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Archive for the ‘LPBI Group, e-Scientific Media, DFP, R&D-M3DP, R&D-Drug Discovery, US Patents: SOPs and Team Management’ Category


Inputs in consideration for Pricing LPBI Groups IP Three Classes of Assets

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

  • About LPBI Group: Entrepreneurial Venture

 

Executive Summary

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019-vista/executive-summary/

 

Founder’s Vision

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/vision/

 

  • Leadership by example

 

Reflections on a Four-phase Career: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, March 2018

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/03/06/reflections-on-a-four-phase-career-aviva-lev-ari-phd-rn-march-2018/

 

Pioneering implementations of analytics to business decision making: contributions to domain knowledge conceptualization, research design, methodology development, data modeling and statistical data analysis: Aviva Lev-Ari, UCB, PhD’83; HUJI, MA’76

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/05/28/pioneering-implementations-of-analytics-to-business-decision-making-contributions-to-domain-knowledge-conceptualization-research-design-methodology-development-data-modeling-and-statistical-data-a/

 

Thriving at the Survival Calls during Careers in the Digital Age – An AGE like no Other, also known as, DIGITAL

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/06/11/thriving-at-the-survival-calls-during-careers-in-the-digital-age-an-age-like-no-other-also-known-as-digital/

 

 

  • Intangible Assets of Firm’s Reputation in the Digital Age

 

The Digital Age Gave Rise to New Definitions – New Benchmarks were born on the World Wide Web for the Intangible Asset of Firm’s Reputation: Pay a Premium for buying e-Reputation

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/31/the-digital-age-gave-rise-to-new-definitions-new-benchmarks-were-born-on-the-world-wide-web-for-the-intangible-asset-of-firms-reputation-pay-a-premium-for-buying-e-reputation/

 

For @AVIVA1950, Founder, LPBI Group @pharma_BI: Twitter Analytics [Engagement Rate, Link Clicks, Retweets, Likes, Replies] & Tweet Highlights [Tweets, Impressions, Profile Visits, Mentions, New Followers]

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/08/06/twitter-analytics-engagement-rate-link-clicks-retweets-likes-replies-tweet-highlights-tweets-impressions-profile-visits-mentions-new-followers-for-aviva1950-founder-lpbi-group-ph/

 

  • Components from IP-V-Cal – Tool for IP Valuation of Intangibles

 

Dr. Williams’ 7 Parameters
1 – Ongoing (currently 7 years article generation on LPBI) 85 3
2 – Co-editor on LPBI ebooks on Amazon and generation of ebook covers 65 1
3 – Daily Engagement on Twitter @pharma_BI, @StephenJWillia2 70 3
4 – Development of Class Curriculum utilizing LPBI site & curation methodology & model for Medical Educational 85 4
5 – Co-development methodology of Scientific Conference Coverage in social media using LPBI platform 70 5
6 – Ongoing and increasing readership on online Journal 85 3
7 – High visibility and reputation of online access Journal and offerings by LPBI 80 6

 

Dr. D. Nir’s 5 Parameters
1 – Originality of content 90 1
2 – Number of market-niche related tangible advice; i.e. action that readers can/should take 90 1 100 4
3 – Team commitment; the level of legally-binding agreements 75 5 100 5
4 – Show cases (testimonials) of specific business consultancy (doesn’t matter if paid or not) 80 2 80 3
5 – Tangible business-benefit attested by followers of the Open Access Online Scientific Journal and by Page downloads from each ebooks [96,000 across all volumes in 4/2019], eBook borrowing and e-Book sales 50 4 80 2

 

Dr. Irina Robu 5 Parameters
1- Ongoing (currently 7 years article generation on LPBI) 1 1 100 89 2
2 – Brought strong writing/editing skills to LPBI 2 2 95 80 1
3 – Regular engagement on Twitter @pharma_BI, @irirobu 3 3 70 60 4
4 – Editor on 3-D Bioprinting LPBI ebook on Amazon and participating writer on other LPBI ebooks 2 2 90 90 3
5-Team Commitment; Information organizer and IT 5 5 85 60 5

 

Gail’s 5 Parameters
1 – Expertise and dedication of highly experienced group of consultants who offer synthesis, analysis and interpretation of complex medical and scientific areas 90 1 40 1
2 – Expertise and dedication of highly experienced group of consultants who offer synthesis, analysis and interpretation of complex medical and scientific areas 60 4 20 2
3 -Brought strong strategy and writing/editing skills to LPBI 60 2 20 3
4 -Wrote original patient-focused articles for Voices of Patients e-book + continued article publishing 80 3 10 4
5 -Explored new and different communications avenues, i.e, recent Bioprinting audio podcast brings 40,000 new listeners 70 5 10 5

 

Amnon’s Parameters
Who cares (the audience)? 70 4 100 The scientists should answer it
Why do the audience care? 80 3 100
How does the audience use the service/product? 90 1 100
What is the real experience of using the LPBI products and services (testimonials) 80 2 100

 

Aviva’s Parameters
1 – Low barriers to entry 10 95
2 – Zero labor cost 8 100 1
3 – Virtual no overhead 7 100 1
4 – Run rate Hosting website $200/yr 95 5
5 – LinkedIn Corp Account $1000/yr 95 5
6 – Leadership demonstrated CAPACITY for new domain entry 100 3
7 – Team ability to swarm to new domains 100 2
8 – Leadership maintains Fidelity of Scientists Core 100 1
9 – Founder’s ability to multitask 5 people in One person 1 100 1
10A – Daily Engagement in Twitter @pharma_Bi # Followers = 519 RatioTweets to Likes: 25,000/3,086 2 95 5
10B – @AVIVA1950 # Followers = 439 RatioTweets to Likes: 11,000/5,615 2 100 5
11 – Daily engagement in LinkedIn 7,000 1st contacts 3 90 4
12 – Daily engagement in Facebook 4 50 5
13 – In-Person at 60 confrences brinking back contacts and Ideas 1 100 1
14 – 60 conferences yielded Corpus of eProceedings – IP Asset Class III [10 by Dr. Williams N= 70] 2 100 1
15 – Founder as Curator of New content – Journal is LIVE 1 100 3
16 – Founder as Book Editor in multiple domains: Series A, B, D, E 4 98 3
17 – Founder as Editor-in-Chief: 16 Titles, content acquisition, eTOCs Designer 2 150 2
18. – Founder as Relations builder with multiple Ecosystems: Israel, US, Europe, Japan 3 120 1
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For @AVIVA1950, Founder, LPBI Group @pharma_BI: Twitter Analytics [Engagement Rate, Link Clicks, Retweets, Likes, Replies] & Tweet Highlights [Tweets, Impressions, Profile Visits, Mentions, New Followers]

Data collection from Twitter Analytics Pages for above Twitter Account: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://analytics.twitter.com/user/AVIVA1950/tweets

Definitions

An engagement rate between 0.09% and 0.33% is considered to be high, where an influencer would expect 0.9 – 3.3 reactions for every 1000 followers onTwitter. Finally, an engagement rate between 0.33% and 1% is considered to be very high, with expected reactions to be between 3.3 – 10 for every 1000 Twitter followers.

What is a Good Engagement Rate on Twitter? – Scrunch

https://www.scrunch.com/blog/what-is-a-good-engagement-rate-on-twitter

How to calculate engagement rate on Twitter?

The Tweet Engagement Rate Formula.
The Tweet Engagement Rate takes into account the Replies and Retweets of the Tweet to the total number of Followers to date. Then it´s multiplied by 100 as well to provide you with the percentage of your Fan base that´s interacting with your Tweet.

Formulas Revealed: The Facebook and Twitter Engagement Rate …

6 engagement rate calculation methods

These are the most common formulas you’ll need to calculate engagement rates on social media.

Total engagements typically represents a tally of likes, favourites, reactions, comments, shares, views, retweets, and sometimes include clicks, depending on which platform you’re using.

1. Engagement rate by reach (ERR)

This formula is the most common way to calculate engagement with content.

ERR measures the percentage of people who chose to interact with your content after seeing it.

Use the first formula for a single post, and the second one to calculate the average rate across multiple posts.

  • ERR = total engagements per post / reach per post * 100

To determine the average, add up the all the ERRs from the posts you want to average, and divide by number of posts:

  • Average ERR = Total ERR / Total posts

In other words: Post 1 (3.4%) + Post 2 (3.5%) / 2 = 3.45%

Pros: Reach can be a more accurate measurement than follower count, since not all your followers will see all your content. And non-followers may have been exposed to your posts through shares, hashtags, and other means.

Cons: Reach can fluctuate for a variety of reasons, making it a different variable to control. A very low reach can lead to a disproportionately high engagement rate, and vice versa, so be sure to keep this in mind.

2. Engagement rate by posts (ER post)

Technically, this formula measures engagements by followers on a specific post. In other words, it’s similar to ERR, except instead of reach it tells you the rate at which followers engage with your content.

Most social media influencers calculate their average engagement rate this way.

  • ER post = Total engagements on a post / Total followers *100

To calculate the average, add up all the ER posts you want to average, and divide by number of posts:

  • Average ER by post = Total ER by post / Total posts

Example: Post 1 (4.0%) + Post 2 (3.0%) / 2 = 3.5%

Pros: While ERR is a better way to gauge interactions based on how many people have seen your post, this formula replaces reach with followers, which is generally a more stable metric.

In other words, if your reach fluctuates often, use this method for a more accurate measure of post-by-post engagement.

Cons: As mentioned, while this may be a more unwavering way to track engagements on posts, it doesn’t necessarily provide the full picture since it doesn’t account for viral reach. And, as your follower count goes up, your rate of engagement could drop off a little.

Make sure to view this stat alongside follower growth analytics.

Bonus: Get a free social media report template to easily and effectively present your social media performance to key stakeholders.

Get the free template now!

3. Engagement rate by impressions (ER impressions)

Another base audience metric you could choose to measure engagements by is impressions. While reach measures how many people see your content, impressions tracks how often that content appears on a screen.

  • ER impressions = Total engagements on a post / Total impressions *100
  • Average ER impressions = Total ER impressions / Total posts

Pros: This formula can be useful if you’re running paid content and need to evaluate effectiveness based on impressions.

Cons: An engagement rate calculated with impressions as the base is bound to be lower than ERR and ER post equations. Like reach, impression figures can also be inconsistent. It may be a good idea to use this method in conjunction with reach.

Read more about the difference between reach and impressions.

4. Daily engagement rate (Daily ER)

While engagement rate by reach measures engagement against maximum exposure, it’s still good to have a sense of how often your followers are engaging with your account on a daily basis.

  • Daily ER = Total engagements in a day / Total followers *100
  • Average Daily ER = Total engagements for X days / (X days *followers) *100

Pros: This formula is a good way to gauge how often your followers interact with your account on a daily basis, rather than how they interact with a specific post. As a result, it takes engagements on new and old posts into equation.

This formula can also be tailored for specific use cases. For instance, if your brand only wants to measure daily comments, you can adjust “total engagements” accordingly.

Cons: There’s a fair amount of room for error with this method. For instance, the formula doesn’t account for the fact that the same follower may engage 10 times in a day, versus 10 followers engaging once.

Daily engagements can also vary for a number of reasons, including how many posts you share. For that reason it may be worthwhile to plot daily engagement versus number of posts.

5. Engagement rate by views (ER views)

If video is a primary vertical for your brand, you’ll likely want to know how many people choose to engage with your videos after watching them.

  • ER view = Total engagements on video post / Total video views *100
  • Average ER view = Total ER view / Total posts

Pros: If one of your video’s objectives is to generate engagement, this can be a good way to track it.

Cons: View tallies often include repeat views from a single user (non-unique views). While that viewer may watch the video multiple times, they may not necessarily engage multiple times.

6. Factored Engagement Rate

In rare cases some marketers use a “factored engagement rate.” As the name suggests, factored engagement rates add more or less weight to certain factors in the equation.

For example, a marketer may wish to place a higher value on comments versus likes, weighting each comment as two versus one. The subsequent equation would look something like this:

  • Comment-weighted ER = (Total comments x 2) + all other engagements / Reach per post *100

Obviously, this technique inflates the resulting engagement rate and can be misleading, especially since the use of factored engagement rates is not widespread. For this reason, Hootsuite does not recommend its use.

SOURCE

https://blog.hootsuite.com/calculate-engagement-rate/

How To Measure An Influencer’s Engagement Rate (A Scientific …

 

 

July 2019

Impressions, Engagement Rate, Link Clicks, Retweets, Likes, Replies

 

2019

Average Impressions per day by Month

Monthly

Average

Engagement Rate

&

Last day of the month

Monthly

Average

Link Clicks

& Last day of the month

& average link clicks per day

Monthly

Average Retweets

& Last day of the month

& average Retweets per day

Monthly

Average

Likes

& Last day of the month

& average Likes per day

Monthly

Average Replies

& Last day of the month

& average Replies per day

January 31

N = 809

2.4% / 2.2% 33 / 3 / 1 80 / 4 / 3 129 / 5 / 4

2 /1 /0

February 28

N = 825

2.1% / 11.7% 22 / 0 / 1 24 / 3 / 1 41 / 1 / 1

1 / 0 / 0

March 31

N = 759

2.5% / 0.5% 18 / 1/ 1 37 / 1/ 1 63 / 1 / 2 1 / 0 / 0

April 30

N = 2.1K

1.0% / 1.8% 21 / 1/ 1 130 / 3 / 4 201 / 3 / 7

0 / 0/ 0

May 31

N = 2.3K

1.3% / 1.2% 51 / 3 / 2 117 / 2 / 4 142 / 2 / 5

3 / 0 / 0

June 30

N = 1.9K

1.2% / 0.1% 33 / 0 / 1 124 / 1 / 4 161 / 0 / 5

1 / 0 / 0

July 31

N = 824

0.9% / 1.1% 54 / 4/ 2 42 / 6 / 1 40 / 3 / 1

3 / 0 / 0

August

N =

October

N =

November

N =

December

N =

Tweets, Impressions, Profile Visits, Mentions, New Followers

2019

Tweets Impressions Profile visits Mentions New Followers

January

25.1K 21

February

1 23.1K 62

21

March 155 23.5K 533 153

10

April

257 64.2K 690 235 14

May

281 70.4K 691 238

28

June

206

58.4K 581 170

23

July

83 25.5K 321 62

15

August

September

October

November

December

TWEET HIGHLIGHTS
TWEET HIGHLIGHTS

Top Tweet earned 2,280 impressions

as and are in unidirectional symbiosis Food affect Microbiome in turn it affects of individuals over theirs
 5  4

Top Follower followed by 289K people

@tveitdal FOLLOWS YOU

Tweeting Climate Change news. Climate lecturer: science, policy, solutions. Director Klima 2020, former UN Director. For contact use svein@klima2020.no

Top mention earned 21 engagements

eProceeding 2019 Koch Institute Symposium – 18th Annual Cancer Research Symposium – Machine Learning and Cancer, June 14, 2019, 8:00 AM-5:00 PMET MIT Kresge Auditorium, Cambridge, MA via
 1  1
JUN 2019 SUMMARY

Tweets

206

Tweet impressions

58.4K

Profile visits

581

Mentions

170

New followers

23
TWEET HIGHLIGHTS

Top Tweet earned 3,800 impressions

create application for robots, we picked pruned by hand in high school as Summer job.
 6  5

Top Follower followed by 202K people

@Alex_Verbeek FOLLOWS YOU

Public Speaker | Moderator | Diplomat | Photographer | Yale World Fellow | Climate Change | Wildlife | Environment | Art | Energy-Water-Food | Sustainability 🌱

Top mention earned 36 engagements

 6  10

Top media Tweet earned 1,319 impressions

Dr. Maus ⁩ monitoring data from clinical trial is very important development of new targets multiple drugs multiple mechanism multiple specificities more modification to one cell contamination results
 3  3
MAY 2019 SUMMARY

Tweets

281

Tweet impressions

70.4K

Profile visits

691

Mentions

238

New followers

28
TWEET HIGHLIGHTS

Top Tweet earned 2,758 impressions

The premise of applied to 30 babies in 1st week of life new to intervention to cause desirable # molecular changes by search immunology search
 7  12

Top media Tweet earned 1,652 impressions

Amazing Disruptive Dozen Technologies ⁩ ⁦ Third Annette Kim streamlining Diagnosis Second Thomas McCoy prediction of Suicide risk FIRST Alexandra Golby Neurosurgery Imaging AI based system real time dynamic data intraop
 1  1
APR 2019 SUMMARY

Tweets

257

Tweet impressions

64.2K

Profile visits

690

Mentions

235

New followers

14
TWEET HIGHLIGHTS

Top Follower followed by 450K people

@CMichaelGibson FOLLOWS YOU

Non-Profit Founder/Leader | ❤️ Doc | Artist | Scientist | Educator | Med News Anchor https://t.co/LDrNxgwhA4 | RT ≠ endorse | Disclaimer here: https://t.co/2jtJQZQU0H

Top mention earned 8 engagements

impact of , how to maintain Boston as Biotech HUB? with ⁦⁩ attract great talent ⁦⁦⁩ culture is asset on the balance sheet PARKING
 1  2

Top media Tweet earned 440 impressions

MAR 2019 SUMMARY

Tweets

155

Tweet impressions

23.5K

Profile visits

533

Mentions

153

New followers

10
TWEET HIGHLIGHTS

Top Tweet earned 795 impressions

Top Follower followed by 252K people

@ArtistsandMusic FOLLOWS YOU

Music Lovers Network . ♫♫ Connecting  talented  with , A&Rs and Fans.   

Top mention earned 6 engagements

Top media Tweet earned 55 impressions

My week on Twitter 🎉: 34 Mentions, 10.6K Mention Reach, 18 Likes, 7 Retweets, 6.7K Retweet Reach. See yours with
 1
FEB 2019 SUMMARY

Tweets

1

Tweet impressions

23.1K

Profile visits

62

New followers

21
TWEET HIGHLIGHTS

Top Follower followed by 450K people

@CMichaelGibson FOLLOWS YOU

Non-Profit Founder/Leader | ❤️ Doc | Artist | Scientist | Educator | Med News Anchor https://t.co/LDrNxgwhA4 | RT ≠ endorse | Disclaimer here: https://t.co/2jtJQZQU0H

JAN 2019 SUMMARY

Tweet impressions

25.1K

New followers

21

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The Digital Age Gave Rise to New Definitions – New Benchmarks were born on the World Wide Web for the Intangible Asset of Firm’s Reputation: Pay a Premium for buying e-Reputation

Curator: Aviva Lev–Ari, PhD, RN

 

Direct reputation, feedback reputation and signaling effects are present; and shows that better sellers are always more likely to brand stretch. The comparative statics with respect to the initial reputation level, however, are not obvious. … a higher reputation firm can earn a higher direct reputation effect premium. But a higher reputation firm also has more to lose. The trade-off between using one’s reputation and protecting it can go both ways.

Luıs M B Cabral, New York University and CEPR, 2005

 

 

Part 1:   A Digital Business Defined and the Intangible Asset of Firm’s Reputation

  1.  Claiming Distinction
  2.  Recognition Bestowed
  3.  The Technology
  4.  The Sphere of Influence
  5.  The Industrial Benefactors in Potential
  6.  The Actors at Play – Experts, Authors, Writers – Life Sciences & Medicine as it applies to HEALTH CARE
  7.  1st Level Connection on LinkedIn = +7,100 and Endorsements = +1,500
  8.  The DIGITAL REPUTATION of our Venture – Twitter for the Professional and for Institutions
  9.  Growth in Twitter Followers and in Global Reach: Who are the NEW Followers? they are OUR COMPETITION   and   other Media Establishments – that is the definition of Trend Setter, Opinion Leader and Source for Emulation
  10.  Business Aspects of the Brick & Mortar World render OBSOLETE

Part 2:   Business Perspectives on Reputation

Part 3:   Economics Perspectives on Reputation

 

 

Part 1:   A Digital Business Defined and the Intangible Asset of Firm’s Reputation

This curation attempts to teach-by-example the new reality of the Intangible Asset of Firm’s Reputation when the business is 100% in the cloud, 100% electronic in nature (paperless), the customers are the Global Universe and the organization is 100% Global and 100% virtual.

 

A Case in Point: Intellectual Property Production Process of Health Care Digital Content using electronic Media Channels

 

Optimal Testimonial of e-Product Quality and Reputation for an Open Access Online Scientific Journal pharmaceuticalintelligence.com 

 

 1.   Claiming Distinction

Executive Summary

WHAT ARE LPBI Group’s NEEDS in June 2019: Aviva’s BOLD VISION on June 11, 2019

 

2.   Recognition Bestowed 

Our Books are here

  • On 8/17/2018, Dr. Lev-Ari, PhD, RN was contacted by the President elect of the Massachusetts Academy of Sciences (MAS), Prof. Katya Ravid of Boston University, School of Medicine, to join MAS in the role of Liaison to the Biotechnology and eScientific Publishing industries for the term of August 2018-July 2021. In the MAS, Dr. Lev-Ari serve as Board member, Fellow, and Advisor to the Governing Board.

http://www.maacadsci.org

MAS FELLOWS 

GOVERNING BOARD

ACTIVITIES

BUNDLED BY AMAZON.COM INTO A SIX-VOLUME SERIES FOR $515

https://lnkd.in/e6WkMgF

Sixteen Volumes ARE ON AMAZON.COM, average book length – 2,400 pages

https://lnkd.in/ekWGNqA

3.   The Technology

Curation Methodology – Digital Communication Technology to mitigate Published Information Explosion and Obsolescence in Medicine and Life Sciences

Detailed Technology Description

LPBI’s Pipeline Map: A Positioning Perspectives – An Outlook to the Future from the Present

 

4.   The Sphere of Influence 

LPBI Group’s Social Media Presence

JOURNAL Statistics on 2/24/2019

  • LPBI Platform is been used by GLOBAL Communities of Scientists for interactive dialogue of SCIENCE – Four case studies are presented in the link, below

Electronic Scientific AGORA: Comment Exchanges by Global Scientists on Articles published in the Open Access Journal @pharmaceuticalintelligence.com – Four Case Studies

Curator and Editor-in-Chief: Journal and BioMed e-Series, Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/04/10/electronic-scientific-agora-comment-exchanges-by-global-scientists-on-articles-published-in-the-open-access-journal-pharmaceuticalintelligence-com-four-case-studies/

 

5.   The Industrial Benefactors in Potential

Opportunities Map in the Acquisition Arena

Dynamic Contents for LPBI Group’s PowerPoint Presentation

Potential Use of LPBI IP as Value Price Driver by Potential Acquirer: Assumptions per Asset Class 

 

6.   The Actors at Play – Experts, Authors, Writers – Life Sciences & Medicine as it applies to HEALTH CARE

Founder’s Role in the Development of Venture’s Factors of Content Production – Biographical Notes by Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, LPBI Group

Top Authors by Number of eReaders Views

Top Articles by Number of e-Readers for All Days ending 2019-02-17

FIT Members Contribute to Opportunities Map

FINAL IMPROVEMENT TEAM (FIT): Definition of Active, Lapsing of Active Status, COMPs Formulas

FIT members – Who works on WHAT?

Summer 2019 Plan – Research Associates Tasks

 

7.   1st Level Connection on LinkedIn = +7,100 and Endorsements = +1,500

Connections First Level on LinkedIn: 500 CEOs, 200 Big Pharma Professionals, 7,000 in Total: LPBI Group Founder – Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

8.   The DIGITAL REPUTATION of our Venture – Twitter for the Professional and for Institutions

Mostly HONORED to be followed by [from an Excerpt of 117 Followers of the Twitter Account @AVIVA1950 from the List of 359 Followers] by the Number of their Followers on 2/24/2019

LPBI Group is mostly HONORED to be followed by [from an Excerpt of 136 Followers of the Twitter Account @pharma_BI from the List of 505 Followers] by the Number of their Followers on 3/20/2019

Excerpt of 136 Followers of @pharma_BI (from the List of 505 Followers) by the Number of their Followers on 3/20/2019

Excerpt of 117 Followers of @AVIVA1950 (from the List of 359 Followers) by the Number of their Followers

REACH – Two Handles on Twitter.com @AVIVA1950 @pharma_BI

9.   Growth in Twitter Followers and in Global Reach: Who are the NEW Followers: OUR COMPETITION and other Media Establishments – that is the definition of Trend Setter, Opinion Leader and Source for Emulation

@4openjournalFollows you

Follow

4open is a multi- & inter-disciplinary, online, peer-reviewed, open access journal publishing across a broad range of subjects in the STEM domain.

@roll_clausFollows you

Follow

Publishing Editor at 

@EDPSciences

@PubtextoPFollows you

Following

Pubtexto is an International online publishing organization that publishes Scientific literature through its different open access Journals.

@alexanderlabrieFollows you

Following

CEO 

@sphereinc

@BjoernBruecherFollows you

Following

THEODOR-BILLROTH-ACADEMY® 

(link: http://linkedin.com/in/bruecher)

linkedin.com/in/bruecher // 

(link: http://4open-sciences.org)

4open-sciences.org – Editor-in-Chief // Science Profile – 

(link: http://researchgate.net/profile/Bjoern)

researchgate.net/profile/Bjoern

@MPDexpertFollows you

Follow

translate research into life-changing Global manufactured Medical Products – drugs, devices, biotech, combination; anything requiring FDA approval#MedProdDev

@P_A_MORGONFollows you

Following

Life science expert & investor_travel, wine & golf amateur_Proud father of 2 girls_My Tweets are only mine 

@INmuneBioFollows you

Follow

INmune Bio, Inc. is developing therapies that harness patient’s #immunesystem to treat #cancer. Our focus is on #NKcells and #myeloid derived suppressor cells.

@sallyeavesFollows you

Following

Innovating #tech #education #business CEO CTO Advisor & Prof. #blockchain #AI 

@OxfordSBS

@Forbes

 #FinTech #speaker #SDGs #STEM #techforgood #sustainability

@sciencetracker2Follows you

You will hear more recent and cool scientific news here. Besides, some health and tech news. Follow us in

(link: http://facebook.com/sciencetracker2)

facebook.com/sciencetracker2

13.8K Following

24.6K Followers

Followed by Stanford Tweets, Biotech Week Boston, and 23 others you follow

@sgruenwaldFollows you

Following

MD, PhD, scientist, futurist, entrepreneur, managing director of 

(link: http://www.genautica.com)

genautica.com, co-founder 

(link: http://www.diagnomics.com)

diagnomics.com

(link: http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science)

scoop.it/t/amazing-scie…user

 

10.  Business Aspects of the Brick & Mortar World render OBSOLETE

Financial Valuation of Three Health Care Intellectual Property (IP) Content Asset Classes

Global Market Penetration Forecast for each Volume in the 16 Volume BioMed e-Series

2013-2019, On the Medical & Scientific Bookshelf in Kindle Store: eReader Behaviors: Browsing, Page Downloads and Buying e-Books – LPBI Group’s BioMed e-Series, Royalties Payment Analysis 

 

Part 2: BUSINESS PERSPECTIVES on Reputation

 

Warren Buffett on reputation: the economic value of values, integrity and corporate culture

Warren Buffett understands that reputation and integrity have economic value. Research that shows that a good reputation is worth real money — in fact, some research indicates that a good reputation might replace a line of credit at the bank. In his book Berkshire Beyond Buffett: The Enduring Value of Values, Lawrence Cunningham argues that one of Berkshire Hathaway’s greatest assets is reputation.

https://www.finn.agency/fr/warren-buffett-reputation-berkshire-hathaway

 

The Value of Reputation

Thomas Pfeiffer1,2,4,*, Lily Tran5, Coco Krumme5 and David G Rand1,3,* 1 Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, FAS, 2 School of Applied Sciences and Engineering, and 3 Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138, USA 4 New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand 5 MIT Media Laboratory, Cambridge MA 02139, USA

 

Reputation plays a central role in human societies.

Empirical and theoretical work indicates that a good reputation is valuable in that it increases one’s expected payoff in the future. Here, we explore a game that couples a repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma (PD), in which participants can earn and can benefit from a good reputation, with a market in which reputation can be bought and sold. This game allows us to investigate how the trading of reputation affects cooperation in the PD, and how participants assess the value of having a good reputation. We find that depending on how the game is set up, trading can have a positive or a negative effect on the overall frequency of cooperation. Moreover, we show that the more valuable a good reputation is in the PD, the higher the price at which it is traded in the market. Our findings have important implications for the use of reputation systems in practice.

Keywords: evolution of cooperation; reciprocal altruism; indirect reciprocity; reputation

http://decisionlab.harvard.edu/_content/research/papers/Krumme_Pfieffer_Tran_and_Rand_Value_of_Reputation.pdf

 

The Impact of Reputation on Market Value by Simon Cole

One of the most familiar, but least understood, intangible assets is a firm’s reputation.

Simon Cole is the founding partner of the corporate reputation and branding consultancy Reputation Dividend (www. reputationdividend.com).

http://www.reputationdividend.com/files/4713/4822/1479/Reputation_Dividend_WEC_133_Cole.pdf

 

Part 3:   ECONOMICS PERSPECTIVES on Reputation

 

The Economics of Trust and Reputation: A Primer

Luıs M B Cabral New York University and CEPR, June 2005, lecture series at the University of Zurich

lcabral@stern.nyu.edu

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/24e5/2f3bd22d4bfa86902e5ae07d57039480004f.pdf

 

Notes on the literature

Important note: The notes in this section are essentially limited to the ideas discussed in the present version of these lectures notes. They cannot therefore be considered a survey of the literature. There are dozens of articles on the economics of reputation which I do not include here. In a future version of the text, I hope to provide a more complete set of notes on the literature. The notes below follow the order with which topics are presented.

Bootstrap models. The bootstrap mechanism for trust is based on a general result known as the folk theorem (known as such because of its uncertain origins). For a fairly general statement of the theorem (and its proof) see Fudenberg and Makin (1986). One of the main areas of application of the folk theorem has been the problem of (tacit or explicit) collusion in oligopoly. This is a typical problem of trust (or lack thereof): all firms would prefer prices to be high and output to be low; but each firm, individually, has an incentive to drop price and increase output. Friedman (1971) presents one of the earliest formal applications of the folk theorem to oligopoly collusion. He considers the case when firms set prices and history is perfectly observable. Both of the extensions presented in Section 2.2 were first developed with oligopoly collusion applications in mind. The case of trust with noisy signals (2.2.1) was first developed by Green and Porter (1984). A long series of papers have been written on this topic, including the influential work by Abreu, Pearce and Stacchetti (1990). Rotemberg and Saloner (1986) proposed a model of oligopoly collusion with fluctuating market demand. In this case, the intuition presented in Section 2.2.2 implies that firms collude on a lower price during periods of higher demand. This suggests that prices are counter-cyclical in markets where firms collude. Rotemberg and Saloner (1986) present supporting evidence from the cement industry. A number of papers have built on Rotemberg and Saloner’s analysis. Kandori (1992) shows that the i.i.d. assumption simplifies the analysis but is not crucial. Harrington (19??) considers a richer demand model and looks at how prices vary along the business cycle. The basic idea of repetition as a form of ensuring seller trustworthiness is developed in Klein and Leffler (1981). See also Telser (1980) and Shapiro (1983). When considering the problem of free entry, Klein and Leffler (1981) propose advertising as a solution, whereas Shapiro (1983) suggests low intro25 ductory prices. Section ?? is based on my own research notes. The general analysis of selfreinforcing agreements when there is an outside option of the kind considered here may be found in Ray (2002). Watson (1999, 2002) also considers models where the level of trust stars at a low level and gradually increases.

Bayesian models. The seminal contributions to the study of Bayesian models of reputation are Kreps and Wilson (1982) and Milgrom and Roberts (1982). The model in Section 3.2.1 includes elements from these papers as well as from Diamond (1989). H¨olmstrom (1982/1999) makes the point that separation leads to reduced incentives to invest in reputation. The issue of reputation with separation and changing types is treated in detail in the forthcoming book by Mailath and Samuelson (2006). In Section 3.3, I presented a series of models that deal with name as carriers of reputations. The part on changing names (Section 3.3.1) reflects elements from a variety of models, though, to the best of my knowledge, no study exists that models the process of secret, costless name changes in an infinite period adverse selection context. The study of markets for names follows the work by Tadelis (1999) and Mailath and Samuelson (2001). All of these papers are based on the Bayesian updating paradigm. Kreps (1990) presents an argument for trading reputations in a bootstrap type of model. The analysis of brand stretching (Section 3.3.3) is adapted from Cabral (2000). The paper considers a more general framework where the direct reputation, feedback reputation and signalling effects are present; and shows that better sellers are always more likely to brand stretch. The comparative statics with respect to the initial reputation level, however, are not obvious. As we saw above, a higher reputation firm can earn a higher direct reputation effect premium. But a higher reputation firm also has more to lose. The trade-off between using one’s reputation and protecting it can go both ways. For other papers on brand stretching and umbrella branding see Choi (1998), Anderson (2002).

Bibliography

Abreu, Dilip, David Pearce and Ennio Stacchetti (1990), “Toward a Theory of Discounted Repeated Games with Imperfect Monitoring,” Econometrica 58, 1041–1064. Andersson, Fredrik (2002), “Pooling reputations,” International Journal of Industrial Organization 20, 715–730. Bernhein, B. Douglas and Michael D. Whinston (1990), “Multimarket Contact and Collusive Behavior,” Rand Journal of Economics 21, 1–26. Cabral, Lu´ıs M B (2000), “Stretching Firm and Brand Reputation,” Rand Journal of Economics 31, 658-673. Choi, J.P. (1998), “Brand Extension and Informational Leverage,” Review of Economic Studies 65, 655–69. Diamond, Douglas W (1989), “Reputation Acquisition in Debt Markets,” Journal of Political Economy 97, 828–862. Ely, Jeffrey C., and Juuso Valim ¨ aki ¨ (2003), “Bad Reputation,” The Quarterly Journal of Economics 118, 785–814. Fishman, A., and R. Rob (2005), “Is Bigger Better? Customer Base Expansion through Word of Mouth Reputation,” forthcoming in Journal of Political Economy. Friedman, James (1971), “A Noncooperative Equilibrium for Supergames,” Review of Economic Studies 28, 1–12. Fudenberg, Drew and Eric Maskin (1986), “The Folk Theorem in Repeated Games with Discounting or with Imperfect Public Information,” Econometrica 54, 533–556. Green, Ed and Robert Porter (1984), “Noncooperative Collusion Under Imperfect Price Information,” Econometrica 52, 87–100. Holmstrom, Bengt ¨ (1999), “Managerial Incentive Problems: A Dynamic Perspective,” Review of Economic Studies 66, 169–182. (Originally (1982) in Essays in Honor of Professor Lars Wahlback.) Kandori, Michihiro (1992), “Repeated Games Played by Overlapping Generations of Players,” Review of Economic Studies 59, 81–92. Klein, B, and K Leffler (1981), “The Role of Market Forces in Assuring Contractual Performance,” Journal of Political Economy 89, 615–641. 27 Kreps, David (1990), “Corporate Culture and Economic Theory,” in J Alt and K Shepsle (Eds), Perspectives on Positive Political Economy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 90–143. Kreps, David M., Paul Milgrom, John Roberts and Robert Wilson (1982), “Rational Cooperation in the Finitely Repeated Prisoners’ Dilemma,” Journal of Economic Theory 27, 245–252. Kreps, David M., and Robert Wilson (1982), “Reputation and Imperfect Information,” Journal of Economic Theory 27, 253–279. Mailath, George J, and Larry Samuelson (2001), “Who Wants a Good Reputation?,” Review of Economic Studies 68, 415–441. Mailath, George J, and Larry Samuelson (1998), “Your Reputation Is Who You’re Not, Not Who You’d Like To Be,” University of Pennsylvania and University of Wisconsin. Mailath, George J, and Larry Samuelson (2006), Repeated Games and Reputations: Long-Run Relationships, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Milgrom, Paul, and John Roberts (1982), “Predation, Reputation, and Entry Deterrence,” Journal of Economic Theory 27, 280–312. Phelan, Christopher (2001), “Public Trust and Government Betrayal,” forthcoming in Journal of Economic Theory. Ray, Debraj (2002), “The Time Structure of Self-Enforcing Agreements,” Econometrica 70, 547–582. Rotemberg, Julio, and Garth Saloner (1986), “A Supergame-Theoretic Model of Price Wars During Booms,” American Economic Review 76, 390–407. Shapiro, Carl (1983), “Premiums for High Quality Products as Rents to Reputation,” Quarterly Journal of Economics 98, 659–680. Tadelis, S. (1999), “What’s in a Name? Reputation as a Tradeable Asset,” American Economic Review 89, 548–563. Tadelis, Steven (2002), “The Market for Reputations as an Incentive Mechanism,” Journal of Political Economy 92, 854–882. Telser, L G (1980), “A Theory of Self-enforcing Agreements,” Journal of Business 53, 27–44. Tirole, Jean (1996), “A Theory of Collective Reputations (with applications to the persistence of corruption and to firm quality),” Review of Economic Studies 63, 1–22. 28 Watson, Joel (1999), “Starting Small and Renegotiation,” Journal of Economic Theory 85, 52–90. Watson, Joel (2002), “Starting Small and Commitment,” Games and Economic Behavior 38, 176–199. Wernerfelt, Birger (1988), “Umbrella Branding as a Signal of New Product Quality: An Example of Signalling by Posting a Bond,” Rand Journal of Economics 19, 458–466.

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/24e5/2f3bd22d4bfa86902e5ae07d57039480004f.pdf

 

Read Full Post »


In-House Development of an intellectual property value calculator (IP-V-Cal) for Valuation of INTANGIBLE products: Intellectual property (IP) assets of Digital Printed Products (DPP) – Online Journal(s), e-Books and a Corpus of Real Time generated eProceedings of the Top Biotech Global Conferences

Author: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1. All the points I made, below in my e-mail 4AM on 6/28/2019, see below – to match Intangible Assets in Document #2, 4/19/2019 in Inbox of each FIT member.

(after reading Rick’s article we received a link to and after reading the link that I provided in this e-mail)

2. We Need Amnon to enter into an Excel spread sheet as Column #1 all the Contributing Factors to valuation in that 4AM e-mail

3. Columns #2,#3,#4 will be Gail, Amnon, Rick (Business Team)

4. Columns #5,#6 will be Dr. Williams, Prof. Feldman (our Board)

5. Columns #7,#8 #9,#10 will be Dr. Pearlman, Dr. Dror Nir, Dr. Saha, Dr. Irina (Scientists Team)

7. Each Column dedicated to each of out 10 alive and well Active FIT

Will be split into two columns

6. Column #11 will be Aviva’s 

8. First column of each of the 10 FIT members will be filled by each by a number between 50 to 100, representing the subjectively perceived contributing weight of the Factor mentioned in Column 1: list of factors contributing to Venture’s valuation

9. Second column of each of the 10 FIT members will list the member’s subjective perspective on Ranking the Factors in Column #1

10. To Column #1: each Business Team member (mentioned in 3, above), needs to contribute FIVE new factors taken from your discussion on Valuation add them with your initials to Column #1

11. Aviva will bring DATA from Article Scoring System already populating a database designed to quantify the 

11.1 Valuation of the Journal

11.2 Valuation of the BioMed e-Series: each book, each series, all 16 volumes

11.3 Author’s factor in pricing 11.1 and 11.2

 

12. Valuation of 70 eProceedings 

(60 by Aviva; 10 by Dr. Williams)

needs to be tied to a growth factor in LPBI Group’s INFLUENCE on Twitter

12.1 @pharma_BI

12.2 @AVIVA1950

12.3 Gail’s Twitter account

12.4 Dr. Williams’ Twitter account

12.5 Dr. Asha’s Twitter account

12.6 Dr. Irina’s Twitter account

Factors of INFLUENCE:

– Growth in #Followers on Twitter 

– Ratio #Tweets/#Likes

– Cumulative # of Followers’ Followers

13. LinkedIn

I discovered new features and I wish to conduct a Skype training session with narrow messaging to FIT members

Please contribute your thoughts, while 

 

– Amnon is building this Excel

– Irina will be designing DropBox for this Excel that TEN FIT members need to add a number 50 to 100, Ranking the relative importance of each factor for Venture Valuation

GREAT initiative by Business Team to focus on valuation, thank you.

Thank you all FIT members, get ready yo add your subjective numbers into the Valuation Excel.

Amnon, please share with me in a Skype session the draft of this Excel, before we deplore this instrument, place it in Dropbox and announce the window of one week when we collect 2×10 data points on each of the Factors in Column #1, 

Board members and Scientists: you are welcome to contribute Factors in Valuation of the Venture in Column #1, the longer this column, the greater the granularity. 

We can then focus only on factors that scored above the Mean or any cut off point we will agree upon.

Thank you all – it is exciting to get the entire Team, developing a custom tailor methodology for DIGITAL printed products, NO OFF THE SHELF MODEL WILL FIT US. 

Current valuation models that do NOT APPLY to our venture include the following:

“Book to market value” 

– we got Intangibles, Column #1

– LPBI Group’s Tangibles are royalties for books sold. 

(all data was reviewed by Dr. Williams, for Section #13 in Document #2, for the period, 4/2012 to 4/19/2019)

“VC investment dilution models” 

– we kept 100% of ownership 

– our shareholders are 12 FIT members: 

— >>>>>> 10 are active members 

– (Scientist Team: Formula in place) (Gail included)

– (Business Team: 10% of UPSIDE) (Gail included)

— >>>>>> Past commitments outstanding:

– to Dr. Larry and 

– to Adam Sonnenberg

– (Formula in place). 

– No UPSIDE, due to idle status since 2/6/2019, Exit period launch.

Thank you again.

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Editor-in-Chief, BioMed e-Series

http://PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Director & Founder

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

On Jun 28, 2019, at 3:57 AM, Amnon Danzig <amnon.danzig@gmail.com> wrote:

This is a nice article that put in place Corporate Finance practices.

However, The Business Team currently is struggling in much more earlier stages of the valuation of the Group.

We have a long way to go before we are entering the valuation scene in numeric terms.

Aviva,

I must confess that in the last two weeks we (Rick, Gail and me) invested huge amount of work to disclose the real valuation of the Group.

It is a work-in-process.

Thank you for your patience.

Amnon

Amnon Danzig

Business Strategy 

https://lnkd.in/e-zTVz4

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Israel

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com 

e-Mailamnon.danzig@gmail.com

(M) +972-54-6998405

 www.amnondanzig.com

SkypeID: Amnon.Danzig  LinkedIn Profile Twitter Profile

On Fri, Jun 28, 2019 at 10:30 AM Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu> wrote:

What is Aviva’s take on LPBI Group Valuation?

https://bothsidesofthetable.com/do-you-really-even-need-vc-72013e985fab

  • Advantages of LPBI Group:
  1. We had low barrier to entry and 
  2. We had/have Zero labor cost
  3. We are virtual, therefore, no overhead expenses 
  4. Run rate at WordPress.com Business Premium Annual Fee $200 and LinkedIn Annual Business Premium $1000
  5. Our 1st CARDINAL factor of production [The Team] is the DEAPTH and very diverse EXPERTISE residing in the Scientist Team and in the Business TEAM
  6. Leadership expressed by new timely challenge selection – Directions into new domains
  7. Team ability to swarm around new domains (new timely challenge selection), Examples: 
  • 2015-2016 – 3D BioPrinting – Book: Series E, Volume 4
  • Volume 4: Medical 3D BioPrinting – The Revolution in Medicine, Technologies for Patient-centered Medicine: From R&D in Biologics to New Medical Devices. On Amazon.com since since 12/30/2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078QVDV2W

  • 2016-2017 – Drug Discovery – JV with SBH Sciences, Dr. Raphael Nir

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/drugdiscovery-lpbi-group/

  • 2019-2020 – AI + ML in Medicine – Book: Series B, Volume 2

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-two-genomics-methodologies-ngs-bioinformatics-simulations-and-the-genome-ontology/

  1. Our 2nd CARDINAL factor of Leadership is the FIDELITY of a CORE team of Scientists
  2. Aviva’s ability to multitask on several levels – FIVE persons in just One woman (nee: 1950): 
  • LPBI Group’s DAILY activity on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook
  • IN PERSON at +60 Conferences – yielded a Corpus of eProceedings N=70 [10 by Dr. Williams 
  • Curator of new content – Journal is LIVE at 

1,639,029 eReaders 

Content

5,642

Posts

686

Categories

10,083

Tags

  • Book Editor – multiple domains of knowledge: Series A, B, D, E
  • Full functions of Editor-in-Chief: 16 Titles, content acquisition, eTOCs designer
  • Relations builder with multiple Ecosystems: Israel, US, Europe – stay tune

4/19/2019 

@pharma_Bi # Followers = 505 

6/28/2019

@pharma_Bi # Followers = 519 RatioTweets to Likes: 25,000/3,086

4/19/2019 

@AVIVA1950 # Followers = 359

6/28/2019

@AVIVA1950 # Followers = 439 RatioTweets to Likes: 11,000/5,615

How can you use all of the above for your Valuation Modeling???

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Narrative Building for the Future of LPBI Group: List of Talking Points

 

Exchange between Gail and Aviva

 

On Tuesday, June 25, 2019, 11:43:27 AM EDT, Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu> wrote:

https://www.terarecon.com/blog/beyond-the-screen-episode-6-next-generation-ai-companies-providing-physicians-a-starting-point-in-ai?utm_campaign=AuntMinnie%20June%202019

HOW can we get  Kevin Landwher of terarecon.com to create a Podcast for LPBI Group IP Assets, including a section on our forthcoming Genomics, Volume 2 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-two-genomics-methodologies-ngs-bioinformatics-simulations-and-the-genome-ontology/

In response to this question we are in discussion on POINTS #1,2,3,4

 

From: Gail Thornton <gailsthornton@yahoo.com>

Reply-To: Gail Thornton <gailsthornton@yahoo.com>

Date: Sunday, June 30, 2019 at 8:38 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <aviva.lev-ari@comcast.net>

Cc: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>, Rick Mandahl <rmandahl@gmail.com>, Amnon Danzig <amnon.danzig@gmail.com>

Subject: Please AUDIT PODCAST —>>>>>>>> Beyond the Screen Episode 6: Next Generation AI Companies Providing Physicians a Starting Point in AI

Aviva:

These videos from terarecon.com typically focus on one topic (not many as you’ve described below). 

If there are too many topics proposed to this company, they will not be interested.

My recommendation is for you to finalize Genomics, volume 2, and let’s see the story we have about that specific topic.

Gali 

 

On Tuesday, June 25, 2019, 11:43:27 AM EDT, Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu> wrote:

https://www.terarecon.com/blog/beyond-the-screen-episode-6-next-generation-ai-companies-providing-physicians-a-starting-point-in-ai?utm_campaign=AuntMinnie%20June%202019

HOW can we get  Kevin Landwher of terarecon.com to create a Podcast for LPBI Group IP Assets, including a section on our forthcoming Genomics, Volume 2 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-two-genomics-methodologies-ngs-bioinformatics-simulations-and-the-genome-ontology/

 

On Saturday, June 29, 2019, 03:56:08 PM EDT, Aviva Lev-Ari <aviva.lev-ari@comcast.net> wrote:

 

POINT #1 for VIDEO coverage – Focus on Genomics, Volume 2

After 7/15, Prof. Feldman will be back in the US, stating to work on Part 5 in Genomics, Volume 2. We will Skype to discuss what to include in 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4

On 7/15, I am submitting my work on creation of Parts 1,2,3,4,6

Dr. Williams and Dr. Saha are working already on Part 7&8.

Below you have abbreviated eTOCs.

Go to URL of the Book to see what I placed already inside this book.

Dr. Williams and Prof. Feldman will compose 

Preface

Introduction to Volume 2

Volume Summary

Epilogue

Based on these four parts and the eTOCs you will have ample content for the video, which may start with the epitome of our book creation: Genomics Volume 2 (you interview the three Editors why it is Epitome)

POINT #2 or #3 or #4  for VIDEOs to Focus on coverage for Marketing LPBI Group

by DESCRIPTION of what was accomplished

 

  • Venture history/background
  • Venture milestones: all posts in the Journal with the Title
  • “We celebrate …..
  • 5-6 Titles like that, I may add two more
  • Site Statistics
  • Book articles cumulative views (Article Scoring System: Data Extract)
  • section on BioMed e-Series
  • section on List of Conference covered in Real Time
  • FIT Team input to Venture Valuation: top 5 or top 10 Factors in consensus 
  • the 3D graphs on Opportunity Maps: Gail, Rick, Amnon, Aviva – each explains their own outcome
  • section on Pipeline

Video on What is the Ideal Solution for the FUTURE of LPBI Group

  • Interviews with All FIT Members

For POINT #1:

To build the narrative for a VIDEO dedication to Genomics, Volume Two and Marketing campaign as a NEW BOOK on NGS, the Narrative will use content extracts to built a CASE for

Why GENOMICS Volume 2 – is the Epitome of all BioMed e-Series???????

 

forthcoming Genomics, Volume 2 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-two-genomics-methodologies-ngs-bioinformatics-simulations-and-the-genome-ontology/

 

Aviva completed Parts 1,2,3,4,6, 

[5 is by Prof. Feldman] 

[7,8 are by Scientists on FIT]:

Latest in Genomics Methodologies for Therapeutics:

Gene Editing, NGS & BioInformatics,

Simulations and the Genome Ontology

 

2019

Volume Two

Prof. Marcus W. Feldman, PhD, Editor

Prof. Stephen J. Williams, PhD, Editor

And

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-two-genomics-methodologies-ngs-bioinformatics-simulations-and-the-genome-ontology/

Abbreviated eTOCs

Part 1: NGS

1.1 The Science

1.2 Technologies and Methodologies

1.3 Clinical Aspects

1.4 Business and Legal

 

Part 2: CRISPR for Gene Editing and DNA Repair

2.1 The Science

2.2 Technologies and Methodologies

2.3 Clinical Aspects

2.4 Business and Legal

 

Part 3: AI in Medicine

3.1 The Science

3.2 Technologies and Methodologies

3.3 Clinical Aspects

3.4 Business and Legal

3.5 Latest in Machine Learning (ML) Algorithms harnessed for Medical Diagnosis: Pattern Recognition & Prediction of Disease Onset

 

Part 4: Single Cell Genomics

4.1 The Science

4.2 Technologies and Methodologies

4.3 Clinical Aspects

4.4 Business and Legal

 

Part 5: Evolution Biology Genomics Modeling @Feldman Lab, Stanford University – Written and Curated by Prof. Marc Feldman

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

 

Part 6: Simulation Modeling in Genomics

6.1   Mutation Analysis – Gene Encoding

6.2   Mitochondrial Variations

6.3   Variant Analysis

6.4   Variant Detection in Hereditary Cancer Genes

6.5   Immuno-Informatics

6.6   RNA Sequencing

6.7   Complex Insertions and Deletions

6.8   Evolutionary Biology

6.9   Simulation Programs

6.10  A comparison of tools for the simulation of genomic next-generation sequencing data

 

Part 7: Applications of Genomics: Genotypes, Phenotypes and Complex Diseases

7.1 Genome-wide associations with complex diseases (GWAS)

7.2 Non-coding DNA and phenotypes—including diseases like cancer

7.3 Epigenomic associations with phenotypes including cancer

7.4 Rare variants and diseases

7.5 Population-level genomics and the meaning of group differences

7.6 Targeting drugs for complex diseases

 

Part 8: Epigenomics and Genomic Regulation

8.1  Genomic controls on epigenomics

8.2  The ENCODE project and gene regulation

8.3  Small interfering RNAs and gene expression

8.4  Epigenomics in cancer

8.5  Environmental epigenomics

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Real Time Coverage of BIO 2019 International Convention, June 3-6, 2019 Philadelphia Convention Center, Philadelphia PA

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD @StephenJWillia2

Please follow LIVE on TWITTER using the following @ handles and # hashtags:

@Handles

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

@BIOConvention

# Hashtags

#BIO2019 (official meeting hashtag)

Please check daily on this OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL for updates on one of the most important BIO Conferences of the year for meeting notes, posts, as well as occasional PODCASTS.

 

The BIO International Convention is the largest global event for the biotechnology industry and attracts the biggest names in biotech, offers key networking and partnering opportunities, and provides insights and inspiration on the major trends affecting the industry. The event features keynotes and sessions from key policymakers, scientists, CEOs, and celebrities.  The Convention also features the BIO Business Forum (One-on-One Partnering), hundreds of sessions covering biotech trends, policy issues and technological innovations, and the world’s largest biotechnology exhibition – the BIO Exhibition.

The BIO International Convention is hosted by the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO). BIO represents more than 1,100 biotechnology companies, academic institutions, state biotechnology centers and related organizations across the United States and in more than 30 other nations. BIO members are involved in the research and development of innovative healthcare, agricultural, industrial and environmental biotechnology products.

 

Keynote Speakers INCLUDE:

Fireside Chat with Margaret (Peggy) Hamburg, MD, Foreign Secretary, National Academy of Medicine; Chairman of the Board, American Association for the Advancement of Science

Tuesday Keynote: Siddhartha Mukherjee (Author of the bestsellers Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer and  The Gene: An Intimate History)

Fireside Chat with Jeffrey Solomon, Chief Executive Officer, COWEN

Fireside Chat with Christi Shaw, Senior Vice President and President, Lilly BIO-Medicines, Eli Lilly and Company

Wednesday Keynote: Jamie Dimon (Chairman JP Morgan Chase)

Fireside Chat with Kenneth C. Frazier, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co., Inc.

Fireside Chat: Understanding the Voices of Patients: Unique Perspectives on Healthcare

Fireside Chat: FDA Town Hall

 

ALSO SUPERSESSIONS including:

Super Session: What’s Next: The Landscape of Innovation in 2019 and Beyond

Super Session: Falling in Love with Science: Championing Science for Everyone, Everywhere

Super Session: Digital Health in Practice: A Conversation with Ameet Nathawani, Chief Digital Officer, Chief Medical Falling in Love with Science: Championing Science for Everyone, Everywhere

Super Session: Realizing the Promise of Gene Therapies for Patients Around the World

Super Session: Biotech’s Contribution to Innovation: Current and Future Drivers of Success

Super Session: The Art & Science of R&D Innovation and Productivity

Super Session: Dealmaker’s Intentions: 2019 Market Outlook

Super Session: The State of the Vaccine Industry: Stimulating Sustainable Growth

 

See here for full AGENDA

Link for Registration: https://convention.bio.org/register/

The BIO International Convention is literally where hundreds of deals and partnerships have been made over the years.

 

BIO performs many services for members, but none of them are more visible than the BIO International Convention. The BIO International Convention helps BIO fulfill its mission to help grow the global biotech industry. Profits from the BIO International Convention are returned to the biotechnology industry by supporting BIO programs and initiatives. BIO works throughout the year to create a policy environment that enables the industry to continue to fulfill its vision of bettering the world through biotechnology innovation.

The key benefits of attending the BIO International Convention are access to global biotech and pharma leaders via BIO One-on-One Partnering, exposure to industry though-leaders with over 1,500 education sessions at your fingertips, and unparalleled networking opportunities with 16,000+ attendees from 74 countries.

In addition, we produce BIOtechNOW, an online blog chronicling ‘innovations transforming our world’ and the BIO Newsletter, the organization’s bi-weekly email newsletter. Subscribe to the BIO Newsletter.

 

Membership with the Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO)

BIO has a diverse membership that is comprised of  companies from all facets of biotechnology. Corporate R&D members range from entrepreneurial companies developing a first product to Fortune 100 multinationals. The majority of our members are small companies – 90 percent have annual revenues of $25 million or less, reflecting the broader biotechnology industry. Learn more about how you can save with BIO Membership.

BIO also represents academic centers, state and regional biotech associations and service providers to the industry, including financial and consulting firms.

  • 66% R&D-Intensive Companies *Of those: 89% have annual revenues under $25 million,  4% have annual revenues between $25 million and $1 billion, 7% have annual revenues over $1 billion.
  • 16% Nonprofit/Academic
  • 11% Service Providers
  • 7% State/International Affiliate Organizations

Other posts on LIVE CONFERENCE COVERAGE using Social Media on this OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL and OTHER Conferences Covered please see the following link at https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/press-coverage/

 

Notable Conferences Covered THIS YEAR INCLUDE: (see full list from 2013 at this link)

  • Koch Institute 2019 Immune Engineering Symposium, January 28-29, 2019, Kresge Auditorium, MIT

https://calendar.mit.edu/event/immune_engineering_symposium_2019#.XBrIDc9Kgcg

http://kochinstituteevents.cvent.com/events/koch-institute-2019-immune-engineering-symposium/event-summary-8d2098bb601a4654991060d59e92d7fe.aspx?dvce=1

 

  • 2019 MassBio’s Annual Meeting, State of Possible Conference ​, March 27 – 28, 2019, Royal Sonesta, Cambridge

http://files.massbio.org/file/MassBio-State-Of-Possible-Conference-Agenda-Feb-22-2019.pdf

 

  • World Medical Innovation Forum, Partners Innovations, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE | APRIL 8–10, 2019 | Westin, BOSTON

https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/agenda-list/

https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/

 

  • 18th Annual 2019 BioIT, Conference & Expo, April 16-18, 2019, Boston, Seaport World Trade Center, Track 5 Next-Gen Sequencing Informatics – Advances in Large-Scale Computing

http://www.giiconference.com/chi653337/

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/22/18th-annual-2019-bioit-conference-expo-april-16-18-2019-boston-seaport-world-trade-center-track-5-next-gen-sequencing-informatics-advances-in-large-scale-computing/

 

  • Translating Genetics into Medicine, April 25, 2019, 8:30 AM – 6:00 PM, The New York Academy of Sciences, 7 World Trade Center, 250 Greenwich St Fl 40, New York

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/25/translating-genetics-into-medicine-april-25-2019-830-am-600-pm-the-new-york-academy-of-sciences-7-world-trade-center-250-greenwich-st-fl-40-new-york/

 

  • 13th Annual US-India BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, May 9, 2019, Marriott, Cambridge

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/30/13th-annual-biopharma-healthcare-summit-thursday-may-9-2019/

 

  • 2019 Petrie-Flom Center Annual Conference: Consuming Genetics: Ethical and Legal Considerations of New Technologies, May 17, 2019, Harvard Law School

http://petrieflom.law.harvard.edu/events/details/2019-petrie-flom-center-annual-conference

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/01/11/2019-petrie-flom-center-annual-conference-consuming-genetics-ethical-and-legal-considerations-of-new-technologies/

 

  • 2019 Koch Institute Symposium – Machine Learning and Cancer, June 14, 2019, 8:00 AM-5:00 PM  ET MIT Kresge Auditorium, 48 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/03/12/2019-koch-institute-symposium-machine-learning-and-cancer-june-14-2019-800-am-500-pmet-mit-kresge-auditorium-48-massachusetts-ave-cambridge-ma/

 

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Tweets and Retweets by @AVIVA1950 and by @pharma_BI for @USAIC and #USAIC2019 at the 13th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit, Thursday, May 9, 2019, Marriott Hotel, Cambridge, MA

 

  1.  liked Tweets you were included in

    18 hours ago

    4 other likes

  2.  liked your Tweets

    18 hours ago

    10 other likes

 

  1.   Retweeted

    Alise Reicin discusses endpoints needed in and effect of cost of in Panel Discussion morning Networking break

  2.   Retweeted

    Alise Reicin Panel Discussion: best done as Basket&Umbrella trial; response rate 30-50% but Phase3 negative

    Translate Tweet

  3.   Retweeted

    Dr. William Chin design challenges with newer in recruiting patients; use Basket&Umbrella Trial design Live

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On risk | benefit: Long term impacts of treatment may be present for the life of the patient

  1.   Retweeted

    Discussion of cyber security at panel moderated by – realization that everything is interconnected: risks to business-critical functions. Much to learn from FinTech & others’ prior experience.

  2.   Retweeted

    Unexpected best thing about – at least three Zimbabweans in the crowd / on the stage.

  3.   Retweeted

    segueing into a discussion of safety, and risk tolerance. Prevention has a higher safety bar than treatment later in the disease process.

  4.   Retweeted

    Most humbling & touching moment: meeting an exec who nodded & teared up as I told him what we do His 9 yo child needs frequent contrast enhanced MRI scans for a rare disease. We felt like the smallest co at yet so important for hope & health

  5.  
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    Great initiatives to bring CAR-T to India an automation to drug manufacturion

    Amazing moderator asking provoking question of best panel in responses by experts made known were different for competing rivals the aim is same best faster largest at lowest keeping maximized

  7.   Retweeted

    Dr. Bruce Chabner Talk: Old Phase 1,2,3 design not needed for & era based . very accommodating in Phase 1 trial design.

  8.   Retweeted

    Dr. Bruce Chabner panel discussion: selection based on new design paradigm; 40 drugs approved by accelerated approval for

  9.   Retweeted

    Dr. Mace Rothenberg talks for approvals vary greatly over multiple countries makes issues of ong-term design and post approval reimbursement

  10.   Retweeted

    Talk : design now depends on systems e.g. organelle delivery. only wants accelerated approval not conditional approval. Surrogate markers critical for new trial design

  11.   Retweeted

    Dr. Rob Scott Panel Talk crisis in not in . Lowest investment in development. Physicians using SAME design for . use in trails increasing

  12.   Retweeted

    Dr. Rob Scott on design @usaic2019: Regulators as partners not barriers but burden of efficacy on . Can use advertising to increase recruitment as 70% willing participants live too far away so use &

  13.   Retweeted

    Dr. Rob Scott discusses recruitment and burdens : prefers to do in house & not use CRO as CRO less effective in monitoring trial

  14.   Retweeted

    “Some drug platforms are mature enough to fall under the practice of medicine” – Tim Yu of

  15.   Retweeted

    Closing R&D strategies panel at is with NIBR’s Janssen’s and Takeda’s Andy Plump. Moderator Martin Mackay (now of newco Rallybio) asks: What are you most excited about?

  16.   Retweeted

    Talk of indexed pricing model in the US may be a challenge for access to other parts of the world, says a speaker on rare disease panel

  17.   Retweeted

    The biggest problem that we have in the industry is the lack of empathy, says Chris Viehbacher

  18.   Retweeted

    Tim Yu’s example left a room full of seasoned biopharma R&D execs wowed. More background here:

  19.   Retweeted

    (May 9, Boston) will feature plenary panel on Emerging R&D Strategies moderated by Dr. Martin Mackay, Co-Founder, Rallybio, with of , Andy Plump of , of Janssen, Michael Ehler of -> register today

  20.   Retweeted

    Check out my latest article: Where is Oncology Drug Development Heading Next? Hear From Top KOLs at 13th BioPharma Summit May 9, Boston via

  21.   Retweeted

    Check out my latest article: One in a Million: Emerging Trends in Rare Diseases at 13th annual BioPharma Summit- May 9, Boston via

  22.   Retweeted

    Check out my latest article: Chris Viehbacher, Gurnet Point Capital joins the USAIC Advisory Board. Please join Chris &amp; other leaders at our annual BioPharma Summit, May 9, Boston via

  23.   Retweeted

    Check out my latest article: R&D Panel: BioPharma KOLs Debate R&D Strategies & Trends at 13th annual BioPharma Summit, May 9, Boston via

  24.   Retweeted

    Check out my latest article: What Does The Future Hold For Drug Development & Clinical Trials? Hear Predictions From Top Drug Developers at the 13th BioPharma Summit May Boston 9 via

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    Value and Access – The Ongoing Debate.The BioPharma Summit will feature this special session. Join the discussion with BioPharma KOLs via

  27.   Retweeted

    BioPharma Manufacturing in the Future: Hear KOLs Debate the Challenges and Opportunities at the 13th annual BioPharma Summit, May 9, Boston via

  28.   Retweeted

    Our 13th Biopharma & Healthcare Summit has kicked off with introductory remarks from USAIC President Karun Rishi and emcee Dr. Andrew Plump, President of R&D for Takeda.

  29.   Retweeted

    The session is starting as I attend the focused on US-India bio-pharma healthcare summit. The focus is on and to deliver compelling affordable care with key role for technologies.

  30.   Retweeted

    Carl June believes we’re only a few years away from outpatient CAR therapies, with no need for intensive infrastructure with ICU.

  31.   Retweeted

    Dr. Maus ⁩ monitoring data from clinical trial is very important development of new targets multiple drugs multiple mechanism multiple specificities more modification to one cell contamination results

  32.   Retweeted

    “Cancer is a collection of rare diseases” – , Director of Clinical Research, Cancer

  33.   Retweeted

    Sanat Chattopadhyay of US Merck says costs of manufacturing in US/Europe is significantly higher because technology deployed is ancient, both in small molecules and biologics.

  34.   Retweeted

    Rare disease taking center stage as technologies mature, panel moderated by CRISPR Therapeutics CEO Samarth Kulkarni

  35.   Retweeted
    Replying to  

    Enjoyed moderating the panel on manufacturing in the future as bio pharma companies explore ways to deliver drugs at affordable price and address access challenges. Digital innovation in manufacturing and supply chains will be key.

  36.   Retweeted

    Price is part of doing business…if you are not able to define value, you are sunk, says Chris Viehbacher Gurnet Point Capital

  37.   Retweeted

    All diseases are unique Your perspective changes when you or someone you love is diagnosed with a life-altering disease – rare diseases panel

  38.   Retweeted

    Arun Singhal, addl secretary, health ministry speaks about Ayushman Bharat, trade margin rationalisation, clinical trial rules at meeting

  39.   Retweeted

    Clinical trials in India picking up steadily, says Eswara Reddy, DCGI

  40.   Retweeted

    Regulators will “provide complete support” for clinical trials in India provided drug developers meet the new requirements – Drug Controller General of India Eswara Reddy

  41.   Retweeted

    discusses prevention and treatment of early disease e.g. precancer The challenge is to work out the commercial model says organize around prevention Early diagnosis / discovery of disease processes saves lives (’s raison d’etre)

  42. AMAZING EVENT @AVIVA11950 13th Annual & Healthcare Summit, Thursday, May 9, 2019, Marriott Hotel, Cambridge, MA via

  43. Dr. James Bradner, President, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research biophysical biochemical protein degradation – rewire disease cells with biomolecules combing propertitie of permiability of small molecules

  44. World PGD Growth of 4% in India 31%

  45.   Retweeted

    Takeda R&D Head Andy Plump asks question from audience to peers on stage: “I’ve been in the industry for 18 years and I can’t understand why a clinical trial costs so much. Why does it?”

  46.   Retweeted

    Manufacturing in the age of individualized medicine? We may need a completely different thinking for that says Paul Mckenzie, Biogen

  47.   Retweeted

    The so-called low-cost manufacturing edge of India will go away in a few years, says Hari Bhartia, Jubilant…being closer to the customer will be important

  48.   Retweeted

    Tricky question: getting patients to cancer centers to participate in clinical trials. Should patients be reimbursed for long travels and other expenses or will it be seen as an inducement?

  49.   Retweeted

    A chance to collaborate with my old colleague & friend ! -> another point from same panel: AbbVie CMO Rob Scott predicts tele-health solutions for clinical trial patients will be scalable soon

  50.   Retweeted

    Carl June: There are no CAR-T clinical trials in India. But says countries like India could eventually leapfrog to next gen (outpatient) cell therapy which will require less infrastructure + lower COG

  51.   Retweeted

    The 13th Annual BioPharma & Healthcare Summit is being kicked off by Andrew Plump. In his opening remarks, he commented that we should feel privileged as attendees because not even or is invited to this meeting.

  52.   Retweeted

    A well-represented panel of scientists, CEOs and entrepreneurs discuss a range of discovery research from CAR-Ts to small molecules…on the same panel is Arjun Surya of Curadev that licensed a preclinical oncology lead to Takeda.

  53. The promise of India is the largest democracy, the educated workforce the size of the market for therapeutics, access and price, reimbursement and regulation. DCGI the analogue of FDA is very active and innovated the challenge of 1.3 Billion a population of patients

  54. Great Leader in immunotherapy, Carl June early inventor and endless commitment to patient a Pro for BioPharma

  55. GREAT Conference of who is who in BioPharma, Boston at the top 500 startats of Biotech in Cambridge, MA ten years afo only a handful, boost by Novartis HQS in Cambridge, MA

  56. Liked the analogy of

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