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Archive for the ‘Clinical Diagnostics’ Category


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

There has been a genuine decline in semen quality over the past 50 years. There is lot of controversy about this as there are limitations in studies that have attempted to address it. Sperm count is of considerable public health importance for several reasons. First, sperm count is closely linked to male fecundity and is a crucial component of semen analysis, the first step to identify male factor infertility.

 

Reduced sperm count is associated with cryptorchidism, hypospadias and testicular cancer. It may be associated with multiple environmental influences, including endocrine disrupting chemicals, pesticides, heat and lifestyle factors, including diet, stress, smoking and BMI. Therefore, sperm count may sensitively reflect the impacts of the modern environment on male health throughout the life course.

 

This study provided a systematic review and meta-regression analysis of recent trends in sperm counts as measured by sperm concentration (SC) and total sperm count (TSC), and their modification by fertility and geographic group. Analyzing trends by birth cohorts instead of year of sample collection may aid in assessing the causes of the decline (prenatal or in adult life) but was not feasible owing to lack of information.

 

This rigorous and comprehensive analysis found that SC declined 52.4% between 1973 and 2011 among unselected men from western countries, with no evidence of a ‘leveling off’ in recent years. Declining mean SC implies that an increasing proportion of men have sperm counts below any given threshold for sub-fertility or infertility. The high proportion of men from western countries with concentration below 40 million/ml is particularly concerning given the evidence that SC below this threshold is associated with a decreased monthly probability of conception.

 

Declines in sperm count have implications beyond fertility and reproduction. The decline reported in this study is consistent with reported trends in other male reproductive health indicators, such as testicular germ cell tumors, cryptorchidism, onset of male puberty and total testosterone levels. The public health implications are even wider. Recent studies have shown that poor sperm count is associated with overall morbidity and mortality. While the current study is not designed to provide direct information on the causes of the observed declines, sperm count has been plausibly associated with multiple environmental and lifestyle influences, both prenatally and in adult life. In particular, endocrine disruption from chemical exposures or maternal smoking during critical windows of male reproductive development may play a role in prenatal life, while lifestyle changes and exposure to pesticides may play a role in adult life.

 

These findings strongly suggest a significant decline in male reproductive health, which has serious implications beyond fertility concerns. Research on causes and implications of this decline is urgently needed.

 

References:

 

https://academic.oup.com/humupd/article/doi/10.1093/humupd/dmx022/4035689/Temporal-trends-in-sperm-count-a-systematic-review

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6688444

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8458929

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9777833

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19934213

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27075904

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12849857

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8612826

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First Haploid Human Stem Cells

Reported: Irina Robu, PhD

Most of the cells in our body are diploid, which indicate they carry two sets of chromosomes—one from each parent. So far, scientists have only succeeded in generating haploid embryonic stem cells—which comprise a single set of chromosomes in non-human mammals such as mice, rats and monkeys. Nevertheless, scientists have tried to isolate and duplicate these haploid ESCs in humans, which would allow them to work with one set of human chromosomes as opposed to a mixture from both parents.

Scientists from Hebrew from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute (NYSCF) were successful in generating a new type of embryonic stem cells that has a single copy of the human genome, instead of two copies which is typically found in normal stem cells.

This landmark was finally obtained by Ido Sagi, working as a PhD student at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem which was successful in isolating and maintaining haploid embryonic stem cells in humans. Unlike in mice, these haploid stem cells were capable to differentiate into various cell types such as brain, heart and pancreas, although holding a single set of chromosomes. Sagi and his advisor, Prof. Nissim Benvenisty showed that this new human stem cell type will play an important role in human genetic and medical research.  This new human cell type cell type will aid in understanding human development and it will make genetic screening simpler and more precise, by examining a single set of chromosomes.

Based on this research, the Technology Transfer arm of the Hebrew University, started a new company New Stem, which is developing a diagnostic kit for predicting resistance to chemotherapy treatments. By gathering a broad library of human pluripotent stem cells with various genetic makeups and mutations. The company is planning to use this kit for personalized medication and future therapeutic and reproductive products.

SOURCE

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-06-haploid-human-stem-cells-medical.html#jCp

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

Ido Sagi – PhD Student @HUJI, 2017 Kaye Innovation Award winner for leading research that yielded the first successful isolation and maintenance of haploid embryonic stem cells in humans.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Ido Sagi – PhD Student @HUJI, 2017 Kaye Innovation Award winner for leading research that yielded the first successful isolation and maintenance of haploid embryonic stem cells in humans.

 

 

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Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

During pregnancy, the baby is mostly protected from harmful microorganisms by the amniotic sac, but recent research suggests the baby could be exposed to small quantities of microbes from the placenta, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood and fetal membranes. One theory is that any possible prenatal exposure could ‘pre-seed’ the infant microbiome. In other words, to set the right conditions for the ‘main seeding event’ for founding the infant microbiome.

When a mother gives birth vaginally and if she breastfeeds, she passes on colonies of essential microbes to her baby. This continues a chain of maternal heritage that stretches through female ancestry for thousands of generations, if all have been vaginally born and breastfed. This means a child’s microbiome, that is the trillions of microorganisms that live on and in him or her, will resemble the microbiome of his/her mother, the grandmother, the great-grandmother and so on, if all have been vaginally born and breastfed.

As soon as the mother’s waters break, suddenly the baby is exposed to a wave of the mother’s vaginal microbes that wash over the baby in the birth canal. They coat the baby’s skin, and enter the baby’s eyes, ears, nose and some are swallowed to be sent down into the gut. More microbes form of the mother’s gut microbes join the colonization through contact with the mother’s faecal matter. Many more microbes come from every breath, from every touch including skin-to-skin contact with the mother and of course, from breastfeeding.

With formula feeding, the baby won’t receive the 700 species of microbes found in breast milk. Inside breast milk, there are special sugars called human milk oligosaccharides (HMO’s) that are indigestible by the baby. These sugars are designed to feed the mother’s microbes newly arrived in the baby’s gut. By multiplying quickly, the ‘good’ bacteria crowd out any potentially harmful pathogens. These ‘good’ bacteria help train the baby’s naive immune system, teaching it to identify what is to be tolerated and what is pathogen to be attacked. This leads to the optimal training of the infant immune system resulting in a child’s best possible lifelong health.

With C-section birth and formula feeding, the baby is not likely to acquire the full complement of the mother’s vaginal, gut and breast milk microbes. Therefore, the baby’s microbiome is not likely to closely resemble the mother’s microbiome. A baby born by C-section is likely to have a different microbiome from its mother, its grandmother, its great-grandmother and so on. C-section breaks the chain of maternal heritage and this break can never be restored.

The long term effect of an altered microbiome for a child’s lifelong health is still to be proven, but many studies link C-section with a significantly increased risk for developing asthma, Type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and obesity. Scientists might not yet have all the answers, but the picture that is forming is that C-section and formula feeding could be significantly impacting the health of the next generation. Through the transgenerational aspect to birth, it could even be impacting the health of future generations.

References:

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/shortchanging-a-babys-microbiome/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23926244

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26412384

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25290507

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25974306

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24637604

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22911969

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25650398

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27362264

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27306663

http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/14/11/2036

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4464665/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24848255

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26412384

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28112736

http://ndnr.com/gastrointestinal/the-infant-microbiome-how-environmental-maternal-factors-influence-its-development/

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3D Liver Model in a Droplet

Curator: Marzan Khan, BSc

Recently, a Harvard University Professor of Physics and Applied Physics, David Weitz and his team of researchers have successfully generated 3D models of liver tissue composed of two different kinds of liver cells, precisely compartmentalized in a core-shell droplet, using the microfluidics approach(1). Compared to alternative in-vitro methods, this approach comes with more advantages – it is cost-effective, can be quickly assembled and produces millions of organ droplets in a second(1). It is the first “organ in a droplet” technology that enables two disparate liver cells to physically co-exist and exchange biochemical information, thus making it a good mimic of the organ in vivo(1).

Liver tissue models are used by researchers to investigate the effect of drugs and other chemical compounds, either alone or in combination on liver toxicity(2). The liver is the primary center of drug metabolism, detoxification and removal and all of these processes need to be carried out systematically in order to maintain a homeostatic environment within the body(2) Any deviation from the steady state will shift the dynamic equilibrium of metabolism, leading to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS)(2). These are harmful because they will exert oxidative stress on the liver, and ultimately cause the organ to malfunction. Drug-induced liver toxicity is a critical problem – 10% of all cases of acute hepatitis, 5% of all hospital admissions, and 50% of all acute liver failures are caused by it(2).

Before any novel drug is launched into the market, it is tested in-vitro, in animal models, and then progresses onto human clinical trials(1). Weitz’s system can produce up to one-thousand organ droplets per second, each of which can be used in an experiment to test for drug toxicity(1). Clarifying further, he asserts that “Each droplet is like a mini experiment. Normally, if we are running experiments, say in test tubes, we need a milliliter of fluid per test tube. If we were to do a million experiments, we would need a thousand liters of fluid. That’s the equivalent of a thousand milk jugs! Here, each droplet is only a nanoliter, so we can do the whole experiment with one milliliter of fluid, meaning we can do a million more experiments with the same amount of fluid.”

Testing hepatocytes alone on a petri dish is a poor indicator of liver-specific functions because the liver is made up of multiple cells systematically arranged on an extracellular matrix and functionally interdependent(3). The primary hepatocytes, hepatic stellate cells, Kupffer cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts form the basic components of a functioning liver(3). Weitz’s upgraded system contains hepatocytes (that make up the majority of liver cells and carry out most of the important functions) supported by a network of fibroblasts(3). His microfluidic chip is comprised of a network of constricted, circular channels spanning the micrometer range, the inner phase of which contains hepatocytes mixed in a cell culture solution(3). The surrounding middle phase accommodates fibroblasts in an alginate solution and the two liquids remain separated due to differences in their chemical properties as well as the physics of fluids travelling in narrow channels. Addition of a fluorinated carbon oil interferes with the two aqueous layers, forcing them to become individual monodisperse droplets(3). The hydrogel shell is completed when a 0.15% solution of acetic acid facilitates the cross-linking of alginate to form a gelatinous shell, locking the fibroblasts in place(3). Thus, the aqueous core of hepatocytes are encapsulated by fibroblasts confined to a strong hydrogel network, creating a core-shell hydrogel scaffold of 3D liver micro-tissue in a droplet(3). Using empirical analysis, scientists have shown that albumin secretion and urea synthesis (two important markers of liver function) were significantly higher in a co-culture of hepatocytes and fibroblasts 3D core-shell spheroids compared to a monotypic cell-culture of hepatocyte-only spheroids(3). These results validate the theory that homotypic as well as heterotypic communication between cells are important to achieve optimal organ function in vitro(3).

This system of creating micro-tissues in a droplet with enhanced properties is a step-forward in biomedical science(3). It can be used in experiments to test for a myriad of drugs, chemicals and cosmetics on different human tissue samples, as well as to understand the biological connectivity of contrasting cells(3).

diagram

Image source: DOI: 10.1039/c6lc00231

A simple demonstration of the microfluidic chip that combines different solutions to create a core-shell droplet consisting of two different kinds of liver cells.

References:

  1. National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. (2016, December 13). New device creates 3D livers in a droplet.ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 9, 2017 from https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161213112337.htm
  2. Singh, D., Cho, W. C., & Upadhyay, G. (2015). Drug-Induced Liver Toxicity and Prevention by Herbal Antioxidants: An Overview.Frontiers in Physiology,6, 363. http://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2015.00363
  3. Qiushui Chen, Stefanie Utech, Dong Chen, Radivoje Prodanovic, Jin-Ming Lin and David A. Weitz; Controlled assembly of heterotypic cells in a core– shell scaffold: organ in a droplet; Lab Chip, 2016, 16, 1346; DOI: 10.1039/c6lc00231

Other related articles on 3D on a Chip published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

What could replace animal testing – ‘Human-on-a-chip’ from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

AGENDA for Second Annual Organ-on-a-Chip World Congress & 3D-Culture Conference, July 7-8, 2016, Wyndham Boston Beacon Hill by SELECTBIO US

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Medical MEMS, BioMEMS and Sensor Applications

Curator and Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Contribution to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) of bacterial overgrowth in gut on a chip

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

Current Advances in Medical Technology

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

 

Other related articles on Liver published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Alnylam down as it halts development for RNAi liver disease candidate

by Stacy Lawrence

LIVE 9/21 8AM to 2:40PM Targeting Cardio-Metabolic Diseases: A focus on Liver Fibrosis and NASH Targets at CHI’s 14th Discovery On Target, 9/19 – 9/22/2016, Westin Boston Waterfront, Boston

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

2016 Nobel in Economics for Work on The Theory of Contracts to winners: Oliver Hart and Bengt Holmstrom

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

LIVE 9/20 2PM to 5:30PM New Viruses for Therapeutic Gene Delivery at CHI’s 14th Discovery On Target, 9/19 – 9/22/2016, Westin Boston Waterfront, Boston

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Seven Cancers: oropharynx, larynx, oesophagus, liver, colon, rectum and breast are caused by Alcohol Consumption

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Other related articles on 3D on a Chip published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Liquid Biopsy Chip detects an array of metastatic cancer cell markers in blood – R&D @Worcester Polytechnic Institute,  Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Reporters: Tilda Barliya, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Trovagene’s ctDNA Liquid Biopsy urine and blood tests to be used in Monitoring and Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer

Reporters: David Orchard-Webb, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers: R&D at WPI

Curator: Marzan Khan, B.Sc

Real Time Coverage of the AGENDA for Powering Precision Health (PPH) with Science, 9/26/2016, Cambridge Marriott Hotel, Cambridge, MA

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

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Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small non-coding RNA molecules that play a major role in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are expressed in an organ-specific manner. One miRNA can potentially regulate the expression of several genes, depending on cell type and differentiation stage. They control every cellular process and their altered regulation is involved in human diseases. miRNAs are differentially expressed in the male and female gonads and have an organ-specific reproductive function. Exerting their affect through germ cells and gonadal somatic cells, miRNAs regulate key proteins necessary for gonad development. The role of miRNAs in the testes is only starting to emerge though they have been shown to be required for adequate spermatogenesis. In the ovary, miRNAs play a fundamental role in follicles’ assembly, growth, differentiation, and ovulation.

 

Deciphering the underlying causes of idiopathic male infertility is one of the main challenges in reproductive medicine. This is especially relevant in infertile patients displaying normal seminal parameters and no urogenital or genetic abnormalities. In these cases, the search for additional sperm biomarkers is of high interest. This study was aimed to determine the implications of the sperm miRNA expression profiles in the reproductive capacity of normozoospermic infertile individuals. The expression levels of 736 miRNAs were evaluated in spermatozoa from normozoospermic infertile males and normozoospermic fertile males analyzed under the same conditions. 57 miRNAs were differentially expressed between populations; 20 of them was regulated by a host gene promoter that in three cases comprised genes involved in fertility. The predicted targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs unveiled a significant enrichment of biological processes related to embryonic morphogenesis and chromatin modification. Normozoospermic infertile individuals exhibit a specific sperm miRNA expression profile clearly differentiated from normozoospermic fertile individuals. This miRNA cargo has potential implications in the individuals’ reproductive competence.

 

Circulating or “extracellular” miRNAs detected in biological fluids, could be used as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of several disease, such as cancer, gynecological and pregnancy disorders. However, their contributions in female infertility and in vitro fertilization (IVF) remain unknown. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a frequent endocrine disorder in women. PCOS is associated with altered features of androgen metabolism, increased insulin resistance and impaired fertility. Furthermore, PCOS, being a syndrome diagnosis, is heterogeneous and characterized by polycystic ovaries, chronic anovulation and evidence of hyperandrogenism, as well as being associated with chronic low-grade inflammation and an increased life time risk of type 2 diabetes. Altered miRNA levels have been associated with diabetes, insulin resistance, inflammation and various cancers. Studies have shown that circulating miRNAs are present in whole blood, serum, plasma and the follicular fluid of PCOS patients and that these might serve as potential biomarkers and a new approach for the diagnosis of PCOS. Presence of miRNA in mammalian follicular fluid has been demonstrated to be enclosed within microvesicles and exosomes or they can also be associated to protein complexes. The presence of microvesicles and exosomes carrying microRNAs in follicular fluid could represent an alternative mechanism of autocrine and paracrine communication inside the ovarian follicle. The investigation of the expression profiles of five circulating miRNAs (let-7b, miR-29a, miR-30a, miR-140 and miR-320a) in human follicular fluid from women with normal ovarian reserve and with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and their ability to predict IVF outcomes showed that these miRNAs could provide new helpful biomarkers to facilitate personalized medical care for oocyte quality in ART (Assisted Reproductive Treatment) and during IVF (In Vitro Fertilization).

 

References:

 

http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-319-31973-5_12

 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/andr.12276/abstract;jsessionid=F805A89DCC94BDBD42D6D60C40AD4AB0.f03t03

 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0009279716302241

 

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10815-016-0657-9

 

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep24976

 

 

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Milestones in Physiology & Discoveries in Medicine and Genomics: Request for Book Review Writing on Amazon.com


physiology-cover-seriese-vol-3individualsaddlebrown-page2

Milestones in Physiology

Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics

Patient-centric Perspective 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019VH97LU 

2015

 

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

Preface

Introduction 

Chapter 1: Evolution of the Foundation for Diagnostics and Pharmaceuticals Industries

1.1  Outline of Medical Discoveries between 1880 and 1980

1.2 The History of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology in the late 19th and 20th Century

1.3 The Classification of Microbiota

1.4 Selected Contributions to Chemistry from 1880 to 1980

1.5 The Evolution of Clinical Chemistry in the 20th Century

1.6 Milestones in the Evolution of Diagnostics in the US HealthCare System: 1920s to Pre-Genomics

 

Chapter 2. The search for the evolution of function of proteins, enzymes and metal catalysts in life processes

2.1 The life and work of Allan Wilson
2.2  The  evolution of myoglobin and hemoglobin
2.3  More complexity in proteins evolution
2.4  Life on earth is traced to oxygen binding
2.5  The colors of life function
2.6  The colors of respiration and electron transport
2.7  Highlights of a green evolution

 

Chapter 3. Evolution of New Relationships in Neuroendocrine States
3.1 Pituitary endocrine axis
3.2 Thyroid function
3.3 Sex hormones
3.4 Adrenal Cortex
3.5 Pancreatic Islets
3.6 Parathyroids
3.7 Gastointestinal hormones
3.8 Endocrine action on midbrain
3.9 Neural activity regulating endocrine response

3.10 Genomic Promise for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Dementias, Autism Spectrum, Schizophrenia, and Serious Depression

 

Chapter 4.  Problems of the Circulation, Altitude, and Immunity

4.1 Innervation of Heart and Heart Rate
4.2 Action of hormones on the circulation
4.3 Allogeneic Transfusion Reactions
4.4 Graft-versus Host reaction
4.5 Unique problems of perinatal period
4.6. High altitude sickness
4.7 Deep water adaptation
4.8 Heart-Lung-and Kidney
4.9 Acute Lung Injury

4.10 Reconstruction of Life Processes requires both Genomics and Metabolomics to explain Phenotypes and Phylogenetics

 

Chapter 5. Problems of Diets and Lifestyle Changes

5.1 Anorexia nervosa
5.2 Voluntary and Involuntary S-insufficiency
5.3 Diarrheas – bacterial and nonbacterial
5.4 Gluten-free diets
5.5 Diet and cholesterol
5.6 Diet and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
5.7 Diet and exercise
5.8 Anxiety and quality of Life
5.9 Nutritional Supplements

 

Chapter 6. Advances in Genomics, Therapeutics and Pharmacogenomics

6.1 Natural Products Chemistry

6.2 The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance

6.3 Viruses, Vaccines and immunotherapy

6.4 Genomics and Metabolomics Advances in Cancer

6.5 Proteomics – Protein Interaction

6.6 Pharmacogenomics

6.7 Biomarker Guided Therapy

6.8 The Emergence of a Pharmaceutical Industry in the 20th Century: Diagnostics Industry and Drug Development in the Genomics Era: Mid 80s to Present

6.09 The Union of Biomarkers and Drug Development

6.10 Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

6.11 Epigenomics and Companion Diagnostics

 

Chapter  7

Integration of Physiology, Genomics and Pharmacotherapy

7.1 Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

7.2 Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD

7.3 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

7.4 Synthetic Biology: On Advanced Genome Interpretation for Gene Variants and Pathways: What is the Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

7.5 Diagnosing Diseases & Gene Therapy: Precision Genome Editing and Cost-effective microRNA Profiling

7.6 Imaging Biomarker for Arterial Stiffness: Pathways in Pharmacotherapy for Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia Management

7.7 Neuroprotective Therapies: Pharmacogenomics vs Psychotropic drugs and Cholinesterase Inhibitors

7.8 Metabolite Identification Combining Genetic and Metabolic Information: Genetic association links unknown metabolites to functionally related genes

7.9 Preserved vs Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available and Needed Therapies

7.10 Biosimilars: Intellectual Property Creation and Protection by Pioneer and by

7.11 Demonstrate Biosimilarity: New FDA Biosimilar Guidelines

 

Chapter 7.  Biopharma Today

8.1 A Great University engaged in Drug Discovery: University of Pittsburgh

8.2 Introduction – The Evolution of Cancer Therapy and Cancer Research: How We Got Here?

8.3 Predicting Tumor Response, Progression, and Time to Recurrence

8.4 Targeting Untargetable Proto-Oncogenes

8.5 Innovation: Drug Discovery, Medical Devices and Digital Health

8.6 Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse Effects

8.7 Nanotechnology and Ocular Drug Delivery: Part I

8.8 Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) system and nanotechnology: Part II

8.9 The Delicate Connection: IDO (Indolamine 2, 3 dehydrogenase) and Cancer Immunology

8.10 Natural Drug Target Discovery and Translational Medicine in Human Microbiome

8.11 From Genomics of Microorganisms to Translational Medicine

8.12 Confined Indolamine 2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) Controls the Homeostasis of Immune Responses for Good and Bad

 

Chapter 9. BioPharma – Future Trends

9.1 Artificial Intelligence Versus the Scientist: Who Will Win?

9.2 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on KannaLife Sciences and the Discipline and Potential of Pharmacognosy

9.3 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on Computer-Aided Drug Design and Gfree Bio, LLC

9.4 Heroes in Medical Research: The Postdoctoral Fellow

9.5 NIH Considers Guidelines for CAR-T therapy: Report from Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee

9.6 1st Pitch Life Science- Philadelphia- What VCs Really Think of your Pitch

9.7 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

9.8 Heroes in Medical Research: Green Fluorescent Protein and the Rough Road in Science

9.9 Issues in Personalized Medicine in Cancer: Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

9.10 The SCID Pig II: Researchers Develop Another SCID Pig, And Another Great Model For Cancer Research

Epilogue

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metabolomics-seriesdindividualred-page2

Metabolic Genomics & Pharmaceutics

2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B012BB0ZF0

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

Chapter 1: Metabolic Pathways

1.1            Carbohydrate Metabolism

1.2            Studies of Respiration Lead to Acetyl CoA

1.3            Pentose Shunt, Electron Transfer, Galactose, more Lipids in brief

1.4            The Multi-step Transfer of Phosphate Bond and Hydrogen Exchange Energy

1.5            Diabetes Mellitus

1.6            Glycosaminoglycans, Mucopolysaccharides, L-iduronidase, Enzyme Therapy

Chapter 2: Lipid Metabolism

2.1            Lipid Classification System

2.2            Essential Fatty Acids

2.3            Lipid Oxidation and Synthesis of Fatty Acids

2.4            Cholesterol and Regulation of Liver Synthetic Pathways

2.5            Sex hormones, Adrenal cortisol, Prostaglandins

2.6            Cytoskeleton and Cell Membrane Physiology

2.7            Pharmacological Action of Steroid hormone

Chapter 3: Cell Signaling

3.1            Signaling and Signaling Pathways

3.2            Signaling Transduction Tutorial

3.3            Selected References to Signaling and Metabolic Pathways in Leaders in Pharmaceutical Intelligence

3.4            Integrins, Cadherins, Signaling and the Cytoskeleton

3.5            Complex Models of Signaling: Therapeutic Implications

3.6            Functional Correlates of Signaling Pathways

Chapter 4: Protein Synthesis and Degradation

4.1            The Role and Importance of Transcription Factors

4.2            RNA and the Transcription of the Genetic Code

4.3            9:30 – 10:00, 6/13/2014, David Bartel “MicroRNAs, Poly(A) tails and Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation

4.4            Transcriptional Silencing and Longevity Protein Sir2

4.5            Ca2+ Signaling: Transcriptional Control

4.6            Long Noncoding RNA Network regulates PTEN Transcription

4.7            Zinc-Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator–Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs)

4.8            Cardiac Ca2+ Signaling: Transcriptional Control

4.9            Transcription Factor Lyl-1 Critical in Producing Early T-Cell Progenitors

4.10            Human Frontal Lobe Brain: Specific Transcriptional Networks

4.11            Somatic, Germ-cell, and Whole Sequence DNA in Cell Lineage and Disease

Chapter 5:  Sub-cellular Structure

5.1            Mitochondria: Origin from Oxygen free environment, Role in Aerobic Glycolysis and Metabolic Adaptation

5.2            Mitochondrial Metabolism and Cardiac Function

5.3            Mitochondria: More than just the “Powerhouse of the Cell”

5.4            Mitochondrial Fission and Fusion: Potential Therapeutic Targets?

5.5            Mitochondrial Mutation Analysis might be “1-step” Away

5.6            Autophagy-Modulating Proteins and Small Molecules Candidate Targets for Cancer Therapy: Commentary of Bioinformatics Approaches

5.7            Chromatophagy, A New Cancer Therapy: Starve The Diseased Cell Until It Eats Its Own DNA

5.8           A Curated Census of Autophagy-Modulating Proteins and Small Molecules Candidate Targets for Cancer Therapy

5.9           Role of Calcium, the Actin Skeleton, and Lipid Structures in Signaling and Cell Motility

Chapter 6: Proteomics

6.1            Proteomics, Metabolomics, Signaling Pathways, and Cell Regulation: a Compilation of Articles in the Journal http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

6.2            A Brief Curation of Proteomics, Metabolomics, and Metabolism

6.3            Using RNA-seq and Targeted Nucleases to Identify Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia, SK Rathe in Nature, 2014

6.4            Proteomics – The Pathway to Understanding and Decision-making in Medicine

6.5            Advances in Separations Technology for the “OMICs” and Clarification of Therapeutic Targets

6.6           Expanding the Genetic Alphabet and Linking the Genome to the Metabolome

6.7            Genomics, Proteomics and Standards

6.8            Proteins and Cellular Adaptation to Stress

6.9            Genes, Proteomes, and their Interaction

6.10           Regulation of Somatic Stem Cell Function

6.11           Scientists discover that Pluripotency factor NANOG is also active in Adult Organism

Chapter 7: Metabolomics

7.1            Extracellular Evaluation of Intracellular Flux in Yeast Cells

7.2            Metabolomic Analysis of Two Leukemia Cell Lines Part I

7.3            Metabolomic Analysis of Two Leukemia Cell Lines Part II

7.4            Buffering of Genetic Modules involved in Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Metabolism provides Homeomeostatic Regulation

7.5            Metabolomics, Metabonomics and Functional Nutrition: The Next Step in Nutritional Metabolism and Biotherapeutics

7.6            Isoenzymes in Cell Metabolic Pathways

7.7            A Brief Curation of Proteomics, Metabolomics, and Metabolism

7.8            Metabolomics is about Metabolic Systems Integration

7.9             Mechanisms of Drug Resistance

7.10           Development Of Super-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy

7.11            Metabolic Reactions Need Just Enough

Chapter 8.  Impairments in Pathological States: Endocrine Disorders; Stress Hypermetabolism and CAncer

8.1           Omega3 Fatty Acids, Depleting the Source, and Protein Insufficiency in Renal Disease

8.2             Liver Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Hepatosteatosis

8.3            How Methionine Imbalance with Sulfur Insufficiency Leads to Hyperhomocysteinemia

8.4            AMPK Is a Negative Regulator of the Warburg Effect and Suppresses Tumor Growth InVivo

8.5           A Second Look at the Transthyretin Nutrition Inflammatory Conundrum

8.6            Mitochondrial Damage and Repair under Oxidative Stress

8.7            Metformin, Thyroid Pituitary Axis, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolism

8.8            Is the Warburg Effect the Cause or the Effect of Cancer: A 21st Century View?

8.9            Social Behavior Traits Embedded in Gene Expression

8.10          A Future for Plasma Metabolomics in Cardiovascular Disease Assessment

Chapter 9: Genomic Expression in Health and Disease 

9.1            Genetics of Conduction Disease: Atrioventricular (AV) Conduction Disease (block): Gene Mutations – Transcription, Excitability, and Energy Homeostasis

9.2            BRCA1 a Tumour Suppressor in Breast and Ovarian Cancer – Functions in Transcription, Ubiquitination and DNA Repair

9.3            Metabolic Drivers in Aggressive Brain Tumors

9.4            Modified Yeast Produces a Range of Opiates for the First time

9.5            Parasitic Plant Strangleweed Injects Host With Over 9,000 RNA Transcripts

9.6            Plant-based Nutrition, Neutraceuticals and Alternative Medicine: Article Compilation the Journal

9.7            Reference Genes in the Human Gut Microbiome: The BGI Catalogue

9.8            Two Mutations, in the PCSK9 Gene: Eliminates a Protein involved in Controlling LDL Cholesterol

9.9            HDL-C: Target of Therapy – Steven E. Nissen, MD, MACC, Cleveland Clinic vs Peter Libby, MD, BWH

Summary 

Epilogue


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