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Archive for the ‘CANCER BIOLOGY & Innovations in Cancer Therapy’ Category


The Puzzle of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells: The MIT Stem Cell Initiative

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

The MIT Stem Cell Initiative is looking to research fundamental biological questions about normal adult stem cells and their malignant counterparts, cancer stem cells. The MIT Stem Cell Initiative is applying new technologies and approaches in pursuit of this goal. In particular, the MIT Stem Cell Initiative has focused on the breast and colon, as these tissues are quite different from each other, yet each constitutes a major portion of cancer occurrence. The program purposes are to

(a) identify the stem cells and cancer stem cells in various tissues and tumor types,

(b) control how these cells change during aging or with disease progression and

(c) determine the similarities and differences between

  • normal cells, and
  • cancer stem cells,

with the goal of finding weaknesses in cancer stem cells that can be feasible and exact targets for treatment.

In due course, the ability to identify, purify, and establish several populations of stem cells and cancer stem cells could aid researchers to understand the biology of these cells, and learn how to exploit them more efficiently in regenerative medicine applications and target them in cancer.

Normal adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells within a tissue that divide to produce two daughter cells and divide periodically to replenish or repair the tissue. One of the two daughter cells remain in the stem cell state and the other adopts a partially differentiated state, then goes on to divide and differentiate further to harvest multiple cell types that form that tissue. The division process is through a precise process to ensure that tissues are restricted to the appropriate size and cell content.

Cancer stem cells perform the same division but, rather than differentiating, the additional cells produced by the second daughter cell amass to form the bulk of the tumor.

  • Cancer stem cells can regrow the tumor, and
  • are frequently resistant to chemotherapy.

This exclusive ability of normal and cancer stem cells to both self-renew and form a tissue or tumor is referred to by researchers as “stemness,” and has important implications for biomedical applications.

As a result, cancer stem cells are thought to be responsible for

  • tumor recurrence after remission, and also for the
  • formation of metastases, which account for the majority of cancer-associated deaths.

Accordingly, an anti-cancer stem cell therapy that can target and kill cancer stem cells is one of the holy grail of cancer treatment as means to suppress both tumor recurrence and metastatic disease. One of the important tasks to studying normal and cancer stem cells, and to ultimately harnessing that knowledge is developing the ability to identify, purify, and propagate these cells. Accordingly, the main goal in stem cell and cancer stem cell research is discovering ways to distinguish them, preferably by identifying unique surface markers that can be used to cleanse stem cell and cancer stem cell populations and enable their study.

New technologies are permitting the researchers to make significant headway in these investigations, progress that was not possible just a few years ago. Explicitly, they are using

  • a mixture of specially cultured cells,
  • highly controllable mouse models of cancer, and s
  • ingle-cell RNA sequencing and
  • computational analysis techniques that are extremely matched to extracting an excessive deal of information from the moderately small number of stem cells.

SOURCE

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-initiative-delves-into-stem-cell-biology-1015

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37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: News at #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019: Deals and Announcements

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

From Biospace.com

JP Morgan Healthcare Conference Update: FDA, bluebird, Moderna and the Price of Coffee

Researcher holding test tube up behind circle of animated research icons

Tuesday, January 8, was another busy day in San Francisco for the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference. One interesting sideline was the idea that the current government shutdown could complicate some deals. Kent Thiry, chief executive officer of dialysis provider DaVita, who is working on the sale of its medical group to UnitedHealth Group this quarter, said, “We couldn’t guarantee that even if the government wasn’t shut down, but we and the buyer are both working toward that goal with the same intensity if not more.”

And in a slightly amusing bit of synchrony, U.S.Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Commissioner Scott Gottlieb’s keynote address that was delivered by way of video conference from Washington, D.C., had his audio cut out in the middle of the presentation. Gottlieb was talking about teen nicotine use and continued talking, unaware that his audio had shut off for 30 seconds. When it reconnected, the sound quality was reportedly poor.

Click to search for life sciences jobs

bluebird bio’s chief executive officer, Nick Leschlygave an update of his company’s pipeline, with a particular emphasis on a proposed payment model for its upcoming LentiGlobin, a gene therapy being evaluated for transfusion-dependent ß-thalassemia (TDT). The gene therapy is expected to be approved in Europe this year and in the U.S. in 2020. Although the price hasn’t been set, figures up to $2.1 million per treatment have been floated. Bluebird is proposing a five-year payment program, a pledge to not raise prices above CPI, and no costs after the payment period.

Eli Lilly’s chief executive officer David Ricks, just days after acquiring Loxo Oncologyoffered up projections for this year, noting that 45 percent of its revenue will be created by drugs launched in 2015. Those include Trulicity, Taltz and Verzenio. The company also expects to launch two new molecular entities this year—nasal glucagons, a rescue medicine for high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), and Lasmiditan, a rescue drug for migraine headaches.

CNBC’s Jim Cramer interviewed Allergan chief executive officer Brent Saunders, in particular discussing the fact the company’s shares traded in 2015 for $331.15 but were now trading for $145.60. Cramer noted that the company’s internal fundamentals were strong, with multiple pipeline assets and a strong leadership team. Some of the stock problems are related to what Saunders said were “unforced errors,” including intellectual property rights to Restasis, its dry-eye drug, and Allergan’s dubious scheme to protect those patents by transferring the rights to the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe in New York. On the positive side, the company’s medical aesthetics portfolio, dominated by Botox, is very strong and the overall market is expected to double.

One of the big areas of conversation is so-called “flyover tech.” Biopharma startups are dominant in Boston and in San Francisco, but suddenly venture capital investors have realized there’s a lot going on in between. New York City-based Radian Capital, for example, invests exclusively in markets outside major U.S. cities.

“At Radian, we partner with entrepreneurs who have built their businesses with a focus on strong economics rather than growth at all costs,” Aly Lovett, partner at Radian, told The Observer. “Historically, given the amount of money required to stand up a product, the software knowledge base, and coastal access to capital, health start-ups were concentrated in a handful of cities. As those dynamics have inverted and as the quality of living becomes a more important factor in attracting talent, we’re not seeing a significant increase in the number of amazing companies being built outside of the Bay Area.”

“Flyover companies” mentioned include Bind in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Solera Health in Phoenix, Arizona; ClearDATA in Austin, Texas; Healthe, in Eden Prairie, Minnesota; HistoSonics in Ann Arbor, Michigan; and many others.

Only a month after its record-breaking IPO, Moderna Therapeutics’ chief executive officer Stephane Bancelspent time both updating the company’s clinical pipeline and justifying the company’s value despite the stock dropping off 26 percent since the IPO. Although one clinical program, a Zika vaccine, mRNA-1325, has been abandoned, the company has three new drugs coming into the clinic: mRNA-2752 for solid tumors or lymphoma; mRNA-4157, a Personalized Cancer Vaccine with Merck; and mRNA-5671, a KRAS cancer vaccine. The company also submitted an IND amendment to the FDA to add an ovarian cancer cohort to its mRNA-2416 program.

One interesting bit of trivia, supplied on Twitter by Rasu Shrestha, chief innovation officer for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, this year at the conference, 33 female chief executive officers were presenting corporate updates … compared to 19 men named Michael. Well, it’s a start.

And for another bit of trivia, Elisabeth Bik, of Microbiome Digest, tweeted, “San Francisco prices are so out of control that one hotel is charging the equivalent of $21.25 for a cup of coffee during a JPMorgan conference.”

Other posts on the JP Morgan 2019 Healthcare Conference on this Open Access Journal include:

#JPM19 Conference: Lilly Announces Agreement To Acquire Loxo Oncology

36th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE January 8 – 11, 2018

37th Annual J.P. Morgan HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE: #JPM2019 for Jan. 8, 2019; Opening Videos, Novartis expands Cell Therapies, January 7 – 10, 2019, Westin St. Francis Hotel | San Francisco, California

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News announced during the 37th J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference (#JPM19): Drugmaker Eli Lilly and Company announced its plans to acquire Loxo for $8 billion, as part of its oncology strategy, which focuses  “opportunities for first-in-class and best-in-class therapies.”   

Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

Please read their press release below.


INDIANAPOLIS and STAMFORD, Conn.Jan. 7, 2019 /PRNewswire/ —

  • Acquisition will broaden the scope of Lilly’s oncology portfolio into precision medicines through the addition of a marketed therapy and a pipeline of highly selective potential medicines for patients with genomically defined cancers.
  • Loxo Oncology’s pipeline includes LOXO-292, an oral RET inhibitor being studied across multiple tumor types, which recently was granted Breakthrough Therapy designation by the FDA and could launch in 2020.
  • Loxo Oncology’s Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib) is an oral TRK inhibitor developed and commercialized in collaboration with Bayer that was recently approved by the FDA.
  • Lilly will commence a tender offer to acquire all outstanding shares of Loxo Oncology for a purchase price of$235.00 per share in cash, or approximately $8.0 billion.
  • Lilly will conduct a conference call with the investment community and media today at 8:45 a.m. EST.

Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) and Loxo Oncology, Inc. (NASDAQ: LOXO) today announced a definitive agreement for Lilly to acquire Loxo Oncology for $235.00 per share in cash, or approximately $8.0 billion. Loxo Oncology is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of highly selective medicines for patients with genomically defined cancers.

The acquisition would be the largest and latest in a series of transactions Lilly has conducted to broaden its cancer treatment efforts with externally sourced opportunities for first-in-class and best-in-class therapies. Loxo Oncology is developing a pipeline of targeted medicines focused on cancers that are uniquely dependent on single gene abnormalities that can be detected by genomic testing.  For patients with cancers that harbor these genomic alterations, a targeted medicine could have the potential to treat the cancer with dramatic effect.

Loxo Oncology has a promising portfolio of approved and investigational medicines, including:

  • LOXO-292, a first-in-class oral RET inhibitor that has been granted Breakthrough Therapy designation by the FDA for three indications, with an initial potential launch in 2020.  LOXO-292 targets cancers with alterations to the rearranged during transfection (RET) kinase. RET fusions and mutations occur across multiple tumor types, including certain lung and thyroid cancers as well as a subset of other cancers.
  • LOXO-305, an oral BTK inhibitor currently in Phase 1/2. LOXO-305 targets cancers with alterations to the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), and is designed to address acquired resistance to currently available BTK inhibitors. BTK is a validated molecular target found across numerous B-cell leukemias and lymphomas.
  • Vitrakvi, a first-in-class oral TRK inhibitor developed and commercialized in collaboration with Bayer that was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Vitrakvi is the first treatment that targets a specific genetic abnormality to receive a tumor-agnostic indication at the time of initial FDA approval.
  • LOXO-195, a follow-on TRK inhibitor also being studied by Loxo Oncology and Bayer for acquired resistance to TRK inhibition, with a potential launch in 2022.

“Using tailored medicines to target key tumor dependencies offers an increasingly robust approach to cancer treatment,” said Daniel Skovronsky, M.D., Ph.D., Lilly’s chief scientific officer and president of Lilly Research Laboratories. “Loxo Oncology’s portfolio of RET, BTK and TRK inhibitors targeted specifically to patients with mutations or fusions in these genes, in combination with advanced diagnostics that allow us to know exactly which patients may benefit, creates new opportunities to improve the lives of people with advanced cancer.”

“We are gratified that Lilly has recognized our contributions to the field of precision medicine and are excited to see our pipeline benefit from the resources and global reach of the Lilly organization,” said Josh Bilenker, M.D., chief executive officer of Loxo Oncology. “Tumor genomic profiling is becoming standard-of-care, and it will be critical to continue innovating against new targets, while anticipating mechanisms of resistance to available therapies, so that patients with advanced cancer have the chance to live longer and better lives.”

“Lilly Oncology is committed to developing innovative, breakthrough medicines that will make a meaningful difference for people with cancer and help them live longer, healthier lives,” said Anne White, president of Lilly Oncology. “The acquisition of Loxo Oncology represents an exciting and immediate opportunity to expand the breadth of our portfolio into precision medicines and target cancers that are caused by specific gene abnormalities. The ability to target tumor dependencies in these populations is a key part of our Lilly Oncology strategy. We look forward to continuing to advance the pioneering scientific innovation begun by Loxo Oncology.”

“We are excited to have reached this agreement with a team that shares our commitment to ensuring that emerging translational science reaches patients in need,” said Jacob Van Naarden, chief operating officer of Loxo Oncology. “We are confident that the work we have started, which includes an FDA approved drug, and a pipeline spanning from Phase 2 to discovery, will continue to thrive in Lilly’s hands.”

Under the terms of the agreement, Lilly will commence a tender offer to acquire all outstanding shares of Loxo Oncology for a purchase price of $235.00 per share in cash, or approximately $8.0 billion. The transaction is not subject to any financing condition and is expected to close by the end of the first quarter of 2019, subject to customary closing conditions, including receipt of required regulatory approvals and the tender of a majority of the outstanding shares of Loxo Oncology’s common stock. Following the successful closing of the tender offer, Lilly will acquire any shares of Loxo Oncology that are not tendered into the tender offer through a second-step merger at the tender offer price.

The tender offer represents a premium of approximately 68 percent to Loxo Oncology’s closing stock price on January 4, 2019, the last trading day before the announcement of the transaction. Loxo Oncology’s board recommends that Loxo Oncology’s shareholders tender their shares in the tender offer.  Additionally, a Loxo Oncology shareholder, beneficially owning approximately 6.6 percent of Loxo Oncology’s outstanding common stock, has agreed to tender its shares in the tender offer.

This transaction will be reflected in Lilly’s financial results and financial guidance according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Lilly will provide an update to its 2019 financial guidance, including the expected impact from the acquisition of Loxo Oncology, as part of its fourth-quarter and full-year 2018 financial results announcement on February 13, 2019.

For Lilly, Deutsche Bank is acting as the exclusive financial advisor and Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP is acting as legal advisor in this transaction. For Loxo Oncology, Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC is acting as exclusive financial advisor and Fenwick & West LLP is acting as legal advisor.

Conference Call and Webcast
Lilly will conduct a conference call with the investment community and media today at 8:45 a.m. EST to discuss the acquisition of Loxo Oncology.  Investors, media and the general public can access a live webcast of the conference call through the Webcasts & Presentations link that will be posted on Lilly’s website at www.lilly.com.  The webcast of the conference call will be available for replay through February 7, 2019.

About LOXO-292
LOXO-292 is an oral and selective investigational new drug in clinical development for the treatment of patients with cancers that harbor abnormalities in the rearranged during transfection (RET) kinase. RET fusions and mutations occur across multiple tumor types with varying frequency. LOXO-292 was designed to inhibit native RET signaling as well as anticipated acquired resistance mechanisms that could otherwise limit the activity of this therapeutic approach. LOXO-292 has been granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation by the U.S. FDA for three indications, and could launch as early as 2020.

About LOXO-305
LOXO-305 is an investigational, highly selective non-covalent Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor. BTK plays a key role in the B-cell antigen receptor signaling pathway, which is required for the development, activation and survival of normal white blood cells, known as B-cells, and malignant B-cells. BTK is a validated molecular target found across numerous B-cell leukemias and lymphomas including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia, mantle cell lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma.

About Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib)
Vitrakvi is an oral TRK inhibitor for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with solid tumors with a neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase (NTRK) gene fusion without a known acquired resistance mutation that are either metastatic or where surgical resection will likely result in severe morbidity, and have no satisfactory alternative treatments or have progressed following treatment. This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

About LOXO-195
LOXO-195 is a selective TRK inhibitor that is being investigated to address potential mechanisms of acquired resistance that may emerge in patients receiving Vitrakvi® (larotrectinib) or other multikinase inhibitors with anti-TRK activity.

About Eli Lilly and Company
Lilly is a global healthcare leader that unites caring with discovery to create medicines that make life better for people around the world. We were founded more than a century ago by a man committed to creating high-quality medicines that meet real needs, and today we remain true to that mission in all our work. Across the globe, Lilly employees work to discover and bring life-changing medicines to those who need them, improve the understanding and management of disease, and give back to communities through philanthropy and volunteerism. To learn more about Lilly, please visit us at www.lilly.com and www.lilly.com/newsroom/social-channels. C-LLY

About Loxo Oncology
Loxo Oncology is a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of highly selective medicines for patients with genomically defined cancers. Our pipeline focuses on cancers that are uniquely dependent on single gene abnormalities, such that a single drug has the potential to treat the cancer with dramatic effect. We believe that the most selective, purpose-built medicines have the highest probability of maximally inhibiting the intended target, with the intention of delivering best-in-class disease control and safety. Our management team seeks out experienced industry partners, world-class scientific advisors and innovative clinical-regulatory approaches to deliver new cancer therapies to patients as quickly and efficiently as possible. For more information, please visit the company’s website at http://www.loxooncology.com.

Lilly Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements about the benefits of Lilly’s acquisition of Loxo Oncology, Inc. (“Loxo Oncology”). It reflects Lillys current beliefs; however, as with any such undertaking, there are substantial risks and uncertainties in implementing the transaction and in drug developmentAmong other things, there can be no guarantee that the transaction will be completed in the anticipated timeframe, or at all, or that the conditions required to complete the transaction will be met, that Lilly will realize the expected benefits of the transaction, that the molecules will be approved on the anticipated timeline or at all, or that the potential products will be commercially successful. For further discussion of these and other risks and uncertainties, see Lillys most recent Form 10-K and Form 10-Q filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“the SEC”). Lilly will provide an update to certain elements of its 2019 financial guidance as part of its fourth quarter and full-year 2018 financial results announcement. Except as required by law, Lilly undertakes no duty to update forward-looking statements to reflect events after the date of this release.

Loxo Oncology Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains “forward-looking statements” relating to the acquisition of Loxo Oncology by Lilly. Such forward-looking statements include the ability of Loxo Oncology and Lilly to complete the transactions contemplated by the merger agreement, including the parties’ ability to satisfy the conditions to the consummation of the offer and the other conditions set forth in the merger agreement and the possibility of any termination of the merger agreement, as well as the role of targeted genomics and diagnostics in oncology treatment and acceleration of our work in developing medicines. Such forward-looking statements are based upon current expectations that involve risks, changes in circumstances, assumptions and uncertainties. Actual results may differ materially from current expectations because of risks associated with uncertainties as to the timing of the offer and the subsequent merger; uncertainties as to how many of Loxo Oncology’s stockholders will tender their shares in the offer; the risk that competing offers or acquisition proposals will be made; the possibility that various conditions to the consummation of the offer or the merger may not be satisfied or waived; the effects of disruption from the transactions contemplated by the merger agreement on Loxo Oncology’s business and the fact that the announcement and pendency of the transactions may make it more difficult to establish or maintain relationships with employees, suppliers and other business partners; the risk that stockholder litigation in connection with the offer or the merger may result in significant costs of defense, indemnification and liability; other uncertainties pertaining to the business of Loxo Oncology, including those set forth in the “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” sections of Loxo Oncology’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017, which is on file with the SEC and available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. Additional factors may be set forth in those sections of Loxo Oncology’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter endedSeptember 30, 2018, filed with the SEC in the fourth quarter of 2018.  In addition to the risks described above and in Loxo Oncology’s other filings with the SEC, other unknown or unpredictable factors could also affect Loxo Oncology’s results. No forward-looking statements can be guaranteed and actual results may differ materially from such statements. The information contained in this press release is provided only as of the date of this report, and Loxo Oncology undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements either contained in or incorporated by reference into this report on account of new information, future events, or otherwise, except as required by law.

Additional Information about the Acquisition and Where to Find It

The tender offer for the outstanding shares of Loxo Oncology referenced in this communication has not yet commenced. This announcement is for informational purposes only and is neither an offer to purchase nor a solicitation of an offer to sell shares of Loxo Oncology, nor is it a substitute for the tender offer materials that Lilly and its acquisition subsidiary will file with the SEC upon commencement of the tender offer. At the time the tender offer is commenced, Lilly and its acquisition subsidiary will file tender offer materials on Schedule TO, and Loxo Oncology will file a Solicitation/Recommendation Statement on Schedule 14D-9 with the SEC with respect to the tender offer. THE TENDER OFFER MATERIALS (INCLUDING AN OFFER TO PURCHASE, A RELATED LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL AND CERTAIN OTHER TENDER OFFER DOCUMENTS) AND THE SOLICITATION/RECOMMENDATION STATEMENT WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION. HOLDERS OF SHARES OF LOXO ONCOLOGY ARE URGED TO READ THESE DOCUMENTS CAREFULLY WHEN THEY BECOME AVAILABLE (AS EACH MAY BE AMENDED OR SUPPLEMENTED FROM TIME TO TIME) BECAUSE THEY WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION THAT HOLDERS OF LOXO ONCOLOGY SECURITIES SHOULD CONSIDER BEFORE MAKING ANY DECISION REGARDING TENDERING THEIR SECURITIES. The Offer to Purchase, the related Letter of Transmittal and certain other tender offer documents, as well as the Solicitation/Recommendation Statement, will be made available to all holders of shares of Loxo Oncology at no expense to them. The tender offer materials and the Solicitation/Recommendation Statement will be made available for free at the SEC’s web site at www.sec.gov

In addition to the Offer to Purchase, the related Letter of Transmittal and certain other tender offer documents, as well as the Solicitation/Recommendation Statement, Lilly and Loxo Oncology file annual, quarterly and special reports and other information with the SEC.  You may read and copy any reports or other information filed by Lilly or Loxo Oncology at the SEC public reference room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Please call the Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the public reference room.  Lilly’s and Loxo Oncology’s filings with the SEC are also available to the public from commercial document-retrieval services and at the website maintained by the SEC at www.sec.gov.

SOURCE

Eli Lilly and Company – https://www.lilly.com

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

2017

FDA has approved the world’s first CAR-T therapy, Novartis for Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel) and Gilead’s $12 billion buy of Kite Pharma, no approved drug and Canakinumab for Lung Cancer (may be?)

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/08/30/fda-has-approved-the-worlds-first-car-t-therapy-novartis-for-kymriah-tisagenlecleucel-and-gileads-12-billion-buy-of-kite-pharma-no-approved-drug-and-canakinumab-for-lung-cancer-may-be/

2016

Pioneers of Cancer Cell Therapy:  Turbocharging the Immune System to Battle Cancer Cells — Success in Hematological Cancers vs. Solid Tumors

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/19/pioneers-of-cancer-cell-therapy-turbocharging-the-immune-system-to-battle-cancer-cells-success-in-hematological-cancers-vs-solid-tumors/

2015

Personalized Medicine – The California Initiative

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/10/12/personalized-medicine/

2013

Volume One: Genomics Orientations for Personalized Medicine

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/volume-one-genomics-orientations-for-personalized-medicine/

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Innovation + Technology = Good Patient Experience

Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

 

Following are a sampling of several relevant articles comprising health innovation and technology, which may ultimately lead to a good patient experience. 

When a health journalist found out her 4-year-old son had a brain tumor, her family faced an urgent choice: proven but punishing rounds of chemotherapy, or a twice-a-day pill of a new “targeted” therapy with a scant track record.

SOURCE

https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/genomics-tumor/

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Paying for Tumor Testing

A recent U.S. government decision about coverage of tumor sequencing could affect cancer patients.

SOURCE

https://www.cancertodaymag.org/Pages/cancer-talk/Paying-for-Tumor-Testing.aspx

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Dr. Elaine Schattner has authored numerous articles on cancer — as a doctor and patient. She is a freelance journalist and former oncologist who lives in New York City. She is writing a book about public attitudes toward cancer.

A life-long patient with scoliosis and other chronic medical conditions, and a history of breast cancer, Elaine’s current interests include physicians’ health, cancer, and medical journalism.

SOURCE

https://www.elaineschattner.com/

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Speaking Up for Patient Preferences in Cancer Treatment Decisions.

Informed consent should include your input.

SOURCE

https://health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/articles/2016-04-15/speaking-up-for-patient-preferences-in-cancer-treatment-decisions

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Breast Cancer, Risk And Women’s Imperfect Choices

SOURCE

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2013/05/15/184188710/breast-cancer-risk-and-womens-imperfect-choices

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A cancer researchers takes cancer personally: Dr. Tony Blau, who started All4Cure, an online platform for myeloma clinicians and researchers to interact directly with patients to come up with a customer treatment plan.

SOURCE

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Julia Louis-Dreyfus Acts Out: The actress on challenging comedy’s sexism, fighting cancer, and becoming the star of her own show.

SOURCE

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/12/17/julia-louis-dreyfus-acts-out

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Thanks to Wendy Lund, CEO of GCI Health (gcihealth.com)  and her team for compiling part of this list. 

Interoperability, patient matching could be fixed by smartphone apps, RAND says: Patients need quality information. A physician at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences believes that the healthcare community must improve reports by making them more accessible to patients.

SOURCE

https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/interoperability-patient-matching-could-be-fixed-smartphone-apps-rand-says

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Sometimes Patients Simply Need Other Patients: Finding a support community is also getting easier, through resources like the Database of Patients’ Experiences, which houses videos of patients speaking about their experiences

 

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At These Hotels and Spas, Cancer is No Obstacle to Quality Care: A trend among spas and wellness resorts shows the increasing integration of safe wellness treatment options for cancer patients.

SOURCE

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The Future of Precision Cancer Medicine, Inaugural Symposium, MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine, December 13, 2018, 8AM-6PM, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

#CPCM2018 @AVIVA1950 @pharma_BI

 

 

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor-in-Chief, will attend and cover this event in REAL TIME for

 http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com 


Over the past decade, there have been major advancements in the field of precision medicine, leading to exciting new treatments for some cancer patients. Much attention has been focused on genomic profiling of tumors to identify genomic alterations that might guide selection of specific therapies for individual patients. Beyond genomics, however, there is a variety of other precision approaches that can identify and exploit cancer-specific biological mechanisms including proteomics, metabolomics, and computational modeling, resulting in the more effective use of existing cancer medicines. On Thursday, December 13, 2018, the MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine will hold its inaugural annual symposium in the Samberg Conference Center at MIT. This full-day event will feature leading researchers and clinicians, who will highlight recent advances in precision cancer medicine and share perspectives on the future. An industry panel will also discuss the barriers to instituting precision medicine into current and future clinical trials.

 


Keynote Address

Charles Sawyers

Charles Sawyers, MD

Chair, Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Speakers

Andrea Califano

Andrea Califano, PhD

Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology, Columbia University
Chair, Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University
Director, JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center
Associate Director, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center

Chris Love

J. Christopher Love, PhD

Professor of Chemical Engineering, MIT
Associate Member, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard
Member, Koch Institute, MIT

Richard Marais

Richard Marais, PhD

Professor of Molecular Oncology
Director, CRUK Manchester Institute
The University of Manchester

Kenna Mills Shaw

Kenna Mills Shaw, PhD

Executive Director
Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed al Nahyan Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy
MD Anderson Cancer Center

Alice Shaw

Alice Shaw, MD, PhD

Professor, Harvard Medical School
Director, Thoracic Cancer Program, Massachusetts General Hospital

Matt Vander Heiden

Matthew Vander Heiden, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Biology, MIT
Associate Director, Koch Institute
Member, MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine

Mike Yaffe

Michael B. Yaffe, MD, PhD

David H. Koch Professor of Science, MIT
Professor of Biology and Biological Engineering, MIT
Director, MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine
Director, Koch Institute Clinical Investigator Program

Jean Zhao

Jean Zhao, PhD

Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute


Panelists: Barriers to Instituting Precision Medicine in Clinical Trials

Hammerman

Peter Hammerman, MD, PhD

Global Head, Translational Research
Oncology Disease Area
Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research

Ho

Steffan N. Ho, MD, PhD

Vice President, Head of Translational Oncology
Pfizer Global Product Development

Shiva Malek

Shiva Malek, PhD

Director and Principal Scientist
Department of Discovery Oncology
Genentech Inc

Marks

Kevin Marks, PhD

VP of Biology
Agios Pharmaceuticals

Michael Rothenberg

S. Michael Rothenberg, MD, PhD

Vice-President, Research and Development
Loxo Oncology, Inc.

Angela Koehler

Moderator:

Angela Koehler, PhD

Goldblith Career Development Professor in Applied Biology, MIT
Member, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research
Member, MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine

 

Speakers:

Panelists:

  • Peter Hammerman, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research
  • Steffan Ho, Pfizer
  • Shiva Malek, Genentech, Inc
  • Kevin Marks, Agios Pharmaceuticals
  • S. Michael Rothenberg, Loxo Oncology, Inc

Moderated by Angela Koehler, MIT’s Koch Institute

Agenda:

8:00 am Registration and continental breakfast

8:45 am Opening remarks by Michael Yaffe (MIT’s Koch Institute)

  • Season of great expectation, tumor genetics is just the beginning, beyond: science, engineering, medicine: beyond genomics: immunology, cell biology, early detection, new drug development for the undrugable, system biology, RNAi
  • Jack Tyler was the initiator to find a donor for CPCM

9:00 am Keynote Address by Charles L. Sawyers (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)

  • developed a drug for prostate cancer
  • Clinical trained oncologist/genomics
  • Lineage Plasticity:
  1. luminal cells in histology of origin and basal cells and require androgen receptor AR) function
  2. deprive lunimal cells fro growth factor
  3. Hormonal therapy Leuprolite, degarelix [castration methastatic]
  4. after relapse 2nd generation anti-androgens abirateron
  5. PING MU ENZALUTAMIDE RESISTANCE P53/RB! DELETION CONFER
  6. TRANSCRIPTION CHANGE: ANTIADROGEN RESISTANCE
  7. Lineage shift Sox2 level goes up – prevent drug resistance, in vivo and in vitro
  8. SOX2 promotes lineage placticity and antiadrogen resistance in TP53 and RBI-deficient prostate cancer
  9. Evolution of Lineage plasticity over time
  10. AR Pathway inhibition accelerates lineage plasticity: synaptophysin-positive disease in-vivo
  11. scRNA-seq time course – modeled by diffusion map displayed in luminal and basal cells
  12. Emergence of EMT phenotype, with retention of epithelial features
  13. Use CRISPR to perturb luminal plasticity by phyeno type
  14. Genomic landscape of Primary Prostate Cancer: ERG gain drives luminal layer
  15. Different classes of FOXA1 mutations in Prostate organoid Cancer – Missense, inframe, truncated
  16. FOXA1 key in hormone receptor signaling
  17. Hypermorphic peaks – ATAC-seq neomorphic FOXA1 pioneering activity
  18. Common Prostate Cancer Genes:differentiation phenotypes: TP53 Loss, RB1 – Loss,
  19. work of Matan Hofree – four subtypes of luminal cells
  20. involution and regeneration of single cell RNAseq
  21. Transcriptional shifts in response to castration/androgen addback
  22. androgen addback: 50% of luminal cells are proliferation in 48 hours
  23. cell responsible for organ regeneration

 

9:45 am Alice T. Shaw (Massachusetts General Hospital)

  • evolution of drug resistance in Lung Cancer
  • oncogenic drivers in lung adenocarcenoma –
  1. EGFR – sensitizing 19.4% of all patients
  2. KRAS
  3. ALK
  4. ROS1
  5. CMET
  6. BRAF
  7. NTRK1
  8. RET

Delay and prevention of drug resistance: liquid biopsy of pleural fluids and serial blood collections

  • Crizotinib patient with ROS1 + nsclc
  • acquired mutation in ROS1 G2032R – resistance to Crizotinib – Michael Lawrence, MGH – analysis of mutation and resistance
  • Repotrectinib – for ROS1 – Resistance mediated by this mutation
  • If patient fails three antiinhibitor drugs: secondary ALK mutations mediate Crizotinib Resistance
  • 2nd generation of  ALK inhibitors are structurally Distinct molecules
  • Lorlatinib – 3rd generation –>> back to 1st generation Crizotinib
  • Clonal evolution of resistance in ALK in NSCLC
  • compound mutations in ALK mutations – Lorlatinib Resistance
  • Sequential TKI therapy foster the development of compound mutation refractory to all generations og ALK TKIs – compound mutation can’t be overcome
  • Intratumoral Heterogeneity revealed by multiregion sequencing of renal cell carcinoma and resected NSCLC
  • somatic mutations: Pre-treatment to Lorlatinib resistance
  • Clonal Analysis: Multiple Drivers of resistance underlie clinical relapse
  • genomic instability – eradicate residual disease to eliminate drug resistance and tolerance persistance

 

10:25 am Networking Break

10:45 am Richard Marais (Cancer Research UK, Manchester Institute)

  • Melanoma – Precision Medicin
  • Request – NOT TO PUBLISH on the INTERNET, some of the work presented is not PUBLISHED.
  • Request is honored

11:25 am Matthew Vander Heiden (MIT’s Koch Institute)

  • Targeting Metabolism is altered in cancer
  • Metabolism is glucose carbohydrates, lipids – conversion of nutrients into biomass: ATP, Protein, Nucleic acid,
  • Not -proliferating cells vs proliferating cells
  • genetic mutations, tissue of origin, lineage of cells — metabolism takes place: combination of these three facto
  • environment consists the metabolic network definers.d by cell intrinsic network
  • Assessment of nutrient levels in tumor microenvironment
  • Metabolite analysis: ion suppression vs nutrients
  • nutrients are available to cells in tumors
  • depletion of glucose vs enrichment
  • metabolite most different: Gluthamine, needed for cancer to grow
  • Lineage can contribute – tryptophane and argenine
  • gluthamine – Cyctine affect gluthamine sensitivity to gluthamine inhibitors
  • what you eat, where is the tumor locate, tissue environment — more important
  • therapeutic window: metabolism processes – cell proliferation
  • ability to make aspartate – given to mice pancreatic  — tumor grow faster
  • cellular oxidation state correlate with pyruvate oxidation — PDH Activator suppress oxidation
  • Aspartate vs NAD+/NADH – lactate TCA – form more carbon
  • PDH activation reduces Redux
  • Serine availability can limit proliferation even in cells with increase
  • Serine vs NAD regeneration
  • which cancer falls into which group : Serine pathway – increase serine synthesis: Melanoma vs Breast cancer
  • growth of breast cancer: Serine availability dependent – accelerate of inhibit growth by level of serine
  • Model for how nutrient limitation affect tumor growth, tumor size depends of serine levels

 

12:05 pm Box lunch

12:30 pm Industry panel: Barriers to instituting precision medicine into clinical trials

  • Long term benefits of Precision Medicine
  • What phynotype are now looked for?

Michael Rothenberg

  1. short term, identify mutations
  2. more testing is needed
  3. sequencing the therapies
  4. challenge getting tissue, doing experiments in house
  5. Industry needs Academia collaboration for accelerated innovations
  6. AI may lower the cost of drug discovery

KEVIN MARX:

  1. MECHANISM OF RESISTANCE – COMBINATORIAL DRUG DISCOVERY
  2. phynotyping, tissue acquisition immune phenotype, what drive therapeutic response?
  3. genetic drivers
  4. HR seeks Scientistist that worked in TEAMS, collaborative science

STEPHAN HO

  1. long term benefits are very important
  2. Stage III disease – technology advances
  3. advanced in the regulatory space
  4. smaller cohort size to approve a drug
  5. biologic complexity, driver oncogenes, precision to imprecision
  6. cost of risk in investment in innovations
  7. check point inhibitor – known biology and immuno-modulation, data hypothesis and moving forward
  8. Organizational culture, interaction in teams, functional behavior
  9. commit to deliverable, perfect timing contingent on work of others.

Peter Hammerman

  1. single cell tumor immunity in combination drug therapy
  2. Tumor monitoring over time
  3. Novartis is interested to collaborate with innovators in Academia and in other institutions
  4. critical thinking on DATA and on negative data
  5. Combination drug therapy: orthogonal mechanism of actions and drug classed – toxicity is an issue

Shiva Malek

  1. How to drug mutations on DATA
  2. Acquired and intrinsic mutations
  3. exposure and patient safety
  4. UCSF’s Ashkenazi’s Team and Genetech – basic biology area selection
  5. Failure are not talked about
  6. Round table for problem solvers, how you approach a problem
  7. translational work require skills beyond technical expertise
  8. learning the navigation inside an organization
  9. leadership in R&D, expected to demonstrate leadership, the Scientist needs to have command of the field and of desirable directions of research

 

2:00 pm J. Christopher Love (MIT’s Koch Institute)

Acceleration of the PROCESS to develop Precision Medicine products

  • design, build, test – PROCESS
  • New drugs and vaccines – the process is iterative
  • measurements, with use of smallest number of samples
  • deliver precision medical: small f patients or large population or
  • clinical samples provide rich source of information: Blood or tissue sample
  • Tissue – extract RNA, component cells, single-cell RNA sequencing,
  • Challenges of enabling scRNA-seq in clinical labs
  • Probability, scale, capture efficiencies, temporal uniformity
  • single-cell sequencing
  • Seq-Well: method for scRNA-Seq
  • New Chemistries for T-cell
  • Blood: cell, cfDNA, Exosomes
  • map cancer genome from blood
  • Tissue:
  • Single circulating Tumor cells:
  • yield genomic landscape of cancer
  • cell free DNA, vells, proteins, metabolite, Tumor is existence, draw blood
  • cfDNA Tumor Fraction is prognostic of survival in mTNBC
  • automate to 13 cancer types
  • Rs is now possible
  • reduce sample requirement
  • cost is low digital information from clinical samples
  • Keytruda – is a molecular Signature
  • low volume product, advanced preparation (mo-years) __>>> agile solutions (days to years)
  • bentchtop, on-demand manufacturing system: Production, Purification, Formulation
  • hand-free production of formulated G-CSF: comparable to licensed products.
  • Plug and play manufacturing using  InSeq
  • Novel MAbs from patients
  • Many molecules to many products

 

2:40 pm Andrea Califano (Columbia University, System Biology)

Mechanistic Framework for the systematic pharmacological targeting of Non-Oncogene Dependencies – Precise Precision Oncology

  • systematic elucidation od critical cancer cell dependencies
  • drug MOA
  • Tumor dependencies to Drug MOA
  • Tumor heterogeneity
  • ARACNe – regulatory targets of regulatory proteins
  • Combinational Therapy: HER@ inhibitor and JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor
  • Driver Mutations
  • ARACNe; MINDy DIGGIT; Expression VIPER: MetaVIPER
  • Aberrantly activated protein for Prioritizing treatment in patients
  • Checkpoint activity reversal – prioritize drugs based on
  • Tumor model selection: GIST
  • 260 patients, 14 untreatable cancers — N of 1 Study
  • Single cell Studies – active proteins in stem-like progenitor cells
  • Ivermectin Treatment vs Control (7d vs 14d)

 

3:20 pm Networking Break

3:40 pm Jean Zhao (Dana Farber Cancer Institute)

Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapy in Cancer Therapy

  • Targeting cancer with CDK4/6 inhibitors
  • CDK4/6 inhibitors causes tumor regression in breast cancer and regression of CT-26 colorectal cancer
  • CDK4/6DNMT1 inducing viral mimicry
  • PARP inhibitors  changing treatment in ovarian cancer
  • FDA approved three drugs for ovarian cancer
  • p53-null; BRCA-null; myc high – model testing

 

4:20 pm Kenna Mills Shaw (MD Anderson Cancer Center)

  • PM nor a Silver bullet nor a Dream Illusion
  • 2013: not all mutations are equally actionable
  • Context of Biomarkers
  • co-mutations in lung cancer identity – therapeutic vulnerability
  • NGS cost decrease leads to increases in Data generation
  • there are only 125 genes ACTIONABLE IN THE CLINIC
  • finding biomarkers beyond direct targets
  • clinical actionability:80K mutation – 32%
  • patients: No standard treatment available
  • Enrollment inGenotype Matched TRIALS
  • MUTATIONS SCREENED: LACK OF ENROLLMENT NOT DUE TO LACK OF MATCHING PROCESS
  • 69% GOT NEW REGIMEN, 17% did not come back — no one called them
  • 58% enrolled on genotrype-matched trials
  • Beyond NGS:

www.personalizedcancertherapy.org

  • DECISION SUPPORT IN REAL TIME IMPROVES “MATCHING” TO RIGHT DRUG.
  • MULTIFACTORS: CO-MOEBIDITIES, MICROBIOME, IMMUNE PHYNOTYPING, GENOMICS, MICROBIOME, ZIP CODE, INFECTION

5:00 pm Michael Yaffe (MIT)

  • AUGMENTED SYNTHETIC LETHALITY
  • CANCER CELLS ARE UNDER CONSTANT STRESS
  • inflammation
  • Therpeutics-targeted Synthetic Lethality
  • BRCA mutation seen in 10%-20% of patients
  • p53 mutations DNA demage – leads to apoptosis p38 MK2 as a pathway is taking over repair DNA and no apotosis occurs.
  • doxorubicin
  • Nanoparticle targeting of siRNAs to established tumors
  • The Concept of augmented Synthetic Lethality   —- enhance a prevosly known synthetic interaction by targeting additional pathways
  • combination of repair pathway  and checkpoint activation – lead to better therapeutic results
  • MK2 – targets hnRNP A0 (an RNA binding protein)  – Cleaved Caspase 3 – is synthetic lethal with p53 mutuant tumors, not just p53 null alleles
  • MK2 links Inflammation and Cancer – IBD –>> polyps and Colon Cancer
  • myeloid cell recruitment to inflammatory tumors in
  • MK2 KO mice: IL-4 –M2 magrophage – tumor progression; regulate the tumor microenvironment
  • IFNgamma –>M1 macrophages – tumor suppression

 

 

 

SOURCE

https://ki.mit.edu/news/events/cpcmsymposium-2018

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-center-for-precision-cancer-medicine-inaugural-symposium-tickets-50424019600?utm_campaign=event_reminder&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=eventname

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-center-for-precision-cancer-medicine-inaugural-symposium-tickets-50424019600

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Study Finds that Both Women and their Primary Care Physicians Confusion over Ovarian Cancer Symptoms May Lead to Misdiagnosis

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

This post discusses the recently released “The Every Woman Study” conducted by the World Ovarian Cancer Coalition.  For full PDF of the study please click here: WOCC-Every-Woman-Study-Summary-Report-Oct-16

The findings are summarized nicely in the NPR article from Joanne Silberner below but just want to list a few takeaways from the study

  1.  Ovarian Cancer, while not the most common cancer in women, is still one of the most deadly malignancies.  A major reason for this is the inability to catch the disease in its early, and most treatable stages.  Much work is being done on early detection (a few posts on this area from this online journal are given at the end of this post for reference)
  2. The symptoms of ovarian cancer closely mimic symptoms of gastrointestinal distress and disorders and many times these symptoms are overlooked by women as benign, temporary issues and may be mis-self diagnosed.  In addition, if mistaken for common gastrointestinal discomfort or gynecologic discomfort (cramping)  women may self-medicate with over the counter agents which mask the symptoms of ovarian cancer
  3. certain lessons can be learned from the experiences in other countries regarding access to healthcare and diagnosis. For instance

Looking at the key findings of the study it becomes clear that countries have significant potential to
learn from each other:
• Women in Germany had the shortest time to diagnosis, but much less access to
specialist clinicians that are key to successful treatment.
• Women in the UK have almost universal access to specialists but the lowest
proportion of women diagnosed within a month of visiting a doctor.
• Women in Japan had one of the shortest times to diagnosis, but very little access to
genetic testing, and were least likely to get the emotional support they needed.
• Women in the USA were most likely to wait more than three months before
consulting a doctor about symptoms, but most likely to receive genetic testing.
• Women with ovarian cancer in Hungary were most aware of ovarian cancer before
their diagnosis, but were much less likely to be offered surgery to treat their disease.

 

In summary it appears there are three key areas needing to be addressed with regard to improving early reporting of symptoms of ovarian cancer

  1. information and awareness of symptoms by BOTH women and their physicians
  2. family risk assessment programs are very important to make women aware of their risks and needs for screening
  3. access to specialist treatment is important in the early diagnosis and treatment of this disease

 

Learn the Symptoms

Symptoms (from the Sandy Rollman Ovarian Cancer Foundation)

Historically ovarian cancer was called the “silent killer” because symptoms were not thought to develop until the chance of cure was poor. However, recent studies have shown this term is untrue and that the following symptoms are much more likely to occur in women with ovarian cancer than women in the general population. These symptoms include:

  • Bloating
  • Pelvic or abdominal pain
  • Difficulty eating or feeling full quickly
  • Urinary symptoms (urgency or frequency)

Women with ovarian cancer report that symptoms are persistent and represent a change from normal for their bodies. The frequency and/or number of such symptoms are key factors in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Several studies show that even early stage ovarian cancer can produce these symptoms.

Women who have these symptoms almost daily for more than a few weeks should see their doctor, preferably a gynecologist. Prompt medical evaluation may lead to detection at the earliest possible stage of the disease. Early stage diagnosis is associated with an improved prognosis.

Several other symptoms have been commonly reported by women with ovarian cancer. These symptoms include fatigue, indigestion, back pain, pain with intercourse, constipation and menstrual irregularities. However, these other symptoms are not as useful in identifying ovarian cancer because they are also found in equal frequency in women in the general population who do not have ovarian cancer.

 

In addition there are serum biomarker tests which have shown useful in the screening for ovarian cancer however these tests have their caveats and not generally suggested for whole population screening due to number of false postitives which may occur (these tests will be discussed in further posts)

Serum biomarker tests include:

 Taken From NPR at https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/10/21/658798956/report-women-everywhere-dont-know-enough-about-ovarian-cancer

Report: Women Everywhere Don’t Know Enough About Ovarian Cancer

Colored scanning electron micrograph of dividing ovarian cancer cells.

Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

new study of women with ovarian cancer shows that ignorance about the condition is common among patients in all 44 countries surveyed. And that ignorance has a cost. The disease is more treatable, even potentially curable, in its early stages.

The women’s answers also suggested their doctors were ignorant. Many of them reported that diagnosis took a long time and that they weren’t referred to proper specialists.

The study was based on an online survey of 1,531 women who had been diagnosed with the cancer and was conducted by the World Ovarian Cancer Coalition, a nonprofit support group between March and May of this year.

Ovarian cancer is the eighth leading cause of cancer in women, according to the World Health Organization. Nearly 300,000 women will develop it this year. The World Ovarian Cancer Coalition estimates that one in six will die within three months of diagnosis and fewer than half will be alive in five years.

Prior to their diagnosis, two-thirds of the women surveyed either had never heard of ovarian cancer or were familiar with the name but didn’t know anything about the disease.

 

Other articles related to Ovarian Cancer on this online Open Access Journal Include:

Model mimicking clinical profile of patients with ovarian cancer @ Yale School of Medicine

New Findings in Endometrial Cancer: Mutations, Molecular Types and Immune Responses Evoked by Mutation-prone Endometrial, Ovarian Cancer Subtypes

Good and Bad News Reported for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

Efficacy of Ovariectomy in Presence of BRCA1 vs BRCA2 and the Risk for Ovarian Cancer

Testing for Multiple Genetic Mutations via NGS for Patients: Very Strong Family History of Breast & Ovarian Cancer, Diagnosed at Young Ages, & Negative on BRCA Test

Ultrasound-based Screening for Ovarian Cancer

Warning signs may lead to better early detection of ovarian cancer

Epigenetics, Environment and Cancer: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Early Diagnosis [Early Detection Research Networks]

 

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Live 12:00 – 1:00 P.M  Mediterranean Diet and Lifestyle: A Symposium on Diet and Human Health : October 19, 2018

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

12.00 The Italian Mediterranean Diet as a Model of Identity of a People with a Universal Good to Safeguard Health?

Prof. Antonino De Lorenzo, MD, PhD.

Director of the School of Specialization in Clinical Nutrition, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”

It is important to determine how our bodies interacts with the environment, such as absorption of nutrients.

Studies shown here show decrease in life expectancy of a high sugar diet, but the quality of the diet, not just the type of diet is important, especially the role of natural probiotics and phenolic compounds found in the Mediterranean diet.

The WHO report in 2005 discusses the unsustainability of nutrition deficiencies and suggest a proactive personalized and preventative/predictive approach of diet and health.

Most of the noncommunicable diseases like CV (46%) cancer 21% and 11% respiratory and 4% diabetes could be prevented and or cured with proper dietary approaches

Italy vs. the US diseases: in Italy most disease due to environmental contamination while US diet plays a major role

The issue we are facing in less than 10% of the Italian population (fruit, fibers, oils) are not getting the proper foods, diet and contributing to as we suggest 46% of the disease

The Food Paradox: 1.5 billion are obese; we notice we are eating less products of quality and most quality produce is going to waste;

  •  growing BMI and junk food: our studies are correlating the junk food (pre-prepared) and global BMI
  • modern diet and impact of human health (junk food high in additives, salt) has impact on microflora
  • Western Diet and Addiction: We show a link (using brain scans) showing correlation of junk food, sugar cravings, and other addictive behaviors by affecting the dopamine signaling in the substantia nigra
  • developed a junk food calculator and a Mediterranean diet calculator
  • the intersection of culture, food is embedded in the Mediterranean diet; this is supported by dietary studies of two distinct rural Italian populations (one of these in the US) show decrease in diet
  • Impact of diet: have model in Germany how this diet can increase health and life expectancy
  • from 1950 to present day 2.7 unit increase in the diet index can increase life expectancy by 26%
  • so there is an inverse relationship with our index and breast cancer

Environment and metal contamination and glyphosate: contribution to disease and impact of maintaining the healthy diet

  • huge problem with use of pesticides and increase in celiac disease

12:30 Environment and Health

Dr. Iris Maria Forte, PhD.

National Cancer Institute “Pascale” Foundation | IRCCS · Department of Research, Naples, Italy

Cancer as a disease of the environment.  Weinberg’s hallmarks of Cancer reveal how environment and epigenetics can impact any of these hallmarks.

Epigenetic effects

  • gene gatekeepers (Rb and P53)
  • DNA repair and damage stabilization

Heavy Metals and Dioxins:( alterations of the immune system as well as epigenetic regulations)

Asbestos and Mesothelioma:  they have demonstrated that p53 can be involved in development of mesothelioma as reactivating p53 may be a suitable strategy for therapy

Diet, Tomato and Cancer

  • looked at tomato extract on p53 function in gastric cancer: tomato extract had a growth reduction effect and altered cell cycle regulation and results in apoptosis
  • RBL2 levels are increased in extract amount dependent manner so data shows effect of certain tomato extracts of the southern italian tomato (     )

Antonio Giordano: we tested whole extracts of almost 30 different varieties of tomato.  The tomato variety  with highest activity was near Ravela however black tomatoes have shown high antitumor activity.  We have done a followup studies showing that these varieties, if grow elsewhere lose their antitumor activity after two or three generations of breeding, even though there genetics are similar.  We are also studying the effects of different styles of cooking of these tomatoes and if it reduces antitumor effect

please see post https://news.temple.edu/news/2017-08-28/muse-cancer-fighting-tomatoes-study-italian-food

 

To follow or Tweet on Twitter please use the following handles (@) and hashtags (#):

@ handles


@S_H_R_O 

@SbarroHealth

@Pharma_BI 

@ItalyinPhilly

@WHO_Europe

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# hashtags


#healthydiet

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#health

#nutrition

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