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Archive for the ‘Imaging-based Cancer Patient Management’ Category

Immunoediting can be a constant defense in the cancer landscape


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

There are many considerations in the cancer immunoediting landscape of defense and regulation in the cancer hallmark biology. The cancer hallmark biology in concert with key controls of the HLA compatibility affinity mechanisms are pivotal in architecting a unique patient-centric therapeutic application. Selection of random immune products including neoantigens, antigens, antibodies and other vital immune elements creates a high level of uncertainty and risk of undesirable immune reactions. Immunoediting is a constant process. The human innate and adaptive forces can either trigger favorable or unfavorable immunoediting features. Cancer is a multi-disease entity. There are multi-factorial initiators in a certain disease process. Namely, environmental exposures, viral and / or microbiome exposure disequilibrium, direct harm to DNA, poor immune adaptability, inherent risk and an individual’s own vibration rhythm in life.

 

When a human single cell is crippled (Deranged DNA) with mixed up molecular behavior that is the initiator of the problem. A once normal cell now transitioned into full threatening molecular time bomb. In the modeling and creation of a tumor it all begins with the singular molecular crisis and crippling of a normal human cell. At this point it is either chop suey (mixed bit responses) or a productive defensive and regulation response and posture of the immune system. Mixed bits of normal DNA, cancer-laden DNA, circulating tumor DNA, circulating normal cells, circulating tumor cells, circulating immune defense cells, circulating immune inflammatory cells forming a moiety of normal and a moiety of mess. The challenge is to scavenge the mess and amplify the normal.

 

Immunoediting is a primary push-button feature that is definitely required to be hit when it comes to initiating immune defenses against cancer and an adaptation in favor of regression. As mentioned before that the tumor microenvironment is a “mixed bit” moiety, which includes elements of the immune system that can defend against circulating cancer cells and tumor growth. Personalized (Precision-Based) cancer vaccines must become the primary form of treatment in this case. Current treatment regimens in conventional therapy destroy immune defenses and regulation and create more serious complications observed in tumor progression, metastasis and survival. Commonly resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is observed. These personalized treatments will be developed in concert with cancer hallmark analytics and immunocentrics affinity and selection mapping. This mapping will demonstrate molecular pathway interface and HLA compatibility and adaptation with patientcentricity.

References:

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/immunoediting-cancer-landscape-john-catanzaro/

 

https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(16)31609-9

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309432057_Circulating_tumor_cell_clusters_What_we_know_and_what_we_expect_Review

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190561/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840207/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593672/

 

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2018.00414/full

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593672/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190561/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4388310/

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cancer-hallmark-analytics-omics-data-pathway-studio-review-catanzaro/

 

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Immunotherapy may help in glioblastoma survival


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is associated with poor survival. But, in a glimmer of hope, a recent study found that a drug designed to unleash the immune system helped some patients live longer. Glioblastoma powerfully suppresses the immune system, both at the site of the cancer and throughout the body, which has made it difficult to find effective treatments. Such tumors are complex and differ widely in their behavior and characteristics.

 

A small randomized, multi-institution clinical trial was conducted and led by researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles involved patients who had a recurrence of glioblastoma, the most common central nervous system cancer. The aim was to evaluate immune responses and survival following neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy with pembrolizumab (checkpoint inhibitor) in 35 patients with recurrent, surgically resectable glioblastoma. Patients who were randomized to receive neoadjuvant pembrolizumab, with continued adjuvant therapy following surgery, had significantly extended overall survival compared to patients that were randomized to receive adjuvant, post-surgical programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) blockade alone.

 

Neoadjuvant PD-1 blockade was associated with upregulation of T cell– and interferon-γ-related gene expression, but downregulation of cell-cycle-related gene expression within the tumor, which was not seen in patients that received adjuvant therapy alone. Focal induction of programmed death-ligand 1 in the tumor microenvironment, enhanced clonal expansion of T cells, decreased PD-1 expression on peripheral blood T cells and a decreasing monocytic population was observed more frequently in the neoadjuvant group than in patients treated only in the adjuvant setting. These findings suggest that the neoadjuvant administration of PD-1 blockade enhanced both the local and systemic antitumor immune response and may represent a more efficacious approach to the treatment of this uniformly lethal brain tumor.

 

Immunotherapy has not proved to be effective against glioblastoma. This small clinical trial explored the effect of PD-1 blockade on recurrent glioblastoma in relation to the timing of administration. A total of 35 patients undergoing resection of recurrent disease were randomized to either neoadjuvant or adjuvant pembrolizumab, and surgical specimens were compared between the two groups. Interestingly, the tumoral gene expression signature varied between the two groups, such that those who received neoadjuvant pembrolizumab displayed an INF-γ gene signature suggestive of T-cell activation as well as suppression of cell-cycle signaling, possibly consistent with growth arrest. Although the study was not powered for efficacy, the group found an increase in overall survival in patients receiving neoadjuvant pembrolizumab compared with adjuvant pembrolizumab of 13.7 months versus 7.5 months, respectively.

 

In this small pilot study, neoadjuvant PD-1 blockade followed by surgical resection was associated with intratumoral T-cell activation and inhibition of tumor growth as well as longer survival. How the drug works in glioblastoma has not been totally established. The researchers speculated that giving the drug before surgery prompted T-cells within the tumor, which had been impaired, to attack the cancer and extend lives. The drug didn’t spur such anti-cancer activity after the surgery because those T-cells were removed along with the tumor. The results are very important and very promising but would need to be validated in much larger trials.

 

References:

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2019/02/11/immunotherapy-may-help-patients-with-kind-cancer-that-killed-john-mccain/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.e1b2e6fffccc

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30742122

 

https://www.practiceupdate.com/content/neoadjuvant-anti-pd-1-immunotherapy-promotes-immune-responses-in-recurrent-gbm/79742/37/12/1

 

https://www.esmo.org/Oncology-News/Neoadjuvant-PD-1-Blockade-in-Glioblastoma

 

https://neurosciencenews.com/immunotherapy-glioblastoma-cancer-10722/

 

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Live Conference Coverage @Medcitynews Converge 2018 Philadelphia: The Davids vs. the Cancer Goliath Part 2

8:40 – 9:25 AM The Davids vs. the Cancer Goliath Part 2

Startups from diagnostics, biopharma, medtech, digital health and emerging tech will have 8 minutes to articulate their visions on how they aim to tame the beast.

Start Time End Time Company
8:40 8:48 3Derm
8:49 8:57 CNS Pharmaceuticals
8:58 9:06 Cubismi
9:07 9:15 CytoSavvy
9:16 9:24 PotentiaMetrics

Speakers:
Liz Asai, CEO & Co-Founder, 3Derm Systems, Inc. @liz_asai
John M. Climaco, CEO, CNS Pharmaceuticals @cns_pharma 

John Freyhof, CEO, CytoSavvy
Robert Palmer, President & CEO, PotentiaMetrics @robertdpalmer 
Moira Schieke M.D., Founder, Cubismi, Adjunct Assistant Prof UW Madison @cubismi_inc

 

3Derm Systems

3Derm Systems is an image analysis firm for dermatologic malignancies.  They use a tele-medicine platform to accurately triage out benign malignancies observed from the primary care physician, expediate those pathology cases if urgent to the dermatologist and rapidly consults with you over home or portable device (HIPAA compliant).  Their suite also includes a digital dermatology teaching resource including digital training for students and documentation services.

 

CNS Pharmaceuticals

developing drugs against CNS malignancies, spun out of research at MD Anderson.  They are focusing on glioblastoma and Berubicin, an anthracycline antiobiotic (TOPOII inhibitor) that can cross the blood brain barrier.  Berubicin has good activity in a number of animal models.  Phase I results were very positive and Phase II is scheduled for later in the year.  They hope that the cardiotoxicity profile is less severe than other anthracyclines.  The market opportunity will be in temazolamide resistant glioblastoma.

Cubismi

They are using machine learning and biomarker based imaging to visualize tumor heterogeneity. “Data is the new oil” (Intel CEO). We need prediction machines so they developed a “my body one file” system, a cloud based data rich file of a 3D map of human body.

CUBISMI IS ON A MISSION TO HELP DELIVER THE FUTURE PROMISE OF PRECISION MEDICINE TO CURE DISEASE AND ASSURE YOUR OPTIMAL HEALTH.  WE ARE BUILDING A PATIENT-DOCTOR HEALTH DATA EXCHANGE PLATFORM THAT WILL LEVERAGE REVOLUTIONARY MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY AND PUT THE POWER OF HEALTH DATA INTO THE HANDS OF YOU AND YOUR DOCTORS.

 

CytoSavvy

CytoSavvy is a digital pathology company.  They feel AI has a fatal flaw in that no way to tell how a decision was made. Use a Shape Based Model Segmentation algorithm which uses automated image analysis to provide objective personalized pathology data.  They are partnering with three academic centers (OSU, UM, UPMC) and pool data and automate the rule base for image analysis.

CytoSavvy’s patented diagnostic dashboards are intuitive, easy–to-use and HIPAA compliant. Our patented Shape-Based Modeling Segmentation (SBMS) algorithms combine shape and color analysis capabilities to increase reliability, save time, and improve decisions. Specifications and capabilities for our web-based delivery system follow.

link to their white paper: https://www.cytosavvy.com/resources/healthcare-ai-value-proposition.pdf

PotentialMetrics

They were developing a diagnostic software for cardiology epidemiology measuring outcomes however when a family member got a cancer diagnosis felt there was a need for outcomes based models for cancer treatment/care.  They deliver real world outcomes for persoanlized patient care to help patients make decisions on there care by using a socioeconomic modeling integrated with real time clinical data.

Featured in the Wall Street Journal, using the informed treatment decisions they have generated achieve a 20% cost savings on average.  There research was spun out of Washington University St. Louis.

They have concentrated on urban markets however the CEO had mentioned his desire to move into more rural areas of the country as there models work well for patients in the rural setting as well.

Please follow on Twitter using the following #hash tags and @pharma_BI 

#MCConverge

#cancertreatment

#healthIT

#innovation

#precisionmedicine

#healthcaremodels

#personalizedmedicine

#healthcaredata

And at the following handles:

@pharma_BI

@medcitynews

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cancerandoncologyseriesccover

Series C: e-Books on Cancer & Oncology

Series C Content Consultant: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

VOLUME ONE 

Cancer Biology and Genomics

for

Disease Diagnosis

2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K

Stephen J. Williams, PhD, Senior Editor

sjwilliamspa@comcast.net

Tilda Barliya, PhD, Editor

tildabarliya@gmail.com

Ritu Saxena, PhD, Editor

ritu.uab@gmail.com

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence 

Part I

Historical Perspective of Cancer Demographics, Etiology, and Progress in Research

Chapter 1:  The Occurrence of Cancer in World Populations

1.1   Understanding Cancer

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

1.2  Cancer Metastasis

Tilda Barliya, PhD

1.3      2013 Perspective on “War on Cancer” on December 23, 1971

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1.4   Global Burden of Cancer Treatment & Women Health: Market Access & Cost Concerns

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1.5    The Importance of Cancer Prevention Programs: New Perspectives for Fighting Cancer

Ziv Raviv, PhD

1.6      The “Cancer establishments” examined by James Watson, co-discoverer of DNA w/Crick, 4/1953,  

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

1.7      New Ecosystem of Cancer Research: Cross Institutional Team Science

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1.8       Cancer Innovations from across the Web

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

1.9         Exploring the role of vitamin C in Cancer therapy

Ritu Saxena PhD

1.10        Relation of Diet and Cancer

Sudipta Saha, PhD

1.11      Association between Non-melanoma Skin Cancer and subsequent Primary Cancers in White Population 

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1.12       Men With Prostate Cancer More Likely to Die from Other Causes

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

1.13      Battle of Steve Jobs and Ralph Steinman with Pancreatic Cancer: How we Lost

Ritu Saxena, PhD

Chapter 2.  Rapid Scientific Advances Changes Our View on How Cancer Forms

2.1     All Cancer Cells Are Not Created Equal: Some Cell Types Control Continued Tumor Growth, Others Prepare the Way for Metastasis 

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

2.2      Hold on. Mutations in Cancer do Good

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

2.3       Is the Warburg Effect the Cause or the Effect of Cancer: A 21st Century View?

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.4          Naked Mole Rats Cancer-Free

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.5           Zebrafish—Susceptible to Cancer

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.6         Demythologizing Sharks, Cancer, and Shark Fins,

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.7       Tumor Cells’ Inner Workings Predict Cancer Progression

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

2.8      In Focus: Identity of Cancer Stem Cells

Ritu Saxena, PhD

2.9      In Focus: Circulating Tumor Cells

Ritu Saxena, PhD

2.10     Rewriting the Mathematics of Tumor Growth; Teams Use Math Models to Sort Drivers from Passengers 

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

2.11     Role of Primary Cilia in Ovarian Cancer

Aashir Awan, PhD

Chapter 3:  A Genetic Basis and Genetic Complexity of Cancer Emerges

3.1       The Binding of Oligonucleotides in DNA and 3-D Lattice Structures

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

3.2      How Mobile Elements in “Junk” DNA Promote Cancer. Part 1: Transposon-mediated Tumorigenesis. 

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

3.3      DNA: One Man’s Trash is another Man’s Treasure, but there is no JUNK after all

Demet Sag, PhD

3.4 Issues of Tumor Heterogeneity

3.4.1    Issues in Personalized Medicine in Cancer: Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

3.4.2       Issues in Personalized Medicine: Discussions of Intratumor Heterogeneity from the Oncology Pharma forum on LinkedIn

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

3.5        arrayMap: Genomic Feature Mining of Cancer Entities of Copy Number Abnormalities (CNAs) Data

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

3.6        HBV and HCV-associated Liver Cancer: Important Insights from the Genome

Ritu Saxena, PhD

3.7      Salivary Gland Cancer – Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: Mutation Patterns: Exome- and Genome-Sequencing @ Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

3.8         Gastric Cancer: Whole-genome Reconstruction and Mutational Signatures

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

3.9        Missing Gene may Drive more than a quarter of Breast Cancers

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

3.10     Critical Gene in Calcium Reabsorption: Variants in the KCNJ and SLC12A1 genes – Calcium Intake and Cancer Protection

Aviva Lev-Ari,PhD, RN

Chapter 4: How Epigenetic and Metabolic Factors Affect Tumor Growth

4.1    Epigenetics

4.1.1     The Magic of the Pandora’s Box : Epigenetics and Stemness with Long non-coding RNAs (lincRNA)

Demet Sag, PhD, CRA, GCP

4.1.2     Stomach Cancer Subtypes Methylation-based identified by Singapore-Led Team

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

4.1.3     The Underappreciated EpiGenome

Demet Sag, Ph.D., CRA, GCP

4.1.4     Differentiation Therapy – Epigenetics Tackles Solid Tumors

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

4.1.5      “The SILENCE of the Lambs” Introducing The Power of Uncoded RNA

Demet Sag, Ph.D., CRA, GCP

4.1.6      DNA Methyltransferases – Implications to Epigenetic Regulation and Cancer Therapy Targeting: James Shen, PhD

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

4.2   Metabolism

4.2.1      Mitochondria and Cancer: An overview of mechanisms

Ritu Saxena, PhD

4.2.2     Bioenergetic Mechanism: The Inverse Association of Cancer and Alzheimer’s

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

4.2.3      Crucial role of Nitric Oxide in Cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

4.2.4      Nitric Oxide Mitigates Sensitivity of Melanoma Cells to Cisplatin

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

4.2.5      Increased risks of obesity and cancer, Decreased risk of type 2 diabetes: The role of Tumor-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

4.2.6      Lipid Profile, Saturated Fats, Raman Spectrosopy, Cancer Cytology

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

4.3     Other Factors Affecting Tumor Growth

4.3.1      Squeezing Ovarian Cancer Cells to Predict Metastatic Potential: Cell Stiffness as Possible Biomarker

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

4.3.2      Prostate Cancer: Androgen-driven “Pathomechanism” in Early-onset Forms of the Disease

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Chapter 5: Advances in Breast and Gastrointestinal Cancer Research Supports Hope for Cure

5.1 Breast Cancer

5.1.1      Cell Movement Provides Clues to Aggressive Breast Cancer

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

5.1.2    Identifying Aggressive Breast Cancers by Interpreting the Mathematical Patterns in the Cancer Genome

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

5.1.3  Mechanism involved in Breast Cancer Cell Growth: Function in Early Detection & Treatment

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

5.1.4       BRCA1 a tumour suppressor in breast and ovarian cancer – functions in transcription, ubiquitination and DNA repair

Sudipta Saha, PhD

5.1.5      Breast Cancer and Mitochondrial Mutations

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

5.1.6      MIT Scientists Identified Gene that Controls Aggressiveness in Breast Cancer Cells

Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN

5.1.7       “The Molecular pathology of Breast Cancer Progression”

Tilda Barliya, PhD

5.1.8       In focus: Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

5.1.9       Automated Breast Ultrasound System (‘ABUS’) for full breast scanning: The beginning of structuring a solution for an acute need!

Dror Nir, PhD

5.1.10       State of the art in oncologic imaging of breast.

Dror Nir, PhD

 

5.2 Gastrointestinal Cancer

5.2.1         Colon Cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

5.2.2      PIK3CA mutation in Colorectal Cancer may serve as a Predictive Molecular Biomarker for adjuvant Aspirin therapy

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

5.2.3     State of the art in oncologic imaging of colorectal cancers.

Dror Nir, PhD

5.2.4     Pancreatic Cancer: Genetics, Genomics and Immunotherapy

Tilda Barliya, PhD

5.2.5     Pancreatic cancer genomes: Axon guidance pathway genes – aberrations revealed

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Part II

Advent of Translational Medicine, “omics”, and Personalized Medicine Ushers in New Paradigms in Cancer Treatment and Advances in Drug Development

Chapter 6:  Treatment Strategies

6.1 Marketed and Novel Drugs

Breast Cancer                                   

6.1.1     Treatment for Metastatic HER2 Breast Cancer

Larry H Bernstein MD, FCAP

6.1.2          Aspirin a Day Tied to Lower Cancer Mortality

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

6.1.3       New Anti-Cancer Drug Developed

Prabodh Kandala, Ph.D.

6.1.4         Pfizer’s Kidney Cancer Drug Sutent Effectively caused REMISSION to Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Aviva Lev-Ari ,PhD, RN

6.1.5     “To Die or Not To Die” – Time and Order of Combination drugs for Triple Negative Breast Cancer cells: A Systems Level Analysis

Anamika Sarkar, PhD. and Ritu Saxena, PhD

Melanoma

6.1.6    “Thymosin alpha1 and melanoma”

Tilda Barliya, PhD

Leukemia

6.1.7    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Bone Marrow Transplantation

Tilda Barliya PhD

6.2 Natural agents

Prostate Cancer                 

6.2.1      Scientists use natural agents for prostate cancer bone metastasis treatment

Ritu Saxena, PhD

Breast Cancer

6.2.2        Marijuana Compound Shows Promise In Fighting Breast Cancer

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Ovarian Cancer                  

6.2.3        Dimming ovarian cancer growth

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

6.3 Potential Therapeutic Agents

Gastric Cancer                 

6.3.1       β Integrin emerges as an important player in mitochondrial dysfunction associated Gastric Cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

6.3.2      Arthritis, Cancer: New Screening Technique Yields Elusive Compounds to Block Immune-Regulating Enzyme

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Pancreatic Cancer                                   

6.3.3    Usp9x: Promising therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

Breast Cancer                 

6.3.4       Breast Cancer, drug resistance, and biopharmaceutical targets

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Prostate Cancer

6.3.5        Prostate Cancer Cells: Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Induce Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

Glioblastoma

6.3.6      Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA) as a Therapeutic tool in the Management of Glioblastoma

Raphael Nir, PhD, MSM, MSc

6.3.7   Akt inhibition for cancer treatment, where do we stand today?

Ziv Raviv, PhD

Chapter 7:  Personalized Medicine and Targeted Therapy

7.1.1        Harnessing Personalized Medicine for Cancer Management, Prospects of Prevention and Cure: Opinions of Cancer Scientific Leaders

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.1.2      Personalized medicine-based cure for cancer might not be far away

Ritu Saxena, PhD

7.1.3      Personalized medicine gearing up to tackle cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

7.1.4       Cancer Screening at Sourasky Medical Center Cancer Prevention Center in Tel-Aviv

Ziv Raviv, PhD

7.1.5       Inspiration From Dr. Maureen Cronin’s Achievements in Applying Genomic Sequencing to Cancer Diagnostics

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.1.6       Personalized Medicine: Cancer Cell Biology and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2 Personalized Medicine and Genomics

7.2.1       Cancer Genomics – Leading the Way by Cancer Genomics Program at UC Santa Cruz

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2.2       Whole exome somatic mutations analysis of malignant melanoma contributes to the development of personalized cancer therapy for this disease

Ziv Raviv, PhD

7.2.3       Genotype-based Analysis for Cancer Therapy using Large-scale Data Modeling: Nayoung Kim, PhD(c)

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2.4         Cancer Genomic Precision Therapy: Digitized Tumor’s Genome (WGSA) Compared with Genome-native Germ Line: Flash-frozen specimen and Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded Specimen Needed

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2.5         LEADERS in Genome Sequencing of Genetic Mutations for Therapeutic Drug Selection in Cancer Personalized Treatment: Part 2

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2.6       Ethical Concerns in Personalized Medicine: BRCA1/2 Testing in Minors and Communication of Breast Cancer Risk

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

7.3  Personalized Medicine and Targeted Therapy

7.3.1     The Development of siRNA-Based Therapies for Cancer

Ziv Raviv, PhD

7.3.2       mRNA interference with cancer expression

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

7.3.3       CD47: Target Therapy for Cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

7.3.4      Targeting Mitochondrial-bound Hexokinase for Cancer Therapy

Ziv Raviv, PhD

7.3.5       GSK for Personalized Medicine using Cancer Drugs needs Alacris systems biology model to determine the in silico effect of the inhibitor in its “virtual clinical trial”

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.3.6         Personalized Pancreatic Cancer Treatment Option

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.3.7        New scheme to routinely test patients for inherited cancer genes

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

7.3.8        Targeting Untargetable Proto-Oncogenes

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.3.9        The Future of Translational Medicine with Smart Diagnostics and Therapies: PharmacoGenomics 

Demet Sag, PhD

7.4 Personalized Medicine in Specific Cancers

7.4.1      Personalized medicine and Colon cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

7.4.2      Comprehensive Genomic Characterization of Squamous Cell Lung Cancers

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.4.3        Targeted Tumor-Penetrating siRNA Nanocomplexes for Credentialing the Ovarian Cancer Oncogene ID4

Sudipta Saha, PhD

7.4.4        Cancer and Bone: low magnitude vibrations help mitigate bone loss

Ritu Saxena, PhD

7.4.5         New Prostate Cancer Screening Guidelines Face a Tough Sell, Study Suggests

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Part III

Translational Medicine, Genomics, and New Technologies Converge to Improve Early Detection

Diagnosis, Detection And Biomarkers

Chapter 8:  Diagnosis Diagnosis: Prostate Cancer

8.1        Prostate Cancer Molecular Diagnostic Market – the Players are: SRI Int’l, Genomic Health w/Cleveland Clinic, Myriad Genetics w/UCSF, GenomeDx and BioTheranostics

Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN

8.2         Today’s fundamental challenge in Prostate cancer screening

Dror Nir, PhD

Diagnosis & Guidance: Prostate Cancer

8.3      Prostate Cancers Plunged After USPSTF Guidance, Will It Happen Again?

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Diagnosis, Guidance and Market Aspects: Prostate Cancer

8.4       New Prostate Cancer Screening Guidelines Face a Tough Sell, Study Suggests

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Diagnossis: Lung Cancer

8.5      Diagnosing lung cancer in exhaled breath using gold nanoparticles

Tilda Barliya PhD

Chapter 9:  Detection

Detection: Prostate Cancer

9.1     Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: American Urological Association (AUA) Guideline

Dror Nir, PhD

Detection: Breast & Ovarian Cancer

9.2       Testing for Multiple Genetic Mutations via NGS for Patients: Very Strong Family History of Breast & Ovarian Cancer, Diagnosed at Young Ages, & Negative on BRCA Test

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Detection: Aggressive Prostate Cancer

9.3     A Blood Test to Identify Aggressive Prostate Cancer: a Discovery @ SRI International, Menlo Park, CA

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Diagnostic Markers & Screening as Diagnosis Method

9.4      Combining Nanotube Technology and Genetically Engineered Antibodies to Detect Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

Detection: Ovarian Cancer

9.5      Warning signs may lead to better early detection of ovarian cancer

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

9.6       Knowing the tumor’s size and location, could we target treatment to THE ROI by applying imaging-guided intervention?

Dror Nir, PhD

Chapter 10:  Biomarkers

                                                Biomarkers: Pancreatic Cancer

10.1        Mesothelin: An early detection biomarker for cancer (By Jack Andraka)

Tilda Barliya, PhD

Biomarkers: All Types of Cancer, Genomics and Histology

10.2                  Stanniocalcin: A Cancer Biomarker

Aashir Awan, PhD

10.3         Breast Cancer: Genomic Profiling to Predict Survival: Combination of Histopathology and Gene Expression Analysis

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Biomarkers: Pancreatic Cancer

10.4         Biomarker tool development for Early Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer: Van Andel Institute and Emory University

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

10.5     Early Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer Identified

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Biomarkers: Head and Neck Cancer

10.6        Head and Neck Cancer Studies Suggest Alternative Markers More Prognostically Useful than HPV DNA Testing

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

10.7      Opens Exome Service for Rare Diseases & Advanced Cancer @Mayo Clinic’s OncoSpire

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Diagnostic Markers and Screening as Diagnosis Methods

10.8         In Search of Clarity on Prostate Cancer Screening, Post-Surgical Followup, and Prediction of Long Term Remission

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chapter 11  Imaging In Cancer

11.1  Introduction by Dror Nir, PhD

11.2  Ultrasound

11.2.1        2013 – YEAR OF THE ULTRASOUND

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.2      Imaging: seeing or imagining? (Part 1)

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.3        Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: American Urological Association (AUA) Guideline

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.4        Today’s fundamental challenge in Prostate cancer screening

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.5       State of the art in oncologic imaging of Prostate

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.6        From AUA 2013: “HistoScanning”- aided template biopsies for patients with previous negative TRUS biopsies

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.7     On the road to improve prostate biopsy

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.8       Ultrasound imaging as an instrument for measuring tissue elasticity: “Shear-wave Elastography” VS. “Strain-Imaging”

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.9       What could transform an underdog into a winner?

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.10        Ultrasound-based Screening for Ovarian Cancer

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.11        Imaging Guided Cancer-Therapy – a Discipline in Need of Guidance

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3   MRI & PET/MRI

11.3.1     Introducing smart-imaging into radiologists’ daily practice

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.2     Imaging: seeing or imagining? (Part 2)

[Part 1 is included in the ultrasound section above]

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.3    Imaging-guided biopsies: Is there a preferred strategy to choose?

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.4     New clinical results support Imaging-guidance for targeted prostate biopsy

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.5      Whole-body imaging as cancer screening tool; answering an unmet clinical need?

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.6        State of the art in oncologic imaging of Lymphoma

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.7      A corner in the medical imaging’s ECO system

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4  CT, Mammography & PET/CT 

11.4.1      Causes and imaging features of false positives and false negatives on 18F-PET/CT in oncologic imaging

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.2     Minimally invasive image-guided therapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.3        Improving Mammography-based imaging for better treatment planning

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.4       Closing the Mammography gap

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.5       State of the art in oncologic imaging of lungs

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.6       Ovarian Cancer and fluorescence-guided surgery: A report

Tilda Barliya, PhD

11.5  Optical Coherent Tomography (OCT)

11.5.1       Optical Coherent Tomography – emerging technology in cancer patient management

Dror Nir, PhD

11.5.2     New Imaging device bears a promise for better quality control of breast-cancer lumpectomies – considering the cost impact

Dror Nir, PhD

11.5.3        Virtual Biopsy – is it possible?

Dror Nir, PhD

11.5.4      New development in measuring mechanical properties of tissue

Dror Nir, PhD

Chapter 12. Nanotechnology Imparts New Advances in Cancer Treatment,  Detection, and Imaging  

12.1     DNA Nanotechnology

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.2     Nanotechnology, personalized medicine and DNA sequencing

Tilda Barliya, PhD       

12.3     Nanotech Therapy for Breast Cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.4     Prostate Cancer and Nanotecnology

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.5     Nanotechnology: Detecting and Treating metastatic cancer in the lymph node

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.6     Nanotechnology Tackles Brain Cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.7     Lung Cancer (NSCLC), drug administration and nanotechnology

Tilda Barliya, PhD

Volume Epilogue by Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FACP

Epilogue: Envisioning New Insights in Cancer Translational Biology

Larry H. Berstein, MD, FACP

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Almudena’s Story:  A Life of Hope, Rejuvenation and Strength

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

Patient had ovarian clear cell adenocarcinomas (OCCAs) and underwent a complete hysterectomy at age 52. Interview was conducted 15 months’ post-surgery. Earlier in life, patient had thyroid cancer and removal of her thyroid gland and all the lymph nodes in her neck.

 

Almudena Seeder-Alonso, originally from Madrid, Spain, and now living in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, with her Dutch husband, René, is the eternal optimist, embracing life, reinventing herself, and looking for opportunity in every moment. She is an influential blogger of international relations issues, a career professional in human resources management in both corporate and consulting businesses in Legal, Accounting and Technology, and a lawyer and political scientist with an advanced degree in international relations who is also pursuing a Ph.D. in international relations and diplomacy. And she speaks four languages fluently – Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese and English.

Her story is one of hope, rejuvenation and strength that defines her effervescent personality. One year ago, a routine gynecology exam changed her outlook and perspective on life. She would have never thought that her diagnosis would be ovarian carcinoma of the clear cell, the most aggressive form of cancer.

 

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of Almudena Seeder-Alonso. Top Left: Almudena’s parents, María and Angel, and sister, Cristina, and her husband. Top Right: Almudena during chemotherapy last summer (2015). Middle: Almudena attending a wedding in Asturias (northwest Spain – May 2016), Almudena and René in Comporta, Portugal (Summer 2014) and in New York (April 2014). Below left: Almudena in New York (April 2014). Below Right: Almudena’s sisters, María and Cristina with nephew, Jaime (May 2016). 

A Small Cyst Turns Into Diagnosis of Ovarian Cancer

In early 2015, Almudena visited her gynecologist in Amsterdam for a regular, yearly appointment.

“I was feeling fine. I had no physical complaints, except for my monthly periods which were heavy. I didn’t think much about it. During my examination, my doctor told me that she found a small cyst on my right ovary and we would just observe it to make sure it was not growing.”

Almudena went back to her gynecologist at the OLVG (Onze Lieve Vrouw Gasthuis https://www.olvg.nl/) in Amsterdam twice over the next month to monitor the cyst, only to find that the cyst was growing slightly. Her gynecologist recommended blood tests, an ultrasound, and a specimen of the cyst to be removed through a laparoscopy, a procedure requiring small incisions made below the navel using specialized tools.

“The pathology report said that the cyst was an aggressive cancer, called ovarian carcinoma of the clear cell. I remember sitting in my doctor’s office once she told me the results of the test, and I got very quiet. I could not believe that this was happening to me. While I was meeting with the doctor, I called my husband to let the doctor inform him about the situation. I was listening to this conversation but from far away. He immediately left his meeting with his client (he is one of two founding partners of SeederdeBoer, a Dutch Consulting & Technology firm), to come home. I left the doctor’s office, went home and cried in my husband’s arms.”

Almudena then called her parents, María and Angel, and her two sisters, María and Cristina who live in Madrid, to tell them the news.

“My Mother was very emotional when she heard about my diagnosis. My Father, who is a quiet man by nature, asked me, ‘How could this be happening to you again?’ I did not have an answer for him.”

Almudena’s father was referring to his daughter’s diagnosis of thyroid cancer in her late 20s.

Diagnosis of Thyroid Cancer As A Young Woman

When Almudena was 27 years old, she was diagnosed with follicular thyroid cancer, a slow-growing, highly treatable type of cancer that forms in follicular cells in the thyroid gland. After a 12-hour surgery to remove the gland through a procedure called a full thyroidectomy, she also needed radiation therapy. Many years later, she is feeling fine and continues to be on thyroid medication for the rest of her life.

“I was not aware at that young age of the scope of the diagnosis, but my life really changed. I was kind of a party animal at the end of the 1980s, and I did not have any amount of energy for that anymore. I needed several months to get back into shape as the scar from the surgery was a large one on the right side of my neck. I could not use my right arm and hand properly for months, even writing was complicated. The worst news came later when I could not get pregnant given the situation that many of my eggs were gone because of radiation. At that moment, egg freezing technology was not as advanced as it is today; it was not normal to freeze eggs for a later time. That was really painful, as I could not become a mother, even after four in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles.”

According to the National Cancer Institute’s web site, thyroid cancer is a disease in which malignant cancer cells form in the tissues of the thyroid gland. The thyroid is a gland at the base of the throat near the trachea (windpipe). It is shaped like a butterfly, with a right lobe and a left lobe. The isthmus, a thin piece of tissue, connects the two lobes. A healthy thyroid is a little larger than a quarter coin. It usually cannot be felt through the skin. The thyroid uses iodine, a mineral found in some foods and in iodized salt, to help make several hormones. Thyroid hormones control heart rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy (metabolism) as well as, it controls the amount of calcium in the blood.  http://www.cancer.gov/types/thyroid/patient/thyroid-treatment-pdq

Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis Continues

Almudena then spoke with her physicians in Madrid, as that is where she grew up, to get a second opinion about her ovarian carcinoma diagnosis. The physicians knew her history well and they told her that they did not believe that the follicular thyroid cancer was directly related to the ovarian cancer.

“My local gynecologist in Amsterdam then referred me to a specialist, Dr. J. van der Velden, a gynecologist/oncologist at the Amsterdam Medisch Centrum (AMC), http://www.cgoa.nl/page/view/name/34-wie-we-zijn, one of the top university hospitals in The Netherlands for this surgery and treatment. My husband, René, and I met with Dr. van der Velden, and he told us that my cancer was a fast-spreading condition and I needed to have it removed immediately. He answered our questions, calmed my fears and said he would do everything to help me.

“I have an open attitude towards people so it was easy to create a good connection with the doctors and medical personnel, which I consider very fundamental in such a process. I talked to them about my concerns or doubts and shared my worries about the process that I was going through. I have to say that all of them were wonderful in every aspect!”

Dr. van der Velden explained to Almudena that as clear cell is an aggressive form of ovarian cancer, it would need to be treated that way. One month later, Almudena underwent a procedure called open surgery, rather than laparoscopic surgery, requiring an incision large enough for the doctor to see the cyst and surrounding tissue.

“My incision from the surgery is a constant reminder of the struggle I went through. The cyst, which was 3cm, was a solid mass on my right ovary. It had adhered itself to the ovary and had to be broken to be removed, so some cells spilled out into my reproductive organs, namely, in my uterus and fallopian tubes. During this surgery, which was a complete hysterectomy, the doctor took additional tissue samples of my reproductive organs to be analyzed by pathology. Weeks later, he found no other metastases or extra cancer cells.”

http://www.mountsinai.org/patient-care/health-library/treatments-and-procedures/ovarian-cyst-removal-open-surgery

https://www.amc.nl/web/Het-AMC/Organisatie/Academisch-Medisch-Centrum.htm

The Process of Healing Begins

One month later, Almudena’s body was still recovering from the operation. Now, she had to start chemotherapy back at the OLVG.

“The doctor, Dr. W. Terpstra, hematologist/oncologist instructed me that I would be going through six full cycles of chemotherapy, which means full doses of carboplatin & paclitaxel every 21 days. At first, I felt reasonably good, then as each week progressed, I became more and more tired, nauseous, and just feeling terrible. I was not sleeping well and even lost the sensation of my fingers and toes as chemo attacks the nerves, too. Then, I started losing my eyelashes and hair so I shaved my long, flowing hair and wore a scarf wrapped around my head.”

Almudena would report to the hospital for her weekly chemotherapy session, starting at 9am and leaving at 6pm. The medical team would put her in a room with a full-size bed so she can relax during the infusion. Her husband, two sisters and some close friends would take turns accompanying her during this time, as she had a nurturing and caring support network.

“I could not have gone through this condition without my family and friends. It tests your relationships and shows you who your friends really are.”

The chemotherapy affected Almudena’s red blood cell count halfway through the process and she felt weak and tired.

“Anemia is normal during this time, but always being tired made me concentrate and focus on things less. I would watch a movie or read a book through the chemo session, and then I would fall asleep quickly.”

After Almudena finished the complete cycle of chemotherapy infusions, she had a follow-up appointment with her doctor, which included blood work, CT scan, and other diagnostic tests.

“My doctor said the tests results were very good. Now, I see him every three months for a routine visit. That was such a wonderful report to hear.

“During this process I learned to love myself, and pampered myself and my body. I learned to improve in terms of beauty, even in the worst circumstances. I wanted to feel beautiful and attractive for myself and for my close family. After three chemo cycles, I started even to think about how my new hair style would be in the moment that I finished chemo.”

Ovarian Carcinoma Pathophysiology Facts

According to published studies, ovarian clear cell adenocarcinomas (OCCAs) account for less than 5 percent of all ovarian malignancies, and 3.7–12.1 percent of all epithelial ovarian carcinomas. By contrast, early‐stage clear cell ovarian cancer carries a relatively good prognosis. When compared with their serous counterparts, a greater proportion of OCCA tumors present as early‐stage (I–II) tumors, are often associated with a large pelvic mass, which may account for their earlier diagnosis, and rarely occur bilaterally. Very little is known about the pathobiology of OCCA. Between 5 percent and 10 percent of ovarian cancers are associated with endometriotic lesions in which there is a predominance of clear and endometrioid cell subtypes, suggesting that both tumor types may arise in endometriosis. http://www.cancer.gov/types/ovarian/hp/ovarian-epithelial-treatment-pdq

The National Cancer Institute’s web site offers these statistics. In most families affected with the breast and ovarian cancer syndrome or site-specific ovarian cancer, genetic linkage has been found to the BRCA1 locus on chromosome 17q21. BRCA2, also responsible for some instances of inherited ovarian and breast cancer, has been mapped by genetic linkage to chromosome 13q12. The lifetime risk for developing ovarian cancer in patients harboring germline mutations in BRCA1 is substantially increased over that of the general population. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2001101/

Words Of Wisdom

“Throughout this journey, I found myself again in some way and found my strength as well. When it seemed I could not stand it anymore, either physically and mentally, I realized that I could.

“At the beginning of my diagnosis, I asked myself, ‘Why me?’, and I then changed it to, ‘Why not me?’ I discovered that I have the same opportunities as anyone who becomes ill. The important perspective to have is not whining and dwelling on my bad luck. The important thing is to heal, survive, and recover my life, which is very good!

“I learned the real value and importance of things: to differentiate and give real meaning and value to the care and support of my husband, René, who was always there for me, and my parents and sisters, who came to Amsterdam very often during the process. I also made sure that René was well-supported and accompanied by my family.  René was feeling terrible for me, but he never showed it — and I learned this fact after I was starting to be back on track.”

Almudena’s Life Today

“At a significant moment in my life during my cancer diagnosis and after a long professional life in many corporate and consulting business in several countries, I decided to re-invent myself and start a new career, this time, in the battle of the opinions. I always liked foreign affairs and diplomacy, so why not share my thoughts and write about current international issues.”

That’s when Almudena started a blog to discuss relevant international political issues with her background specialization in International Relations, International Politics, International Law and Governance.

“I consider myself politically liberal and have been influenced by J.S. Mill and A. Tocqueville’s tradition of thought, as well as their ethical conception of the defense of freedom. This is what I try to capture in my political approach and in this blog. http://almudenas.website/index.php/about-me/

“Regarding my profession, I have already reinvented myself, leaving the corporate life with all that is included regarding life’s standards, and do what really makes me happy, which I´m doing right now. It seems after all, looking back with perspective, I did the right thing.

“I am grateful for my life and never take anything for granted. I am the happiest when I am doing things that please me or give me the utmost satisfaction. I now have balance in my personal and professional life, something that I’ve never had before. My husband, René, likes it too and I have his full support.”

She recently ‘liked’ this saying on LinkedIn, the professional network site, ‘I never lose. I either win or learn,’ which was attributed to Nelson Mandela, the deceased South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, politician and philanthropist.

Almudena’s life continues on a path of balance, richness and thankfulness for the person she is and the many blessings she continues to have along the way.

Editor’s note:

We would like to thank Gabriela Contreras, a global communications consultant and patient advocate, for the tremendous help and support she provided in locating and scheduling time to talk with Almudena Seeder-Alonso.

Almudena Seeder-Alonso provided her permission to publish this interview on August 10, 2016.

REFERENCES/SOURCES

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/31/health/harnessing-the-immune-system-to-fight-cancer.html?_r=0

http://www.sharecancersupport.org/share-new/support/stories/linda_clear_cell_ovarian_cancer/

http://www.cancer.gov/types/thyroid/patient/thyroid-treatment-pdq

http://almudenas.website/index.php/about-me/

http://www.cancer.gov/types/ovarian/hp/ovarian-epithelial-treatment-pdq

http://www.cgoa.nl/page/view/name/34-wie-we-zijn

http://www.mountsinai.org/patient-care/health-library/treatments-and-procedures/ovarian-cyst-removal-open-surgery

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2001101/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2001101/

Other related articles on the link between Ovarian Cancer and Thyroid Cancer:

https://www.whatnext.com/questions/is-there-a-link-between-ovarian-and-thyroid-cancer

Other related articles/information:

https://www.olvg.nl/

https://www.amc.nl/web/Het-AMC/Organisatie/Academisch-Medisch-Centrum.htm

 

Other related articles on Ovarian Cancer and Thyroid Cancer were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

Ovarian Cancer (N = 285)

2015

A Curated History of the Science Behind the Ovarian Cancer β-Blocker Trial

Model mimicking clinical profile of patients with ovarian cancer @ Yale School of Medicine

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/09/26/model-mimicking-clinical-profile-of-patients-with-ovarian-cancer-yale-school-of-medicine/

2014

Preclinical study identifies ‘master’ proto-oncogene that regulates stress-induced ovarian cancer metastasis | MD Anderson Cancer Center

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/08/15/preclinical-study-identifies-master-proto-oncogene-that-regulates-stress-induced-ovarian-cancer-metastasis-md-anderson-cancer-center/

Good and Bad News Reported for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/07/01/good-and-bad-news-reported-for-ovarian-cancer-therapy-2/

Efficacy of Ovariectomy in Presence of BRCA1 vs BRCA2 and the Risk for Ovarian Cancer

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/25/efficacy-of-ovariectomy-in-presence-of-brca1-vs-brca2-and-the-risk-for-ovarian-cancer/

 

And 
 
Thyroid Cancer (N = 124)
2015
Experience with Thyroid Cancer

 

2012

Thyroid Cancer: The Evolution of Treatment Options

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/08/19/thyroid-cancer-the-evolution-of-treatment-options/

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CancerBase.org – The Global HUB for Diagnoses, Genomes, Pathology Images: A Real-time Diagnosis and Therapy Mapping Service for Cancer Patients – Anonymized Medical Records accessible to anyone on Earth

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

July 27, 2016
world map illustration
Illustration by Tricia Seibold and iStock/liuzishan

During his 2016 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama called on Vice President Joe Biden – who had months earlier lost his son Beau to brain cancer – to head a “moonshot” to significantly accelerate research into the disease. The president said he wanted to harness the spirit of American innovation that took us from zero to landing a man on the moon in a decade to similarly find new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.

One of those intrigued by that call to action was Stanford’s Jan Liphardt, an associate professor of bioengineering who specializes in biophysics, the tumor microenvironment and data analysis. Stanford Engineering talked to Liphardt about how he came to be involved with the moonshot and his approach to using data and the voice of patients to better understand cancer and how it can be treated, and how sharing information can better inform the course of cancer research.

How did you get involved in the National Cancer Moonshot?

In March, after the president’s charge, the vice president challenged scientists, doctors, industry and patients to give their best ideas to the moonshot. The White House also reached out to a few outsiders, myself included. The White House instructions were unusual: “Do something big and different. There is no money and you have 87 days. Go.”

I like a challenge, and this was a chance to serve, even in the face of administrative hurdles. So I looked for advice, teammates and support. Russ Altman, a colleague at Stanford, suggested it was time to give patients a way to volunteer their own health data in order to help find cures. I collaborated with Peter Kuhn, a professor of medicine and engineering at the University of Southern California, who’s known for carefully listening to cancer patients, advocates and their supporters. In short order we had links with advocates like AnneMarie Ciccarella, Sonja Durham, Lori Marx-Rubiner, Jack Whelan and Jack Park. That’s how we got to CancerBase.org.

What’s the idea the team came up with?

We thought for about a week: What would matter to the patients that Stanford and other research institutions serve? What would scale? Well, we’re not going to run a clinical trial, go near protected health information, invent a new drug or write a research proposal. There’s no time for that. Whatever it was, it had to be useful, scalable, legal and different. That pointed to data, the web, patients and decisions.

One thing jumped out: Right now, there’s significant friction in medical data sharing. People all over the world can already effortlessly share other kinds of information – pictures, movies, ideas, stories, tweets. Increasingly, they are using the same tools to share personal medical information. It’s remarkable what cancer patients already share: diagnoses, genomes, pathology images. But that information is not yet widely used to understand where they are with their diseases.

Ideally, everyone, including scientists and doctors, would have as much information as possible at their fingertips. Many patients think when they give data for research, magically scientists all over the world can dig into this information, find patterns and help. The practical reality is that it’s nearly impossible for any one scientist to access the amounts of data they would like.

So that’s the simple idea: A global map and give patients the tools they need to share their data – if they want to. They can donate information for the greater good. In return, we make a simple promise: When you post data, we’ll anonymize them and make them available to anyone on Earth in one second. We plan to display this information like real-time traffic data. HIPAA doesn’t apply to this direct data-sharing. The patients can give us whatever information they want, and they can tell us what they want us to do with it. We’re a conduit. Their data belong to them, not to us.

How does it work?

Today we ask just five basic questions. Over time we will add more. You join, give some information, and we’ll put you on a global map. Right now, some of the things we don’t know about cancer are incredibly simple: Where is everyone on Earth with cancer? How old are they? What is their diagnosis? Did their cancers metastasize? Global, instantaneous data sharing is the story.

In a second phase, we are going to see if we can plot all the information just like Waze does for traffic. Our role is to synthesize the information and plot it in ways that ordinary people can understand. Think of it this way – patients want to be able to chart their treatment path. Who went straight, who went left? People just getting on the highway are curious about what people did who came before them, and what happened to those people. Did they arrive at the destination easily and promptly? We’re a real-time diagnosis and therapy mapping service for cancer.

You say that giving patients a way to share their health data is important to help finding cures. Why?

Let me give you a specific example. At Stanford, I’m part of a team of cancer biologists and clinicians funded by the Stanford Cancer Institute to think about the next generation of screening for breast cancer in the U.S. Every year, the U.S. uses mammography to screen more than 40 million women for breast cancer. In this project, it quickly became clear that there is currently no central, easy-to-access repository of mammograms for research use.

That’s a major lost opportunity – our nation spends billions on screening, but we don’t store, share and analyze this information in a scalable and simple manner. In the traditional approach, our team would spend several hundred thousand dollars, and about three years, to assemble perhaps 1,000 mammograms. We would then use this tiny dataset to try to find something interesting, but since the dataset is so small, we would be blind to rare features of breast cancer and its predictors. It clearly makes a lot more sense to compare and explore 100 million images.

This sounds completely impossible until you realize that Instagram users upload 58 million images every day. Once you start to think about supposedly intractable research problems from a web or social networking perspective, new possibilities open. Imagine, for example, if there were a simple way for every single woman on Earth to upload and share her de-identified mammogram? Or more generally, imagine a world in which patients have the tools to globally share de-identified health data, if they want to. That’s exactly the idea behind CancerBase – let’s just give people those tools and see what happens.

How much data and how many people are needed to make this viable?

We think we are going to need several tens-of-thousands of members. There are approximately 50 million people on Earth with a cancer diagnosed in the last five years, and 200 million more people have an immediate family member with cancer. Almost 2 billion people are active on Twitter and Facebook – a quarter of the world’s population. If just a few percent of those people sign up, we could do something no one on Earth has done before.

Are there hopes to create a “developer community,” people who find ways to use your data that you didn’t even think about or have the time to work on?

Definitely. As much as we think we can predict what these data are useful for, we don’t really know. By making the anonymized data available to everyone within one second, they might start to do things that we never dreamed of. The more eyes look at these data, the better off everyone will be. The dream is to have cancer-relevant medical data flow unimpeded around the world in seconds, so that everyone, wherever they are, can see and use this information.

SOURCE

https://engineering.stanford.edu/news/how-data-can-help-us-understand-cancer-and-its-treatment

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3D Imaging of Cancer Cells

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

3D Imaging of Cancer Cells Could Lead to Improved Ability of Pathologists and Radiologists to Plan Cancer Treatments and Monitor Cell Interactions

Dark Daily Apr 8th 2016        Jon Stone

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/3d-imaging-cancer-cells-could-lead-improved-ability-plan-joseph-colao

 

3D Imaging of Cancer Cells Could Lead to Improved Ability of Pathologists and Radiologists to Plan Cancer Treatments and Monitor Cell Interactions.

New technology from researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center enables the ability to study cancer cells in their native microenvironments.

Imaging research is one step closer to giving clinicians a way to do high-resolution scans of malignant cells in order to diagnose cancer and help identify useful therapies. If this technology were to prove successful in clinical studies, it might change how anatomic pathologists and radiologists diagnose and treat cancer.

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed a way to create near-isotropic, high-resolution scans of cells within their microenvironments. The process involves utilizing a combination of two-photonBessel beams and specialized filtering.

New Imaging Approach Could be Useful to Both Pathologists and Radiologists

In a recent press release, senior author Reto Fiolka, PhD, said “there is clear evidence that the environment strongly affects cellular behavior—thus, the value of cell culture experiments on glass must at least be questioned. Our microscope is one tool that may bring us a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive cancer cell behavior, since it enables high-resolution imaging in more realistic tumor.”

In a study in Developmental Cell, Erik S. Welf, PhD, et al, described the new microenvironmental selective plane illumination microscopy (meSPIM). When developing the technology, the team outlined three goals:

1. The microscope design must not prohibitively constrain microenvironmental properties.

2. Spatial and temporal resolution must match the cellular features of interest.

3. Spatial resolution must be isotropic to avoid spatial bias in quantitative measurements.

This new technology offers pathologists and medical laboratory scientists a new look at cancer cells and other diseases. The study notes that meSPIM eliminates the influence of stiff barriers, such as glass slide covers, while also allowing a level of control over both mechanical and chemical influences that was previously impossible.

Early meSPIM Research Reveals New Cell Behaviors

Early use of meSPIM in observing melanoma cells is already offering new insights into the relationship between the cell behavior of cellular- and subcellular-scale mechanisms and the microenvironment in which these cells exist. The study notes, “The ability to image fine cellular details in controllable microenvironments revealed morphodynamic features not commonly observed in the narrow range of mechanical environments usually studied in vitro.”

One such difference is the appearance of blebbing. Created by melanoma cells and lines, these small protrusions are thought to aid in cell mobility and survival. Using meSPIM, observers could follow the blebbing process in real-time. Formation of blebs on slides and within an extracellular matrix (ECM) showed significant differences in both formation and manipulation of the surrounding microenvironment.

The team is also using meSPIM to take a look at membrane-associated biosensor and cytosolic biosensor signals in 3D. They hope that investigation of proteins such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C will help to further clarify the roles these signals play in reorientation of fibroblasts.

meSPIM combined with computer vision enables imaging, visualization, and quantification of how cells alter collagen fibers over large distances within an image volume measuring 100 mm on each side. (Photo Copyright: Welf and Driscoll et al.)

The research team believes this opens new possibilities for studying diseases at a subcellular level, saying, “Cell biology is necessarily restricted to studying what we can measure. Accordingly, while the last hundred years have yielded incredible insight into cellular processes, unfortunately most of these studies have involved cells plated onto flat, stiff surfaces that are drastically different from the in vivo microenvironment …

“Here, we introduce an imaging platform that enables detailed subcellular observations without compromising microenvironmental control and thus should open a window for addressing these fundamental questions of cell biology.”

Limitations of meSPIM

One significant issue associated with the use of meSPIM is the need to process the large quantity of data into useful information. Algorithms currently allow for automatic bleb detection. However, manual marking, while time consuming, still provides increased accuracy. Researchers believe the next step in improving the quality of meSPIM scans lie in computer platforms designed to extract and process the scan data.

Until this process is automated, user bias, sample mounting, and data handling will remain risks for introducing errors into the collected data. Yet, even in its early stages, meSPIM offers new options for assessing the state of cancer cells and may eventually provide pathologists and radiologists with additional information when creating treatment plans or assessments.

 

Seeing cancer cells in 3-D (w/ Video)

http://phys.org/news/2016-02-cancer-cells-d-video.html

 

Cancer in 3-D

http://cdn.phys.org/newman/csz/news/800/2016/cancerin3d.png

Extracted surfaces of two cancer cells. (Left) A lung cancer cell colored by actin intensity near the cell surface. Actin is a structural molecule that is integral to cell movement. (Right) A melanoma cell colored by PI3-kinase activity near the cell surface. PI3K is a signaling molecule that is key to many cell processes. Credit: Welf and Driscoll et al.

Cancer cells don’t live on glass slides, yet the vast majority of images related to cancer biology come from the cells being photographed on flat, two-dimensional surfaces—images that are sometimes used to make conclusions about the behaviour of cells that normally reside in a more complex environment. But a new high-resolution microscope, presented February 22 in Developmental Cell, now makes it possible to visualize cancer cells in 3D and record how they are signaling to other parts of their environment, revealing previously unappreciated biology of how cancer cells survive and disperse within living things.

“There is clear evidence that the environment strongly affects cellular behavior—thus, the value of cell culture experiments on glass must at least be questioned,” says senior author Reto Fiolka, an optical scientist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “Our is one tool that may bring us a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive cancer cell behavior, since it enables high-resolution imaging in more realistic tumor environments.”

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-02-cancer-cells-d-video.html#jCp

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