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Posts Tagged ‘innovation in healthcare’


Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

 

From The Wall Street Journal (www.wsj.com)

Published January 9, 2019

Health-Care CEOs Outline Strategies at J.P. Morgan Conference

Chiefs at Johnson & Johnson, CVS discuss what’s next on a range of industry issues

One of the biggest health conferences of the year for investors, the J.P. Morgan Health-Care Conference, is taking place this week in San Francisco. Here are some of the hot topics covered at the four-day event, which wraps up Thursday.

BioMarin Mulls Payment Plans

BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. CEO Jean-Jacques Bienaimé said he would consider pursuing installment payment arrangements for the biotech’s experimental gene therapy for hemophilia. At the conference, Mr. Bienaimé told the Wall Street Journal that the one-time infusion, Valrox, is likely to cost in the millions because studies have shown it can eliminate bleeding episodes in patients, and current hemophilia treatments taken chronically can cost millions over several years. “We’re not trying to charge more than existing therapies,” he said. “We want to offer a better treatment at the same or lower cost.”

Johnson & Johnson Warns on Pricing

As politicians hammer drug prices, Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky suggested companies need to police themselves. At the conference, Mr. Gorsky told investors that drug companies should price drugs reasonably and be transparent. “If we don’t do this as an industry, I think there will be other alternatives that will be more onerous for us,” Mr. Gorsky says. Some drugmakers pulled back from price increases in mid-2018 amid heightened political scrutiny, but prices went up for many drugs at the start of 2019.

Marijuana-Derived Drugs Show Promise

 

CVS Discusses New Stores

CVS Health Corp. Chief Executive Larry Merlo began showing initial concepts the company will be testing as it begins piloting new models of its drugstores that incorporate its Aetna combination. The first new test store will open next month in Houston, he told investors, and it will include expanded health-care services including a new concierge who will help patients with questions. 

Aetna Savings On the Way

Mr. Merlo also spelled out when the company will achieve the initial $750 million in synergies it has promised from the CVS-Aetna deal. In the first quarter, he said the company will see benefits from consolidating corporate functions. Savings from procurement and aligning lists of covered drugs should be seen in the first half, he says. Medical-cost savings will start affecting results toward the end of the year, he noted. 

Lilly Cuts Price

Drugmaker Eli Lilly & Co. expects average net US pricing for its drugs–after rebates and discounts–to decline in the low- to mid-single digits on a percentage basis this year, Chief Financial Officer Josh Smiley told the Journal. Lilly’s net prices had risen during the first half of 2018, but dropped in the third quarter as the company took a “restrained approach,” Mr. Smiley said. Lilly, which hasn’t yet reported fourth-quarter results, took some list price increases for cancer drugs in late December but hasn’t raised prices in the new year, he said.

Peter Loftus at peter.loftus@wsj.com and Anna Wilde Mathews at anna.mathews@wsj.com

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Role of Informatics in Precision Medicine: Notes from Boston Healthcare Webinar: Can It Drive the Next Cost Efficiencies in Oncology Care?

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

 

Boston Healthcare sponsored a Webinar recently entitled ” Role of Informatics in Precision Medicine: Implications for Innovators”.  The webinar focused on the different informatic needs along the Oncology Care value chain from drug discovery through clinicians, C-suite executives and payers. The presentation, by Joseph Ferrara and Mark Girardi, discussed the specific informatics needs and deficiencies experienced by all players in oncology care and how innovators in this space could create value. The final part of the webinar discussed artificial intelligence and the role in cancer informatics.

 

Below is the mp4 video and audio for this webinar.  Notes on each of the slides with a few representative slides are also given below:

Please click below for the mp4 of the webinar:

 

 


  • worldwide oncology related care to increase by 40% in 2020
  • big movement to participatory care: moving decision making to the patient. Need for information
  • cost components focused on clinical action
  • use informatics before clinical stage might add value to cost chain

 

 

 

 

Key unmet needs from perspectives of different players in oncology care where informatics may help in decision making

 

 

 

  1.   Needs of Clinicians

– informatic needs for clinical enrollment

– informatic needs for obtaining drug access/newer therapies

2.  Needs of C-suite/health system executives

– informatic needs to help focus of quality of care

– informatic needs to determine health outcomes/metrics

3.  Needs of Payers

– informatic needs to determine quality metrics and managing costs

– informatics needs to form guidelines

– informatics needs to determine if biomarkers are used consistently and properly

– population level data analytics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What are the kind of value innovations that tech entrepreneurs need to create in this space? Two areas/problems need to be solved.

  • innovations in data depth and breadth
  • need to aggregate information to inform intervention

Different players in value chains have different data needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data Depth: Cumulative Understanding of disease

Data Depth: Cumulative number of oncology transactions

  • technology innovators rely on LEGACY businesses (those that already have technology) and these LEGACY businesses either have data breath or data depth BUT NOT BOTH; (IS THIS WHERE THE GREATEST VALUE CAN BE INNOVATED?)
  • NEED to provide ACTIONABLE as well as PHENOTYPIC/GENOTYPIC DATA
  • data depth more important in clinical setting as it drives solutions and cost effective interventions.  For example Foundation Medicine, who supplies genotypic/phenotypic data for patient samples supplies high data depth
  • technologies are moving to data support
  • evidence will need to be tied to umbrella value propositions
  • Informatic solutions will have to prove outcome benefit

 

 

 

 

 

How will Machine Learning be involved in the healthcare value chain?

  • increased emphasis on real time datasets – CONSTANT UPDATES NEED TO OCCUR. THIS IS NOT HAPPENING BUT VALUED BY MANY PLAYERS IN THIS SPACE
  • Interoperability of DATABASES Important!  Many Players in this space don’t understand the complexities integrating these datasets

Other Articles on this topic of healthcare informatics, value based oncology, and healthcare IT on this OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL include:

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced that the federal healthcare program will cover the costs of cancer gene tests that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration

Broad Institute launches Merkin Institute for Transformative Technologies in Healthcare

HealthCare focused AI Startups from the 100 Companies Leading the Way in A.I. Globally

Paradoxical Findings in HealthCare Delivery and Outcomes: Economics in MEDICINE – Original Research by Anupam “Bapu” Jena, the Ruth L. Newhouse Associate Professor of Health Care Policy at HMS

Google & Digital Healthcare Technology

Can Blockchain Technology and Artificial Intelligence Cure What Ails Biomedical Research and Healthcare

The Future of Precision Cancer Medicine, Inaugural Symposium, MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine, December 13, 2018, 8AM-6PM, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA

Live Conference Coverage @Medcity Converge 2018 Philadelphia: Oncology Value Based Care and Patient Management

2016 BioIT World: Track 5 – April 5 – 7, 2016 Bioinformatics Computational Resources and Tools to Turn Big Data into Smart Data

The Need for an Informatics Solution in Translational Medicine

 

 

 

 

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Innovation + Technology = Good Patient Experience

Reporter: Gail S. Thornton

 

Following are a sampling of several relevant articles comprising health innovation and technology, which may ultimately lead to a good patient experience. 

When a health journalist found out her 4-year-old son had a brain tumor, her family faced an urgent choice: proven but punishing rounds of chemotherapy, or a twice-a-day pill of a new “targeted” therapy with a scant track record.

SOURCE

https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/genomics-tumor/

###

Paying for Tumor Testing

A recent U.S. government decision about coverage of tumor sequencing could affect cancer patients.

SOURCE

https://www.cancertodaymag.org/Pages/cancer-talk/Paying-for-Tumor-Testing.aspx

###

Dr. Elaine Schattner has authored numerous articles on cancer — as a doctor and patient. She is a freelance journalist and former oncologist who lives in New York City. She is writing a book about public attitudes toward cancer.

A life-long patient with scoliosis and other chronic medical conditions, and a history of breast cancer, Elaine’s current interests include physicians’ health, cancer, and medical journalism.

SOURCE

https://www.elaineschattner.com/

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Speaking Up for Patient Preferences in Cancer Treatment Decisions.

Informed consent should include your input.

SOURCE

https://health.usnews.com/health-news/patient-advice/articles/2016-04-15/speaking-up-for-patient-preferences-in-cancer-treatment-decisions

###

Breast Cancer, Risk And Women’s Imperfect Choices

SOURCE

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2013/05/15/184188710/breast-cancer-risk-and-womens-imperfect-choices

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A cancer researchers takes cancer personally: Dr. Tony Blau, who started All4Cure, an online platform for myeloma clinicians and researchers to interact directly with patients to come up with a customer treatment plan.

SOURCE

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Julia Louis-Dreyfus Acts Out: The actress on challenging comedy’s sexism, fighting cancer, and becoming the star of her own show.

SOURCE

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/12/17/julia-louis-dreyfus-acts-out

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Thanks to Wendy Lund, CEO of GCI Health (gcihealth.com)  and her team for compiling part of this list. 

Interoperability, patient matching could be fixed by smartphone apps, RAND says: Patients need quality information. A physician at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences believes that the healthcare community must improve reports by making them more accessible to patients.

SOURCE

https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/interoperability-patient-matching-could-be-fixed-smartphone-apps-rand-says

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Sometimes Patients Simply Need Other Patients: Finding a support community is also getting easier, through resources like the Database of Patients’ Experiences, which houses videos of patients speaking about their experiences

 

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At These Hotels and Spas, Cancer is No Obstacle to Quality Care: A trend among spas and wellness resorts shows the increasing integration of safe wellness treatment options for cancer patients.

SOURCE

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A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s newest private healthcare service provider, headed by newly appointed Chief Executive Officer Timothy Low, M.D., is a private, acute tertiary institution that represents an innovation in hospital administration, incorporating the latest technology to support better decision making for better patient outcomes and shorter hospital stays along with the beauty of nature and art to enhance the patient experience. The hospital, opened in March 2016, is sited within Singapore’s first, fully integrated healthcare and hospitality complex, called Connexion, which is Asia’s first, integrated lifestyle hub for healthcare and wellness. Connexion houses the 220-bed Farrer Park Hospital with its more than 300-accredited specialists and 18 operating rooms, a 10-floor specialist Medical Center, along with a five-star hotel and spa. In 2016, Farrer Park Hospital was awarded best new hospital of the year in Asia Pacific by Global Health and Travel Awards.

Farrer Park Hospital at Connexion at night

Image SOURCE: Photograph courtesy of Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore. An integrated healthcare and hospitality complex, called Connexion, Asia’s first, integrated lifestyle hub for healthcare and wellness, which includes Farrer Park Hospital.  

The hospital is also a teaching site for undergraduate medical training, providing enhanced medical care, service quality and professional integrity and value. Supported by approximately 600 hospital staff, specialists at Farrer Park Hospital provide a range of services, such as cardiology, oncology, orthopedic surgery, gastroenterology and ophthalmology. A 24-hour emergency department provides attention for acute illnesses and the hospital has the most modern facilities for diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and clinical laboratories.

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore. Left is a deluxe suite, top right is Farrer Park Hospital lobby, bottom right is Farrer Park Hospital building.

 

Medical tourism — the process of traveling outside your country of residence to receive medical care — represents a worldwide, multi-billion-dollar business that is expected to grow considerably in the next decade. Interestingly, Singapore’s medical tourism market is projected to grow by 8.3 percent annually and reach revenue of USD $1.36 billion a year by 2018.

My first question is: Why has Singapore emerged in the past few years as an international healthcare and research hub?

Dr. Low:  With Singapore’s excellent patient services and its dedication to research and wellness, the country continues to remain as the top destination for those seeking medical care. By providing convenience and trust in our medical sector, there is no doubt that it will continue to expand and grow. Our dedication is towards the patient, cutting-edge technology and personalized care. This makes Singapore a multi-faceted medical hub and a center of excellence. Patient can receive excellent standard of medical treatment, comparable to the Europe and the USA.

Currently, we are attracting foreign patients who expect five- or six-star hotel service, because we’re a private hospital. That’s why I’m strict about appearances. We have to look as groomed, and we need to be as personable, as those in hospitality and the airlines.

Please describe the concept behind Farrer Park Hospital as Singapore’s first, fully integrated healthcare and hospitality complex.

Dr. Low: The Farrer Park Hospital was designed and built to be a hospital of the future, combining innovation in medical care and medical education. The hospital was initially created by medical specialists to respond to the growing challenges of healthcare in Singapore and, more broadly, throughout the Asia Pacific region. We have ‘reimagined’ private healthcare in order to enhance medical care, service quality, professional integrity and value.

We are leading the way in healthcare innovation as we are a premier institution for medical care and education that is based upon three important tenets for the patient — comfort, fairness and value. In fact, our top accredited medical staff, along with state-of-the-art equipment and technology, contributes to increased efficiency, reduced cost, and most, importantly improved patient outcomes.

As an innovation in hospital administration, Farrer Park Hospital embraces technology and improves medical care through its state-of-the-art equipment that facilities telemedicine consulting services across the world. To create a conducive environment for medical professionals, the hospital’s 18 operating rooms are linked via fiber-optic connections to various locations through the Connexion complex, including the hospitals’ education center and lecture hall, teaching clinics and tutorial rooms as well as the hotel’s function rooms. In addition to being equipped with the latest in useful medical technology, the hospital has state-of-the-art information technology which enables seamless and rapid flow of information between the admission services, inpatient areas, operating theaters, diagnostic and therapeutic centers, clinical laboratories and medical clinics. We also are the country’s first private hospital to become a teaching site, with the medical students from Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University.

What is the type of environment you are creating at Farrer Park Hospital?

Dr. Low: Our care philosophy extends beyond healing and the management of disease to engaging with our patients as partners in pursuit of good health and providing an oasis for healing and relaxation. Throughout our facility, patients will find that attention has been given to every aspect and detail of our facility – from the comfort of our patients, to its impact on the environment, to the speed and ease of obtaining medical attention and to the maintenance of hygiene.

As healthcare players go, we are small and that has made us very aware of our challenges. As such, we have encouraged a culture of innovation, to grasp opportunities quickly. Healthcare is a very traditional industry, resistant to change and thus tend to be laggards in technology. Farrer Park Hospital, however, embraces technology. The seamlessness of information flow was the focus at the onset of the project. This hospital was planned technologically to be relevant for the next 20 years.

Being an institution built by healthcare practitioners has its advantages. We achieve painstaking perfection in our attention to detail. The hospital has many practical features that serve the needs of practitioners and patients while the hoteliers add details for comfort, luxury and aesthetics.

Our hospital is also supported by a hospital staff, who provide a range of specialty services, such as cardiology, oncology, orthopedic surgery, gastroenterology and ophthalmology, along with a 24-hour emergency clinic, which provides immediate care for acute illnesses. The hospital also has the most modern facilities for diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and clinical laboratories. There is even a holistic service which focuses on screening, preventive medicine and lifestyle enhancement.

What is your perspective of engaging with patients?  

Dr. Low: The hospital’s care philosophy extends beyond healing and the management of disease to engaging patients in pursuit of good health. Healing does not end after a successful operation. It is not just about coming to the hospital for a procedure and then recuperating at home. It is about having the best and most comfortable services to get the patient on their feet. And having a family support structure close by, where relatives can stay close to the hospital, is essential in the rehabilitation process. That is why, as part of Connexion, the hospital is Asia’s first, integrated lifestyle hub for healthcare and wellness that is linked to a five-star hotel and spa.

Patients are treated by an experienced team of medical and health specialists in an environment meticulously designed to maximize comfort and efficiency while promoting well-being, rest and recovery.

How are you positioned technologically to be a leader in developing first-rate patient care? 

Dr. Low: We have taken the lead in many areas. Our facility is wired completely, any tests and treatments is automated whenever possible and the information is sent in real time to all stakeholders who require it. Our doctors can access this technology and make decisions as if they are in the hospital anywhere in the world.

What type of physician are you attempting to attract?

Dr. Low: The environment at Farrer Park Hospital is about clinical and service excellence, supported by physical and technological constructs that facilitates both these endeavors. We are building a culture of fairness and promoting decision making that is free from self-interest and toward better patient outcome. The doctors who join us must be aware that we take our code of comfort, fairness and value seriously.

What is the thinking behind the philosophy of incorporating nature and art into healthcare in Farrer Park Hospital?

Dr. Low: The architecture of Farrer Park Hospital and Connexion reflects the deep commitment to creating a true learning environment. Synergies between our hospital along with a closely linked hotel stimulate many innovations for improving the healthcare experience. The concept of a hospital near a hotel is not new, however, to integrate it to the level that we have is something novel. We followed a biophilic architecture approach throughout the facility, incorporating nature and art to enhance healing. Hospitals are traditionally not the best place for recuperation. We strive to have the restful ambiance of a hotel, in addition to proximity of doctors and family under the same roof, as well as using technology to enable seamless and speedy decision making; all this in support of better patient outcome and shorter stays.

You could say we are different in how we view private healthcare. A traditional hospital would not carve out 15 gardens at multiple levels throughout the facility so that patients and families can have places to feel the warmth of the sun and breathe fresh air whenever they like. The facility also hosts a private collection of over 700 commissioned Asian paintings meant to enhance the healing environment.

In land-scarce Singapore, a typical businessperson would not have fewer paid parking lots, making them one and a half times the size of a standard lot to allow a patient on crutches to comfortably extend the car door fully to disembark. A standard project manager would not insist that contractors construct a curved sink so that surgeons will not have water dripping down his elbows after scrubbing his or her hands, or a bath bench with a cut out that allows patients to sit while washing themselves. This may seem unnecessary but these innovative approaches translate to actual benefits to people who ‘value’ them.

Everyone has the same end goal, a good experience and better patient outcome. Our strategy is simple. We take our responsibilities to patients, their families and the clinicians seriously. Attend to their needs, anticipate their wants, and find the best way to address these concerns through innovation and technology. This ultimately brings value to patients.

How does nature and art come together at Farrer Park Hospital?

Dr. Low: The hospital, hotel and specialist center share and enjoy 15 gardens created at multiple levels in the building. One of the gardens, The Farm @ Farrer, grows fruits, vegetables and herbs for the hotel kitchens, and at the same time, is a large outdoor green space for recovering patients to stroll and sun. Uniquely, Farrer Park Hospital patients enjoy meals prepared by chefs in the hotel’s kitchens and confectionery.

Our inpatient food service, for example, is also automated, so whatever appears on the electronic screen on a patient’s personal tablet matches their dietary restrictions. The menu is a matrix of over 200 items customized by hotel chefs and our hospital nutritionist. Food that is fresh, delicious and safe for patient consumption is our primary focus.

Not only do we benchmark ourselves with hospitals, but also we take our inspiration from other industries. We believe to be at the top, you need to look beyond, break through and recreate process models and apply them for use in healthcare.

 

Dr. Timothy Low Photo

Image SOURCE: Photograph of Chief Executive Officer Timothy Low, M.D., courtesy of Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore.

Chief Executive Officer of Farrer Park Hospital, Timothy Low, M.D., brings a strong leadership background in managing award-winning hospitals. Prior to his current role, Dr. Low served as CEO of Gleneagles Hospital in Singapore. Through his leadership, the hospital established itself as a six-star private healthcare provider, clinching 14 local and regional awards including the prestigious Asian Hospital Management Award as well as the the ‘National Work Redesign Model Company’ by Spring Singapore, a governing agency for innovation in Singapore. Under his leadership, revenues exceed 42 percent to over USD $100 million.

Having also served in senior management positions for pharmaceutical and medical device industries in the Asia Pacific region, Dr. Low’s breath of exposure allowed him to pioneer the establishment of a global contract research organization, validating Singapore as its regional headquarters.

With more than 28 years of experience in the health care industry with such leading companies as Covidien, Covance and Schering-Plough, Dr. Low brings with him a strong background of leadership within the business and medical community. With his vast experience and contributions to the industry, Dr. Low is listed in the ranks of Stanford Who’s Who.

Dr. Low received his Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and is also a graduate of the NUS Graduate School of Business, Stanford University Executive Program and the Singapore Management University Asia Pacific Hospital Management Program.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

Tan, W. (2016). Farrer Park Hospital patients can recuperate at adjoining hotel to ease ward crunch. The Straits Times. Retrieved from  http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/farrer-park-hospital-patients-can-recuperate-at-adjoining-hotel-to-ease-ward-crunch

Tan, W. (2016). New Farrer Park Hospital aims to offer ‘affordable’ private care. The Straits Times. Retrieved from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/new-farrer-park-hospital-aims-to-offer-affordable-private-care

Anonymous (2012). Singapore Medical Tourism: Farrer Park Healthcare and Hospitality Complex Will Open in 2013. International Medical Travel Journal. Retrieved from http://www.imtj.com/news/singapore-medical-tourism-farrer-park-healthcare-and-hospitality-complex-will-open-2013/

Retrieved from http://news.asiaone.com/news/yourhealth/farrer-park-hospital-appoints-new-ceo

Retrieved from http://today.mims.com/topic/farrer-park-hospital-opened-with-a-call-for-healthcare-changes-to-adapt-for-an-ageing-population-

Retrieved from http://www.farrerpark.com/hospital/Pages/Home.aspx

Retrieved from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/new-farrer-park-hospital-aims-to-offer-affordable-private-care

Retrieved from http://www.bca.gov.sg/friendlybuilding/FindBuilding/Building.aspx?id=4534

Retrieved from http://www.ttgasia.com/article.php?article_id=23292

 

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

Third Annual BioPrinting and 3D Printing in the Life Sciences, 21-22 July 2016 at Academia, Singapore General Hospital Campus

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/18/third-annual-bioprinting-and-3d-printing-in-the-life-sciences-21-22-july-2016-at-academia-singapore-general-hospital-campus/

2015

Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Experience

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/15/patient-satisfaction-with-hospital-experience/

2013

Cardiac Surgery Theatre in China vs. in the US: Cardiac Repair Procedures, Medical Devices in Use, Technology in Hospitals, Surgeons’ Training and Cardiac Disease Severity 

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/08/cardiac-surgery-theatre-in-china-vs-in-the-us-cardiac-repair-procedures-medical-devices-in-use-technology-in-hospitals-surgeons-training-and-cardiac-disease-severity/

Risk Factor for Health Systems: High Turnover of Hospital CEOs and Visionary’s Role of Hospitals In 10 Years

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/08/risk-factor-for-health-systems-high-turnover-of-hospital-ceos-and-visionarys-role-of-hospitals-in-10-years/

Hospitals in China

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/options/scientific-delegation/shanghai-may-2013/hospitals-in-china/

 

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  • Oracle Industry Connect Presents Their 2015 Life Sciences and Healthcare Program

 

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D. and Aviva Lev-Ari, Ph.D., R.N.

oraclehealthcare

Copyright photo Oracle Inc. (TM)

 

Transforming Clinical Research and Clinical Care with Data-Driven Intelligence

March 25-26 Washington, DC

For more information click on the following LINK:

https://www.oracle.com/oracleindustryconnect/life-sciences-healthcare.html

oracle-healthcare-solutions-br-1526409

https://www.oracle.com/industries/health-sciences/index.html  

Oracle Health Sciences: Life Sciences & HealthCare — the Solutions for Big Data

Healthcare and life sciences organizations are facing unprecedented challenges to improve drug development and efficacy while driving toward more targeted and personalized drugs, devices, therapies, and care. Organizations are facing an urgent need to meet the unique demands of patients, regulators, and payers, necessitating a move toward a more patient-centric, value-driven, and personalized healthcare ecosystem.

Meeting these challenges requires redesigning clinical R&D processes, drug therapies, and care delivery through innovative software solutions, IT systems, data analysis, and bench-to-bedside knowledge. The core mission is to improve the health, well-being, and lives of people globally by:

  • Optimizing clinical research and development, speeding time to market, reducing costs, and mitigating risk
  • Accelerating efficiency by using business analytics, costing, and performance management technologies

 

  • Establishing a global infrastructure for collaborative clinical discovery and care delivery models
  • Scaling innovations with world-class, transformative technology solutions
  • Harnessing the power of big data to improve patient experience and outcomes

The Oracle Industry Connect health sciences program features 15 sessions showcasing innovation and transformation of clinical R&D, value-based healthcare, and personalized medicine.

The health sciences program is an invitation-only event for senior-level life sciences and healthcare business and IT executives.

Complete your registration and book your hotel reservation prior to February 27, 2015 in order to secure the Oracle discounted hotel rate.

Learn more about Oracle Healthcare.

General Welcome and Joint Program Agenda

Wednesday, March 25

10:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Oracle Industry Connect Opening Keynote

Mark Hurd, Chief Executive Officer, Oracle

Bob Weiler, Executive Vice President, Global Business Units, Oracle

Warren Berger, Author of “A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas.”

12:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Networking Lunch

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Oracle Industry Connect Keynote

Bob Weiler, Executive Vice President, Global Business Units, Oracle

2:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Networking Break

3:45 p.m.–5:45 p.m.

Life Sciences and Healthcare General Session

Robert Robbins, President, Chief Executive Officer, Texas Medical Center

Steve Rosenberg, Senior Vice President and General Manager Health Sciences Global Business Unit, Oracle

7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m.

Life Sciences and Healthcare Networking Reception

National Museum of American History
14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington DC 20001

Life Sciences Agenda

Thursday, March 26

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Networking Breakfast

8:00 a.m.–9:15 a.m.

Digital Trials and Research Models of the Future 

Markus Christen, Senior Vice President and Head of Global Development, Proteus

Praveen Raja, Senior Director of Medical Affairs, Proteus Digital Health

Michael Stapleton, Vice President and Chief Information Officer, R&D IT, Merck

9:15 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Driving Patient Engagement and the Internet of Things 

Howard Golub, Vice President of Clinical Research, Walgreens

Jean-Remy Behaeghel, Senior Director, Client Account Management, Product Development Solutions, Vertex Pharmaceuticals

10:30 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Leveraging Data and Advanced Analytics to Enable True Pharmacovigilance and Risk Management 

Leonard Reyno, Senior Vice President, Chief Medical Officer, Agensys

 

Accelerating Therapeutic Development Through New Technologies 

Andrew Rut, Chief Executive Officer, Co-Founder and Director, MyMeds&Me

12:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

Networking Lunch

1:45 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Oracle Industry Connect Keynote

2:30 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Break

2:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Harnessing Big Data to Increase R&D Innovation, Efficiency, and Collaboration 

Sandy Tremps, Executive Director, Global Clinical Development IT, Merck

3:15 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Break

3:30 p.m.–4:45 p.m.

Transforming Clinical Research from Planning to Postmarketing 

Kenneth Getz, Director of Sponsored Research Programs and Research Associate Professor, Tufts University

Jason Raines, Head, Global Data Operations, Alcon Laboratories

4:45 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Increasing Efficiency and Pipeline Performance Through Sponsor/CRO Data Transparency and Cloud Collaboration 

Thomas Grundstrom, Vice President, ICONIK, Cross Functional IT Strategies and Innovation, ICON

Margaret Keegan, Senior Vice President, Global Head Data Sciences and Strategy, Quintiles

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Oracle Customer Networking Event

Healthcare Agenda

Thursday, March 26

7:00 a.m.–8:15 a.m.

Networking Breakfast

8:30 a.m.–9:15 a.m.

Population Health: A Core Competency for Providers in a Post Fee-for-Service Model 

Margaret Anderson, Executive Director, FasterCures

Balaji Apparsamy, Director, Business Intellegence, Baycare

Leslie Kelly Hall, Senior Vice President, Policy, Healthwise

Peter Pronovost, Senior Vice President, Patient Safety & Quality, Johns Hopkins

Sanjay Udoshi, Healthcare Product Strategy, Oracle

9:15 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Break

9:30 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Population Health: A Core Competency for Providers in a Post Fee-for-Service Model (Continued)

10:15 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Networking Break

10:45 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Managing Cost of Care in the Era of Healthcare Reform 

Chris Bruerton, Director, Budgeting, Intermountain Healthcare

Tony Byram, Vice President Business Integration, Ascension

Kerri-Lynn Morris, Executive Director, Finance Operations and Strategic Projects, Kaiser Permanente

Kavita Patel, Managing Director, Clinical Transformation, Brookings Institute

Christine Santos, Chief of Strategic Business Analytics, Providence Health & Services

Prashanth Kini, Senior Director, Healthcare Product Strategy, Oracle

11:30 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Break

11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Managing Cost of Care in the Era of Healthcare Reform (Continued)

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Networking Lunch

1:45 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Oracle Industry Connect Keynote

2:30 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Break

2:45 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Precision Medicine 

Annerose Berndt, Vice President, Analytics and Information, UPMC

James Buntrock, Vice Chair, Information Management and Analytics, Mayo Clinic

Dan Ford, Vice Dean for Clinical Investigation, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Jan Hazelzet, Chief Medical Information Officer, Erasmus MC

Stan Huff, Chief Medical Information Officer, Intermountain Healthcare

Vineesh Khanna, Director, Biomedical Informatics, SIDRA

Brian Wells, Vice President, Health Technology, Penn Medicine

Wanmei Ou, Senior Product Strategist, Healthcare, Oracle

3:30 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Networking Break

3:45 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Precision Medicine (Continued)

4:30 p.m.–4:45 p.m.

Break

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Oracle Customer Networking Event

Additional Links to Oracle Pharma, Life Sciences and HealthCare

 
Life Sciences | Industry | Oracle <http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/overview/>

http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/overview/

 
Oracle Corporation

 
Oracle Applications for Life Sciences deliver a powerful combination of technology and preintegrated applications.

  • Clinical

<http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/clinical/overview/index.html>

  • Medical Devices

<http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/medical/overview/index.html>

  • Pharmaceuticals

<http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/pharmaceuticals/overview/index.html>

 
Life Sciences Solutions | Pharmaceuticals and … – Oracle <http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/solutions/index.html>

http://www.oracle.com  Industries  Life Sciences

 
Oracle Corporation

 
Life Sciences Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology.

 
Oracle Life Sciences Data Hub – Overview | Oracle <http://www.oracle.com/us/products/applications/health-sciences/e-clinical/data-hub/index.html>

http://www.oracle.com  …  E-Clinical Solutions

 
Oracle Corporation

 
Oracle Life Sciences Data Hub. Better Insights, More Informed Decision-Making. Provides an integrated environment for clinical data, improving regulatory …

 
Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology | Oracle Life Sciences <http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/pharmaceuticals/overview/index.html>

http://www.oracle.com/us/…/life-sciences/…/index.html

 
Oracle Corporation

 
Oracle Applications for Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology deliver a powerful combination of technology and preintegrated applications.

 
Oracle Health Sciences – Healthcare and Life Sciences … <https://www.oracle.com/industries/health-sciences/>

https://www.oracle.com/industries/health-sciences/

 
Oracle Corporation

 
Oracle Health Sciences leverages industry-shaping technologies that optimize clinical R&D, mitigate risk, advance healthcare, and improve patient outcomes.

 
Clinical | Oracle Life Sciences | Oracle <http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/clinical/overview/index.html>

http://www.oracle.com  Industries  Life Sciences  Clinical

 
Oracle Corporation

 
Oracle for Clinical Applications provides an integrated remote data collection facility for site-based entry.

 
Oracle Life Sciences | Knowledge Zone | Oracle … <http://www.oracle.com/partners/en/products/industries/life-sciences/get-started/index.html>

http://www.oracle.com/partners/…/life-sciences/…/index.ht&#8230;

 
Oracle Corporation

 
This Knowledge Zone was specifically developed for partners interested in reselling or specializing in Oracle Life Sciences solutions. To become a specialized …

 
[PDF]Brochure: Oracle Health Sciences Suite of Life Sciences … <http://www.oracle.com/us/industries/life-sciences/oracle-life-sciences-solutions-br-414127.pdf>

http://www.oracle.com/…/life-sciences/oracle-life-sciences-s&#8230;

 
Oracle Corporation

 
Oracle Health Sciences Suite of. Life Sciences Solutions. Integrated Solutions for Global Clinical Trials. Oracle Health Sciences provides the world’s broadest set …

 

 

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10:15AM 11/13/2014 – 10th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference at the Harvard Medical School, Boston

REAL TIME Coverage of this Conference by Dr. Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN – Director and Founder of LEADERS in PHARMACEUTICAL BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE, Boston http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com

10:15 a.m. Panel Discussion — IT/Big Data

IT/Big Data

The human genome is composed of 6 billion nucleotides (using the genetic alphabet of T, C, G and A). As the cost of sequencing the human genome is decreasing at a rapid rate, it might not be too far into the future that every human being will be sequenced at least once in their lifetime. The sequence data together with the clinical data are going to be used more and more frequently to make clinical decisions. If that is true, we need to have secure methods of storing, retrieving and analyzing all of these data.  Some people argue that this is a tsunami of data that we are not ready to handle. The panel will discuss the types and volumes of data that are being generated and how to deal with it.

IT/Big Data

   Moderator:

Amy Abernethy, M.D.
Chief Medical Officer, Flatiron

Role of Informatics, SW and HW in PM. Big data and Healthcare

How Lab and Clinics can be connected. Oncologist, Hematologist use labs in clinical setting, Role of IT and Technology in the environment of the Clinicians

Compare Stanford Medical Center and Harvard Medical Center and Duke Medical Center — THREE different models in Healthcare data management

Create novel solutions: Capture the voice of the patient for integration of component: Volume, Veracity, Value

Decisions need to be made in short time frame, documentation added after the fact

No system can be perfect in all aspects

Understanding clinical record for conversion into data bases – keeping quality of data collected

Key Topics

Panelists:

Stephen Eck, M.D., Ph.D.
Vice President, Global Head of Oncology Medical Sciences,
Astellas, Inc.

Small data expert, great advantage to small data. Populations data allows for longitudinal studies,

Big Mac Big Data – Big is Good — Is data been collected suitable for what is it used, is it robust, limitations, of what the data analysis mean

Data analysis in Chemical Libraries – now annotated

Diversity data in NOTED by MDs, nuances are very great, Using Medical Records for building Billing Systems

Cases when the data needed is not known or not available — use data that is available — limits the scope of what Valuable solution can be arrived at

In Clinical Trial: needs of researchers, billing clinicians — in one system

Translation of data on disease to data object

Signal to Noise Problem — Thus Big data provided validity and power

 

J. Michael Gaziano, M.D., M.P.H., F.R.C.P.
Scientific Director, Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research
and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System;
Chief Division of Aging, Brigham and Women’s Hospital;
Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

at BWH since 1987 at 75% – push forward the Genomics Agenda, VA system 25% – VA is horizontally data integrated embed research and knowledge — baseline questionnaire 200,000 phenotypes – questionnaire and Genomics data to be integrated, Data hierarchical way to be curated, Simple phenotypes, validate phenotypes, Probability to have susceptibility for actual disease, Genomics Medicine will benefit Clinicians

Data must be of visible quality, collect data via Telephone VA – on Med compliance study, on Ability to tolerate medication

–>>Annotation assisted in building a tool for Neurologist on Alzheimer’s Disease (AlzSWAN knowledge base) (see also Genotator , a Disease-Agnostic Tool for Annotation)

–>>Curation of data is very different than statistical analysis of Clinical Trial Data

–>>Integration of data at VA and at BWH are tow different models of SUCCESSFUL data integration models, accessing the data is also using a different model

–>>Data extraction from the Big data — an issue

–>>Where the answers are in the data, build algorithms that will pick up causes of disease: Alzheimer’s – very difficult to do

–>>system around all stakeholders: investment in connectivity, moving data, individual silo, HR, FIN, Clinical Research

–>>Biobank data and data quality

 

Krishna Yeshwant, M.D.
General Partner, Google Ventures;
Physician, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Computer Scientist and Medical Student. Were the technology is going?

Messy situation, interaction IT and HC, Boston and Silicon Valley are focusing on Consumers, Google Engineers interested in developing Medical and HC applications — HUGE interest. Application or Wearable – new companies in this space, from Computer Science world to Medicine – Enterprise level – EMR or Consumer level – Wearable — both areas are very active in Silicon Valley

IT stuff in the hospital HARDER that IT in any other environment, great progress in last 5 years, security of data, privacy. Sequencing data cost of big data management with highest security

Constrained data vs non-constrained data

Opportunities for Government cooperation as a Lead needed for standardization of data objects

 

Questions from the Podium:

  • Where is the Truth: do we have all the tools or we don’t for Genomic data usage
  • Question on Interoperability
  • Big Valuable data — vs Big data
  • quality, uniform, large cohort, comprehensive Cancer Centers
  • Volume of data can compensate quality of data
  • Data from Imaging – Quality and interpretation – THREE radiologist will read cancer screening

 

 

 

– See more at: http://personalizedmedicine.partners.org/Education/Personalized-Medicine-Conference/Program.aspx#sthash.qGbGZXXf.dpuf

 

@HarvardPMConf

#PMConf

@SachsAssociates

@Duke_Medicine

@AstellasUS

@GoogleVentures

@harvardmed

@BrighamWomens

@kyeshwant

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Pfizer Cambridge Collaborative Innovation Events: ‘The Role of Innovation Districts in Metropolitan Areas to Drive the Global an | Basecamp Business.

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

Monday, September 8 2014 5:30pm – 7:00pm Other Time Presented by:

Event Details:
Date/Time:
Monday, September 8, 2014, 5:30-7PM EDT
Venue: Pfizer Cambridge Seminar Room (ground floor)
Location: Pfizer Inc., 610 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 . Click here for a map to the location
(Corner of Portland and Albany street, Cambridge, MA 02139)
RSVP: To confirm your attendance please RSVP online through this website. This is an ONLINE REGISTRATION-ONLY event (there will not be registration at the door).

The Role of Innovation Districts in Metropolitan Areas to Drive the Global and Local Economy: Cambridge/Boston Case Study

Join Pfizer Cambridge at our new residence for a fascinating evening led by Vise-President and Founding Director, Bruce Katz of Brookings Institution, followed by a networking reception with key partners in our new Cambridge residence; Boston-Cambridge big pharma and biotech, members of the venture capital community, renowned researchers, advocacy groups and Pfizer Cambridge scientists and clinicians.

Boston/Cambridge is one of most prominent biomedical hubs in the world and known for its thriving economy. Recent advances in biomedical innovation and cutting-edge technologies have been a major factor in stimulating growth for the city. The close proximity of big pharma, biotech, academia and venture capital in Boston/Cambridge has particularly been crucial in fostering a culture ripe for such innovation.

Bruce Katz will shed light on the state of the local and global economy and the role innovation districts can play in accelerating therapies to patients. Katz will focus on the success Boston/Cambridge has had thus far in advancing biomedical discoveries as well as offer insights on the city’s future outlook.

The Brookings Institution is a nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, D.C. Mr. Katz is Founding Director of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, which aims to provide decision makers in the public, corporate, and civic sectors with policy ideas for improving the health and prosperity of cities and metropolitan areas.

Agenda:

5:30-6PM      Registration/Gathering (please arrive by no later than 5:45PM EDT with a
                       government issued ID to allow sufficient time for security check)

6-7PM            Welcoming remarks by Cambridge/Boston Site Head and Group Senior 
                       Vice-President WorldWide R&D, Dr. Jose-Carlos Gutierrez-Ramos

                        Keynote speaker: Bruce Katz, 
                        Founding Director Metropolitan Policy Program
                        Vice-president, The Brookings Institution

7-8PM             Open reception and Networking

8PM                 Event ends

This May, Pfizer Cambridge sites are integrating and relocating our research and development teams into our new local headquarters at 610 Main Street, Cambridge, MA 02139. The unified Cambridge presence represents the opportunity to interlace Pfizer’s R&D capability in the densest biomedical community in the world, to potentially expand our already existing collaborations and to embark on forging possible new connections. These events will further drive our collective mission and passion to deliver new medicines to patients in need. Our distinguished invited guests will include leaders in the Boston-Cambridge venture capital and biotech community, renowned researchers, advocacy groups and Pfizer Cambridge scientists and clinicians.  

Online registration:
If you are experiencing issues with online registration, please contact: Cambridge_site_head@pfizer.com  



Hashtags: #bcnet-PCCIE

Monday, September 8 2014 5:30pm – 7:00pm Other Time

Location: Pfizer Inc.
610 Main St
Cambridge, MA 02139
Contact:
 

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