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Archive for the ‘Patents’ Category


Live Conference Coverage @Medcitynews Converge 2018 Philadelphia: The Davids vs. the Cancer Goliath Part 2

8:40 – 9:25 AM The Davids vs. the Cancer Goliath Part 2

Startups from diagnostics, biopharma, medtech, digital health and emerging tech will have 8 minutes to articulate their visions on how they aim to tame the beast.

Start Time End Time Company
8:40 8:48 3Derm
8:49 8:57 CNS Pharmaceuticals
8:58 9:06 Cubismi
9:07 9:15 CytoSavvy
9:16 9:24 PotentiaMetrics

Speakers:
Liz Asai, CEO & Co-Founder, 3Derm Systems, Inc. @liz_asai
John M. Climaco, CEO, CNS Pharmaceuticals @cns_pharma 

John Freyhof, CEO, CytoSavvy
Robert Palmer, President & CEO, PotentiaMetrics @robertdpalmer 
Moira Schieke M.D., Founder, Cubismi, Adjunct Assistant Prof UW Madison @cubismi_inc

 

3Derm Systems

3Derm Systems is an image analysis firm for dermatologic malignancies.  They use a tele-medicine platform to accurately triage out benign malignancies observed from the primary care physician, expediate those pathology cases if urgent to the dermatologist and rapidly consults with you over home or portable device (HIPAA compliant).  Their suite also includes a digital dermatology teaching resource including digital training for students and documentation services.

 

CNS Pharmaceuticals

developing drugs against CNS malignancies, spun out of research at MD Anderson.  They are focusing on glioblastoma and Berubicin, an anthracycline antiobiotic (TOPOII inhibitor) that can cross the blood brain barrier.  Berubicin has good activity in a number of animal models.  Phase I results were very positive and Phase II is scheduled for later in the year.  They hope that the cardiotoxicity profile is less severe than other anthracyclines.  The market opportunity will be in temazolamide resistant glioblastoma.

Cubismi

They are using machine learning and biomarker based imaging to visualize tumor heterogeneity. “Data is the new oil” (Intel CEO). We need prediction machines so they developed a “my body one file” system, a cloud based data rich file of a 3D map of human body.

CUBISMI IS ON A MISSION TO HELP DELIVER THE FUTURE PROMISE OF PRECISION MEDICINE TO CURE DISEASE AND ASSURE YOUR OPTIMAL HEALTH.  WE ARE BUILDING A PATIENT-DOCTOR HEALTH DATA EXCHANGE PLATFORM THAT WILL LEVERAGE REVOLUTIONARY MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY AND PUT THE POWER OF HEALTH DATA INTO THE HANDS OF YOU AND YOUR DOCTORS.

 

CytoSavvy

CytoSavvy is a digital pathology company.  They feel AI has a fatal flaw in that no way to tell how a decision was made. Use a Shape Based Model Segmentation algorithm which uses automated image analysis to provide objective personalized pathology data.  They are partnering with three academic centers (OSU, UM, UPMC) and pool data and automate the rule base for image analysis.

CytoSavvy’s patented diagnostic dashboards are intuitive, easy–to-use and HIPAA compliant. Our patented Shape-Based Modeling Segmentation (SBMS) algorithms combine shape and color analysis capabilities to increase reliability, save time, and improve decisions. Specifications and capabilities for our web-based delivery system follow.

link to their white paper: https://www.cytosavvy.com/resources/healthcare-ai-value-proposition.pdf

PotentialMetrics

They were developing a diagnostic software for cardiology epidemiology measuring outcomes however when a family member got a cancer diagnosis felt there was a need for outcomes based models for cancer treatment/care.  They deliver real world outcomes for persoanlized patient care to help patients make decisions on there care by using a socioeconomic modeling integrated with real time clinical data.

Featured in the Wall Street Journal, using the informed treatment decisions they have generated achieve a 20% cost savings on average.  There research was spun out of Washington University St. Louis.

They have concentrated on urban markets however the CEO had mentioned his desire to move into more rural areas of the country as there models work well for patients in the rural setting as well.

Please follow on Twitter using the following #hash tags and @pharma_BI 

#MCConverge

#cancertreatment

#healthIT

#innovation

#precisionmedicine

#healthcaremodels

#personalizedmedicine

#healthcaredata

And at the following handles:

@pharma_BI

@medcitynews

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Live Conference Coverage @Medcity Converge 2018 Philadelphia: Oncology Value Based Care and Patient Management

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

3:15 – 4:00 PM Breakout: What’s A Good Model for Value-Based Care in Oncology?

How do you implement a value-based care model in oncology? Medicare has created a bundled payment model in oncology and there are lessons to be learned from that and other programs. Listen to two presentations from experts in the field.

Moderator: Mahek Shah, M.D., Senior Researcher, Harvard Business School @Mahek_MD
Speakers:
Charles Saunders M.D., CEO, Integra Connect
Mari Vandenburgh, Director of Value-Based Reimbursement Operations, Highmark @Highmark

 

Mari: Building strategic partnerships with partners focused on population based health and evidence based outcomes. they provide data analytics and consultative services.  Incorporate risk based systems.  also looking at ancillary segments because they see cost savings.  True Performance is their flagship performance program and 11% lower ED (saving $18 million) rates and 16% lower readmissions ($200 million cost savings).  Also launched the Highmark Cancer care Program with Johns Hopkins.  They monitor the adherence pathways and if clinician shows good adherence they give reimbursements.

Charles:  Integra is a cloud based care platform focused on oncology and urology and allow clinicians to practice value based care. Providers must now focus on total cost including ER visits, end of life and therapies (which is half of total cost in US).  The actionable ways to reduce costs is by reducing ER visits.  What is working? Data on reimbursements models is very accurate so practices can dig into data and find effieciencies.  However most practices do not have the analytics to do this.

  • care navigation
  • care path based treatment choices
  • enhanced patient access and experience

What is not working

  • data not structured so someone has to do manual curation of records
  • flawed logic based on plurality of visits but physician doesn’t know who else they saw
  • target pricing not taking into account high prices of new therapies
  • lack of timely reporting either by patient or physician
  • insufficient reimbursements
  • technology limitations

 

4:10- 4:55 Breakout: What Patients Want and Need On Their Journey

Cancer patients are living with an existential threat every day. A panel of patients and experts in oncology care management will discuss what’s needed to make the journey for oncology patients a bit more bearable.

sponsored by CEO Council for Growth

Moderator: Amanda Woodworth, M.D., Director of Breast Health, Drexel University College of Medicine
Speakers:
Kezia Fitzgerald, Chief Innovation Officer & Co-Founder, CareAline® Products, LLC
Sara Hayes, Senior Director of Community Development, Health Union @SaraHayes_HU
Katrece Nolen, Cancer Survivor and Founder, Find Cancer Help @KatreceNolen
John Simpkins, Administrative DirectorService Line Director of the Cancer Center, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia @ChildrensPhila

 

Kezia: was a cancer patient as well as her child getting treated at two different places and tough part was coordinating everything including treatments and schedules, working schedules

Katrece: had problem scheduling with oncologists because misdiagnosis and her imaging records were on CD and surgeon could not use the CD

John:  the above are a common frustration among patients at a time when they don’t need the confusion. He feels cancer centers need to coordinate these services better

Sara:  trying to assist people with this type of coordination is very tough even with all the resources

Kazia:  she needed to do all the research on her own because big dichotomy being an adult and a pediatric patient where pediatrics get more information and patient centered care. She felt she felt burdening the physicians if she asked the same questions.  How can we get more interaction with primary care physicians and feel comfortable with their interaction?

John: there is this dichotomy especially on wait times for adults is usually longer.  We can also improve patient experience with counseling patients

Katrece: Just working with a patient navigator is not enough.  The patient needs to take charge of their disease.

Sara: Patient communities can help as sometimes patients learn from other patients.

Amanda:  in breast cancer , navigators are common but must take care they are not only people patients see after a while

John:  at CHOP they also have a financial navigator.  On the adult side there are on call financial navigators.  Recent change of the high deductible plans are a major problem.  Although new families are starting to become comfortable with the financial navigator

Katrece:  guiding your children through your experience is important.  It was also important for her to advocate for herself as she had three different sites of cancer care to coordinate and multiple teams to coordinate with each other

Amanda:  A common theme seems to be hard trying to find the resources you need.  Why is that?

Kazia:  Sometimes it is hard to talk about your disease because it can be emotionally draining comforting other people who you told about the disease and they are being empathetic.  Sometimes they want to keep their ‘journey’ to themselves

John:  A relative kept her disease secret because she didn’t want to burden others…. a common cancer patient concern

Sara: Moderation of a social group is necessary to keep it a safe space and prevent trollers (like in Facebook support groups).

Kazia:  most group members will get together and force those trollers out of the group

Katrece: alot of anxiety after treatment ends, patient feels like being dropped on the floor like they don’t get support after treatment.  If there were survivorship navigators might be helpful

Amanda: for breast cancer they do a Survivor Care Package but just a paper packet, patients do appreciate it but a human coordinator would be a great idea

 

 

 

 

Please follow on Twitter using the following #hashtags and @pharma_BI

#MCConverge

#cancertreatment

#healthIT

#innovation

#precisionmedicine

#healthcaremodels

#personalizedmedicine

#healthcaredata

And at the following handles:

@pharma_BI

@medcitynews

 

Please see related articles on Live Coverage of Previous Meetings on this Open Access Journal

LIVE – Real Time – 16th Annual Cancer Research Symposium, Koch Institute, Friday, June 16, 9AM – 5PM, Kresge Auditorium, MIT

Real Time Coverage and eProceedings of Presentations on 11/16 – 11/17, 2016, The 12th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Tweets Impression Analytics, Re-Tweets, Tweets and Likes by @AVIVA1950 and @pharma_BI for 2018 BioIT, Boston, 5/15 – 5/17, 2018

BIO 2018! June 4-7, 2018 at Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/press-coverage/

 

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WEGO Health Awards Competition Focuses on Patients

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A., PhD(c)

WEGO Health, a network of over 100,000 influential members of the online health community, empowers patients who drive the health care conversation online.

For their annual “health activist” award competition this year, Gail Thornton, was nominated as the editor/author of a series of compelling patient profiles on chronic and invasive medical conditions that are posted on the online scientific journal, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence.

“The story of patients and their health journey is a critical one to tell and I was blessed to have such inspirational, caring people who shared their lives with me,” said Gail Thornton.” Also many thanks to  Aviva Lev-Ari for her vision in creating this series — and for considering me to be part of it all.”

The series also will be part of an e-book, entitled, The VOICES of Patients, Health Care Providers, Care Givers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group. Here is the link:  https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-e-titles-in-the-strategic-plan-for-2014-1015/2014-the-patients-voice-personal-experience-with-invasive-medical-procedures/

final series E covers volumes 1_4-vol1

 

“Your contribution to the e-Book is very substantial in bringing the LIVE voices of Patients and Health Care Providers to the EAR of the Public at large,” said Aviva Lev-Ari, Ph.D., R.N., on 9/13/2016, Director and Founder, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston.

Also thanks to Gabriela Contreras for suggesting some of these patients.

Please visit the the link below to review Gail’s nomination details and to endorse her!

https://awards.wegohealth.com/nominees/12485

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Live Notes from @AACR’s #cbi16 Meeting on Precision Medicine: 5:10PM Big Idea A survivor’s Story

Tom Whitehead, father of Emily, CHOP’S first CAR-T success story

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

  • Emily Whitehead was 5 years old when came to UPENN and CHOP (2010) with unresponsive leukemia
  • she was healthy up to day she was diagnosed and went to Hershey Medical Center and recieved diagnosis of CLL (came in with 21 bruises, symptom of leukemia)
  • parents told her that it would be the roughest time of her life but they would always tell her the truth about what would happen
  • she started to have relapsed disease
  • Dr. Sue Reingold at CHOP said to get transplant but could do at Hershey
  • Feb. 2012 thought got a matching donor but up to May did not find one, they wanted to do new rounds of chemo but Emily did not want that and CHOP suggested a new drug but they felt it was not right for her

 

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Top Seven big Pharma in Thomson Reuters 2015 Top 100 Global Innovators

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

NAME COUNTRY PREVIOUS WINNER PREVIOUS WINNER PREVIOUS WINNER
Abbott USA

2014

2013
Bayer GERMANY

2011

Boehringer

Ingelheim

GERMANY
Brinstol-Myers Squibb USA

2011

J&J USA

2014

2013

Novartis Switzerland

2014

Roche Switzerland

2014

2013

2012, 2011

SOURCE

http://images.info.science.thomsonreuters.biz/Web/ThomsonReutersScience/%7Beb621c66-e238-4994-b1b5-9f5f9f897a75%7D_Thomson_Reuters_Top100_Global_Innovators_final.pdf

Introducing the Thomson Reuters 2015 Top 100 Global Innovators Organization Country Industry Previous Winners

New in 2015:

Top Bay Area Innovators For the first time, Thomson Reuters analysts studied Silicon Valley, known as the technology and innovation corridor in the US, to see which companies are leading there. Following a methodology similar to that of the Top 100 Global Innovators, except for the Volume criteria, all companies headquartered or with a major subsidiary in that region were investigated. The Top Bay Area Innovators list can be found on page 19. There are 11 companies that overlap with the Top 100 Global Innovators; meaning 31 percent of the leading US innovators and 11 percent of the world’s top innovators are located in the Bay Area.

Absentees:

The United Kingdom is absent from the list yet again this year. Innovation incentives introduced in the UK, such as Patent Box legislation, do not have enough legacy yet to have had an impact. Additionally, the UK spends much less on R&D as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GERD) than the Top 100 Global Innovator countries do. The UK’s GERDis 1.63 percent, whereas, for example, Japan’s is 3.47 percent.5 The region’s underuse of its patent system and lack of significant commercialization keep the UK from making the list once again.

China is also absent from the 2015 list. It joined the innovation-leader ranks in 2014, for the first time, via Huawei, however wasn’t able to replicate that performance to join again in 2015. A big factor contributing to China’s shortcoming is the fact that most of its innovation is domestic and therefore is not realized outside of its borders. In fact, only about six percent of China’s innovation activity is protected, and commercialized, outside of China. In order for China to see more organizations join this prestigious group, it will need to think more internationally and look to bring its inventions to market around the world. There are 27 companies that dropped from the prior year (see Table 1 on page 12), including AT&T, IBM, Siemens and Xerox. While these companies are still innovating at noteworthy levels, their respective scores across all of the metrics did not advance them to the Top 100. It’s expected that we will see them again in the future.

Patent Reform

There’s been some influential intellectual property legislation that is shaping how companies innovate, where they seek protection and when. Some of these initiatives include the America Invents Act and the Patent Trial & Appeal Board; the European unitary patent and unified patent court; the UK’s Patent Box legislation; and impactful court rulings, such as Alice 101 in the US. The landscape is ripe with reform as patent offices and filers grapple with how best to implement these changes given their goals and needs. Despite these changes, one thing remains certain: the patent system is vital to protecting innovation and to the economic wellbeing of organizations, nations and our world. OECD statistics confirm that nations with higher GDPs have similarly high patent filing rates (aka strong patent infrastructures), whereas the converse holds equally true. One way for developing nations to propel their economies forward is to invest in innovation and building a reliable intellectual property infrastructure.

Methodology

The Thomson Reuters Top 100 Global Innovator methodology analyzes patent and citation data across four main criteria:

  • volume,
  • success,
  • globalization and
  • influence

using Thomson Reuters solutions including Derwent World Patents Index (DWPI), Thomson Innovation and Derwent Patent Citations Index (PCI).

Volume

Volume is the first criteria. An organization must have at least 100 unique inventions protected by a granted patent over the most recent five year period to advance for further analysis. A unique invention is defined as one instance of a published application or granted patent for an idea for which protection is sought. In DWPI, these are called “basic” patents. DWPI provides access to 50 patentissuing authorities. Subsequent filings for the same invention are recorded as equivalents and collated into patent families which, for this analysis, were not included. Once an organization passes the volume stage gate, it is measured across the next three criteria: success, globalization and influence.

Success

The success metric covers the ratio of inventions described in published applications (those patents which are filed and publicly published by the patent office but not yet granted) to inventions protected with granted patents over the most recent five years. Not all patent applications pass through the examination process and are granted.

Globalization

Globalization has to do with the value an organization places on an invention by protecting it across the major world markets. The premise being that inventions protected in all four of the Thomson Reuters Quadrilateral Patent Index authorities: the Chinese Patent Office, the European Patent Office, the Japanese Patent Office and the United States Patent & Trademark Office, are deemed to be of significant value to the organization. A ratio is created of the inventions protected across the Quadrilateral Patent Index authorities versus the total volume for that period. Influence Finally,

Influence

influence is the downstream impact of an invention, measured by how often it is cited by other organizations. Via the Derwent Patent Citation Index, citations to an organization’s patents are counted over the most recent five years, excluding self citations. Scores for each of these areas are tallied and combined to produce the Top 100 Global Innovator list.

Top 100 Global Innovator list

3M Company USA Chemical 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Abbott Laboratories USA Pharmaceutical 2013, 2014

Advanced Micro Devices USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Air Products USA Chemical 2013

Aisin Seiki Japan Automotive 2014

Alcatel-Lucent France Telecommunication & Equipment 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Alstom France Electrical Power

Amazon USA Media Internet Search & Navigation Systems

Analog Devices USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2011, 2012, 2013

Apple USA Telecommunication & Equipment 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Arkema France Chemical 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Avago Technologies (previously LSI) USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2011,2012, 2013, 2014

BASF Germany Chemical 2011, 2014

Bayer Germany Pharmaceutical 2011

Becton Dickinson USA Medical Devices

Blackberry Canada Telecommunication & Equipment 2013, 2014

Boehringer Ingelheim Germany Pharmaceutical

Boeing USA Aerospace 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Bridgestone Japan Automotive

Bristol-Myers Squibb USA Pharmaceutical 2011

Canon Japan Imaging 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Casio Computer Japan Computer Hardware 2014

Chevron USA Oil & Gas 2011, 2012, 2013

CNRS, The French National Center for Scientific Research France Scientific Research 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

CEA–The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission France Scientific Research 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Daikin Industries Japan Industrial 2011, 2014

Dow Chemical Company USA Chemical 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

DuPont USA Chemical 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Emerson Electric USA Electrical Products 2012, 2013, 2014

Ericsson Sweden Telecommunication & Equipment 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Exxon Mobil USA Oil & Gas 2011, 2012, 2013

Fraunhofer Germany Scientific Research 2013, 2014

Freescale Semiconductor USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2013, 2014

Fujifilm Japan Imaging 2012, 2013, 2014

Fujitsu Japan Computer Hardware 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Furukawa Electric Japan Electrical Products 2014

General Electric USA Consumer Products 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Google (now Alphabet Inc.) USA Media Internet Search & Navigation Systems 2012, 2013, 2014

Hitachi Japan Computer Hardware 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Honda Motor Japan Automotive 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Honeywell International USA Electrical Products 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Idemitsu Kosan Japan Oil & Gas

IFP Energies Nouvelles France Scientific Research 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Intel USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

InterDigital USA Telecommunication & Equipment

Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Japan Scientific Research

Johnson & Johnson USA Pharmaceutical 2013, 2014

Johnson Controls USA Automotive

JTEKT Japan Automotive Kawasaki Heavy Industries Japan Industrial

Kobe Steel Japan Primary Metals 2014

Komatsu Japan Industrial 2014

Kyocera Japan Electrical Products 2014

LG Electronics S Korea Consumer Products 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Lockheed Martin USA Transportation Equipment 2012, 2013, 2014

LSIS S Korea Electrical Power 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Makita Corporation Japan Machinery

Marvell USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2012, 2013, 2014

MediaTek Taiwan Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2014

Medtronic USA Medical Devices 2014

Micron USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2012, 2013, 2014

Microsoft USA Computer Software 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Mitsubishi Electric Japan Electrical Products 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Japan Machinery 2012, 2013, 2014

Mitsui Chemicals Japan Chemical NEC Japan Computer Hardware 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Nike USA Consumer Products 2012, 2013, 2014

Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Japan Primary Metals 2012, 2013, 2014

Nissan Motor Japan Automotive 2013, 2014

Nitto Denko Japan Chemical 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Novartis Switzerland Pharmaceutical 2014 2015

NTT Japan Telecommunication & Equipment 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Olympus Japan Healthcare Products 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Oracle USA Computer Software 2013, 2014

Panasonic Japan Consumer Products 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Philips Netherlands Electrical Products 2011, 2013, 2014

Qualcomm USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Roche Switzerland Pharmaceutical 2011,2012,2013, 2014

Safran France Transportation Equipment 2013, 2014

Saint-Gobain France Industrial 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Samsung Electronics S Korea Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Seagate USA Computer Hardware 2012, 2013, 2014

Seiko Epson Japan Imaging 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Shin-Etsu Chemical Japan Chemical 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Showa Denko Japan Chemical

Solvay Belgium Chemical 2012

Sony Japan Consumer Products 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Sumitomo Electric Japan Industrial 2011, 2013, 2014

Symantec USA Computer Software 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

TE Connectivity Switzerland Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Thales France Transportation Equipment 2012, 2013

Toray Japan Chemical

Toshiba Japan Computer Hardware 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Toyota Motor Japan Automotive 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Valeo France Automotive 2012, 2013

Xilinx USA Semiconductor & Electronic Components 2012, 2013, 2014

Yamaha Japan Consumer Products 2011, 2014

Yamaha Motor Japan Automotive

Yaskawa Electric Japan Industrial

Yazaki Japan Automotive

 

SOURCE

http://images.info.science.thomsonreuters.biz/Web/ThomsonReutersScience/%7Beb621c66-e238-4994-b1b5-9f5f9f897a75%7D_Thomson_Reuters_Top100_Global_Innovators_final.pdf

 

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P13K delta-gamma anticancer agent

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

RP 6350, Rhizen Pharmaceuticals S.A. and Novartis tieup for Rhizen’s inhaled dual Pl3K-delta gamma inhibitor

by DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

 

(A)           and                         (Al)                  and                (A2)

(S)-2-(l-(9H-purin-6-ylamino)propyl)-3-(3-fluorophenyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (Compound A1 is RP 6350).

 

str1

 

RP 6350, RP6350, RP-6350

(S)-2-(l-(9H-purin-6-ylamino)propyl)-3-(3-fluorophenyl)-4H-chromen-4-one

mw 415

Rhizen Pharmaceuticals is developing RP-6530, a PI3K delta and gamma dual inhibitor, for the potential oral treatment of cancer and inflammation  In November 2013, a phase I trial in patients with hematologic malignancies was initiated in Italy ]\. In September 2015, a phase I/Ib study was initiated in the US, in patients with relapsed and refractory T-cell lymphoma. At that time, the study was expected to complete in December 2016

PATENTS……..WO 11/055215 ,  WO 12/151525.

  • Antineoplastics; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase delta inhibitors; Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase gamma inhibitors
  • Phase I Haematological malignancies
  • Preclinical Multiple myeloma

 

Swaroop K. V. S. Vakkalanka,
COMPANY Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02017613

 

PI3K delta/gamma inhibitor RP6530 An orally active, highly selective, small molecule inhibitor of the delta and gamma isoforms of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) with potential immunomodulating and antineoplastic activities. Upon administration, PI3K delta/gamma inhibitor RP6530 inhibits the PI3K delta and gamma isoforms and prevents the activation of the PI3K/AKT-mediated signaling pathway. This may lead to a reduction in cellular proliferation in PI3K delta/gamma-expressing tumor cells. In addition, this agent modulates inflammatory responses through various mechanisms, including the inhibition of both the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from neutrophils and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha activity. Unlike other isoforms of PI3K, the delta and gamma isoforms are overexpressed primarily in hematologic malignancies and in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. By selectively targeting these isoforms, PI3K signaling in normal, non-neoplastic cells is minimally impacted or not affected at all, which minimizes the side effect profile for this agent. Check for active clinical trials using this agent. (NCI Thesaurus)

Company Rhizen Pharmaceuticals S.A.
Description Dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) delta and gamma inhibitor
Molecular Target Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) delta ; Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) gamma
Mechanism of Action Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) delta inhibitor; Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) gamma inhibitor
Therapeutic Modality Small molecule

 

Dual PI3Kδ/γ Inhibition By RP6530 Induces Apoptosis and Cytotoxicity In B-Lymphoma Cells
 Swaroop Vakkalanka, PhD*,1, Srikant Viswanadha, Ph.D.*,2, Eugenio Gaudio, PhD*,3, Emanuele Zucca, MD4, Francesco Bertoni, MD5, Elena Bernasconi, B.Sc.*,3, Davide Rossi, MD, Ph.D.*,6, and Anastasios Stathis, MD*,7
 1Rhizen Pharmaceuticals S A, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, 2Incozen Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd., Hyderabad, India, 3Lymphoma & Genomics Research Program, IOR-Institute of Oncology Research, Bellinzona, Switzerland, 4IOSI Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland, 5Lymphoma Unit, IOSI-Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland, 6Italian Multiple Myeloma Network, GIMEMA, Italy, 7Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland

RP6530 is a potent and selective dual PI3Kδ/γ inhibitor that inhibited growth of B-cell lymphoma cell lines with a concomitant reduction in the downstream biomarker, pAKT. Additionally, the compound showed cytotoxicity in a panel of lymphoma primary cells. Findings provide a rationale for future clinical trials in B-cell malignancies.

POSTER SESSIONS
Blood 2013 122:4411; published ahead of print December 6, 2013
Swaroop Vakkalanka, Srikant Viswanadha, Eugenio Gaudio, Emanuele Zucca, Francesco Bertoni, Elena Bernasconi, Davide Rossi, Anastasios Stathis
  • Dual PI3K delta/gamma Inhibition By RP6530 Induces Apoptosis and Cytotoxicity
  • RP6530, a novel, small molecule PI3K delta/gamma
  • Activity and selectivity of RP6530 for PI3K delta and gamma isoforms

Introduction Activation of the PI3K pathway triggers multiple events including cell growth, cell cycle entry, cell survival and motility. While α and β isoforms are ubiquitous in their distribution, expression of δ and γ is restricted to cells of the hematopoietic system. Because these isoforms contribute to the development, maintenance, transformation, and proliferation of immune cells, dual targeting of PI3Kδ and γ represents a promising approach in the treatment of lymphomas. The objective of the experiments was to explore the therapeutic potential of RP6530, a novel, small molecule PI3Kδ/γ inhibitor, in B-cell lymphomas.

Methods Activity and selectivity of RP6530 for PI3Kδ and γ isoforms and subsequent downstream activity was determined in enzyme and cell-based assays. Additionally, RP6530 was tested for potency in viability, apoptosis, and Akt phosphorylation assays using a range of immortalized B-cell lymphoma cell lines (Raji, TOLEDO, KG-1, JEKO, OCI-LY-1, OCI-LY-10, MAVER, and REC-1). Viability was assessed using the colorimetric MTT reagent after incubation of cells for 72 h. Inhibition of pAKT was estimated by Western Blotting and bands were quantified using ImageJ after normalization with Actin. Primary cells from lymphoid tumors [1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 2 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL), 2 mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 1 splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL), and 1 extranodal MZL (EMZL)] were isolated, incubated with 4 µM RP6530, and analyzed for apoptosis or cytotoxicity by Annexin V/PI staining.

Results RP6530 demonstrated high potency against PI3Kδ (IC50=24.5 nM) and γ (IC50=33.2 nM) enzymes with selectivity over α (>300-fold) and β (>100-fold) isoforms. Cellular potency was confirmed in target-specific assays, namely anti-FcεR1-(EC50=37.8 nM) or fMLP (EC50=39.0 nM) induced CD63 expression in human whole blood basophils, LPS induced CD19+ cell proliferation in human whole blood (EC50=250 nM), and LPS induced CD45R+ cell proliferation in mouse whole blood (EC50=101 nM). RP6530 caused a dose-dependent inhibition (>50% @ 2-7 μM) in growth of immortalized (Raji, TOLEDO, KG-1, JEKO, REC-1) B-cell lymphoma cells. Effect was more pronounced in the DLBCL cell lines, OCI-LY-1 and OCI-LY-10 (>50% inhibition @ 0.1-0.7 μM), and the reduction in viability was accompanied by corresponding inhibition of pAKT with EC50 of 6 & 70 nM respectively. Treatment of patient-derived primary cells with 4 µM RP6530 caused an increase in cell death. Fold-increase in cytotoxicity as evident from PI+ staining was 1.6 for CLL, 1.1 for DLBCL, 1.2 for MCL, 2.2 for SMZL, and 2.3 for EMZL. Cells in early apotosis (Annexin V+/PI-) were not different between the DMSO blank and RP6530 samples.

Conclusions RP6530 is a potent and selective dual PI3Kδ/γ inhibitor that inhibited growth of B-cell lymphoma cell lines with a concomitant reduction in the downstream biomarker, pAKT. Additionally, the compound showed cytotoxicity in a panel of lymphoma primary cells. Findings provide a rationale for future clinical trials in B-cell malignancies.

Disclosures:Vakkalanka:Rhizen Pharmaceuticals, S.A.: Employment, Equity Ownership; Incozen Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd.: Employment, Equity Ownership.Viswanadha:Incozen Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd.: Employment. Bertoni:Rhizen Pharmaceuticals SA: Research Funding.

 

PI3K Dual Inhibitor (RP-6530)


Therapeutic Area Respiratory , Oncology – Liquid Tumors , Rheumatology Molecule Type Small Molecule
Indication Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) , Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma , Asthma , Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , Rheumatoid Arthritis
Development Phase Phase I Rt. of Administration Oral

Description

Rhizen is developing dual PI3K gamma/delta inhibitors for liquid tumors and inflammatory conditions.

Situation Overview

Dual Pl3K inhibition is strongly implicated as an intervention treatment in allergic and non-allergic inflammation of the airways and autoimmune diseases manifested by a reduction in neutrophilia and TNF in response to LPS. Scientific evidence for PI3-kinase involvement in various cellular processes underlying asthma and COPD stems from inhibitor studies and gene-targeting approaches, which makes it a potential target for treatment of respiratory disease. Resistance to conventional therapies such as corticosteroids in several patients has been attributed to an up-regulation of the PI3K pathway; thus, disruption of PI3K signaling provides a novel strategy aimed at counteracting the immuno-inflammatory response. Given the established criticality of these isoforms in immune surveillance, inhibitors specifically targeting the ? and ? isoforms would be expected to attenuate the progression of immune response encountered in most variations of airway inflammation and arthritis.

Mechanism of Action

While alpha and beta isoforms are ubiquitous in their distribution, expression of delta and gamma is restricted to circulating hematogenous cells and endothelial cells. Unlike PI3K-alpha or beta, mice lacking expression of gamma or delta do not show any adverse phenotype indicating that targeting of these specific isoforms would not result in overt toxicity. Dual delta/gamma inhibition is strongly implicated as an intervention strategy in allergic and non-allergic inflammation of the airways and other autoimmune diseases. Scientific evidence for PI3K-delta and gamma involvement in various cellular processes underlying asthma and COPD stems from inhibitor studies and gene-targeting approaches. Also, resistance to conventional therapies such as corticosteroids in several COPD patients has been attributed to an up-regulation of the PI3K delta/gamma pathway. Disruption of PI3K-delta/gamma signalling therefore provides a novel strategy aimed at counteracting the immuno-inflammatory response. Due to the pivotal role played by PI3K-delta and gamma in mediating inflammatory cell functionality such as leukocyte migration and activation, and mast cell degranulation, blocking these isoforms may also be an effective strategy for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis as well.

Given the established criticality of these isoforms in immune surveillance, inhibitors specifically targeting the delta and gamma isoforms would be expected to attenuate the progression of immune response encountered in airway inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis.

 

http://www.rhizen.com/images/backgrounds/pi3k%20delta%20gamma%20ii.png

http://www.rhizen.com/images/backgrounds/pi3k%20delta%20gamma%20ii.pngtps:/

Clinical Trials

Rhizen has identified an orally active Lead Molecule, RP-6530, that has an excellent pre-clinical profile. RP-6530 is currently in non-GLP Tox studies and is expected to enter Clinical Development in H2 2013.

In December 2013, Rhizen announced the start of a Phase I clinical trial. The study entitled A Phase-I, Dose Escalation Study to Evaluate Safety and Efficacy of RP6530, a dual PI3K delta /gamma inhibitor, in patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancies is designed primarily to establish the safety and tolerability of RP6530. Secondary objectives include clinical efficacy assessment and biomarker response to allow dose determination and potential patient stratification in subsequent expansion studies.

 

Partners by Region

Rhizen’s pipeline consists of internally discovered (with 100% IP ownership) novel small molecule programs aimed at high value markets of Oncology, Immuno-inflammtion and Metabolic Disorders. Rhizen has been successful in securing critical IP space in these areas and efforts are on for further expansion in to several indications. Rhizen seeks partnerships to unlock the potential of these valuable assets for further development from global pharmaceutical partners. At present global rights on all programs are available and Rhizen is flexible to consider suitable business models for licensing/collaboration.

In 2012, Rhizen announced a joint venture collaboration with TG Therapeutics for global development and commercialization of Rhizen’s Novel Selective PI3K Kinase Inhibitors. The selected lead RP5264 (hereafter, to be developed as TGR-1202) is an orally available, small molecule, PI3K specific inhibitor currently being positioned for the treatment of hematological malignancies.

PATENT
WO2014195888, DUAL SELECTIVE PI3 DELTA AND GAMMA KINASE INHIBITORS

This scheme provides a synthetic route for the preparation of compound of formula wherein all the variables are as described herein in above

Figure imgf000094_0001

15 14 10 12 12a

REFERENCES
April 2015, preclinical data were presented at the 106th AACR Meeting in Philadelphia, PA. RP-6530 had GI50 values of 17,028 and 22,014 nM, respectively
December 2014, data were presented at the 56th ASH Meeting in San Francisco, CA.
December 2013, preclinical data were presented at the 55th ASH Meeting in New Orleans, LA.
June 2013, preclinical data were presented at the 18th Annual EHA Congress in Stockholm, Sweden. RP-6530 inhibited PI3K delta and gamma isoforms with IC50 values of 24.5 and 33.2 nM, respectively.
  • 01 Sep 2015 Phase-I clinical trials in Hematological malignancies (Second-line therapy or greater) in USA (PO) (NCT02567656)
  • 18 Nov 2014 Preclinical trials in Multiple myeloma in Switzerland (PO) prior to November 2014
  • 18 Nov 2014 Early research in Multiple myeloma in Switzerland (PO) prior to November 2014

 

WO2011055215A2 Nov 3, 2010 May 12, 2011 Incozen Therapeutics Pvt. Ltd. Novel kinase modulators
WO2012151525A1 May 4, 2012 Nov 8, 2012 Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa Novel compounds as modulators of protein kinases
WO2013164801A1 May 3, 2013 Nov 7, 2013 Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa Process for preparation of optically pure and optionally substituted 2- (1 -hydroxy- alkyl) – chromen – 4 – one derivatives and their use in preparing pharmaceuticals
US20110118257 May 19, 2011 Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa Novel kinase modulators
US20120289496 May 4, 2012 Nov 15, 2012 Rhizen Pharmaceuticals Sa Novel compounds as modulators of protein kinases
WO 2011055215

 

 

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New antibacterials against resistant strains

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

 

WCK ? , WCK Series by Wockhardt for treating the bacterial infection

by DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

Sulfuric acid, mono[(1R,​2S,​5R)​-​7-​oxo-​2-​[[[(2S)​-​2-​pyrrolidinylmethoxy]​amino]​carbonyl]​-​1,​6-​diazabicyclo[3.2.1]​oct-​6-​yl] ester

364.37

C12 H20 N4 O7 S

CAS 1452459-04-9

PATENTS, WO 2015079329, WO 2015079389 , WO 2015063714, US 20130225554

Emergence of bacterial resistance to known antibacterial agents is becoming a major challenge in treating bacterial infections. One way forward to treat bacterial infections, and especially those caused by resistant bacteria, is to develop newer antibacterial agents that can overcome the bacterial resistant. Coates et al. (Br. J. Pharmacol. 2007; 152(8), 1147-1154.) have reviewed novel approaches to developing new antibiotics. However, the development of new antibacterial agents is a challenging task. For example, Gwynn et al. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 2010, 1213: 5-19) have reviewed the challenges in discovery of antibacterial agents.

Several compounds have been described in the prior art for use in treatment of bacterial infections (for example, see Patent Application Nos. PCT/IB2012/054296, PCT/IB2012/054290, US20130225554, PCT/US2010/060923, PCT/EP2010/067647, PCT/US2010/052109, PCT/US2010/048109, PCT/GB2009/050609, PCT/EP2009/056178, PCT/US2009/041200, PCT/US2013/034562, PCT/US2013/034589, PCT/IB2013/053092 and PCT/IB2012054706). However, there remains a need for potent antibacterial agents for preventing and/or treating bacterial infections, including those caused by bacteria that are resistant to known antibacterial agents.

 

PATENT

WO 2015079329

https://encrypted.google.com/patents/WO2015079329A2?cl=en

 

 

 

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