Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Liquid Biopsy: Circulating Tumor Cells in Urine and Blood’ Category


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Gender of a person can affect the kinds of cancer-causing mutations they develop, according to a genomic analysis spanning nearly 2,000 tumours and 28 types of cancer. The results show striking differences in the cancer-causing mutations found in people who are biologically male versus those who are biologically female — not only in the number of mutations lurking in their tumours, but also in the kinds of mutations found there.

 

Liver tumours from women were more likely to carry mutations caused by a faulty system of DNA mending called mismatch repair, for instance. And men with any type of cancer were more likely to exhibit DNA changes thought to be linked to a process that the body uses to repair DNA with two broken strands. These biases could point researchers to key biological differences in how tumours develop and evolve across sexes.

 

The data add to a growing realization that sex is important in cancer, and not only because of lifestyle differences. Lung and liver cancer, for example, are more common in men than in women — even after researchers control for disparities in smoking or alcohol consumption. The source of that bias, however, has remained unclear.

In 2014, the US National Institutes of Health began encouraging researchers to consider sex differences in preclinical research by, for example, including female animals and cell lines from women in their studies. And some studies have since found sex-linked biases in the frequency of mutations in protein-coding genes in certain cancer types, including some brain cancers and advanced melanoma.

 

But the present study is the most comprehensive study of sex differences in tumour genomes so far. It looks at mutations not only in genes that code for proteins, but also in the vast expanses of DNA that have other functions, such as controlling when genes are turned on or off. The study also compares male and female genomes across many different cancers, which can allow researchers to pick up on additional patterns of DNA mutations, in part by increasing the sample sizes.

 

Researchers analysed full genome sequences gathered by the International Cancer Genome Consortium. They looked at differences in the frequency of 174 mutations known to drive cancer, and found that some of these mutations occurred more frequently in men than in women, and vice versa. When they looked more broadly at the loss or duplication of DNA segments in the genome, they found 4,285 sex-biased genes spread across 15 chromosomes.

 

There were also differences found when some mutations seemed to arise during tumour development, suggesting that some cancers follow different evolutionary paths in men and women. Researchers also looked at particular patterns of DNA changes. Such patterns can, in some cases, reflect the source of the mutation. Tobacco smoke, for example, leaves behind a particular signature in the DNA.

 

Taken together, the results highlight the importance of accounting for sex, not only in clinical trials but also in preclinical studies. This could eventually allow researchers to pin down the sources of many of the differences found in this study. Liver cancer is roughly three times as common in men as in women in some populations, and its incidence is increasing in some countries. A better understanding of its aetiology may turn out to be really important for prevention strategies and treatments.

 

References:

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00562-7?utm_source=Nature+Briefing

 

https://www.nature.com/news/policy-nih-to-balance-sex-in-cell-and-animal-studies-1.15195

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26296643

 

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/507939v1

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25985759

 

Read Full Post »

Immunoediting can be a constant defense in the cancer landscape


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

There are many considerations in the cancer immunoediting landscape of defense and regulation in the cancer hallmark biology. The cancer hallmark biology in concert with key controls of the HLA compatibility affinity mechanisms are pivotal in architecting a unique patient-centric therapeutic application. Selection of random immune products including neoantigens, antigens, antibodies and other vital immune elements creates a high level of uncertainty and risk of undesirable immune reactions. Immunoediting is a constant process. The human innate and adaptive forces can either trigger favorable or unfavorable immunoediting features. Cancer is a multi-disease entity. There are multi-factorial initiators in a certain disease process. Namely, environmental exposures, viral and / or microbiome exposure disequilibrium, direct harm to DNA, poor immune adaptability, inherent risk and an individual’s own vibration rhythm in life.

 

When a human single cell is crippled (Deranged DNA) with mixed up molecular behavior that is the initiator of the problem. A once normal cell now transitioned into full threatening molecular time bomb. In the modeling and creation of a tumor it all begins with the singular molecular crisis and crippling of a normal human cell. At this point it is either chop suey (mixed bit responses) or a productive defensive and regulation response and posture of the immune system. Mixed bits of normal DNA, cancer-laden DNA, circulating tumor DNA, circulating normal cells, circulating tumor cells, circulating immune defense cells, circulating immune inflammatory cells forming a moiety of normal and a moiety of mess. The challenge is to scavenge the mess and amplify the normal.

 

Immunoediting is a primary push-button feature that is definitely required to be hit when it comes to initiating immune defenses against cancer and an adaptation in favor of regression. As mentioned before that the tumor microenvironment is a “mixed bit” moiety, which includes elements of the immune system that can defend against circulating cancer cells and tumor growth. Personalized (Precision-Based) cancer vaccines must become the primary form of treatment in this case. Current treatment regimens in conventional therapy destroy immune defenses and regulation and create more serious complications observed in tumor progression, metastasis and survival. Commonly resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is observed. These personalized treatments will be developed in concert with cancer hallmark analytics and immunocentrics affinity and selection mapping. This mapping will demonstrate molecular pathway interface and HLA compatibility and adaptation with patientcentricity.

References:

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/immunoediting-cancer-landscape-john-catanzaro/

 

https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(16)31609-9

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309432057_Circulating_tumor_cell_clusters_What_we_know_and_what_we_expect_Review

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190561/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840207/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593672/

 

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2018.00414/full

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5593672/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4190561/

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4388310/

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cancer-hallmark-analytics-omics-data-pathway-studio-review-catanzaro/

 

Read Full Post »


Live Conference Coverage @Medcitynews Converge 2018 Philadelphia:Liquid Biopsy and Gene Testing vs Reimbursement Hurdles

9:25- 10:15 Liquid Biopsy and Gene Testing vs. Reimbursement Hurdles

Genetic testing, whether broad-scale or single gene-testing, is being ordered by an increasing number of oncologists, but in many cases, patients are left to pay for these expensive tests themselves. How can this dynamic be shifted? What can be learned from the success stories?

Moderator: Shoshannah Roth, Assistant Director of Health Technology Assessment and Information Services , ECRI Institute @Ecri_Institute
Speakers:
Rob Dumanois, Manager – reimbursement strategy, Thermo Fisher Scientific
Eugean Jiwanmall, Senior Research Analyst for Medical Policy & Technology Evaluation , Independence Blue Cross @IBX
Michael Nall, President and Chief Executive Officer, Biocept

 

Michael: Wide range of liquid biopsy services out there.  There are screening companies however they are young and need lots of data to develop pan diagnostic test.  Most of liquid biopsy is more for predictive analysis… especially therapeutic monitoring.  Sometimes solid biopsies are impossible , limited, or not always reliable due to metastasis or tough to biopsy tissues like lung.

Eugean:  Circulating tumor cells and ctDNA is the only FDA approved liquid biopsies.  However you choose then to evaluate the liquid biopsy, PCR NGS, FISH etc, helps determines what the reimbursement options are available.

Rob:  Adoption of reimbursement for liquid biopsy is moving faster in Europe than the US.  It is possible in US that there may be changes to the payment in one to two years though.

Michael:  China is adopting liquid biopsy rapidly.  Patients are demanding this in China.

Reimbursement

Eugean:  For IBX to make better decisions we need more clinical trials to correlate with treatment outcome.  Most of the major cancer networks, like NCCN, ASCO, CAP, just have recommendations and not approved guidelines at this point.  From his perspective with lung cancer NCCN just makes a suggestion with EGFR mutations however only the companion diagnostic is approved by FDA.

Michael:  Fine needle biopsies are usually needed by the pathologist anyway before they go to liquid biopsy as need to know the underlying mutations in the original tumor, it just is how it is done in most cancer centers.

Eugean:  Whatever the established way of doing things, you have to outperform the clinical results of the old method for adoption of a newer method.

Reimbursement issues have driven a need for more research into clinical validity and utility of predictive and therapeutic markers with regard to liquid biopsies.  However although many academic centers try to partner with Biocept Biocept has a limit of funds and must concentrate only on a few trials.  The different payers use different evidence based methods to evaluate liquid biopsy markers.  ECRI also has a database for LB markers using an evidence based criteria.  IBX does sees consistency among payers as far as decision and policy.

NGS in liquid biopsy

Rob: There is a path to coverage, especially through the FDA.  If you have a FDA cleared NGS test, it will be covered.  These are long and difficult paths to reimbursement for NGS but it is feasible. Medicare line of IBX covers this testing, however on the commercial side they can’t cover this.  @IBX: for colon only kras or nras has clinical utility and only a handful of other cancer related genes for other cancers.  For a companion diagnostic built into that Dx do the other markers in the panel cost too much?

Please follow on Twitter using the following #hash tags and @pharma_BI

#MCConverge

#cancertreatment

#healthIT

#innovation

#precisionmedicine

#healthcaremodels

#personalizedmedicine

#healthcaredata

And at the following handles:

@pharma_BI

@medcitynews

Read Full Post »


Accelerating Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing: Navigating the Path to Reimbursement

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Session at PMWC 2018 Silicon Valley

http://www.pmwcintl.com/sessionthemes-accelerating-clinical-next-generation-sequencing-2018sv/

Read Full Post »


Reporter and Curator: Irina Robu, PhD

Monitoring cancer patients and evaluating their response to treatment can sometimes involve invasive procedures, including surgery.

The liquid biopsies have become something of a Holy Grail in cancer treatment among physicians, researchers and companies gambling big on the technology. Liquid biopsies, unlike traditional biopsies involving invasive surgery — rely on an ordinary blood draw. Developments in sequencing the human genome, permitting researchers to detect genetic mutations of cancers, have made the tests conceivable. Some 38 companies in the US alone are working on liquid biopsies by trying to analyze blood for fragments of DNA shed by dying tumor cells.

Premature research on the liquid biopsy has concentrated profoundly on patients with later-stage cancers who have suffered treatments, including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, immunotherapy or drugs that target molecules involved in the growth, progression and spread of cancer. For cancer patients undergoing treatment, liquid biopsies could spare them some of the painful, expensive and risky tissue tumor biopsies and reduce reliance on CT scans. The tests can rapidly evaluate the efficacy of surgery or other treatment, while old-style biopsies and CT scans can still remain inconclusive as a result of scar tissue near the tumor site.

As recently as a few years ago, the liquid biopsies were hardly used except in research. At the moment, thousands of the tests are being used in clinical practices in the United States and abroad, including at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston; the University of California, San Diego; the University of California, San Francisco; the Duke Cancer Institute and several other cancer centers.

With patients for whom physicians cannot get a tissue biopsy, the liquid biopsy could prove a safe and effective alternative that could help determine whether treatment is helping eradicate the cancer. A startup, Miroculus developed a cheap, open source device that can test blood for several types of cancer at once. The platform, called Miriam finds cancer by extracting RNA from blood and spreading it across plates that look at specific type of mRNA. The technology is then hooked up at a smartphone which sends the information to an online database and compares the microRNA found in the patient’s blood to known patterns indicating different type of cancers in the early stage and can reduce unnecessary cancer screenings.

Nevertheless, experts warn that more studies are essential to regulate the accuracy of the test, exactly which cancers it can detect, at what stages and whether it improves care or survival rates.

SOURCE

https://www.fastcompany.com/3037117/a-new-device-can-detect-multiple-types-of-cancer-with-a-single-blood-test

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4356857/

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Publishing Journal include the following:

Liquid Biopsy Chip detects an array of metastatic cancer cell markers in blood – R&D @Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Reporters: Tilda Barliya, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/28/liquid-biopsy-chip-detects-an-array-of-metastatic-cancer-cell-markers-in-blood-rd-worcester-polytechnic-institute-micro-and-nanotechnology-lab/

Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/06/liquid-biopsy-assay-may-predict-drug-resistance/

One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers: R&D at WPI

Curator: Marzan Khan, B.Sc

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/01/05/one-blood-sample-can-be-tested-for-a-comprehensive-array-of-cancer-cell-biomarkers-rd-wpi

 

 

Read Full Post »


Evaluating the Genetic Profiles of Tumor Cells circulating in the Bloodstream could transform Cancer Care: A Blood Test for managing Lung Cancer @Stanford University Medical School

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

A Legacy of Innovation @Stanford University Medical School

  1. 1967

    First synthesis of biologically active DNA in test tube

  2. 1968

    First adult human heart transplant in the United States

    Norman Shumway successfully transplants a heart into 54-year-old steelworker Mike Kasperak, who survives for 14 days.

     

  3. 1973

    First expression of a foreign gene implanted in bacteria by recombinant DNA methods

  4. 1981

    First successful human combined heart/lung transplant in the world (fourth attempted worldwide)

  5. 1984

    Isolation of a gene coding for part of the T-cell receptor, a key to the immune system’s function

  6. 1988

    Isolation of pure hematopoietic stem cells from mice

  7. 2002

    First use of gene expression profiling to predict cancer outcomes

  8. 2007

    Application and expansion of optogenetics, a technique to control brain cell activity with light

SOURCE

Evaluating the Genetic Profiles of Tumor Cells circulating in the Bloodstream could transform Cancer Care: A Blood Test for managing Lung Cancer @Stanford University Medical School

The approach that the team developed could be used to look at mutations in three or four genes, and it requires no more than 2 milliliters of blood — about half a teaspoon. The test can be completed in about five hours, the researcher said, and costs less than $30. For comparison, a single state-of-the art biopsy of lung tissue with DNA sequencing costs about $18,000 and takes as long as three weeks to furnish results. Johnson & Johnson’s CellSearch — another blood test, already approved by the FDA — costs about $900 and takes a week to deliver results.

The researchers created a system for isolating circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients and reading a handful of genes from inside each tumor cell. Thus, they were able to obtain genetic information about the original cancer tumor that resides deep in the lungs without doing a biopsy, which can be dangerous for the patient.

“We are trying to make minimally invasive technology that allows us to continuously monitor one person’s health over time,” said radiology instructor Seung-min Park, PhD, a lead author of the new study, which was published online Dec. 12 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Park shares lead authorship of the study with former Stanford graduate students Dawson Wong, PhD, and Chin Chun Ooi.

A MagSifter chip, shown here fastened to an acrylic holder, can purify circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients.

The MagSifter is an electromagnetic sieve that can be turned on and off. When the MagSifter is on, it pulls the nanoparticle-labeled CTCs from the blood sample and allows the rest of the blood to flow through the sifter. The CTCs pulled from the blood are then deposited into a flat array of tiny wells, each large enough for only one cell. Now the tumor cells are ready for genetic analysis. Each flat of 25,600 wells looks like a miniature muffin tin, with room for a lot of tiny muffins.

SOURCE

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/12/blood-test-could-provide-cheaper-way-to-evaluate-lung-tumors.html

Read Full Post »


Trovagene’s ctDNA Liquid Biopsy urine and blood tests to be used in Monitoring and Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer

Reporters: David Orchard-Webb, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

UPDATED on 7/29/2016

Trovagene’s Dual-Sample Liquid Biopsy Performs Well in First Peer-Reviewed Study

https://www.genomeweb.com/trovagenes-dual-sample-liquid-biopsy-performs-well-first-peer-reviewed-study?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20News:%20NIH%20Seeks%20New%20Centers%20for%20Precision%20Medicine%20Initiative%20Participant%20Enrollment,%20Management%20-%2007/29/2016%2004:15:00%20PM

Detection and quantitation of ctDNA KRAS mutations from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer

Inna Chen 1 , Victoria M. Raymond 2 , Jennifer Geis 2 , Sandeep Pingle 2 , Fernando F. Blanco 2 Eric A. Collisson 3 , Vlada Melnikova 2 , Margaret Tempero 3 , Mark G. Erlander 2 , and Julia S. Johansen 1 1Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Trovagene, Inc, San Diego, California, USA; 3Department of Oncology, University of California San Francisco, California, USA

Conclusions

• This is the largest, prospective dataset exploring ctDNA KRAS in unresectable pancreatic cancer.

• 92.9% of 210 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer were positive for ctDNA KRAS.

• This detection rate closely matches the published prevalence of KRAS in pancreatic cancer (90%), and out performs previous studies, demonstrating the superior assay sensitivity.

• ctDNA analysis offers a viable tissue biopsy alternative for determining KRAS mutation status, especially in late stage patients.

• ctDNA KRAS analysis identified 52% more patients as positive than CA19-9, demonstrating KRAS as an improved diagnostic tool.

• Individuals with metastatic disease had a 8.2 fold difference in median ctDNA KRAS mutation load at baseline versus a 3.9 fold difference in baseline CA19-9. KRAS may represent an improved biomarker for metastatic disease over CA19-9.

• In two representative patients, dynamic changes in KRAS mutation load were consistent with response by imaging and predicted progressive disease months in advance of progression by imaging.

• Quantitation of KRAS mutant copy load may provide a more informative biomarker for prognosis and monitoring for therapeutic response

http://www.trovagene.com/wp-content/uploads/Posters/20160512%20AACR%20PancreasPoster(1).pdf

 

Trovagene and University of Michigan Enter into Collaboration for Monitoring and Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer

Trovagene’s KRAS ctDNA liquid biopsy test will be at the forefront of research partnership with Dr. Diane Simeone at University of Michigan Health System

SAN DIEGO, July 6, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Trovagene, Inc. (NASDAQ: TROV), a developer of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) molecular diagnostics, today announced the initiation of a multi-phased collaborative research program with the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center utilizing the Trovera™ KRAS ctDNA liquid biopsy test.

 

About Pancreatic Cancer and KRAS Mutations

The relative 1-year survival rate for patients with pancreatic cancer is only 28%, and the overall 5-year survival rate is 8%; stage IV pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of about 1%. At present, surgery offers the only therapeutic means of cure, but less than 20% of patients present with tumors amenable to resection.

The significant mortality rate of pancreatic cancer is due to the high incidence of metastases at the time of diagnosis, its fulminant clinical course, and the lack of adequate systemic therapies. Patients who undergo resection for localized pancreatic carcinoma have a long-term survival of approximately 20% and a median survival of 13 to 20 months. At the other end of the clinical spectrum, a high percentage (40% to 45%) of patients present with unresectable metastatic disease, with a short survival of only 3 to 6 months.

Mutations of the KRAS gene occurs in over 90% of pancreatic carcinomas – no other human tumor comes close in mutational frequency of this particular gene.

SOURCE

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/trovagene-and-university-of-michigan-enter-into-collaboration-for-monitoring-and-early-detection-of-pancreatic-cancer-300294646.html?tc=portal_CAP

http://www.trovagene.com/

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

 

Hyaluronidase treatment of high HA pancreatic cancer increased progression-free survival

Author: David Orchard-Webb, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/03/hyaluronidase-treatment-of-high-ha-pancreatic-cancer-increased-progression-free-survival/

 

Targeting paclitaxel to the pancreas with a biodegradable drug-eluting device

Author: David Orchard-Webb, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/03/targeting-paclitaxel-to-the-pancreas-with-a-biodegradable-drug-eluting-device/

 

Recent Research On SMAD4 In Pancreatic Cancer

Curator: David Orchard-Webb, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/27/recent-research-on-smad4-in-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Pancreatic Cancer Modeling using Retrograde Viral Vector Delivery and IN-Vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Somatic Genome Editing

Curators: Larry H. Benstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/10/pancreatic-cancer-modeling-using-retrograde-viral-vector-delivery-and-in-vivo-crisprcas9-mediated-somatic-genome-editing/

 

Mutations in RAS genes

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/23/mutations-in-ras-genes/

 

TP53 tumor Drug Resistance Gene Target

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/12/27/p53-tumor-drug-resistance-mechanism-target/

 

Pancreatic Cancer Targeted Treatment?

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/18/pancreatic-cancer-targeted-treatment/

 

Aduro Biotech Phase II Pancreatic Cancer Trial CRS-207 plus cancer vaccine GVAX Fails

Reporter: Stephen J Williams, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/16/aduro-biotech-phase-ii-pancreatic-cancer-trial-crs-207-plus-cancer-vaccine-gvax-fails/

 

The “Guardian Of The Genome” p53 In Pancreatic Cancer

Curator: David Orchard-Webb, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/09/the-guardian-of-the-genome-p53-in-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Targeting Epithelial To Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) As A Therapy Strategy For Pancreatic Cancer

Curator: David Orchard-Webb, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/19/targeting-emt-as-a-therapy-strategy-for-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Pancreatic Cancer at the Crossroads of Metabolism

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/10/13/pancreatic-cancer-at-the-crosroad-of-metabolism/

 

Using CRISPR to investigate pancreatic cancer

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/07/31/using-crispr-to-investigate-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Prostate Cancer Cells: Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Induce Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

Reporter-Curator: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2012/11/30/histone-deacetylase-inhibitors-induce-epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition-in-prostate-cancer-cells/

 

@Mayo Clinic: Inhibiting the gene, protein kinase D1 (PKD1), and its protein could stop spread of this form of Pancreatic Cancer

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/02/24/inhibiting-the-gene-protein-kinase-d1-pkd1-and-its-protein-could-stop-spread-of-this-form-of-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Efficacy of FOLFIRINOX

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/06/01/locally-advanced-pancreatic-cancer-efficacy-of-folfirinox/

 

Consortium of European Research Institutions and Private Partners will develop a microfluidics-based lab-on-a-chip device to identify Pancreatic Cancer Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) in blood

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/04/10/consortium-of-european-research-institutions-and-private-partners-will-develop-a-microfluidics-based-lab-on-a-chip-device-to-identify-pancreatic-cancer-circulating-tumor-cells-ctc-in-blood/

 

What`s new in pancreatic cancer research and treatment?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/10/21/whats-new-in-pancreatic-cancer-research-and-treatment/

 

Pancreatic Cancer: Genetics, Genomics and Immunotherapy

Author: Tilda Barliya, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/04/11/update-on-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Targeting the Wnt Pathway

Writer and Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/04/10/targeting-the-wnt-pathway-7-11/

 

Gene Amplification and Activation of the Hedgehog Pathway

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/10/29/gene-amplification-and-activation-of-the-hedgehog-pathway/

 

Read Full Post »