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Posts Tagged ‘Cancer Care’


Celgene Triumphs in Legal Battle over Revlimid Patent: Curation of Patents, Litigations, and Impact on Drug Pricing

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

From Celgene

REVLIMID® (lenalidomide) in combination with dexamethasone is indicated for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). as maintenance therapy in patients with MM following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT). and indicated for the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anemia due to low- or intermediate-1–risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with a deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities.

REVLIMID is also indicated for the treatment of patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) whose disease has relapsed or progressed after two prior therapies, one of which included bortezomib.

REVLIMID® sales for the fourth quarter 2018 increased 16 percent to $2,549 million. Fourth quarter U.S. sales of $1,729 million and international sales of $820 million increased 17 percent and 15 percent, respectively. REVLIMID® sales growth was driven by increases in treatment duration and market share. Full year REVLIMID® sales were $9,685 million, an increase of 18 percent year-over-year. (from Celgene press release)

However, Celgene’s Revlimid basically has no competition in the multiple myeloma market and there are no generics of Revlimid, even though Revlimid is a conger of thalidomide, the 1950 era drug developed for depression and resulted in the infamous thalidomide baby cases.

The problem is highlighted in two reports:

As seen in Fortune: Celgene Boosted Price of Top Cancer Drug on Day of Mega Deal

By BLOOMBERG

January 4, 2019

On the same day Celgene Corp. was announcing that it would be acquired by Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. in the biggest pharma deal ever, the company was also raising the price of its blockbuster cancer drug. The Summit, New Jersey-based biotechnology company, which has routinely increased the prices of its top-selling drugs, boosted the price of a 10-milligram dose of Revlimid by 3.5 percent to $719.82 effective Jan. 3, according to price data compiled by Bloomberg Intelligence and First Databank. Cancer patients need many doses of Revlimid a year, and the overall cost can approach $200,000. The same dose cost $247.28 at the end of 2007.

As reported on NPR by Alison Kodjak: Celgene’s Patent Fortress Protects Revlimid, Thalidomide: How A DrugMaker Gamed the Patent System to Keep Generic Competition Away

When Celgene Corp. first started marketing the drug Revlimid to treat multiple myeloma in 2006, the price was $6,195 for 21 capsules, a month’s supply.By the time David Mitchell started taking Revlimid in November 2010, Celgene had bumped the price up to about $8,000 a month. When he took his last month’s worth of pills in April 2016, the sticker price had reached $10,691. By last March, the list price had reached $16,691. Revlimid appears to have caught the attention of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, who used it as an example Wednesday — without naming it outright — of how some drug’s prices rise with impunity. He said the copay for the average senior taking the drug rose from $115 to about $690 per month in the last year. Celgene can keep raising the price of Revlimid because the drug has no competition. It’s been around for more than a decade and its original patent expires next year. But today it looks like another four years could pass with no generic competitor to Revlimid.

 

Therefore, when the European company Alvogen tired to produce a generic version of this drug and took Celgene to court, Celgene quickly shored up its patent fight as outlined below.

As reported in Biopharmadive.com:

 

Celgene dodges Alvogen bid to overturn Revlimid patent

Here is Celgene’s patent on Revlimid (thalidomide).

Some notes:

  • notice the multiple congeners, chemical derivatives
  • notice the multiple drug combination claims especially with using other antibodies with thalidomide (second active ingredient)
  • note multiple dosage forms

Methods for treatment of multiple myeloma using 3-(4-amino-1-oxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-piperidine-2,6-dione

Abstract
Methods of treating, preventing and/or managing cancer as well as and diseases and disorders associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis are disclosed. Specific methods encompass the administration of an immunomodulatory compound alone or in combination with a second active ingredient. The invention further relates to methods of reducing or avoiding adverse side effects associated with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy or immunotherapy which comprise the administration of an immunomodulatory compound. Pharmaceutical compositions, single unit dosage forms, and kits suitable for use in methods of the invention are also disclosed.

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Classifications
A61K31/454 Non condensed piperidines, e.g. piperocaine containing further heterocyclic ring systems containing a five-membered ring with nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. pimozide, domperidone
View 21 more classifications

US7968569B2

United States

Inventor
Jerome B. Zeldis
Current Assignee
Celgene Corp

Worldwide applications

Application US10/438,213 events
2002-05-17
Priority to US38084202P
2011-06-28
Application granted
Application status is Active
Adjusted expiration
Show all events

Description

This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional application No. 60/380,842, filed May 17, 2002, and No. 60/424,600, filed Nov. 6, 2002, the entireties of which are incorporated herein by reference.

1. FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to methods of treating, preventing and/or managing specific cancers, and other diseases including, but not limited to, those associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis, by the administration of one or more immunomodulatory compounds alone or in combination with other therapeutics. In particular, the invention encompasses the use of specific combinations, or “cocktails,” of drugs and other therapy, e.g., radiation to treat these specific cancers, including those refractory to conventional therapy. The invention also relates to pharmaceutical compositions and dosing regimens.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

2.1 Pathobiology of Cancer and Other Diseases

Cancer is characterized primarily by an increase in the number of abnormal cells derived from a given normal tissue, invasion of adjacent tissues by these abnormal cells, or lymphatic or blood-borne spread of malignant cells to regional lymph nodes and to distant sites (metastasis). Clinical data and molecular biologic studies indicate that cancer is a multistep process that begins with minor preneoplastic changes, which may under certain conditions progress to neoplasia. The neoplastic lesion may evolve clonally and develop an increasing capacity for invasion, growth, metastasis, and heterogeneity, especially under conditions in which the neoplastic cells escape the host’s immune surveillance. Roitt, I., Brostoff, J and Kale, D., Immunology, 17.1-17.12 (3rd ed., Mosby, St. Louis, Mo., 1993).

There is an enormous variety of cancers which are described in detail in the medical literature. Examples includes cancer of the lung, colon, rectum, prostate, breast, brain, and intestine. The incidence of cancer continues to climb as the general population ages, as new cancers develop, and as susceptible populations (e.g., people infected with AIDS or excessively exposed to sunlight) grow. A tremendous demand therefore exists for new methods and compositions that can be used to treat patients with cancer.

Many types of cancers are associated with new blood vessel formation, a process known as angiogenesis. Several of the mechanisms involved in tumor-induced angiogenesis have been elucidated. The most direct of these mechanisms is the secretion by the tumor cells of cytokines with angiogenic properties. Examples of these cytokines include acidic and basic fibroblastic growth factor (a,b-FGF), angiogenin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and TNF-α. Alternatively, tumor cells can release angiogenic peptides through the production of proteases and the subsequent breakdown of the extracellular matrix where some cytokines are stored (e.g., b-FGF). Angiogenesis can also be induced indirectly through the recruitment of inflammatory cells (particularly macrophages) and their subsequent release of angiogenic cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, bFGF).

A variety of other diseases and disorders are also associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis. For example, enhanced or unregulated angiogenesis has been implicated in a number of diseases and medical conditions including, but not limited to, ocular neovascular diseases, choroidal neovascular diseases, retina neovascular diseases, rubeosis (neovascularization of the angle), viral diseases, genetic diseases, inflammatory diseases, allergic diseases, and autoimmune diseases. Examples of such diseases and conditions include, but are not limited to: diabetic retinopathy; retinopathy of prematurity; corneal graft rejection; neovascular glaucoma; retrolental fibroplasia; and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

Accordingly, compounds that can control angiogenesis or inhibit the production of certain cytokines, including TNF-α, may be useful in the treatment and prevention of various diseases and conditions.

2.2 Methods of Treating Cancer

Current cancer therapy may involve surgery, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and/or radiation treatment to eradicate neoplastic cells in a patient (see, for example, Stockdale, 1998, Medicine, vol. 3, Rubenstein and Federman, eds., Chapter 12, Section IV). Recently, cancer therapy could also involve biological therapy or immunotherapy. All of these approaches pose significant drawbacks for the patient. Surgery, for example, may be contraindicated due to the health of a patient or may be unacceptable to the patient. Additionally, surgery may not completely remove neoplastic tissue. Radiation therapy is only effective when the neoplastic tissue exhibits a higher sensitivity to radiation than normal tissue. Radiation therapy can also often elicit serious side effects. Hormonal therapy is rarely given as a single agent. Although hormonal therapy can be effective, it is often used to prevent or delay recurrence of cancer after other treatments have removed the majority of cancer cells. Biological therapies and immunotherapies are limited in number and may produce side effects such as rashes or swellings, flu-like symptoms, including fever, chills and fatigue, digestive tract problems or allergic reactions.

With respect to chemotherapy, there are a variety of chemotherapeutic agents available for treatment of cancer. A majority of cancer chemotherapeutics act by inhibiting DNA synthesis, either directly, or indirectly by inhibiting the biosynthesis of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate precursors, to prevent DNA replication and concomitant cell division. Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman’s: The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, Tenth Ed. (McGraw Hill, New York).

Despite availability of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, chemotherapy has many drawbacks. Stockdale, Medicine, vol. 3, Rubenstein and Federman, eds., ch. 12, sect. 10, 1998. Almost all chemotherapeutic agents are toxic, and chemotherapy causes significant, and often dangerous side effects including severe nausea, bone marrow depression, and immunosuppression. Additionally, even with administration of combinations of chemotherapeutic agents, many tumor cells are resistant or develop resistance to the chemotherapeutic agents. In fact, those cells resistant to the particular chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment protocol often prove to be resistant to other drugs, even if those agents act by different mechanism from those of the drugs used in the specific treatment. This phenomenon is referred to as pleiotropic drug or multidrug resistance. Because of the drug resistance, many cancers prove refractory to standard chemotherapeutic treatment protocols.

Other diseases or conditions associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis are also difficult to treat. However, some compounds such as protamine, hepain and steroids have been proposed to be useful in the treatment of certain specific diseases. Taylor et al., Nature 297:307 (1982); Folkman et al., Science 221:719 (1983); and U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,001,116 and 4,994,443. Thalidomide and certain derivatives of it have also been proposed for the treatment of such diseases and conditions. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,593,990, 5,629,327, 5,712,291, 6,071,948 and 6,114,355 to D’Amato.

Still, there is a significant need for safe and effective methods of treating, preventing and managing cancer and other diseases and conditions, particularly for diseases that are refractory to standard treatments, such as surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, while reducing or avoiding the toxicities and/or side effects associated with the conventional therapies.

2.3 IMIDS™

A number of studies have been conducted with the aim of providing compounds that can safely and effectively be used to treat diseases associated with abnormal production of TNF-α See, e.g., Marriott, J. B., et al., Expert Opin. Biol. Ther. 1(4):1-8 (2001); G. W. Muller, et al., Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 39(17): 3238-3240 (1996); and G. W. Muller, et al, Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 8: 2669-2674 (1998). Some studies have focused on a group of compounds selected for their capacity to potently inhibit TNF-α production by LPS stimulated PBMC. L. G. Corral, et al., Ann. Rheum. Dis. 58:(Suppl I) 1107-1113 (1999). These compounds, which are referred to as IMiDS™ (Celgene Corporation) or Immunomodulatory Drugs, show not only potent inhibition of TNF-α but also marked inhibition of LPS induced monocyte IL1β and IL12 production. LPS induced IL6 is also inhibited by immunomodulatory compounds, albeit partially. These compounds are potent stimulators of LPS induced IL10. Id. Particular examples of IMiD™s include, but are not limited to, the substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) phthalimides and substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-1-oxoisoindoles described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,281,230 and 6,316,471, both to G. W. Muller, et al.

3. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention encompasses methods of treating and preventing certain types of cancer, including primary and metastatic cancer, as well as cancers that are refractory or resistant to conventional chemotherapy. The methods comprise administering to a patient in need of such treatment or prevention a therapeutically or prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof. The invention also encompasses methods of managing certain cancers (e.g., preventing or prolonging their recurrence, or lengthening the time of remission) which comprise administering to a patient in need of such management a prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound of the invention, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof.

In particular methods of the invention, an immunomodulatory compound is administered in combination with a therapy conventionally used to treat, prevent or manage cancer. Examples of such conventional therapies include, but are not limited to, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy and immunotherapy.

This invention also encompasses methods of treating, managing or preventing diseases and disorders other than cancer that are associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis, which comprise administering to a patient in need of such treatment, management or prevention a therapeutically or prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof.

In other methods of the invention, an immunomodulatory compound is administered in combination with a therapy conventionally used to treat, prevent or manage diseases or disorders associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis. Examples of such conventional therapies include, but are not limited to, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy and immunotherapy.

This invention encompasses pharmaceutical compositions, single unit dosage forms, dosing regimens and kits which comprise an immunomodulatory compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof, and a second, or additional, active agent. Second active agents include specific combinations, or “cocktails,” of drugs.

4. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURE

FIG. 1 shows a comparison of the effects of 3-(4-amino-1-oxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-piperidine-2,6-dione (Revimid™) and thalidomide in inhibiting the proliferation of multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines in an in vitro study. The uptake of [3H]-thymidine by different MM cell lines (MM. 1S, Hs Sultan, U266 and RPMI-8226) was measured as an indicator of the cell proliferation.

5. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

A first embodiment of the invention encompasses methods of treating, managing, or preventing cancer which comprises administering to a patient in need of such treatment or prevention a therapeutically or prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound of the invention, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof.

In particular methods encompassed by this embodiment, the immunomodulatory compound is administered in combination with another drug (“second active agent”) or method of treating, managing, or preventing cancer. Second active agents include small molecules and large molecules (e.g., proteins and antibodies), examples of which are provided herein, as well as stem cells. Methods, or therapies, that can be used in combination with the administration of the immunomodulatory compound include, but are not limited to, surgery, blood transfusions, immunotherapy, biological therapy, radiation therapy, and other non-drug based therapies presently used to treat, prevent or manage cancer.

Another embodiment of the invention encompasses methods of treating, managing or preventing diseases and disorders other than cancer that are characterized by undesired angiogenesis. These methods comprise the administration of a therapeutically or prophylactically effective amount of an immunomodulatory compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof.

Examples of diseases and disorders associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis include, but are not limited to, inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, viral diseases, genetic diseases, allergic diseases, bacterial diseases, ocular neovascular diseases, choroidal neovascular diseases, retina neovascular diseases, and rubeosis (neovascularization of the angle).

In particular methods encompassed by this embodiment, the immunomodulatory compound is administer in combination with a second active agent or method of treating, managing, or preventing the disease or condition. Second active agents include small molecules and large molecules (e.g., proteins and antibodies), examples of which are provided herein, as well as stem cells. Methods, or therapies, that can be used in combination with the administration of the immunomodulatory compound include, but are not limited to, surgery, blood transfusions, immunotherapy, biological therapy, radiation therapy, and other non-drug based therapies presently used to treat, prevent or manage disease and conditions associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis.

The invention also encompasses pharmaceutical compositions (e.g., single unit dosage forms) that can be used in methods disclosed herein. Particular pharmaceutical compositions comprise an immunomodulatory compound of the invention, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, solvate, hydrate, stereoisomer, clathrate, or prodrug thereof, and a second active agent.

5.1 Immunomodulatory Compounds

Compounds used in the invention include immunomodulatory compounds that are racemic, stereomerically enriched or stereomerically pure, and pharmaceutically acceptable salts, solvates, hydrates, stereoisomers, clathrates, and prodrugs thereof. Preferred compounds used in the invention are small organic molecules having a molecular weight less than about 1,000 g/mol, and are not proteins, peptides, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides or other macromolecules.

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the terms “immunomodulatory compounds” and “IMiDs™” (Celgene Corporation) encompasses small organic molecules that markedly inhibit TNF-α, LPS induced monocyte IL1β and IL12, and partially inhibit IL6 production. Specific immunomodulatory compounds are discussed below.

TNF-α is an inflammatory cytokine produced by macrophages and monocytes during acute inflammation. TNF-α is responsible for a diverse range of signaling events within cells. TNF-α may play a pathological role in cancer. Without being limited by theory, one of the biological effects exerted by the immunomodulatory compounds of the invention is the reduction of synthesis of TNF-α. Immunomodulatory compounds of the invention enhance the degradation of TNF-αmRNA.

Further, without being limited by theory, immunomodulatory compounds used in the invention may also be potent co-stimulators of T cells and increase cell proliferation dramatically in a dose dependent manner. Immunomodulatory compounds of the invention may also have a greater co-stimulatory effect on the CD8+ T cell subset than on the CD4+ T cell subset. In addition, the compounds preferably have anti-inflammatory properties, and efficiently co-stimulate T cells.

Specific examples of immunomodulatory compounds of the invention, include, but are not limited to, cyano and carboxy derivatives of substituted styrenes such as those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,929,117; 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxo-3-fluoropiperidin-3-yl) isoindolines and 1,3-dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxo-3-fluoropiperidine-3-yl) isoindolines such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,874,448; the tetra substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperdin-3-yl)-1-oxoisoindolines described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,798,368; 1-oxo and 1,3-dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) isoindolines (e.g., 4-methyl derivatives of thalidomide and EM-12), including, but not limited to, those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,635,517; and a class of non-polypeptide cyclic amides disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,698,579 and 5,877,200; analogs and derivatives of thalidomide, including hydrolysis products, metabolites, derivatives and precursors of thalidomide, such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,593,990, 5,629,327, and 6,071,948 to D’Amato; aminothalidomide, as well as analogs, hydrolysis products, metabolites, derivatives and precursors of aminothalidomide, and substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) phthalimides and substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-1-oxoisoindoles such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,281,230 and 6,316,471; isoindole-imide compounds such as those described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/972,487 filed on Oct. 5, 2001, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/032,286 filed on Dec. 21, 2001, and International Application No. PCT/US01/50401 (International Publication No. WO 02/059106). The entireties of each of the patents and patent applications identified herein are incorporated herein by reference. Immunomodulatory compounds of the invention do not include thalidomide.

Other specific immunomodulatory compounds of the invention include, but are not limited to, 1-oxo- and 1,3 dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) isoindolines substituted with amino in the benzo ring as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,635,517 which is incorporated herein by reference. These compounds have the structure I:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00001


in which one of X and Y is C═O, the other of X and Y is C═O or CH2, and Ris hydrogen or lower alkyl, in particular methyl. Specific immunomodulatory compounds include, but are not limited to:

  • 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-4-aminoisoindoline;
  • 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-5-aminoisoindoline;
  • 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-6-aminoisoindoline;
  • 1-oxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-7-aminoisoindoline;
  • 1,3-dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-4-aminoisoindoline; and
  • 1,3-dioxo-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-5-aminoisoindoline.

Other specific immunomodulatory compounds of the invention belong to a class of substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl) phthalimides and substituted 2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)-1-oxoisoindoles, such as those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,281,230; 6,316,471; 6,335,349; and 6,476,052, and International Patent Application No. PCT/US97/13375 (International Publication No. WO 98/03502), each of which is incorporated herein by reference. Compounds representative of this class are of the formulas:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00002


wherein Ris hydrogen or methyl. In a separate embodiment, the invention encompasses the use of enantiomerically pure forms (e.g. optically pure (R) or (S) enantiomers) of these compounds.

Still other specific immunomodulatory compounds of the invention belong to a class of isoindole-imides disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 10/032,286 and 09/972,487, and International Application No. PCT/US01/50401 (International Publication No. WO 02/059106), each of which are incorporated herein by reference. Representative compounds are of formula II:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00003

and pharmaceutically acceptable salts, hydrates, solvates, clathrates, enantiomers, diastereomers, racemates, and mixtures of stereoisomers thereof, wherein:

one of X and Y is C═O and the other is CHor C═O;

Ris H, (C1-C8)alkyl, (C3-C7)cycloalkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, C(O)R3, C(S)R3, C(O)OR4, (C1-C8)alkyl-N(R6)2, (C1-C8)alkyl-OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-C(O)OR5, C(O)NHR3, C(S)NHR3, C(O)NR3R3′, C(S)NR3R3′ or (C1-C8)alkyl-O(CO)R5;

Ris H, F, benzyl, (C1-C8)alkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, or (C2-C8)alkynyl;

Rand R3′ are independently (C1-C8)alkyl, (C3-C7)cycloalkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, (C0-C8)alkyl-N(R6)2, (C1-C8)alkyl-OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-C(O)OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-O(CO)R5, or C(O)OR5;

Ris (C1-C8)alkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, (C1-C4)alkyl-OR5, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, or (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl;

Ris (C1-C8)alkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, or (C2-C5)heteroaryl;

each occurrence of Ris independently H, (C1-C8)alkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C2-C5)heteroaryl, or (C0-C8)alkyl-C(O)O—Ror the R6groups can join to form a heterocycloalkyl group;

n is 0 or 1; and

* represents a chiral-carbon center.

In specific compounds of formula II, when n is 0 then Ris (C3-C7)cycloalkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, C(O)R3, C(O)OR4, (C1-C8)alkyl-N(R6)2, (C1-C8)alkyl-OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-C(O)OR5, C(S)NHR3, or (C1-C8)alkyl O(CO)R5;

Ris H or (C1-C8)alkyl; and

Ris (C1-C8)alkyl, (C3-C7)cycloalkyl, (C2-C8)alkenyl, (C2-C8)alkynyl, benzyl, aryl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C1-C6)heterocycloalkyl, (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, (C5-C8)alkyl-N(R6)2; (C0-C8)alkyl-NH—C(O)O—R5; (C1-C8)alkyl-OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-C(O)OR5, (C1-C8)alkyl-O(CO)R5, or C(O)OR5; and the other variables have the same definitions.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris H or (C1-C4)alkyl.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris (C1-C8)alkyl or benzyl.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris H, (C1-C8)alkyl, benzyl, CH2OCH3, CH2CH2OCH3, or

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00004

In another embodiment of the compounds of formula II, Ris

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00005


wherein Q is O or S, and each occurrence of Ris independently H, (C1-C8)alkyl, benzyl, CH2OCH3, or CH2CH2OCH3.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris C(O)R3.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris (C0-C4)alkyl-(C2-C5)heteroaryl, (C1-C5)alkyl, aryl, or (C0-C4)alkyl-OR5.

In other specific compounds of formula II, heteroaryl is pyridyl, furyl, or thienyl.

In other specific compounds of formula II, Ris C(O)OR4.

In other specific compounds of formula II, the H of C(O)NHC(O) can be replaced with (C1-C4)alkyl, aryl, or benzyl.

Still other specific immunomodulatory compounds of the invention belong to a class of isoindole-imides disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/781,179, International Publication No. WO 98/54170, and U.S. Pat. No. 6,395,754, each of which are incorporated herein by reference. Representative compounds are of formula III:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00006


and pharmaceutically acceptable salts, hydrates, solvates, clathrates, enantiomers, diastereomers, racemates, and mixtures of stereoisomers thereof, wherein:

one of X and Y is C═O and the other is CHor C═O;

R is H or CH2OCOR′;

(i) each of R1, R2, R3, or R4, independently of the others, is halo, alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms, or alkoxy of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or (ii) one of R1, R2, R3, or Ris nitro or —NHRand the remaining of R1, R2, R3, or Rare hydrogen;

Ris hydrogen or alkyl of 1 to 8 carbons

Rhydrogen, alkyl of 1 to 8 carbon atoms, benzo, chloro, or fluoro;

R′ is R7—CHR10—N(R8R9);

Ris m-phenylene or p-phenylene or —(CnH2n)— in which n has a value of 0 to 4;

each of Rand Rtaken independently of the other is hydrogen or alkyl of 1 to 8 carbon atoms, or Rand Rtaken together are tetramethylene, pentamethylene, hexamethylene, or —CH2CH2[X]X1CH2CH2— in which [X]Xis —O—, —S—, or —NH—;

R10 is hydrogen, alkyl of to 8 carbon atoms, or phenyl; and

* represents a chiral-carbon center.

The most preferred immunomodulatory compounds of the invention are 4-(amino)-2-(2,6-dioxo(3-piperidyl))-isoindoline-1,3-dione and 3-(4-amino-1-oxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-piperidine-2,6-dione. The compounds can be obtained via standard, synthetic methods (see e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 5,635,517, incorporated herein by reference). The compounds are available from Celgene Corporation, Warren, N.J. 4-(Amino)-2-(2,6-dioxo(3-piperidyl))-isoindoline-1,3-dione (ACTIMID™) has the following chemical structure:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00007


The compound 3-(4-amino-1-oxo-1,3-dihydro-isoindol-2-yl)-piperidine-2,6-dione (REVIMID™) has the following chemical structure:

Figure US07968569-20110628-C00008

Compounds of the invention can either be commercially purchased or prepared according to the methods described in the patents or patent publications disclosed herein. Further, optically pure compounds can be asymmetrically synthesized or resolved using known resolving agents or chiral columns as well as other standard synthetic organic chemistry techniques.

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “pharmaceutically acceptable salt” encompasses non-toxic acid and base addition salts of the compound to which the term refers. Acceptable non-toxic acid addition salts include those derived from organic and inorganic acids or bases know in the art, which include, for example, hydrochloric acid, hydrobromic acid, phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, methanesulphonic acid, acetic acid, tartaric acid, lactic acid, succinic acid, citric acid, malic acid, maleic acid, sorbic acid, aconitic acid, salicylic acid, phthalic acid, embolic acid, enanthic acid, and the like.

Compounds that are acidic in nature are capable of forming salts with various pharmaceutically acceptable bases. The bases that can be used to prepare pharmaceutically acceptable base addition salts of such acidic compounds are those that form non-toxic base addition salts, i.e., salts containing pharmacologically acceptable cations such as, but not limited to, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salts and the calcium, magnesium, sodium or potassium salts in particular. Suitable organic bases include, but are not limited to, N,N-dibenzylethylenediamine, chloroprocaine, choline, diethanolamine, ethylenediamine, meglumaine (N-methylglucamine), lysine, and procaine.

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “prodrug” means a derivative of a compound that can hydrolyze, oxidize, or otherwise react under biological conditions (in vitro or in vivo) to provide the compound. Examples of prodrugs include, but are not limited to, derivatives of immunomodulatory compounds of the invention that comprise biohydrolyzable moieties such as biohydrolyzable amides, biohydrolyzable esters, biohydrolyzable carbamates, biohydrolyzable carbonates, biohydrolyzable ureides, and biohydrolyzable phosphate analogues. Other examples of prodrugs include derivatives of immunomodulatory compounds of the invention that comprise —NO, —NO2, —ONO, or —ONOmoieties. Prodrugs can typically be prepared using well-known methods, such as those described in 1 Burger’s Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Discovery, 172-178, 949-982 (Manfred E. Wolff ed., 5th ed. 1995), and Design of Prodrugs (H. Bundgaard ed., Elselvier, N.Y. 1985).

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the terms “biohydrolyzable amide,” “biohydrolyzable ester,” “biohydrolyzable carbamate,” “biohydrolyzable carbonate,” “biohydrolyzable ureide,” “biohydrolyzable phosphate” mean an amide, ester, carbamate, carbonate, ureide, or phosphate, respectively, of a compound that either: 1) does not interfere with the biological activity of the compound but can confer upon that compound advantageous properties in vivo, such as uptake, duration of action, or onset of action; or 2) is biologically inactive but is converted in vivo to the biologically active compound. Examples of biohydrolyzable esters include, but are not limited to, lower alkyl esters, lower acyloxyalkyl esters (such as acetoxylmethyl, acetoxyethyl, aminocarbonyloxymethyl, pivaloyloxymethyl, and pivaloyloxyethyl esters), lactonyl esters (such as phthalidyl and thiophthalidyl esters), lower alkoxyacyloxyalkyl esters (such as methoxycarbonyl-oxymethyl, ethoxycarbonyloxyethyl and isopropoxycarbonyloxyethyl esters), alkoxyalkyl esters, choline esters, and acylamino alkyl esters (such as acetamidomethyl esters). Examples of biohydrolyzable amides include, but are not limited to, lower alkyl amides, α-amino acid amides, alkoxyacyl amides, and alkylaminoalkylcarbonyl amides. Examples of biohydrolyzable carbamates include, but are not limited to, lower alkylamines, substituted ethylenediamines, amino acids, hydroxyalkylamines, heterocyclic and heteroaromatic amines, and polyether amines.

Various immunomodulatory compounds of the invention contain one or more chiral centers, and can exist as racemic mixtures of enantiomers or mixtures of diastereomers. This invention encompasses the use of stereomerically pure forms of such compounds, as well as the use of mixtures of those forms. For example, mixtures comprising equal or unequal amounts of the enantiomers of a particular immunomodulatory compounds of the invention may be used in methods and compositions of the invention. These isomers may be asymmetrically synthesized or resolved using standard techniques such as chiral columns or chiral resolving agents. See, e.g., Jacques, J., et al., Enantiomers, Racemates and Resolutions(Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1981); Wilen, S. H., et al., Tetrahedron 33:2725 (1977); Eliel, E. L., Stereochemistry of Carbon Compounds (McGraw-Hill, N.Y., 1962); and Wilen, S. H., Tables of Resolving Agents and Optical Resolutions p. 268 (E. L. Eliel, Ed., Univ. of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, Ind., 1972).

As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “stereomerically pure” means a composition that comprises one stereoisomer of a compound and is substantially free of other stereoisomers of that compound. For example, a stereomerically pure composition of a compound having one chiral center will be substantially free of the opposite enantiomer of the compound. A stereomerically pure composition of a compound having two chiral centers will be substantially free of other diastereomers of the compound. A typical stereomerically pure compound comprises greater than about 80% by weight of one stereoisomer of the compound and less than about 20% by weight of other stereoisomers of the compound, more preferably greater than about 90% by weight of one stereoisomer of the compound and less than about 10% by weight of the other stereoisomers of the compound, even more preferably greater than about 95% by weight of one stereoisomer of the compound and less than about 5% by weight of the other stereoisomers of the compound, and most preferably greater than about 97% by weight of one stereoisomer of the compound and less than about 3% by weight of the other stereoisomers of the compound. As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “stereomerically enriched” means a composition that comprises greater than about 60% by weight of one stereoisomer of a compound, preferably greater than about 70% by weight, more preferably greater than about 80% by weight of one stereoisomer of a compound. As used herein and unless otherwise indicated, the term “enantiomerically pure” means a stereomerically pure composition of a compound having one chiral center. Similarly, the term “stereomerically enriched” means a stereomerically enriched composition of a compound having one chiral center.

It should be noted that if there is a discrepancy between a depicted structure and a name given that structure, the depicted structure is to be accorded more weight. In addition, if the stereochemistry of a structure or a portion of a structure is not indicated with, for example, bold or dashed lines, the structure or portion of the structure is to be interpreted as encompassing all stereoisomers of it.

5.2 Second Active Agents

Immunomodulatory compounds can be combined with other pharmacologically active compounds (“second active agents”) in methods and compositions of the invention. It is believed that certain combinations work synergistically in the treatment of particular types of cancer and certain diseases and conditions associated with, or characterized by, undesired angiogenesis. Immunomodulatory compounds can also work to alleviate adverse effects associated with certain second active agents, and some second active agents can be used to alleviate adverse effects associated with immunomodulatory compounds.

One or more second active ingredients or agents can be used in the methods and compositions of the invention together with an immunomodulatory compound. Second active agents can be large molecules (e.g., proteins) or small molecules (e.g., synthetic inorganic, organometallic, or organic molecules).

Examples of large molecule active agents include, but are not limited to, hematopoietic growth factors, cytokines, and monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Typical large molecule active agents are biological molecules, such as naturally occurring or artificially made proteins. Proteins that are particularly useful in this invention include proteins that stimulate the survival and/or proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells and immunologically active poietic cells in vitro or in vivo. Others stimulate the division and differentiation of committed erythroid progenitors in cells in vitro or in vivo. Particular proteins include, but are not limited to: interleukins, such as IL-2 (including recombinant IL-II (“rIL2”) and canarypox IL-2), IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18; interferons, such as interferon alfa-2a, interferon alfa-2b, interferon alfa-n1, interferon alfa-n3, interferon beta-I a, and interferon gamma-I b; GM-CF and GM-CSF; and EPO.

Particular proteins that can be used in the methods and compositions of the invention include, but are not limited to: filgrastim, which is sold in the United States under the trade name Neupogen® (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, Calif.); sargramostim, which is sold in the United States under the trade name Leukine® (Immunex, Seattle, Wash.); and recombinant EPO, which is sold in the United States under the trade name Epogen® (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, Calif.).

Recombinant and mutated forms of GM-CSF can be prepared as described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,391,485; 5,393,870; and 5,229,496; all of which are incorporated herein by reference. Recombinant and mutated forms of G-CSF can be prepared as described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,810,643; 4,999,291; 5,528,823; and 5,580,755; all of which are incorporated herein by reference.

This invention encompasses the use of native, naturally occurring, and recombinant proteins. The invention further encompasses mutants and derivatives (e.g., modified forms) of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit, in vivo, at least some of the pharmacological activity of the proteins upon which they are based. Examples of mutants include, but are not limited to, proteins that have one or more amino acid residues that differ from the corresponding residues in the naturally occurring forms of the proteins. Also encompassed by the term “mutants” are proteins that lack carbohydrate moieties normally present in their naturally occurring forms (e.g., nonglycosylated forms). Examples of derivatives include, but are not limited to, pegylated derivatives and fusion proteins, such as proteins formed by fusing IgG1 or IgG3 to the protein or active portion of the protein of interest. See, e.g., Penichet, M. L. and Morrison, S. L., J. Immunol. Methods 248:91-101 (2001).

Antibodies that can be used in combination with compounds of the invention include monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Examples of antibodies include, but are not limited to, trastuzumab (Herceptin®), rituximab (Rituxan®), bevacizumab (Avastin™), pertuzumab (Omnitarg™), tositumomab (Bexxar®), edrecolomab (Panorex®), and G250. Compounds of the invention can also be combined with, or used in combination with, anti-TNF-α antibodies.

Other posts on Revlimid, Celgene, and other such Patent Litigation on this Open Access Journal Include:

From Thalidomide to Revlimid: Celgene to Bristol Myers to possibly Pfizer; A Curation of Deals, Discovery and the State of Pharma

REVLIMID® (Lenalidomide) Approved by the European Commission for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Previously Untreated Multiple Myeloma who are Not Eligible for Transplant

FDA: Rejects NDA filing: “clinical and non-clinical pharmacology sections of the application were not sufficient to complete a review”: Celgene’s Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis Drug – Ozanimod

The top 15 best-selling cancer drugs in 2022 & Projected Sales in 2020 of World’s Top Ten Oncology Drugs

Monoclonal antibody treatment of Multiple Myeloma

At California Central District Court Juno Therapeutics, Inc. et al v. Kite Pharma, Inc. – Multi-party Patent Infringement

 

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Role of Informatics in Precision Medicine: Notes from Boston Healthcare Webinar: Can It Drive the Next Cost Efficiencies in Oncology Care?

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

Boston Healthcare sponsored a Webinar recently entitled ” Role of Informatics in Precision Medicine: Implications for Innovators”.  The webinar focused on the different informatic needs along the Oncology Care value chain from drug discovery through clinicians, C-suite executives and payers. The presentation, by Joseph Ferrara and Mark Girardi, discussed the specific informatics needs and deficiencies experienced by all players in oncology care and how innovators in this space could create value. The final part of the webinar discussed artificial intelligence and the role in cancer informatics.

 

Below is the mp4 video and audio for this webinar.  Notes on each of the slides with a few representative slides are also given below:

Please click below for the mp4 of the webinar:

 

 


  • worldwide oncology related care to increase by 40% in 2020
  • big movement to participatory care: moving decision making to the patient. Need for information
  • cost components focused on clinical action
  • use informatics before clinical stage might add value to cost chain

 

 

 

 

Key unmet needs from perspectives of different players in oncology care where informatics may help in decision making

 

 

 

  1.   Needs of Clinicians

– informatic needs for clinical enrollment

– informatic needs for obtaining drug access/newer therapies

2.  Needs of C-suite/health system executives

– informatic needs to help focus of quality of care

– informatic needs to determine health outcomes/metrics

3.  Needs of Payers

– informatic needs to determine quality metrics and managing costs

– informatics needs to form guidelines

– informatics needs to determine if biomarkers are used consistently and properly

– population level data analytics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What are the kind of value innovations that tech entrepreneurs need to create in this space? Two areas/problems need to be solved.

  • innovations in data depth and breadth
  • need to aggregate information to inform intervention

Different players in value chains have different data needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Depth: Cumulative Understanding of disease

Data Depth: Cumulative number of oncology transactions

  • technology innovators rely on LEGACY businesses (those that already have technology) and these LEGACY businesses either have data breath or data depth BUT NOT BOTH; (IS THIS WHERE THE GREATEST VALUE CAN BE INNOVATED?)
  • NEED to provide ACTIONABLE as well as PHENOTYPIC/GENOTYPIC DATA
  • data depth more important in clinical setting as it drives solutions and cost effective interventions.  For example Foundation Medicine, who supplies genotypic/phenotypic data for patient samples supplies high data depth
  • technologies are moving to data support
  • evidence will need to be tied to umbrella value propositions
  • Informatic solutions will have to prove outcome benefit

 

 

 

 

 

How will Machine Learning be involved in the healthcare value chain?

  • increased emphasis on real time datasets – CONSTANT UPDATES NEED TO OCCUR. THIS IS NOT HAPPENING BUT VALUED BY MANY PLAYERS IN THIS SPACE
  • Interoperability of DATABASES Important!  Many Players in this space don’t understand the complexities integrating these datasets

Other Articles on this topic of healthcare informatics, value based oncology, and healthcare IT on this OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL include:

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced that the federal healthcare program will cover the costs of cancer gene tests that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration

Broad Institute launches Merkin Institute for Transformative Technologies in Healthcare

HealthCare focused AI Startups from the 100 Companies Leading the Way in A.I. Globally

Paradoxical Findings in HealthCare Delivery and Outcomes: Economics in MEDICINE – Original Research by Anupam “Bapu” Jena, the Ruth L. Newhouse Associate Professor of Health Care Policy at HMS

Google & Digital Healthcare Technology

Can Blockchain Technology and Artificial Intelligence Cure What Ails Biomedical Research and Healthcare

The Future of Precision Cancer Medicine, Inaugural Symposium, MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine, December 13, 2018, 8AM-6PM, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA

Live Conference Coverage @Medcity Converge 2018 Philadelphia: Oncology Value Based Care and Patient Management

2016 BioIT World: Track 5 – April 5 – 7, 2016 Bioinformatics Computational Resources and Tools to Turn Big Data into Smart Data

The Need for an Informatics Solution in Translational Medicine

 

 

 

 

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Live Conference Coverage @Medcity Converge 2018 Philadelphia: Oncology Value Based Care and Patient Management

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

3:15 – 4:00 PM Breakout: What’s A Good Model for Value-Based Care in Oncology?

How do you implement a value-based care model in oncology? Medicare has created a bundled payment model in oncology and there are lessons to be learned from that and other programs. Listen to two presentations from experts in the field.

Moderator: Mahek Shah, M.D., Senior Researcher, Harvard Business School @Mahek_MD
Speakers:
Charles Saunders M.D., CEO, Integra Connect
Mari Vandenburgh, Director of Value-Based Reimbursement Operations, Highmark @Highmark

 

Mari: Building strategic partnerships with partners focused on population based health and evidence based outcomes. they provide data analytics and consultative services.  Incorporate risk based systems.  also looking at ancillary segments because they see cost savings.  True Performance is their flagship performance program and 11% lower ED (saving $18 million) rates and 16% lower readmissions ($200 million cost savings).  Also launched the Highmark Cancer care Program with Johns Hopkins.  They monitor the adherence pathways and if clinician shows good adherence they give reimbursements.

Charles:  Integra is a cloud based care platform focused on oncology and urology and allow clinicians to practice value based care. Providers must now focus on total cost including ER visits, end of life and therapies (which is half of total cost in US).  The actionable ways to reduce costs is by reducing ER visits.  What is working? Data on reimbursements models is very accurate so practices can dig into data and find effieciencies.  However most practices do not have the analytics to do this.

  • care navigation
  • care path based treatment choices
  • enhanced patient access and experience

What is not working

  • data not structured so someone has to do manual curation of records
  • flawed logic based on plurality of visits but physician doesn’t know who else they saw
  • target pricing not taking into account high prices of new therapies
  • lack of timely reporting either by patient or physician
  • insufficient reimbursements
  • technology limitations

 

4:10- 4:55 Breakout: What Patients Want and Need On Their Journey

Cancer patients are living with an existential threat every day. A panel of patients and experts in oncology care management will discuss what’s needed to make the journey for oncology patients a bit more bearable.

sponsored by CEO Council for Growth

Moderator: Amanda Woodworth, M.D., Director of Breast Health, Drexel University College of Medicine
Speakers:
Kezia Fitzgerald, Chief Innovation Officer & Co-Founder, CareAline® Products, LLC
Sara Hayes, Senior Director of Community Development, Health Union @SaraHayes_HU
Katrece Nolen, Cancer Survivor and Founder, Find Cancer Help @KatreceNolen
John Simpkins, Administrative DirectorService Line Director of the Cancer Center, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia @ChildrensPhila

 

Kezia: was a cancer patient as well as her child getting treated at two different places and tough part was coordinating everything including treatments and schedules, working schedules

Katrece: had problem scheduling with oncologists because misdiagnosis and her imaging records were on CD and surgeon could not use the CD

John:  the above are a common frustration among patients at a time when they don’t need the confusion. He feels cancer centers need to coordinate these services better

Sara:  trying to assist people with this type of coordination is very tough even with all the resources

Kazia:  she needed to do all the research on her own because big dichotomy being an adult and a pediatric patient where pediatrics get more information and patient centered care. She felt she felt burdening the physicians if she asked the same questions.  How can we get more interaction with primary care physicians and feel comfortable with their interaction?

John: there is this dichotomy especially on wait times for adults is usually longer.  We can also improve patient experience with counseling patients

Katrece: Just working with a patient navigator is not enough.  The patient needs to take charge of their disease.

Sara: Patient communities can help as sometimes patients learn from other patients.

Amanda:  in breast cancer , navigators are common but must take care they are not only people patients see after a while

John:  at CHOP they also have a financial navigator.  On the adult side there are on call financial navigators.  Recent change of the high deductible plans are a major problem.  Although new families are starting to become comfortable with the financial navigator

Katrece:  guiding your children through your experience is important.  It was also important for her to advocate for herself as she had three different sites of cancer care to coordinate and multiple teams to coordinate with each other

Amanda:  A common theme seems to be hard trying to find the resources you need.  Why is that?

Kazia:  Sometimes it is hard to talk about your disease because it can be emotionally draining comforting other people who you told about the disease and they are being empathetic.  Sometimes they want to keep their ‘journey’ to themselves

John:  A relative kept her disease secret because she didn’t want to burden others…. a common cancer patient concern

Sara: Moderation of a social group is necessary to keep it a safe space and prevent trollers (like in Facebook support groups).

Kazia:  most group members will get together and force those trollers out of the group

Katrece: alot of anxiety after treatment ends, patient feels like being dropped on the floor like they don’t get support after treatment.  If there were survivorship navigators might be helpful

Amanda: for breast cancer they do a Survivor Care Package but just a paper packet, patients do appreciate it but a human coordinator would be a great idea

 

 

 

 

Please follow on Twitter using the following #hashtags and @pharma_BI

#MCConverge

#cancertreatment

#healthIT

#innovation

#precisionmedicine

#healthcaremodels

#personalizedmedicine

#healthcaredata

And at the following handles:

@pharma_BI

@medcitynews

 

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LIVE Tweets via @pharma_BI and by @AVIVA1950 of 2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

@pharma_BI

 

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Have BIG idea for cancer care? @AstellasUS is looking for brilliance! Submit to http://www.C3Prize.com  #C3Prize VIA @Pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

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Innovation Break: Announcing the C³ Prize from Astellas Oncology and the World Medical Innovation Forum https://lnkd.in/eem9XRB 

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

Innovation Break: Announcing the C³ Prize from Astellas Oncology and the World Medical Innovation Forum https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/innovation-break-announcing-the-c%c2%b3-prize-from-astellas-oncology-and-the-world-medical-innovation-forum …

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE 4:50 pm – 5:55 pm 4/25/2016 Early Detection and Prevention of Cancer & Innovation… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-450-pm-555-pm-4252016-

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE 4:00 pm – 4:50 pm 4/25/2016 Winning Portfolio Strategy @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-2…https://lnkd.in/euJGZsR 

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE 4:00 pm – 4:50 pm 4/25/2016 Winning Portfolio Strategy @2016 World Medical Innovation… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-400-pm-450-pm-4252016-

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE 3:10 pm – 4:00 pm 4/25/2016 3:10 pm – 4:00 pm Curative Therapies: The Economics of Game Changing Science @2016https://lnkd.in/e6a8Hed 

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE 3:10 pm – 4:00 pm 4/25/2016 3:10 pm – 4:00 pm Curative Therapies: The Economics of… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-310-pm-400-pm-4252016-

 

@pharma_BI ‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE 1:45 pm – 3:10 pm 4/25/2016 Forum Opening, A War or Moonshot: Where Do We Stand? Creating a Disruptive Cancer P…https://lnkd.in/eWX42-5 

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE 1:45 pm – 3:10 pm 4/25/2016 Forum Opening, A War or Moonshot: Where Do We Stand?… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-145-pm-310-pm-4252016-

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE Look: The Next Wave of Cancer Breakthroughs @2016 World … @ Partners16 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-800-am-1200-pm-4252016-first-look-the-next-wave-of-cancer-breakthroughs-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm 4/25/2016, Discovery Café: Enjoy Lunch with Top Cancer Leadership from across Partners HealthCare…https://lnkd.in/evvmf85 

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm 4/25/2016, Discovery Café: Enjoy Lunch with Top Cancer Leadership from… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/1200-

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE – 8:00 am – 12:00 pm 4/25/2016 – First Look: The Next Wave of Cancer Breakthroughs @2016 World Medical Innovati…https://lnkd.in/ehvWkKE 

 

  1. @pharma_BI‏@Pharma_BI  Apr 25

LIVE – 8:00 am – 12:00 pm 4/25/2016 – First Look: The Next Wave of Cancer Breakthroughs… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-800-am-1200-pm-4252016-

@AVIVA1950

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  8m8 minutes ago

#WMIF16 @PartnersWMIF Real Time Coverage and eProceedings: 2016 WMIF CANCER, April 25-27, 201… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/28/real-time-coverage-and-eproceedings-of-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/ … @Pharma_BI@AVIVA1950

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  12m12 minutes ago

Real Time Coverage and eProceedings of 2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 201… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/28/real-time-coverage-and-eproceedings-of-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

  1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  7h7 hours ago

Have BIG idea for cancer care? @AstellasUS is looking for brilliance! Submit to http://www.C3Prize.com  #C3Prize VIA @Pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

 

  1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  8h8 hours ago

Have an innovative idea for cancer care? @AstellasUS is looking for brilliance! Submit to http://www.C3Prize.com  #C3Prize

 

  1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  8h8 hours ago

Have BIG idea for cancer care? @AstellasUS is looking for brilliance! Submit to http://www.C3Prize.com  #C3Prize VIA pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

 

  1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  8h8 hours ago

innovative idea for cancer care? @AstellasUS is looking for brilliance! Submit to http://www.C3Prize.com  #C3Prize @pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

0 retweets1 like

 

  1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  8h8 hours ago

innovative idea for cancer care? @AstellasUS is looking for brilliance! Submit to http://www.C3Prize.com  #C3Prize via @Pharma_BI @AVIVA1950

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  8h8 hours ago

Innovation Break: Announcing the C³ Prize from Astellas Oncology and the World Medical Innovation Fo… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/innovation-break-announcing-the-c%c2%b3-prize-from-astellas-oncology-and-the-world-medical-innovation-forum/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  17h17 hours ago

CMS releases MACRA rule proposal #WMIF16 @Partners2016 @AVIVA1950 @pharma_BI

 

World Forum @PartnersWMIF Thanks to @AVIVA1950 @SaudeemFoco for tweeting throughout #WMIF16! Efforts much appreciated.

 

World Forum ‏@PartnersWMIF  Apr 27

Thanks to @lisamjarvis @scchak @jaimy_lee @mo_brouillette @AVIVA1950 @SaudeemFoco for tweeting throughout #WMIF16! Efforts much appreciated.

1 retweet 5 likes

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 27

#WMIF16 Top Three among Disruptive Dozen Technologies: Cancer Therapies @2016 World Medical In… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/top-three-among-disruptive-dozen-technologies-the-future-of-cancer-therapies-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 27

Top Three among Disruptive Dozen Technologies: The Future of Cancer Therapies @2016 World Medical In… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/top-three-among-disruptive-dozen-technologies-the-future-of-cancer-therapies-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 27

#WMIF16 CRISPR: Genome Editing and Cancer 7th on the List of Disruptive Dozen Technologies @2016https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/crispr-genome-editing-and-cancer-was-ranked-7th-on-the-list-of-disruptive-dozen-technologies-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum/ … via @Pharma_BI

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    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 27

CRISPR: Genome Editing and Cancer was ranked 7th on the List of Disruptive Dozen Technologies @2016https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/crispr-genome-editing-and-cancer-was-ranked-7th-on-the-list-of-disruptive-dozen-technologies-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 27

LIVE 11:25 am – 12:25 pm 4/27/2016 Disruptive Dozen Technologies: The Future of Cancer Therapies @20https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40798  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 27

#WMIF16 @PartnersWMIF Combination Cancer Therapies: Drug Resistance and Therapeutic Inde… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40796  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 27

LIVE 8:10 am – 11:20 am 4/27/2016 Combination Cancer Therapies: Drug Resistance and Therapeutic Inde… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40796  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 27

New e-Book TITLES forthcoming, http://Amazon.com  in 2016 LPBI Group’s BioMed e-Series – Forthc… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=41309  via @pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE #WMIF16 Andy Slavitt, Acting Administrator, CMS & Giovanni… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40788  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

Study Designs: Challenges of Personalized Cancer Medicin… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40794  via @Pharma_BI @PartnersWMIF #WMIF16 @Partners2016

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 4:00 pm – 4:50 pm 4/26/2016 Study Designs to Meet the Challenges of Personalized Cancer Medicin… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40794  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

C³ Prize from Astellas Oncology and the World Medical Innovation Fo…@PartnersWMIF @Partners2016 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=41797  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 4/26/2016 Global Cancer Markets & Epigenetics and Novel Cancer Targets @2016@Partners2016 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40784  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 10:25 am – 12:00 pm 4/26/2016 Robert Bradway, CEO, Amgen & Immunotherapy I: Che @Partners2016https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40786  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm 4/26/2016 Andy Slavitt, CMS & Giovanni… @Partners2016 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40788  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 4/26/2016 Immunotherapy II: Cell…@PartnersWMIF16 #WMIF16 @Partners2016 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40790  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 1:40 pm – 3:50 pm 4/26/2016 Fireside Chat: Patients Driving Innovation & Immunotherapy II: Cell… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?p=40790  via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

@PartnersWMIF16 #WMIF16 @Paertners2016 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-1230-pm-130-pm-4262016-fireside-chats-andy-slavitt-acting-administrator-cms-giovanni-caforio-md-ceo-bristol-myers-squibb-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-2/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

CMS & BMS @PartnersWMIF16 #WMIF16 @Paertners2016 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-1230-pm-130-pm-4262016-fireside-chats-andy-slavitt-acting-administrator-cms-giovanni-caforio-md-ceo-bristol-myers-squibb-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-2/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm 4/26/2016 Fireside Chats: Andy Slavitt, Acting Administrator, CMS & Giovanni… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-1230-pm-130-pm-4262016-fireside-chats-andy-slavitt-acting-administrator-cms-giovanni-caforio-md-ceo-bristol-myers-squibb-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-2/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 4/26/2016 CEO, Amgen & Immunotherapy I: Che…@PartnersWMIF16 #WMIF16 @Paertners2016 https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-1025-am-1200-pm-4262016-fireside-chat-robert-bradway-ceo-amgen-immunotherapy-i-checkpoint-activation-and-cancer-vaccines-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

  1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 10:25 am – 12:00 pm 4/26/2016 Fireside Chat: Robert Bradway, CEO, Amgen & Immunotherapy I: Che… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-1025-am-1200-pm-4262016-fireside-chat-robert-bradway-ceo-amgen-immunotherapy-i-checkpoint-activation-and-cancer-vaccines-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27/ … via @Pharma_BI

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 4/26/2016 Epigenetics and Novel Cancer Targets @PartnersWMIF16 #WMIF16 @Paertners2016… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-815-am-955-am-4262016-global-cancer-markets-epigenetics-and-novel-cancer-targets-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/ … via @wordpressdotcom

 

    1. Aviva Lev-Ari‏@AVIVA1950  Apr 26

LIVE 8:15 am – 9:55 am 4/26/2016 Global Cancer Markets & Epigenetics and Novel Cancer Targets… https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-815-am-955-am-4262016-global-cancer-markets-epigenetics-and-novel-cancer-targets-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/ … via @wordpressdotcom

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Real Time Coverage and eProceedings of 2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Director & Founder

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence Group, Boston

Editor-in-Chief

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

e-Mail: avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu

SkypeID: HarpPlayer83 

LinkedIn Profile        Twitter Profile

 

LIVE – 8:00 am – 12:00 pm 4/25/2016 – First Look: The Next Wave of Cancer Breakthroughs @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-800-am-1200-pm-4252016-first-look-the-next-wave-of-cancer-breakthroughs-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/

 

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm 4/25/2016, Discovery Café: Enjoy Lunch with Top Cancer Leadership from across Partners HealthCare @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/1200-pm-130-pm-4252016-discovery-cafe-enjoy-lunch-with-top-cancer-leadership-from-across-partners-healthcare-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-bost/

 

LIVE 1:45 pm – 3:10 pm 4/25/2016 Forum Opening, A War or Moonshot: Where Do We Stand? Creating a Disruptive Cancer Pipeline @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-145-pm-310-pm-4252016-forum-opening-a-war-or-moonshot-where-do-we-stand-creating-a-disruptive-cancer-pipeline-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hote/

 

LIVE 3:10 pm – 4:00 pm 4/25/2016 3:10 pm – 4:00 pm Curative Therapies: The Economics of Game Changing Science @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-310-pm-400-pm-4252016-310-pm-400-pm-curative-therapies-the-economics-of-game-changing-science-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/

 

LIVE 4:00 pm – 4:50 pm 4/25/2016 Winning Portfolio Strategy @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-400-pm-450-pm-4252016-winning-portfolio-strategy-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/

 

LIVE 4:50 pm – 5:55 pm Early Detection and Prevention of Cancer & Innovation Break: Announcing the C³ Prize from Astellas Oncology and the World Medical Innovation Forum @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/live-450-pm-555-pm-4252016-early-detection-and-prevention-of-cancer-innovation-break-announcing-the-c%C2%B3-prize-from-astellas-oncology-and-the-world-medical-innovation-forum-2016-world/

 

Innovation Break: Announcing the C³ Prize from Astellas Oncology and the World Medical Innovation Forum

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/25/innovation-break-announcing-the-c%C2%B3-prize-from-astellas-oncology-and-the-world-medical-innovation-forum/

 

LIVE 8:15 am – 9:55 am 4/26/2016  Global Cancer Markets & Epigenetics and Novel Cancer Targets @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-815-am-955-am-4262016-global-cancer-markets-epigenetics-and-novel-cancer-targets-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/

 

LIVE 10:25 am – 12:00 pm 4/26/2016  Fireside Chat: Robert Bradway, CEO, Amgen & Immunotherapy I: Checkpoint Activation and Cancer Vaccines @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-1025-am-1200-pm-4262016-fireside-chat-robert-bradway-ceo-amgen-immunotherapy-i-checkpoint-activation-and-cancer-vaccines-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27/

 

LIVE 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm 4/26/2016 Fireside Chats: Andy Slavitt, Acting Administrator, CMS & Giovanni Caforio, MD, CEO, Bristol-Myers Squibb @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-1230-pm-130-pm-4262016-fireside-chats-andy-slavitt-acting-administrator-cms-giovanni-caforio-md-ceo-bristol-myers-squibb-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-2/

 

LIVE 1:40 pm – 3:50 pm 4/26/2016 Fireside Chat: Patients Driving Innovation & Immunotherapy II: Cell Based Therapies & Financing Breakthrough Cancer Companies @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-140-pm-350-pm-4262016-fireside-chat-patients-driving-innovation-immunotherapy-ii-cell-based-therapies-financing-breakthrough-cancer-companies-2016-world-medical-innovation-fo/

 

LIVE 4:00 pm – 4:50 pm 4/26/2016 Study Designs to Meet the Challenges of Personalized Cancer Medicine & Surviving Cancer: New Realities, New Needs @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/26/live-400-pm-450-pm-4262016-study-designs-to-meet-the-challenges-of-personalized-cancer-medicine-surviving-cancer-new-realities-new-needs-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-apr/

 

LIVE 8:10 am – 11:20 am 4/27/2016 Combination Cancer Therapies: Drug Resistance and Therapeutic Index & Cancer Diagnostics: New Uses, New Reimbursements? & New Philanthropy: Patients Driving Innovation@2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/live-810-am-1120-am-4272016-combination-cancer-therapies-drug-resistance-and-therapeutic-index-cancer-diagnostics-new-uses-new-reimbursements-new-philanthropy-patients-driving-i/

 

LIVE 11:25 am – 12:25 pm 4/27/2016 Disruptive Dozen Technologies: The Future of Cancer Therapies @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum: CANCER, April 25-27, 2016, Westin Hotel, Boston

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/live-1125-am-1225-pm-4272016-disruptive-dozen-technologies-the-future-of-cancer-therapies-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum-cancer-april-25-27-2016-westin-hotel-boston/

 

CRISPR: Genome Editing and Cancer was ranked 7th on the List of Disruptive Dozen Technologies @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/crispr-genome-editing-and-cancer-was-ranked-7th-on-the-list-of-disruptive-dozen-technologies-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum/

 

Top Three among Disruptive Dozen Technologies: The Future of Cancer Therapies @2016 World Medical Innovation Forum

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/27/top-three-among-disruptive-dozen-technologies-the-future-of-cancer-therapies-2016-world-medical-innovation-forum/

 

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