test area under the ROC curve of 80.26.

The authors reported that “Our model showed consistent calibration across sex, immigration status, racial/ethnic and material deprivation, and a low to moderate number of events in the health care history of the patient. The cohort was representative of the whole population of Ontario, which is itself among the most diverse in the world. The model was well calibrated, and its discrimination, although with a slightly different end goal, was competitive with results reported in the literature for other machine learning–based studies that used more granular clinical data from electronic medical records without any modifications to the original test set distribution.”

This model could potentially improve the healthcare system of countries equipped with thorough administrative databases and aim towards specific cohorts that may encounter the faulty outcomes.

Research group stated that “Because our machine learning model included social determinants of health that are known to contribute to diabetes risk, our population-wide approach to risk assessment may represent a tool for addressing health disparities.”

Sources:

https://www.cardiovascularbusiness.com/topics/prevention-risk-reduction/new-ai-model-healthcare-data-predict-type-2-diabetes?utm_source=newsletter

Reference:

Ravaut M, Harish V, Sadeghi H, et al. Development and Validation of a Machine Learning Model Using Administrative Health Data to Predict Onset of Type 2 Diabetes. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(5):e2111315. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.11315 https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2780137

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal, including the following:

AI in Drug Discovery: Data Science and Core Biology @Merck &Co, Inc., @GNS Healthcare, @QuartzBio, @Benevolent AI and Nuritas

Reporters: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN and Irina Robu, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/08/27/ai-in-drug-discovery-data-science-and-core-biology-merck-co-inc-gns-healthcare-quartzbio-benevolent-ai-and-nuritas/

Can Blockchain Technology and Artificial Intelligence Cure What Ails Biomedical Research and Healthcare

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/12/10/can-blockchain-technology-and-artificial-intelligence-cure-what-ails-biomedical-research-and-healthcare/

HealthCare focused AI Startups from the 100 Companies Leading the Way in A.I. Globally

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/01/18/healthcare-focused-ai-startups-from-the-100-companies-leading-the-way-in-a-i-globally/

AI in Psychiatric Treatment – Using Machine Learning to Increase Treatment Efficacy in Mental Health

Reporter: Aviva Lev- Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/06/04/ai-in-psychiatric-treatment-using-machine-learning-to-increase-treatment-efficacy-in-mental-health/

Vyasa Analytics Demos Deep Learning Software for Life Sciences at Bio-IT World 2018 – Vyasa’s booth (#632)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/05/10/vyasa-analytics-demos-deep-learning-software-for-life-sciences-at-bio-it-world-2018-vyasas-booth-632/

New Diabetes Treatment Using Smart Artificial Beta Cells

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/11/08/new-diabetes-treatment-using-smart-artificial-beta-cells/

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Reporter: Adina Hazan, PhD

Elizabeth Unger from the Tian group at UC Davis, Jacob Keller from the Looger lab from HHMI, Michael Altermatt from the Gradinaru group at California Institute of Technology, and colleagues did just this, by redesigned the binding pocket of periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) using artificial intelligence, such that it became a fluorescent sensor specific for serotonin. Not only this, the group showed that it could express and use this molecule to detect serotonin on the cell, tissue, and whole animal level.

By starting with a microbial PBP and early version of an acetyl choline sensor (iAChSnFR), the scientists used machine learning and modeling to redesign the binding site to exhibit a higher affinity and specificity to serotonin. After three repeats of mutagenesis, modeling, and library readouts, they produced iSeroSnFR. This version harbors 19 mutations compared to iAChSnFR0.6 and a Kd of 310 µM. This results in an increase in fluorescence in HEK293T cells expressing the serotonin receptor of 800%. Of over 40 neurotransmitters, amino acids, and small molecules screened, only two endogenous molecules evoked some fluorescence, but at significantly higher concentrations.

To acutely test the ability of the sensor to detect rapid changes of serotonin in the environment, the researchers used caged serotonin, a technique in which the serotonin is rapidly released into the environment with light pulses, and showed that iSeroSnFR accurately and robustly produced a signal with each flash of light. With this tool, it was then possible to move to ex-vivo mouse brain slices and detect endogenous serotonin release patterns across the brain. Three weeks after targeted injection of iSeroSnFR to specifically deliver the receptor into the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, strong fluorescent signal could be detected during perfusion of serotonin or electrical stimulation.

Most significantly, this molecule was also shown to be detected in freely moving mice, a tool which could offer critical insight into the acute role of serotonin regulation during important functions such as mood and alertness. Through optical fiber placements in the basolateral amygdala and prefrontal cortex, the team measured dynamic and real-time changes in serotonin release in fear-trained mice, social interactions, and sleep wake cycles. For example, while both areas of the brain have been established as relevant to the fear response, they reliably tracked that the PFC response was immediate, while the BSA displayed a delayed response. This additional temporal resolution of neuromodulation may have important implications in neurotransmitter pharmacology of the central nervous system.

This study provided the scientific community with several insights and tools. The serotonin sensor itself will be a critical tool in the study of the central nervous system and possibly beyond. Additionally, an AI approach to mutagenesis in order to redesign a binding pocket of a receptor opens new avenues to the development of pharmacological tools and may lead to many new designs in therapeutics and research.

SOURCE:

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Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Health Care Human Again

 

Reviewers: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

5,310 views
Jun 24, 2019

 

123K subscribers

In his new book, Deep Medicine, Eric Topol – cardiologist, geneticist, digital medicine researcher – claims that artificial intelligence can put the humanity back into medicine. By freeing physicians from rote tasks, such as taking notes and performing medical scans, AI creates space for the real healing that occurs between a doctor who listens and a patient who needs to be heard. The counterintuitive recognition that technology can create space for compassion in the clinical setting could mean fewer burned-out doctors, more empowered patients, cost savings, and an entirely new way to approach medicine. Featuring: David Brooks, Eric Topol This conversation was recorded during Aspen Ideas: Health in Aspen, Colorado. Presented by the Aspen Institute, the three-day event opens the Aspen Ideas Festival and features more than 200 speakers engaging with urgent health care challenges and exploring cutting-edge innovations in medicine and science. Learn more at https://www.aspenideas.org

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Artificial pancreas effectively controls type 1 diabetes in children age 6 and up

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

A new trial funded by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institute of Health created a clinical trial at four pediatric diabetes centers in the US of a new artificial pancreas system, which monitors and regulates blood glucose levels automatically. The artificial pancreas technology, the Control-IQ system has an insulin pump programmed with advanced control algorithms based on a mathematical model using the person’s glucose monitoring information to automatically adjust the insulin dose, and it was originally developed at University of Virginia (UVA), Charlottesville with funding support from NIDDK.

The artificial pancreas closed-loop control is all in one diabetes management system which monitors and tracks blood glucose levels using a continuous glucose monitor and at the same time delivers the insulin when needed via an insulin pump. The system is not only useful in children age 6 and up, but it also replaces reliance on testing by fingerstick or delivering insulin via injection multiple times a day.

The study contains 101 children between ages of 6 and 13 and the children are assigned either to the control or experimental group. The control group uses a standard injection method and separate insulin pump and the experimental uses the artificial pancreas system. Data was conducted every week for four months, while the participants continue on daily lives.

The results of the study showed that using an artificial pancreas system has a 7% improvement in keeping blood glucose in range during the daytime, and a 26% improvement in nighttime control compared to the control group. However, night time control group is important in people with type 1 diabetes, since unchecked hypoglycemia can lead to seizure, coma or even death. The artificial pancreas system shows about 11 % improvement to the standard method and it shows that the improvement in blood glucose control is impressive and safer for kids. No severe case of hypoglycemia or diabetic ketoacidosis occurred during the study, only some minor issues with the equipment.

After the clinical trial and based on the data received, Tandem Diabetes Care has received clearance from the U.S. FDA for use of the Control-IQ system in children as young as age 6 years.

SOURCE
https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/artificial-pancreas-effectively-controls-type-1-diabetes-children-age-6

 

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Tweets & Retweets by @pharma_BI and @AVIVA1950 at #BioIT20, 19th Annual Bio-IT World 2020 Conference, October 6-8, 2020 in Boston

 

Virtual Conference coverage in Real Time: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Amazing conference ended at 2PM on October 8, 2020

e-Proceedings 19th Annual Bio-IT World 2020 Conference, October 6-8, 2020 Boston

Virtual Conference coverage in Real Time: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/03/26/19th-annual-bio-it-world-2020-conference-october-6-8-2020-in-boston/

Review Tweets and Retweets

and 2 others liked your Tweet

#BioIT20 Plenary Keynote: cutting innovative approach to #Science #Game On: How #AI, #CitizenScience #HumanComputation are facilitating the next leap forward in #Genomics and in #Biology may be in #PrecisionMedicine in the Future @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 pic.twitter.com/L52qktkeYc

Retweeted your Tweet
#BioIT20 Plenary Keynote: cutting innovative approach to #Science #Game On: How #AI, #CitizenScience #HumanComputation are facilitating the next leap forward in #Genomics and in #Biology may be in #PrecisionMedicine in the Future @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 pic.twitter.com/L52qktkeYc

and

liked your Tweet

#BioIT20 Plenary Keynote: cutting innovative approach to #Science #Game On: How #AI, #CitizenScience #HumanComputation are facilitating the next leap forward in #Genomics and in #Biology may be in #PrecisionMedicine in the Future @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950 pic.twitter.com/L52qktkeYc

NIH Office of Data Science Strategy
@NIHDataScience

We’ve made progress with #FAIRData, but we still have a ways to go and our future is bright. #BioIT20 #NIHData

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Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#BioIT20

Driving Scientific Discovery with Data Digitization great ideas shared by moderator Timothy Gardner

#CEO Inspiration from History Total Quality Implementation is key for BioScience Data #AI won’t solve the problem #Data #Quality will

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Rob Lalonde
@HPC_Cloud_Rob

My #BioIT20 talk, “#Bioinformatics in the #Cloud Age,” is tomorrow at 3:30pm. I discuss cloud migration trends in life sciences and #HPC. Join us! A panel with

and

follows the talk.

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Jean Marois
@JeanMarois

My team is participating in Bio-IT World Virtual 2020, October 6-8. Join me! Use discount code 20NUA to save 20%! invt.io/1tdbae9s8lp

#BioIT20

I’m going to Bio-IT World 2020, Oct 6-8, from home! Its a virtual event. Join me!
My team is participating in Bio-IT World Virtual 2020, October 6-8. Join me! Use discount code 20NUA to save 20%! @bioitworld #BioIT20
invt.io
2

NIH Office of Data Science Strategy
@NIHDataScience

One of the challenges we face today: we need an algorithm that can search across the 36+ PB of Sequence Read Archive (SRA) data now in the cloud. Imagine what we could do! #BioIT20 #NIHdata #SRAdata

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NCBI Staff
@NCBI

NCBI’s virtual #BioIT20 booth will open in 15 minutes. There, you can watch videos, grab some flyers and even speak with an expert! bio-itworld.pathable.co/organizations/ The booth will close at 4:15 PM, but we’ll be back tomorrow, Oct 7 and Thursday, Oct 8 at 9AM.
Bio-IT World
Welcome to Bio-IT World Virtual
bio-itworld.pathable.co
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PERCAYAI
@percayai

Happening soon at #BioIT20: Join our faculty inventor Professor Rich Head’s invited talk “CompBio: An Augmented Intelligence System for Comprehensive Interpretation of Biological Data.”
4

Wendy Anne Warr
@WendyAnneWarr

This was a good discussion
Quote Tweet
Cambridge Innovation
@CIInstitute
·
RT percayai: We’ve put together what’s sure to be a thought-provoking discussion group for #BioIT20 “Why Current Approaches Using #AI in #…
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Cambridge Innovation
@CIInstitute

RT VishakhaSharma_: Excited to speak and moderate a panel on Emerging #AI technologies bioitworld #BioIT20
1

Titian Software
@TitianSoftware

Meet Titian at #BioIT20 on 6-8th October and discover the latest research, science and solutions for exploring the world of precision medicine and the technologies that are powering it: bit.ly/2GjCj4B

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PERCAYAI
@percayai

Thanks for joining us, Wendy! You’ve done a great job summing up key points from the discussion. #BioIT20
1

Aviva Lev-Ari
@AVIVA1950

#NIHhealthInitiative #BioItWorld20

Out standing Plenary Keynote on #DataScience

CONNECTED DATA ECOSYSTEM FAIR Foundable, Accessible, Interoperable, reusable

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Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage AACR 2020: Tuesday June 23, 2020 3:00 PM-5:30 PM Educational Sessions

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

Follow Live in Real Time using

#AACR20

@pharma_BI

@AACR

Register for FREE at https://www.aacr.org/

uesday, June 23

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Virtual Educational Session
Tumor Biology, Bioinformatics and Systems Biology

The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium: Resources and Data Dissemination

This session will provide information regarding methodologic and computational aspects of proteogenomic analysis of tumor samples, particularly in the context of clinical trials. Availability of comprehensive proteomic and matching genomic data for tumor samples characterized by the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program will be described, including data access procedures and informatic tools under development. Recent advances on mass spectrometry-based targeted assays for inclusion in clinical trials will also be discussed.

Amanda G Paulovich, Shankha Satpathy, Meenakshi Anurag, Bing Zhang, Steven A Carr

Methods and tools for comprehensive proteogenomic characterization of bulk tumor to needle core biopsies

Shankha Satpathy
  • TCGA has 11,000 cancers with >20,000 somatic alterations but only 128 proteins as proteomics was still young field
  • CPTAC is NCI proteomic effort
  • Chemical labeling approach now method of choice for quantitative proteomics
  • Looked at ovarian and breast cancers: to measure PTM like phosphorylated the sample preparation is critical

 

Data access and informatics tools for proteogenomics analysis

Bing Zhang
  • Raw and processed data (raw MS data) with linked clinical data can be extracted in CPTAC
  • Python scripts are available for bioinformatic programming

 

Pathways to clinical translation of mass spectrometry-based assays

Meenakshi Anurag

·         Using kinase inhibitor pulldown (KIP) assay to identify unique kinome profiles

·         Found single strand break repair defects in endometrial luminal cases, especially with immune checkpoint prognostic tumors

·         Paper: JNCI 2019 analyzed 20,000 genes correlated with ET resistant in luminal B cases (selected for a list of 30 genes)

·         Validated in METABRIC dataset

·         KIP assay uses magnetic beads to pull out kinases to determine druggable kinases

·         Looked in xenografts and was able to pull out differential kinomes

·         Matched with PDX data so good clinical correlation

·         Were able to detect ESR1 fusion correlated with ER+ tumors

Tuesday, June 23

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Virtual Educational Session
Survivorship

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning from Research to the Cancer Clinic

The adoption of omic technologies in the cancer clinic is giving rise to an increasing number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording multiple aspects of the disease. This creates the need for frameworks for translatable discovery and learning from such data. Like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) for the cancer lab, methods for the clinic need to (i) compare and integrate different data types; (ii) scale with data sizes; (iii) prove interpretable in terms of the known biology and batch effects underlying the data; and (iv) predict previously unknown experimentally verifiable mechanisms. Methods for the clinic, beyond the lab, also need to (v) produce accurate actionable recommendations; (vi) prove relevant to patient populations based upon small cohorts; and (vii) be validated in clinical trials. In this educational session we will present recent studies that demonstrate AI and ML translated to the cancer clinic, from prognosis and diagnosis to therapy.
NOTE: Dr. Fish’s talk is not eligible for CME credit to permit the free flow of information of the commercial interest employee participating.

Ron C. Anafi, Rick L. Stevens, Orly Alter, Guy Fish

Overview of AI approaches in cancer research and patient care

Rick L. Stevens
  • Deep learning is less likely to saturate as data increases
  • Deep learning attempts to learn multiple layers of information
  • The ultimate goal is prediction but this will be the greatest challenge for ML
  • ML models can integrate data validation and cross database validation
  • What limits the performance of cross validation is the internal noise of data (reproducibility)
  • Learning curves: not the more data but more reproducible data is important
  • Neural networks can outperform classical methods
  • Important to measure validation accuracy in training set. Class weighting can assist in development of data set for training set especially for unbalanced data sets

Discovering genome-scale predictors of survival and response to treatment with multi-tensor decompositions

Orly Alter
  • Finding patterns using SVD component analysis. Gene and SVD patterns match 1:1
  • Comparative spectral decompositions can be used for global datasets
  • Validation of CNV data using this strategy
  • Found Ras, Shh and Notch pathways with altered CNV in glioblastoma which correlated with prognosis
  • These predictors was significantly better than independent prognostic indicator like age of diagnosis

 

Identifying targets for cancer chronotherapy with unsupervised machine learning

Ron C. Anafi
  • Many clinicians have noticed that some patients do better when chemo is given at certain times of the day and felt there may be a circadian rhythm or chronotherapeutic effect with respect to side effects or with outcomes
  • ML used to determine if there is indeed this chronotherapy effect or can we use unstructured data to determine molecular rhythms?
  • Found a circadian transcription in human lung
  • Most dataset in cancer from one clinical trial so there might need to be more trials conducted to take into consideration circadian rhythms

Stratifying patients by live-cell biomarkers with random-forest decision trees

Stratifying patients by live-cell biomarkers with random-forest decision trees

Guy Fish CEO Cellanyx Diagnostics

 

Tuesday, June 23

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Virtual Educational Session
Tumor Biology, Molecular and Cellular Biology/Genetics, Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Prevention Research

The Wound Healing that Never Heals: The Tumor Microenvironment (TME) in Cancer Progression

This educational session focuses on the chronic wound healing, fibrosis, and cancer “triad.” It emphasizes the similarities and differences seen in these conditions and attempts to clarify why sustained fibrosis commonly supports tumorigenesis. Importance will be placed on cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), vascularity, extracellular matrix (ECM), and chronic conditions like aging. Dr. Dvorak will provide an historical insight into the triad field focusing on the importance of vascular permeability. Dr. Stewart will explain how chronic inflammatory conditions, such as the aging tumor microenvironment (TME), drive cancer progression. The session will close with a review by Dr. Cukierman of the roles that CAFs and self-produced ECMs play in enabling the signaling reciprocity observed between fibrosis and cancer in solid epithelial cancers, such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Harold F Dvorak, Sheila A Stewart, Edna Cukierman

 

The importance of vascular permeability in tumor stroma generation and wound healing

Harold F Dvorak

Aging in the driver’s seat: Tumor progression and beyond

Sheila A Stewart

Why won’t CAFs stay normal?

Edna Cukierman

 

Tuesday, June 23

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Articles on this Open Access  Online Journal on Cancer Conferences and Conference Coverage in Real Time Include

Press Coverage
Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Symposium: New Drugs on the Horizon Part 3 12:30-1:25 PM
Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Session on NCI Activities: COVID-19 and Cancer Research 5:20 PM
Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Session on Evaluating Cancer Genomics from Normal Tissues Through Metastatic Disease 3:50 PM
Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Session on Novel Targets and Therapies 2:35 PM

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Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage AACR 2020 #AACR20: Tuesday June 23, 2020 Noon-2:45 Educational Sessions


Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage AACR 2020: Tuesday June 23, 2020 Noon-2:45 Educational Sessions

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

Follow Live in Real Time using

#AACR20

@pharma_BI

@AACR

Register for FREE at https://www.aacr.org/

 

Presidential Address

Elaine R Mardis, William N Hait

DETAILS

Welcome and introduction

William N Hait

 

Improving diagnostic yield in pediatric cancer precision medicine

Elaine R Mardis
  • Advent of genomics have revolutionized how we diagnose and treat lung cancer
  • We are currently needing to understand the driver mutations and variants where we can personalize therapy
  • PD-L1 and other checkpoint therapy have not really been used in pediatric cancers even though CAR-T have been successful
  • The incidence rates and mortality rates of pediatric cancers are rising
  • Large scale study of over 700 pediatric cancers show cancers driven by epigenetic drivers or fusion proteins. Need for transcriptomics.  Also study demonstrated that we have underestimated germ line mutations and hereditary factors.
  • They put together a database to nominate patients on their IGM Cancer protocol. Involves genetic counseling and obtaining germ line samples to determine hereditary factors.  RNA and protein are evaluated as well as exome sequencing. RNASeq and Archer Dx test to identify driver fusions
  • PECAN curated database from St. Jude used to determine driver mutations. They use multiple databases and overlap within these databases and knowledge base to determine or weed out false positives
  • They have used these studies to understand the immune infiltrate into recurrent cancers (CytoCure)
  • They found 40 germline cancer predisposition genes, 47 driver somatic fusion proteins, 81 potential actionable targets, 106 CNV, 196 meaningful somatic driver mutations

 

 

Tuesday, June 23

12:00 PM – 12:30 PM EDT

Awards and Lectures

NCI Director’s Address

Norman E Sharpless, Elaine R Mardis

DETAILS

Introduction: Elaine Mardis

 

NCI Director Address: Norman E Sharpless
  • They are functioning well at NCI with respect to grant reviews, research, and general functions in spite of the COVID pandemic and the massive demonstrations on also focusing on the disparities which occur in cancer research field and cancer care
  • There are ongoing efforts at NCI to make a positive difference in racial injustice, diversity in the cancer workforce, and for patients as well
  • Need a diverse workforce across the cancer research and care spectrum
  • Data show that areas where the clinicians are successful in putting African Americans on clinical trials are areas (geographic and site specific) where health disparities are narrowing
  • Grants through NCI new SeroNet for COVID-19 serologic testing funded by two RFAs through NIAD (RFA-CA-30-038 and RFA-CA-20-039) and will close on July 22, 2020

 

Tuesday, June 23

12:45 PM – 1:46 PM EDT

Virtual Educational Session

Immunology, Tumor Biology, Experimental and Molecular Therapeutics, Molecular and Cellular Biology/Genetics

Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy for Nonimmunologists: Innovation and Discovery in Immune-Oncology

This educational session will update cancer researchers and clinicians about the latest developments in the detailed understanding of the types and roles of immune cells in tumors. It will summarize current knowledge about the types of T cells, natural killer cells, B cells, and myeloid cells in tumors and discuss current knowledge about the roles these cells play in the antitumor immune response. The session will feature some of the most promising up-and-coming cancer immunologists who will inform about their latest strategies to harness the immune system to promote more effective therapies.

Judith A Varner, Yuliya Pylayeva-Gupta

 

Introduction

Judith A Varner
New techniques reveal critical roles of myeloid cells in tumor development and progression
  • Different type of cells are becoming targets for immune checkpoint like myeloid cells
  • In T cell excluded or desert tumors T cells are held at periphery so myeloid cells can infiltrate though so macrophages might be effective in these immune t cell naïve tumors, macrophages are most abundant types of immune cells in tumors
  • CXCLs are potential targets
  • PI3K delta inhibitors,
  • Reduce the infiltrate of myeloid tumor suppressor cells like macrophages
  • When should we give myeloid or T cell therapy is the issue
Judith A Varner
Novel strategies to harness T-cell biology for cancer therapy
Positive and negative roles of B cells in cancer
Yuliya Pylayeva-Gupta
New approaches in cancer immunotherapy: Programming bacteria to induce systemic antitumor immunity

 

 

Tuesday, June 23

12:45 PM – 1:46 PM EDT

Virtual Educational Session

Cancer Chemistry

Chemistry to the Clinic: Part 2: Irreversible Inhibitors as Potential Anticancer Agents

There are numerous examples of highly successful covalent drugs such as aspirin and penicillin that have been in use for a long period of time. Despite historical success, there was a period of reluctance among many to purse covalent drugs based on concerns about toxicity. With advances in understanding features of a well-designed covalent drug, new techniques to discover and characterize covalent inhibitors, and clinical success of new covalent cancer drugs in recent years, there is renewed interest in covalent compounds. This session will provide a broad look at covalent probe compounds and drug development, including a historical perspective, examination of warheads and electrophilic amino acids, the role of chemoproteomics, and case studies.

Benjamin F Cravatt, Richard A. Ward, Sara J Buhrlage

 

Discovering and optimizing covalent small-molecule ligands by chemical proteomics

Benjamin F Cravatt
  • Multiple approaches are being investigated to find new covalent inhibitors such as: 1) cysteine reactivity mapping, 2) mapping cysteine ligandability, 3) and functional screening in phenotypic assays for electrophilic compounds
  • Using fluorescent activity probes in proteomic screens; have broad useability in the proteome but can be specific
  • They screened quiescent versus stimulated T cells to determine reactive cysteines in a phenotypic screen and analyzed by MS proteomics (cysteine reactivity profiling); can quantitate 15000 to 20,000 reactive cysteines
  • Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and adapter protein LCP-1 are two examples of changes in reactive cysteines they have seen using this method
  • They use scout molecules to target ligands or proteins with reactive cysteines
  • For phenotypic screens they first use a cytotoxic assay to screen out toxic compounds which just kill cells without causing T cell activation (like IL10 secretion)
  • INTERESTINGLY coupling these MS reactive cysteine screens with phenotypic screens you can find NONCANONICAL mechanisms of many of these target proteins (many of the compounds found targets which were not predicted or known)

Electrophilic warheads and nucleophilic amino acids: A chemical and computational perspective on covalent modifier

The covalent targeting of cysteine residues in drug discovery and its application to the discovery of Osimertinib

Richard A. Ward
  • Cysteine activation: thiolate form of cysteine is a strong nucleophile
  • Thiolate form preferred in polar environment
  • Activation can be assisted by neighboring residues; pKA will have an effect on deprotonation
  • pKas of cysteine vary in EGFR
  • cysteine that are too reactive give toxicity while not reactive enough are ineffective

 

Accelerating drug discovery with lysine-targeted covalent probes

 

Tuesday, June 23

12:45 PM – 2:15 PM EDT

Virtual Educational Session

Molecular and Cellular Biology/Genetics

Virtual Educational Session

Tumor Biology, Immunology

Metabolism and Tumor Microenvironment

This Educational Session aims to guide discussion on the heterogeneous cells and metabolism in the tumor microenvironment. It is now clear that the diversity of cells in tumors each require distinct metabolic programs to survive and proliferate. Tumors, however, are genetically programmed for high rates of metabolism and can present a metabolically hostile environment in which nutrient competition and hypoxia can limit antitumor immunity.

Jeffrey C Rathmell, Lydia Lynch, Mara H Sherman, Greg M Delgoffe

 

T-cell metabolism and metabolic reprogramming antitumor immunity

Jeffrey C Rathmell

Introduction

Jeffrey C Rathmell

Metabolic functions of cancer-associated fibroblasts

Mara H Sherman

Tumor microenvironment metabolism and its effects on antitumor immunity and immunotherapeutic response

Greg M Delgoffe
  • Multiple metabolites, reactive oxygen species within the tumor microenvironment; is there heterogeneity within the TME metabolome which can predict their ability to be immunosensitive
  • Took melanoma cells and looked at metabolism using Seahorse (glycolysis): and there was vast heterogeneity in melanoma tumor cells; some just do oxphos and no glycolytic metabolism (inverse Warburg)
  • As they profiled whole tumors they could separate out the metabolism of each cell type within the tumor and could look at T cells versus stromal CAFs or tumor cells and characterized cells as indolent or metabolic
  • T cells from hyerglycolytic tumors were fine but from high glycolysis the T cells were more indolent
  • When knock down glucose transporter the cells become more glycolytic
  • If patient had high oxidative metabolism had low PDL1 sensitivity
  • Showed this result in head and neck cancer as well
  • Metformin a complex 1 inhibitor which is not as toxic as most mito oxphos inhibitors the T cells have less hypoxia and can remodel the TME and stimulate the immune response
  • Metformin now in clinical trials
  • T cells though seem metabolically restricted; T cells that infiltrate tumors are low mitochondrial phosph cells
  • T cells from tumors have defective mitochondria or little respiratory capacity
  • They have some preliminary findings that metabolic inhibitors may help with CAR-T therapy

Obesity, lipids and suppression of anti-tumor immunity

Lydia Lynch
  • Hypothesis: obesity causes issues with anti tumor immunity
  • Less NK cells in obese people; also produce less IFN gamma
  • RNASeq on NOD mice; granzymes and perforins at top of list of obese downregulated
  • Upregulated genes that were upregulated involved in lipid metabolism
  • All were PPAR target genes
  • NK cells from obese patients takes up palmitate and this reduces their glycolysis but OXPHOS also reduced; they think increased FFA basically overloads mitochondria
  • PPAR alpha gamma activation mimics obesity

 

 

Tuesday, June 23

12:45 PM – 2:45 PM EDT

Virtual Educational Session

Clinical Research Excluding Trials

The Evolving Role of the Pathologist in Cancer Research

Long recognized for their role in cancer diagnosis and prognostication, pathologists are beginning to leverage a variety of digital imaging technologies and computational tools to improve both clinical practice and cancer research. Remarkably, the emergence of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning algorithms for analyzing pathology specimens is poised to not only augment the resolution and accuracy of clinical diagnosis, but also fundamentally transform the role of the pathologist in cancer science and precision oncology. This session will discuss what pathologists are currently able to achieve with these new technologies, present their challenges and barriers, and overview their future possibilities in cancer diagnosis and research. The session will also include discussions of what is practical and doable in the clinic for diagnostic and clinical oncology in comparison to technologies and approaches primarily utilized to accelerate cancer research.

 

Jorge S Reis-Filho, Thomas J Fuchs, David L Rimm, Jayanta Debnath

DETAILS

Tuesday, June 23

12:45 PM – 2:45 PM EDT

 

High-dimensional imaging technologies in cancer research

David L Rimm

  • Using old methods and new methods; so cell counting you use to find the cells then phenotype; with quantification like with Aqua use densitometry of positive signal to determine a threshold to determine presence of a cell for counting
  • Hiplex versus multiplex imaging where you have ten channels to measure by cycling of flour on antibody (can get up to 20plex)
  • Hiplex can be coupled with Mass spectrometry (Imaging Mass spectrometry, based on heavy metal tags on mAbs)
  • However it will still take a trained pathologist to define regions of interest or field of desired view

 

Introduction

Jayanta Debnath

Challenges and barriers of implementing AI tools for cancer diagnostics

Jorge S Reis-Filho

Implementing robust digital pathology workflows into clinical practice and cancer research

Jayanta Debnath

Invited Speaker

Thomas J Fuchs
  • Founder of spinout of Memorial Sloan Kettering
  • Separates AI from computational algothimic
  • Dealing with not just machines but integrating human intelligence
  • Making decision for the patients must involve human decision making as well
  • How do we get experts to do these decisions faster
  • AI in pathology: what is difficult? =è sandbox scenarios where machines are great,; curated datasets; human decision support systems or maps; or try to predict nature
  • 1) learn rules made by humans; human to human scenario 2)constrained nature 3)unconstrained nature like images and or behavior 4) predict nature response to nature response to itself
  • In sandbox scenario the rules are set in stone and machines are great like chess playing
  • In second scenario can train computer to predict what a human would predict
  • So third scenario is like driving cars
  • System on constrained nature or constrained dataset will take a long time for commuter to get to decision
  • Fourth category is long term data collection project
  • He is finding it is still finding it is still is difficult to predict nature so going from clinical finding to prognosis still does not have good predictability with AI alone; need for human involvement
  • End to end partnering (EPL) is a new way where humans can get more involved with the algorithm and assist with the problem of constrained data
  • An example of a workflow for pathology would be as follows from Campanella et al 2019 Nature Medicine: obtain digital images (they digitized a million slides), train a massive data set with highthroughput computing (needed a lot of time and big software developing effort), and then train it using input be the best expert pathologists (nature to human and unconstrained because no data curation done)
  • Led to first clinically grade machine learning system (Camelyon16 was the challenge for detecting metastatic cells in lymph tissue; tested on 12,000 patients from 45 countries)
  • The first big hurdle was moving from manually annotated slides (which was a big bottleneck) to automatically extracted data from path reports).
  • Now problem is in prediction: How can we bridge the gap from predicting humans to predicting nature?
  • With an AI system pathologist drastically improved the ability to detect very small lesions

 

Virtual Educational Session

Epidemiology

Cancer Increases in Younger Populations: Where Are They Coming from?

Incidence rates of several cancers (e.g., colorectal, pancreatic, and breast cancers) are rising in younger populations, which contrasts with either declining or more slowly rising incidence in older populations. Early-onset cancers are also more aggressive and have different tumor characteristics than those in older populations. Evidence on risk factors and contributors to early-onset cancers is emerging. In this Educational Session, the trends and burden, potential causes, risk factors, and tumor characteristics of early-onset cancers will be covered. Presenters will focus on colorectal and breast cancer, which are among the most common causes of cancer deaths in younger people. Potential mechanisms of early-onset cancers and racial/ethnic differences will also be discussed.

Stacey A. Fedewa, Xavier Llor, Pepper Jo Schedin, Yin Cao

Cancers that are and are not increasing in younger populations

Stacey A. Fedewa

 

  • Early onset cancers, pediatric cancers and colon cancers are increasing in younger adults
  • Younger people are more likely to be uninsured and these are there most productive years so it is a horrible life event for a young adult to be diagnosed with cancer. They will have more financial hardship and most (70%) of the young adults with cancer have had financial difficulties.  It is very hard for women as they are on their childbearing years so additional stress
  • Types of early onset cancer varies by age as well as geographic locations. For example in 20s thyroid cancer is more common but in 30s it is breast cancer.  Colorectal and testicular most common in US.
  • SCC is decreasing by adenocarcinoma of the cervix is increasing in women’s 40s, potentially due to changing sexual behaviors
  • Breast cancer is increasing in younger women: maybe etiologic distinct like triple negative and larger racial disparities in younger African American women
  • Increased obesity among younger people is becoming a factor in this increasing incidence of early onset cancers

 

 

Other Articles on this Open Access  Online Journal on Cancer Conferences and Conference Coverage in Real Time Include

Press Coverage

Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Symposium: New Drugs on the Horizon Part 3 12:30-1:25 PM

Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Session on NCI Activities: COVID-19 and Cancer Research 5:20 PM

Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Session on Evaluating Cancer Genomics from Normal Tissues Through Metastatic Disease 3:50 PM

Live Notes, Real Time Conference Coverage 2020 AACR Virtual Meeting April 28, 2020 Session on Novel Targets and Therapies 2:35 PM

 

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2020 World Medical Innovation Forum – COVID-19, AI and the Future of Medicine, Featuring Harvard and Industry Leader Insights – MGH & BWH, Virtual Event: Monday, May 11, 8:15 a.m. – 5:15 p.m. ET

Dialogue among principals is a World Forum’s signature. Expert moderators guiding discussion and questions in audience friendly exchanges. No slides – shared perspectives facilitated by Harvard faculty, leading journalists and Mass General Brigham executives.

Jeffrey Golden, MD

Chair, Department of Pathology, BH; Ramzi S. Cotran Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School

Hadine Joffe, MD

Vice Chair, Psychiatry, Executive Director, Mary Horrigan Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, BH; Paula A. Johnson Professor, Women’s Health, Harvard Medical School

Thomas Sequist, MD

Chief Patient Experience and Equity Officer, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

Erica Shenoy, MD, PhD

Associate Chief, Infection Control Unit, MGH; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

Gregg Meyer, MD

Chief Clinical Officer, Mass General Brigham; Interim President, NWH; Professor, Harvard Medical School

Ravi Thadhani, MD

CAO, Mass General Brigham; Professor and Faculty Dean for Academic Programs, Harvard Medical School

Ann Prestipino

SVP; Incident Commander, MGH

Roger Kitterman

VP, Venture and Managing Partner, Partners Innovation Fund, Mass General Brigham

David Louis, MD

Pathologist-in-Chief, MGH; Benjamin Castleman Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School

Janet Wu

Bloomberg

Ron Walls, MD

EVP and Chief Operating Officer, BH; Neskey Family Professor of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Alice Park

Senior Writer, TIME

 

Jeffrey Golden, MD

Chair, Department of Pathology, BH; Ramzi S. Cotran Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School

Hadine Joffe, MD

Vice Chair, Psychiatry, Executive Director, Mary Horrigan Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, BH; Paula A. Johnson Professor, Women’s Health, Harvard Medical School

Thomas Sequist, MD

Chief Patient Experience and Equity Officer, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School

Erica Shenoy, MD, PhD

Associate Chief, Infection Control Unit, MGH; Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School

Gregg Meyer, MD

Chief Clinical Officer, Mass General Brigham; Interim President, NWH; Professor, Harvard Medical School

Ravi Thadhani, MD

CAO, Mass General Brigham; Professor and Faculty Dean for Academic Programs, Harvard Medical School

Ann Prestipino

SVP; Incident Commander, MGH

Roger Kitterman

VP, Venture and Managing Partner, Partners Innovation Fund, Mass General Brigham

David Louis, MD

Pathologist-in-Chief, MGH; Benjamin Castleman Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School

Janet Wu

Bloomberg

Ron Walls, MD

EVP and Chief Operating Officer, BH; Neskey Family Professor of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Alice Park

Senior Writer, TIME

 

VIEW VIDEOS from the event

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCauKpbsS_hUqQaPp8EVGYOg

 

From: “Coburn, Christopher Mark” <CMCOBURN@PARTNERS.ORG>

Date: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 at 6:48 AM

To: “Coburn, Christopher Mark” <CMCOBURN@PARTNERS.ORG>

Subject: REGISTRANT RECAP | World Medical Innovation Forum  

 

Dear World Forum Attendee, 

On behalf of Mass General Brigham CEO Anne Klibanski MD and Forum co-Chairs Gregg Meyer MD and Ravi Thadhani MD, many thanks for being among the nearly 11,000 registrants representing 93 countries, 46 states and 3200 organizations yesterday. A community was established around many pressing topics that  will continue long into the future. We hope you have a chance to examine the attached survey results. There are several revealing items that should be the basis for ongoing discussion. We expect to be in touch regularly during the year. Among the plans is a “First Look” video series highlighting top Mass General Brigham Harvard faculty as well as emerging Harvard investigators.  As promised, we  wanted to also share visual Forum session summaries.  You will be able to access the recordings on the Forum’s YouTube page . The first set will go up this morning

We hope you will join us for the 2021 Forum!  

Thanks again, Chris

e-Proceedings 2020 World Medical Innovation Forum – COVID-19, AI and the Future of Medicine, Featuring Harvard and Industry Leader Insights – MGH & BWH, Virtual Event: Monday, May 11, 8:15 a.m. – 5:15 p.m. ET

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/04/22/world-medical-innovation-forum-covid-19-ai-and-the-future-of-medicine-featuring-harvard-and-industry-leader-insights-mgh-bwh-virtual-event-monday-may-11-815-a-m-515-p-m-et/

Tweets & Retweets 2020 World Medical Innovation Forum – COVID-19, AI and the Future of Medicine, Featuring Harvard and Industry Leader Insights – MGH & BWH, Virtual Event: Monday, May 11, 8:15 a.m. – 5:15 p.m. ET

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2020/05/11/tweets-retweets-2020-world-medical-innovation-forum-covid-19-ai-and-the-future-of-medicine-featuring-harvard-and-industry-leader-insights-mgh-bwh-virtual-event-mond/

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e-Proceedings 2020 World Medical Innovation Forum – COVID-19, AI and the Future of Medicine, Featuring Harvard and Industry Leader Insights – MGH & BWH, Virtual Event: Monday, May 11, 8:15 a.m. – 5:15 p.m. ET

 

Featuring Clinical, Scientific, Tech, AI and Venture Experts

https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/

7:50NOW PLAYING

2020 WMIF | Welcome

34 views1 hour ago

5:31NOW PLAYING

2020 WMIF | Disruptive Dozen #1

122 views1 day ago

3:27NOW PLAYING

3:56NOW PLAYING

2020 WMIF | Disruptive Dozen #4

57 views2 days ago

SOURCE

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCauKpbsS_hUqQaPp8EVGYOg

 

THIS IS THE EVENT I COVERED on 5/11/2020  BY INVITATION AS MEDIA for Mass General Brigham

 

From: “Coburn, Christopher Mark” <CMCOBURN@PARTNERS.ORG>

Date: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 at 6:48 AM

To: “Coburn, Christopher Mark” <CMCOBURN@PARTNERS.ORG>

Subject: REGISTRANT RECAP | World Medical Innovation Forum  

 

Dear World Forum Attendee, 

On behalf of Mass General Brigham CEO Anne Klibanski MD and Forum co-Chairs Gregg Meyer MD and Ravi Thadhani MD, many thanks for being among the nearly 11,000 registrants representing 93 countries, 46 states and 3200 organizations yesterday. A community was established around many pressing topics that  will continue long into the future. We hope you have a chance to examine the attached survey results. There are several revealing items that should be the basis for ongoing discussion. We expect to be in touch regularly during the year. Among the plans is a “First Look” video series highlighting top Mass General Brigham Harvard faculty as well as emerging Harvard investigators.  As promised, we  wanted to also share visual Forum session summaries.  You will be able to access the recordings on the Forum’s YouTube page . The first set will go up this morning

We hope you will join us for the 2021 Forum!  

Thanks again, Chris

 

Mass General Brigham (formerly Partners Healthcare) is pleased to invite media to attend the World Medical Innovation Forum (WMIF) virtual event on Monday, May 11. Our day-long interactive web event features expert discussions of COVID-related infectious disease innovation and the pandemic’s impact on transforming medicine, plus insights on how care may be radically transformed post-COVID. The agenda features nearly 70 executive speakers from the healthcare industry, venture, start-ups, consumer health and the front lines of COVID care, including many of our Harvard Medical School-affiliated researchers and clinicians. The event replaces our annual in-person conference, which we plan to resume in 2021.

 

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor-in Chief, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston will cover the event in Real Time as MEDIA for our Coronavirus Portal

CORONAVIRUS, SARS-CoV-2 PORTAL @LPBI

http://lnkd.in/ePwTDxm

Launched on 3/14/2020

8:15 – 8:25 AM
Opening Remarks

Dr. Klibanski will welcome participants to the 2020 World Medical Innovation Forum, a global — and this year, virtual — gathering of more than 5,000 senior health care leaders. This annual event was established to respond to the intensifying transformation of health care and its impact on innovation. The Forum is rooted in the belief that no matter the magnitude of that change, the center of health care needs to be a shared, fundamental commitment to collaborative innovation – industry and academia working together to improve patient lives. No collaborative endeavor is more pressing than responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Introduction:
Scott Sperling, Co-President, Thomas H. Lee Partners; Chairman of the Board of Directors, Mass General Brigham

  • Introducing Anne Klibanski – Leadership at its best for breakthroughs in the entire system when return to normalcy

Anne Klibanski, MD, President & CEO, Mass General Brigham

  • Collaborative innovation between Industry and Hospitals and Government
  • Expediting innovations: Prophylactic, Diagnostics, research and care delivery
  • COVID caregivers contribution to this battle, patient experience and outcome

Add Panel to Calendar

8:25 – 8:50 AM
Care in the Next 18 Months – Routine, Elective, Remote

Hospital chief executives reflect on how health care will evolve over the next 18 months in the face of COVID-19. What will routine health care look like? What about elective surgeries and other interventions? And will care-at-a-distance continue to be an essential component? Simply put, how will we provide manage, and pay for health care in a world forever changed by COVID-19?

Moderator:
Gregg Meyer, MD, Chief Clinical Officer, Mass General Brigham; Interim President, NWH; Professor of Medicine, HMS

John Fernandez,  President, Mass Eye and Ear and Mass General Brigham Ambulatory Care

  • Out patients decrease in volume now social distancing enabled by using parking lot as waiting rooms
  • Pre visit and post visit websites will become places of touch – patients accessing via website

Elizabeth Nabel, MD, President, Brigham Health; Professor of Medicine, HMS

  • Support to frontline care
  • Old normal will not be the new normal
  • Telehealth and digital health, work force, healthcare experience, improve access
  • lower medical expense
  • Patients were afraid
  • deferred cancer operation and treatment
  • Cath Lab less 50% occupied
  • Hospitals are safe and patients must come back for procedures
  • COVID-19 only 20% of all patients
  • ICU and OR Scheduling rethink procedure digital care delivers procedures
  • deploy workforce work across repurposed units hybrids, talent acquisition new strategy
  • COVID-19 will have distinct areas
  • BWH – Patient-Nurse-Doctor relations in healing Healthcare team became the Family of the Patients

Peter Slavin, MD, President, MGH; Professor, Health Care Policy, HMS

  • Reemerging more complicated
  • In patients and Out patient realigned with care for COVID-19
  • Telemedicine 85% of outpatients visits at MGH
  • virtual care will dominate the future of care
  • disadvantaged populations suffered more in the pandemic Communities in Chelsea and Revere household received kits social determinants of illness

Add Panel to Calendar

8:50 – 9:15 AM
COVID-19: Technology Solutions Now and in the Future

Experts leading large teams at the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak discuss how technology is shaping the pandemic response today and in the coming years. What technology categories are most important? What tools are healthcare organizations, biopharmaceutical companies, and other organizations leveraging to battle this crisis? How will those tools evolve? And, importantly, how can technology inform the medical response to future pandemics? What were the biggest technology surprises in the current response?

Moderator:
Alice Park, Senior Writer, Time

Stephane Bancel, CEO, Moderna

  • mRNA synthetic RNA of Spike protein injected to stir immune response
  • Phase II working with FDA starting Phase III early Summer
  • 15 mcg dose available in 2020
  • using own capital to invest to scale up manufacturing no help from Gov’t Grant for clinical trial not for manufacturing

Paul Biddinger, MD, Medical Director for Emergency Preparedness, MGH; Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS

  • Sharing information across the system aggregate data technologies
  • ML as Guidance in resource coordination

David Kaufman, MD, PhD, Head of Translational Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Medical Research Institute

  • drug development, clinical operations remote monitoring
  • repurpose compounds usinf libraries
  • scalability and Global vaccine cheap and available globally
  • complexity is in coordinations – toolset  biology tool RNA mapping viral screening primaru cells and organoids
  • Outcomes: Aging and co-morbidities
  • Discovery effort using tools infrastructure maintained between pandemics

Rochelle Walensky, MDChief, Infectious Disease, Steve and Deborah Gorlin MGH Research Scholar, MGH; Professor of Medicine, HMS

  • shared photos important for Public health, using iPhone distribution Demedicalize Testic – not only at clinics but at many placed contact tracing and diagnosis in 24 hours – iPhone is invaluable GPS capability – privacy issues
  • detect patients with high risk and existing infection monitoring
  • Public Health – Thermometer given to Patients – data collected centrally any spike and pulse oximeter given to home – remote
  • Anxiety in opening the economy requires a bit of giving up on privacy
  • TeleHealth and monitoring remotely
  • Pharmacy and workplace as points to start Testing vs Order and a nurse call

Add Panel to Calendar

9:15 – 9:40 AM
Digital Health Becomes a Pillar: Tools, Payment, Data

Deployed in the crucible of the coronavirus pandemic, digital health has now become an essential pillar in the delivery of care. Why is that significant? How and why did it happen? What are the essential tools and components? How is the electronic health record and other health data contributing to this digital movement?

Are there novel use cases for telehealth that arose during the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic? How can digital technologies help enable a full return to work. Thinking ahead to the fall and a possible second wave, are there things we should be doing today to ensure this technology to better detect and profile a resurgence and enhance the patient benefit.

Moderator:
David Louis, MD, Pathologist-in-Chief, MGH; Benjamin Castleman Professor of Pathology, HMS

  • DIgitsl technologies – boostong and innovating
  • upscale activity
  • risk of upscaling on Providers
  • Adaptations of innovation

Alistair Erskine, MD, Chief Digital Health Officer, Mass General Brigham

Adam Landman, MD, VP, Chief Information and Digital Innovation Officer, BH; Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS

  • COVID-19 call center across Partners, Chat bots automated screening tools, Microsoft assisted 60,000 users of chat bots triaging by screening calls of the Hotline
  • TeleHealth transformation may be lost due to reimbursement which may not be reimburse after the emergency is over Insurers to incentivize use of of TeleHealth
  • In person care: Redesign and how to provide In care for the staff and for the Patients

Brooke LeVasseur, CEO, AristaMD

  • Access problem due to care shortage of specialty care
  • technology better allocate resources
  • Industry and Hospital Institutions populations they serve
  • innovations needs a sustainable economic model for reimbursement
  • Inequity issues How Telehealth can benefit all of Society, potential for future solutions

Lee Schwamm, MD, Director, Center for TeleHealth and Exec Vice Chair, Neurology, MGH; Vice President, Virtual Care/Digital Health, Mass General Brigham; Professor, Neurology, HMS

  • Surge capabilities
  • generate insight
  • Research and Innovation needs embedding in the enterprise
  • technical gap in maintenance
  • supply chain disrupted

Add Panel to Calendar

9:40 – 9:45 AM
BREAK
9:45 – 10:05 AM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Bayer Pharma Reflections on Innovation: Creating, Collaborating, and Accelerating Discovery During and After a Pandemic

Dr. Moeller will reflect on how Bayer is weathering the organizational challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. How does a global pharmaceutical company continue to drive drug development when its labs are shut down? What are the critical elements needed to keep the engines of innovation firing even in the face of a global public health crisis? How does a global r&d enterprise plan for an uncertain fall 2020 given a potential return of the virus.

Introduction:
John Fish, CEO, Suffolk; Chairman of Board Trustees, Brigham Health

  • COPD

Moderator:
Janet Wu, Bloomberg

Joerg Moeller, MD, PhD, Head of Research & Development, Pharmaceuticals Division, Bayer AG

  • led team of 9 products
  • Unprecedented is COVID-19: effect on work, travel, life
  • Anti-Malaria vs COVID-19: In China testing early chloroquine approved for RA and anti Malaria Government in China experimental and Bayer supports Clinical Trials by Bill & Melinda Foundation
  • In 8 weeks most Scientist work from home – amazed what was accomplished by 80% of Bayer working from home
  • production is kept ongoing anti-infective for Pneumonia
  • focus on most critical and keep experiment critical and push out studies run Globally – No pre-maturely study was interrupted completely
  • Great collaboration Flexibility with regulatory agencies in Europe and with FDA – levels not seen before
  • R&D in Pharma – when out different point than when we started: Opportunities- Compound libraries OPEN after the COVID Pandemic, speed of decision making, team spirit outstanding – levels not seen before
  • Partnerships: Bayer testing machines and ventilators shared, accelerate mechanisms for new drug development
  • evidence for repurposing drugs: Chloroquine
  • Solidarity – everyone are in it TOGETHER, keep that after the Pandemic is over – levels not seen before

Add Panel to Calendar

10:05 – 10:30 AM
The Patient Experience During the Pandemic

The coronavirus outbreak is not only testing health care staff and resources, it is also having an overwhelming impact on patients. This panel will focus on the approach and technologies providers are using to address the patient experience along the continuum of care.

Moderator:
Thomas Sequist, MD, Chief Patient Experience and Equity Officer, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, HMS

Anjali Kataria, CEO, Mytonomy

  • Video overcome illiteracy and provide personal engagement without the negative
  • Home health will be the shift – a human component will not go away – sensor technology in car, bathroom
  • COVID-19 accelerated user adoption of Telehealth
  • Digital technologies as an equailizer Hispanic patients consumed for information with the new technologies

Daniel Kuritzkes, MD, Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, BH; Harriet Ryan Albee Professor of Medicine, HMS

  • conserve PPE impacted Physicians ability to see Patients, Nurses meet patients vs Physicians that delivered care remotely – laying on hands was missing in the care
  • Masks will not come off but in a while, can’t allow the infection to surge and curtail hospitals from functioning, use mask for the foreseable future

 

Peter Lee, PhD, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research and Incubation

  • Interactive Chat bots 1 out of 500 hospitals around the Globe adopted the Chat Bot for Patient Intake
  • Scaling telemetry with feedback loop
  • iPad at bedside, platform orchestration, new workflows for COVID-19 patients in the backend guiding Patients in the Process was new infrastructure was in the front line
  • preparing for a game change in Medicine: Patients demanding new experience
  • Historical context for physicians contribution to care and bridge the digital divide

Jag Singh, MD, PhD, Cardiologist & Founding Director, Resynchronization and Advanced Cardiac Therapeutics Program, MGH; Professor of Medicine, HMS

  • Isolation is unbearable
  • Predictive analytics
  • no going back to before Pandemic
  • COVID-19 only severe go to hospital
  • Human contact enhanced interaction with families and Docs

Add Panel to Calendar

10:30 – 10:55 AM
The Role of AI and Big Data in Fighting COVID-19 and the Next Global Crisis – Successes and Aspirations

AI is a key weapon used to fight COVID-19. What are the biggest successes so far? Which applications show the most promise for the future? Can it help a return to work? Can AI help predict and even prevent the next global health care crisis?

Moderator:
Alice Park, Senior Writer, Time

Mike Devoy, MD, EVP, Medical Affairs & Pharmacovigilance and CMO, Bayer AG

  • AI allows speeding up Genome of Spike Proteins sequencing
  • Partnership with Academia help focus effort
  • openness and willingness to collaborate and take risk in Therapeutics

Karen DeSalvo, MD,  Chief Health Officer, Google Health

  • Partnership with Apple on Contact Tracing System – BLE – only for Health applications
  • Public Health as driver as consumer Privacy preserving
  • Individual level data collection for AI applications, privacy giving up for public good
  • Trust component – in sharing data

Keith Dreyer, DO, PhD, Chief Data Science Officer, Mass General Brigham; Vice Chairman, Radiology, MGH; Associate Professor, Radiology, HMS

  • COVID allowed data on contact tracing
  • AI in image capturing for Public health – target Imaging use data to be equivalent to Human Testing at Home va in ER 1 in 10, 000 vs all populations
  • Data to AI application SW providers are stewards Open source , no conflict of interest and no discussion on profits
  • Each country will have own lessens

Add Panel to Calendar

10:55 – 11:20 AM
Designing for Infection Prevention: Innovation and Investment in Personal Protective Equipment and Facility Design

As with many pathogens, prevention is the best defense against SARS-CoV2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Panelists will discuss the insights, design strategies, technologies, and practices that are emerging to guard against infection and how those innovations are being applied to protect health care providers and their patients.
Based on what was learned during the spring of 2020, are there specific changes that will lessen morbidity and mortality in a potential a second wave?

Moderator:
Erica Shenoy, MD, PhD, Associate Chief, Infection Control Unit, MGH; Assistant Professor, HMS

Shelly AndersonSVP, Strategic Initiatives and Partnerships, & Chief Strategy Officer, BH

  • How to establish the New normal
  • Surveillence for new sources of infection
  • Operations under uncertainty
  • learned to be effective with data monitoring, training, facility adaptation to new roles
  • Investments in new materials to stabilize the supply chain: Additional suppliers,
  • Extend internal supply work with R&D on alternative materials

Michele Holcomb, PhD, EVP, Strategy and Corporate Development, Cardinal Health

  • Optimize toward lower cost vs availability of supply
  • Diverting supply chain to manufacturing not in PPE business

 

Guillermo Tearney, MD, PhD, Remondi Family Endowed MGH Research Institute Chair, Mike and Sue Hazard MGH Research Scholar, MGH; Professor, Pathology, HMS

  • 3D Printing innovations for filtration capacity of particles, respirators decontaminated, prevention of patient transmission
  • Negative pressure applied on materials as second line of protection beyond PPE
  • CPAP to be used
  • weaning from Ventilators to CPAP
  • Environment to be protected from air born pathogens

Teresa Wilson, Director/Architect, Colliers Project Leaders

  • Physical Design of the facility and rooms – use design to minimize Hospital infections principals of location of clean vs dirty functions
  • room kept cleaned, how long it takes to clean, where is the sink, hands free, modular construction plug & play design of rooms functions

Add Panel to Calendar

11:20 – 11:25 AM
BREAK
11:25 – 11:45 AM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Preparing for Fall 2020 and Beyond: Production, Innovation, Optimization

How does a global medical technology and life sciences company respond to the health challenges posed by COVID-19? Mr. Murphy will reflect on how his organization is working to meet the unprecedented demand for life-saving medical equipment for diagnosing, treating, and managing coronavirus patients. How does a large manufacturer make adjustments to FDA regulated products and supply chains in time to help lessen the impact of a second wave of COVID-19 infections.

Introduction:
Jonathan Kraft, President, The Kraft Group; Chair, Mass General Hospital Board of Trustees

  • 90 countries around the Globe – collaborative innovations partnership with GE Health – all assets around the World
  • Academic with GE Health AI, Diagnostics, data set for ML for Health care

Moderator:
Timothy Ferris, MD, CEO, MGPO; Professor, HMS

Kieran Murphy, CEO, GE Healthcare

  • Partnership GE Health & MGH
  • COVID-19 Innovations and Customers needs: Ventilators and
  • ICU Cloud application with Microsoft to save PPE and Labor, monitor several ICU rooms at once by technology
  • Quadruple the production and enter new contracts, crisis exposed weaknesses in supply chain of many products
  • Shortage of PPE was not expected, flexibility and trusted relations with GE Health Suppliers
  • CT in a BOX – 42 Slices in a container – no exposure to radiation in prefabricated rooms in field hospital requiring no contact with clinicians and rapid response
  • Command control center with John Hopkins University
  • Manufacturing facilities in China communicate the situation of the business and the customers needs buyers in the Health care industry
  • Future for Biotech industry: Modular systems deploy rapidly, test vaccine, SPEED is everything productivity & Speed
  • Productivity will increase collaboration and speed like partnership with FORD and MIcrosoft

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11:45 AM – 12:10 PM
Big Tech and Digital Health

Tech giants are dedicating their vast resources to aid in the global response to the coronavirus. This panel will highlight how the big data and computational power of major tech companies is being deployed to help contain the current pandemic through new technologies and services, enable return to work, and how it could help prevent future ones.

Moderator:
Natasha Singer, Reporter, New York Times

Amanda Goltz, Principal, Business Development, Alexa Health & Wellness, Amazon

Michael Mina, MD, PhD, Associate Medical Director, Molecular Virology, BH; Assistant Professor, Epidemiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard Chan School

  • Limitations on Viral Testing
  • Shortage of Swabs for testing
  • Tech giant: Amazon, Walmart – global reach in supply chain
  • new collaborations formed on super charge
  • Antigen test for home administration consumerization of the Testing
  • Walmart can be positioned for blood tests
  • Not only Physicians can order tests
  • Microsoft and Amazon can help in interpretation of the Test using Alexa

Marcus Osborne, VP, Walmart Health, Walmart

Jim Weinstein, MD, SVP, Microsoft

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12:10 – 12:35 PM
LUNCH BREAK
12:35 – 12:55PM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Insights on Pandemics and Health Care from the National Security Community

General Alexander, a renowned expert on national security as well as pandemics and health care, will reflect on how AI can help identify and predict future global disease outbreaks and enable fully reopening commerce. He will also discuss what health care systems can learn from the response to COVID-19 to ensure preparedness for the next infectious disease challenge.

Moderator:
Gregg Meyer, MD, Chief Clinical Officer, Mass General Brigham; Interim President, NWH; Professor of Medicine, HMS

General (Ret) Keith Alexander, Co-CEO, IronNet Cybersecurity

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12:55 – 1:20 PM
Calibrating Innovation Opportunity and Urgency: Medical and Social

The social and medical needs of patients are deeply intertwined, yet there are significant gaps in the tools and technologies being developed to help address those needs. These are especially apparent in the non-uniform impact of COVID-19. Harnessing opportunities, particularly for patients whose needs fall into the low medical complexity/high social complexity category — a group often overlooked by health care innovators.

Moderator:
Natasha Singer, Reporter, New York Times

Giles Boland, MD, Chair, Department of Radiology, BH; Philip H. Cook Professor of Radiology, HMS

  • Boston Hope: 1400 patients were treated at Boston Convention Center, 700 COVID -19 patients and 700 post acute after release from ICUs
  • Policy makers to address social determinants of Health

Amit Phadnis, Chief Digital Officer and GE Company Officer, GE Healthcare

  • Crisis will go away the innovations will stay and develop
  • Population Health to benefit from iPhone in Africa and in India mapping hotspots in populations
  • Multi channels TV, Phones and other devices – social disparities – no app to address social inequality

Krishna Yeshwant, MD, General Partner, GV; Instructor in Medicine, BH

  • communities most affected by social determinants of Health like in Chelsea in MA, a hotspot for COVID-19
  • Google Ventures – social issues are most complex invest in underprivileged

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1:20 – 1:45 PM
FDA Role in Managing Crisis and Anticipating the Next

The FDA and other regulatory bodies have played a key role in managing the coronavirus pandemic. How will the agency’s priorities shift in the coming months as community transmission (ideally) slows? What is the FDA’s role in return to work? What is the FDA doing to anticipate future health crises? How will these drive new tools and effect that rate of innovation?

Moderator:
Ravi Thadhani, MD, CAO, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Faculty Dean for Academic Programs, HMS

Amy Abernethy, MD, PhD, Principal Deputy Commissioner & Acting CIO, FDA

  • Future – common tools, more efficient studies study protocols and study design evaluation
  • Learned what need to be put in place to move fast learn what is not in place
  • post pandemic regulatories lessons for being ready for the next one

Lindsey Baden, MD, Director, Clinical Research, Division of Infectious Diseases, BH; Associate Professor, HMS

  • Identify diagnostics for clinical definition of a virus unknown
  • treatment to be developed
  • Sick patients in need for treatment, researchers and clinicians need the best available FDA and the hospitals are flexible in responding
  • Spread globally like a respiratory virus
  • IRB – fast than ever before FDA and Pharma, DSMB – speed

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1:45– 2:05 PM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Keeping Priority on the Biggest Diseases

Biogen CEO Michel Vounatsos will discuss how Biogen is tackling some of society’s most devastating neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, and share his perspective on the impact the global COVID-19 pandemic is having on the biopharmaceutical industry.

Moderator:
Jean-François Formela, MD, Partner, Atlas Venture

  • Testing programs – lack of government cooordination

Michel Vounatsos, CEO, Biogen

  • Venture community supportive
  • to be on the safe side
  • employees tested every evenings to prevent rebound of the pandemic
  • Pandemic is acceleration progress that was only dreamt about
  • Opportunities in technologies new drugs,
  • Biogen will lead the new model
  • ALS – rare genetic expression Phase I encouraging
  • Neuro-immunology – MS phase III Parkinson drug
  • Lessons from COVID-19: Delay in clinical trials because Patients are fearing Hospital admission – Stroke patient did not go to Hospital
  • Biogen is joining the fight against COVID
  • Neuroimmunology is the strength – remain focus

 

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2:05 – 2:30 PM
Building the Plane While Flying: The Experience of Real-Time Innovation from the Front Line

The COVID-19 crisis has required continuous, real time innovation, impacting the way care is delivered on the front lines and across care continuum. This panel will present the perspective, innovations and experiences of care givers interacting directly with patients across the continuum of care – acute, post-acute, rehab and home care.

Moderator:
Ann Prestipino, SVP; Incident Commander, MGH; Teaching Associate, HMS

  • coming out of crisis
  • the New normal will be diferent

Theresa Gallivan, RN, Associate Chief Nurse, MGH

  • Ambulatory procedures
  • 700 nurses were deployed
  • 164 ICU beds increase of 90%
  • Health care demand will change in the future
  • focussed problem alarms from ventilators were not coordinated till biomed engineers arrives to device a solution

 

Karen Reilly, DNP, RN, Associate Chief Nursing Officer, Critical Care, Cardiovascular and Surgical Services, BH

  • Collaborate and move forward
  • Interdisciplinary team: Physical therapy help quickly
  • tech to communicate with families
  • Ready – I wish I had information to stay ahead of the curve
  • New normal ability to expand and contract

Ross Zafonte, DO, SVP, Research Education and Medical Affairs, SRN; Earle P. and Ida S. Charlton Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, HMS

  • Rehabilitation in Cambridge Spaulding Brighton
  • Off loading to rehab from other units
  • Flexibility MGH Brigham – learn to be a new organization
  • Hotspots optimal mapping
  • Right person at right challenge
  • Stay ready for catastrophies
  • Telecare and Tele rehabilitation – greater benefit on TeleHealth or not who will not benefit from Rehab

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2:30 – 2:55 PM
CEO Roundtable: Will the Innovation Model Remain as It Was

As we envision a post-COVID-19 world, how will the model for biomedical innovation change? What lessons have been learned? Was this pandemic a once-in-a-lifetime event or should organizations begin to weave pandemic planning into their business and operations strategies? Panelists will discuss these and other related questions.

Moderator:
Janet Wu, Bloomberg

Mike Mahoney, CEO, Boston Scientific

  • China 6% of Sales
  • Employees – 148 Counties
  • support hospitals – 57% of volume
  • Resilience for liquidity Variable cost needed be removes partially
  • How will the company come out stronger
  • Innovations by business model innovations – Remote physicians in Japan by European experts in OR
  • Next week 10% of Product management and Quality are priority to come back
  • working remotely works very well except for R&S who needs Labs

Bernd Montag, PhD, CEO, Siemens Healthineers

  • Keep present business and the emerging needs for technologies
  • Serology Test
  • Antibody Test genomic testing
  • Company is Global but Health care is local

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2:55 – 3:05 PM
BREAK
3:05 – 3:30 PM
Emergency and Urgent Care: How COVID-19 Vulnerabilities and Solutions Will Change the Model

How are the roles of emergency medicine and urgent care changing in light of the COVID-19 pandemic? Panelists will discuss this topic as well as how current and anticipated new technologies can aid in the delivery of community, urgent, and emergency care now and in the future.

Given a false negative at the point of care has consequences well beyond the patient being treated, does this change what can be offered in the various patient care settings?

Moderator:
Ron Walls, MD, EVP and Chief Operating Officer, BH; Neskey Family Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS

Troyen Brennan, MD, EVP and CMO, CVS Health

  • Labs – Quest Diagnostics
  • Point of care – Tests will move to Home will replace Labs
  • Pandemic heated hard people of color and comorbidities

David Brown, MD, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, MGH; MGH Trustees Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS

  • Tele Urgent care
  • EMS Providers using TeleHealth
  • Scaled up capability needed administered by Governmental agency
  • new surges of some disease after Re-opening
  • Sensitivity of test for ill patient
  • Demand for Urgent Care will decline higher acuity will increase

Julie Lankiewicz, Head, Clinical Affairs & Health Economics Outcomes Research, Bose Health

  • Management of care with VRE other microbial agents
  • Vulnerable populations EKG between patients no more
  • mitigation of care – Brand new prescriptions for Anxiety and burnout
  • Digital solution to replace medications – audio content to avoid pharmacology by other methods of relaxation
  • Herd immunity  – Digital transformation

Michael VanRooyen, MD, Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine, BH; Director, Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University; Professor, HMS

  •  Separate Patients from Providers
  • Infection threat – Intubation – Tent for airsolize – trap air in the hood
  • manage Emergence Health OUT side of EM at Hospital
  • Rapid testing will continue to be central in Emergency Care

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3:30 – 3:55 PM
Accelerating Diagnostics – Maintaining the Priority: Lab, Home and Digital

COVID-19 diagnostics, a linchpin in controlling viral spread — what caused testing in the U.S. to fall so far behind and how can those missteps be prevented in the future? How do the diagnostics industry, and academic medicine, develop the tests that enable group activities including businesses sports, and community? What is the profile of diagnostic tests coming online in the coming months and into next year? What lessons can be learned to guide the global health community in future disease outbreaks? Given the biological complexity, required performance standards, and immense volume is a simple DTC assays possible on a greatly accelerated timeline.

Moderator:
Jeffrey Golden, MD, Chair, Department of Pathology, BH; Ramzi S. Cotran Professor of Pathology, HMS

James Brink, MD, Chief, Department of Radiology, MGH; Juan M. Taveras Professor of Radiology, HMS

  • social determinant of care – communities not able to social distance, multiple languages
  • Radiology: Rapid evolution of pandemic
  • MGB – Standardizations

John Iafrate, MD, PhD, Vice Chair, Academic Affairs, MGH; Professor, Pathology, HMS

  • Ability for Rapid testing was not in existence in the US
  • CDC Test deployed
  • BD and Roche diagnostics will
  • recipients and donors of antibodies

Celine Roger-Dalbert, VP Diagnostic Assays R&D – Integrated Diagnostic Solutions, BD Life Sciences

  • Telemedicine collection of samples outside the hospital
  • Testing if a patient had – serology – antibody – past exposure after day 14
  • Testing if a patient has – PCR after 10 days the virus is not infectious but it is present
  • antigen detection testing
  • molecular test

Matt Sause, President and CEO, Roche Diagnostics Corporation

  • Serology – more people become infected
  • active infection
  • Partnership between FDA and the manufactures
  • In the US scaling – infrastructure in place is a must

 

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3:55 – 4:15 PM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Return to Work: Understanding the Technologies and Strategies

Diagnostic testing is a linchpin of the worldwide response to the coronavirus. How does a global leader pivot to develop molecular diagnostics for a novel global pathogen? How does it scale, including managing international supply chains, to provide unprecedented levels of products and services. What are the expectations for return to work and a possible disease spike in fall 2020 or beyond. How will the diagnostics industry be permanently changed.

Moderator:
Peter Markell, EVP, Finance and Administration, CFO & Treasurer, Mass General Brigham

Marc Casper, Chairman, President and CEO, Thermo Fisher Scientific

  • Re-opening the economy requires Testing for certification of health
  • Testing bringing confidence
  • PCR – have or have not viral proteins: 5Millions a week, June 10 million tests
  • antibody testing will also become available in massive scale
  • Supply chain, more preparedness, robustness of the supply chain
  • Buying supply in China vs US based
  • stockpiling by governments not only at the Hospital level vs JIT shocks to the system
  • Work from home – productivity is good, work from home not ideal environment
  • Transportation and elevators – social distancing – impossible
  • Global change enormous Telemedicine ramp up Academic center Telemedicine will prevail
  • more resilient Health care system dialogue and communications across countries technology will play a role it will improve Health care every where

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4:15 – 4:40 PM
Digital Therapeutics: Current and Future Opportunities

Digital therapeutics (DTx) represents an emerging class of therapies that is poised for significant growth. Yet already, these software-driven, evidence-based tools for the prevention, management, and/or treatment of disease are already changing patients’ lives. This panel will address how existing DTx are having an early impact — in the COVID-19 pandemic and — and where current development efforts are headed in the coming years especially if there is a aggressive return of the virus in the fall 2020 or later.

Moderator:
Hadine Joffe, MD, Vice Chair for Research, Department of Psychiatry, Executive Director, Mary Horrigan Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, BH; Paula A. Johnson Professor, Women’s Health, HMS

Priya Abani, CEO, AliveCor

  • Medical grade EKG devices
  • Telemedicine on the rise

Julia Hu, CEO, Lark Health

  • AI 24×7 counseling data streaming in data
  • TeleHealth
  • VirtualHealth Provider – working hard to scale
  • Patients @Home work at their schedule 9PM – midnight text messaging
  • 70% in employment reported stress experienced by employees

Dawn Sugarman, PhD, Assistant Psychologist, Division of Alcohol, Drugs, and Addiction, McLean; Assistant Professor, Psychiatry, HMS

  • Opioid & substance abuse
  • Treatment gap for women – gender specific Programs online gender specific  treatment

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4:40 – 5:05 PM
Investing During and After the Coronavirus Crisis

The investment environment in life sciences and health care overall was at record levels for most of the last decade. What will this environment look like in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic – especially over the near to mid-term? Will investor priorities and enthusiasm shift? What is the investor role in developing new coronavisurs tests, vaccines, and therapeutics?

Moderator:
Roger Kitterman, VP, Venture and Managing Partner, Partners Innovation Fund, Mass General Brigham

Jan Garfinkle, Founder & Manager Partner, Arboretum Ventures

  • Can you close a deal with out meeting management team
  • Known funds will prevail vs new funds Parma adjacencies vs medical devices
  • Telehealth is of interest GI, Cardiovascular
  • Mental health with TeleHealth

Phillip Gross, Managing Director, Adage Capital Management

  • Clinical Trial issues
  • Inflating value of Biotech because therapeutic related to COVID gives a boost
  • 90 programs in clinical trials on Vaccine

Christopher Viehbacher, Managing Partner, Gurnet Point Capital

  • Health care was great investment because prople will get sick.
  • deal making switch to zoom meeting, no site visit, banking is adapting
  • relationship with people you do not know will be very hard
  • early stage if the cloud exist
  • Medical profession: Healthcare system is hurting revenue loss new technologies
  • clinical trials will be changing like for COVID
  • Sharing data will accelerate science

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5:05 – 5:10 PM
Closing Remarks
Gregg Meyer, MDChief Clinical Officer, Mass General Brigham; Interim President, NWH; Professor of Medicine, HMS
Ravi Thadhani, MD, CAO, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Faculty Dean for Academic Programs, HMS

Mass General Brigham (formerly Partners Healthcare) is pleased to invite media to attend the World Medical Innovation Forum (WMIF) virtual event on Monday, May 11. Our day-long interactive web event features expert discussions of COVID-related infectious disease innovation and the pandemic’s impact on transforming medicine, plus insights on how care may be radically transformed post-COVID. The agenda features nearly 70 executive speakers from the healthcare industry, venture, start-ups, consumer health and the front lines of COVID care, including many of our Harvard Medical School-affiliated researchers and clinicians. The event replaces our annual in-person conference, which we plan to resume in 2021.

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Vaccines are one of the most powerful tools to curb a pandemic and prevent its recurrence,

says. He discusses how AI tools built upon immunology knowledge and data can increase the chances of finding an effective vaccine. stanford.io/3aBidgh

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covering in real time Stanford HAI – COVID-19 and AI: A Virtual Conference youtu.be/z4105Exe23Q via

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COVID-19 and AI: A Virtual Conference will address a developing public health crisis. Sponsored by the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intel…
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Aviva Lev-Ari
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pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/coronavirus-po Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) Conference on COVID-19 and AI: A Virtual Conference on April 1, 2020 beginning at 9:00am (PDT). event covered in real time

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