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Archive for the ‘Cancer and Current Therapeutics’ Category


City of Hope, Duarte, California – Combining Science with Soul to Create Miracles at a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer InstituteAn Interview with the Provost and Chief Scientific Officer of City of Hope, Steven T. Rosen, M.D.

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

City of Hope (https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage), a world leader in the research and treatment of cancer, diabetes, and other serious diseases, is an independent, biomedical research institution and comprehensive cancer center committed to researching, treating and preventing cancer, with an equal commitment to curing and preventing diabetes and other life-threatening diseases. Founded in 1913, City of Hope is one of only 47 comprehensive cancer centers in the nation, as designated by the National Cancer Institute.

City of Hope possesses flexibility that larger institutions typically lack. Innovative concepts move quickly from the laboratory to patient trials — and then to market, where they benefit patients around the world.

As a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, their research and treatment protocols advance care throughout the nation. They are also part of ORIEN (Oncology Research Information Exchange Network), the world’s largest cancer research collaboration devoted to precision medicine. And they continue to receive the highest level of accreditation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer for their exceptional level of cancer care.

As an innovator, City of Hope is a pioneer in bone marrow and stem cell transplants with one of the largest and most successful of its kind in the world. Other examples of its leadership and innovation include,

  • Numerous breakthrough cancer drugs, including Herceptin, Rituxan, Erbitux, and Avastin, are based on technology pioneered by City of Hope and are saving lives worldwide.
  • To date, City of Hope surgeons have performed more than 10,000 robotic procedures for prostate, kidney, colon, liver, bladder, gynecologic, oral and other cancers.
  • They are a national leader in islet cell transplantation, which has the potential to reverse type 1 diabetes, and also provide islet cells for research at other institutions throughout the U.S.
  • Millions of people with diabetes benefit from synthetic human insulin, developed through research conducted at City of Hope.
  • Their scientists are pioneering the application of blood stem cell transplants to treat patients with HIV- and AIDS related lymphoma. Using a new form of gene therapy, their researchers achieved the first long-term persistence of anti-HIV genes in patients with AIDS-related lymphoma — a treatment that may ultimately cure lymphoma and HIV/AIDS.

 

Additionally, City of Hope has three on-campus manufacturing facilities producing biologic and chemical compounds to good manufacturing practice (GMP) standards.

City of Hope launched its Alpha Clinic, thanks to an $8 million, five-year grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). The award is part of CIRM’s Alpha Stem Cell Clinics program, which aims to create one-stop centers for clinical trials focused on stem cell treatments for currently incurable diseases. The Alpha Clinics Network is already running 35 different clinical trials involving hundreds of patients, 17 of which are being conducted at City of Hope. Current clinical trials include transplants of blood stem cells modified to treat patients with AIDS and lymphoma, neural stem cells to deliver drugs directly to cancers hiding in the brain, and T cell immunotherapy trials.

Located just northeast of Los Angeles, landscaped gardens and open spaces surround City of Hope’s leading-edge medical and research facilities at its main campus in Duarte, California. City of Hope also has 14 community practice clinics throughout Southern California.

COH robotic (1)COH Helford H (1)COH1 Dr__Rosen_Clinic-2 (2)COH8 Janice_Huss-7COH7 COH_1369COH6 GMP_0454COH4 DSC_9279

Image SOURCE: Photographs courtesy of City of Hope, Duarte, California. Interior and exterior photos of the City of Hope, including Dr. Steven T. Rosen and his team.

 

Below is my interview with the Provost and Chief Scientific Officer of City of Hope, Steven T. Rosen, M.D., which occurred in April, 2017.

 

What sets City of Hope apart from other hospitals and research centers?

Dr. Rosen: City of Hope offers a unique blend of compassionate care and research innovation that simply can’t be found anywhere else.

We’re more than a medical center, and more than a research facility. We take the most compassionate patient-focused care available, combine it with today’s leading-edge medical advances, and infuse both with a quest to deliver better outcomes.

I’m proud to say that we’re known for rapidly translating scientific research into new treatments and cures, and that our technology has led to the development of four of the most widely used cancer-fighting drugs, Herceptin (trastuzumab), Avastin (bevacizumab), Erbitux (cetuximab), and Rituxin (rituximab).

City of Hope is a family. Our special team of experts treats the whole person and the family, not just a body, or a case or a disease. In fact, some of our patients have shared their stories of success. It is gratifying for me and our many health professionals to be able to make a positive difference in their lives.

Eleven years ago, Los Angeles firefighter Gus Perez was facing a battle far greater than any he’d ever known. He was diagnosed with CML (chronic myelogenous leukemia). Gus began receiving the drug Gleevec, which put him into remission. Given the drug’s success, he almost resigned himself to staying on it, yet was drawn to another option: undergoing a bone marrow transplant at City of Hope. “I went to my favorite ocean spot,” Gus recalls. “I put on my wetsuit, like I’ve done thousands of times, and paddled out. Every wave was special because I wasn’t sure if I was ever going to be back. And I remember getting out of the water and counting the steps to my car, thinking, ‘I’m going to beat this. I’m going to retrace those steps.’ And I’m happy to say I was able to do it.” Gus and his family recently celebrated the 10th anniversary of his bone marrow transplant. “City of Hope is more than just medical treatment,” Gus says. “They have to put you back together from the ground up. And to me, that’s truly a miracle.”

 

As an active 14-year-old, Nicole Schulz loved cheerleading and hanging out with her friends. Then her whole world changed. Nicole learned that her fatigue and other symptoms weren’t “just the flu,” but the effects of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), an aggressive disease that rendered her bone marrow 97 percent cancerous. Nicole spent the next three and a half months at City of Hope, fighting the cancer with a daily regimen of chemotherapy and blood and platelet transfusions. “It put me into remission,” Nicole says. “But I wasn’t cured. And I wanted a cure.” Fortunately, Nicole was a candidate for a bone marrow transplant. Her malfunctioning marrow cells would be replaced with healthy marrow from a matching unrelated donor. “I never gave up — and neither did City of Hope,” Nicole says. After two bone marrow transplants and tremendous perseverance, Nicole is back to living the life she once knew and quickly making up for lost time.

 

When Jim Murphy’s doctor called and asked to see him on Christmas Eve, Jim knew it wasn’t going to be good news. And he was right. “The diagnosis was esophageal cancer,” Jim says. “Once they tell you that, there’s nothing you can do but formulate your action plan.” Jim would need to undergo chemotherapy, radiation and surgery to remove the tumor from his esophagus. It would require taking two-thirds of his esophagus and a third of his stomach. Despite the intense treatment, Jim was determined to keep his life as normal as possible. Throughout his chemotherapy and radiation therapy, he never missed a day of work, even riding his mountain bike to and from City of Hope to take his treatments. “I needed to show myself one victory after another,” Jim says. “I know City of Hope appreciated the fact that I was fighting as hard as they were.” Now cancer-free for several years, Jim credits City of Hope with giving him the best chance to fight his disease. “What really impressed me was that the research was right there at City of Hope. If they have something experimental, it goes from the researcher, right to the doctor and right to you. It’s the ultimate weapon — doctors reaching out for researchers, researchers reaching out for doctors. And the patient wins.”

 

City of Hope is a pioneer in the fields of bone marrow transplantation, diabetes and breakthrough cancer drugs based on technology developed at the institution.  How are you transforming the future of health care by turning science into a practical benefit for patients? 

Dr. Rosen: This is a distinctive place where brilliant research moves rapidly from concept to cure. That’s what we do—we speed breakthroughs in the lab to benefit patients in the clinic

Many know us for our leadership in fighting cancer, but fighting cancer is only part of our story. For decades, we’ve been making history in the fight against diabetes and other life-threatening illnesses that can be just as dangerous, and shattering, to patients and their families.

Every year, we conduct 400+ clinical trials, enrolling 6,000+ patients; hold 300+ patents and submit nearly 30 applications to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for investigational new drugs; and offer comprehensive assistance for patients and their families, including patient education, support groups, social resources, mind-body therapies and patient navigators.

We also translate breakthrough laboratory findings into real, lifesaving treatments and cures, and manufacture them at three on-campus facilities. Our goal is to get patients the treatments they need as fast as humanly possible.

We are in the race to save lives – and win. In our research efforts, we are teaching immune cells to attack tumors and Don J. Diamond [Ph.D.], Vincent Chung, [M.D.], and other City of Hope researchers launched a clinical trial seeking ways to effectively activate a patient’s own immune system to fight his or her cancer. The team is combining an immune-boosting vaccine with a drug that inhibits tumor cells’ ability to grow — to encourage immune cells to attack and eliminate tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, triple-negative breast cancer, renal cell carcinoma and many other cancer types.

City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. Research is already underway to unlock the immune system’s role in diabetes, including T cell modulation and stem cell-based therapies that may reverse the autoimmune attack on islet cells in the pancreas, which is the cause of T1D. City of Hope’s Bart Roep [Ph.D.], previously worked at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, where he was instrumental in launching a phase 1 clinical trial for a vaccine that aims to spur the immune system to fight, and possibly cure, T1D. Plans are developing for a larger, phase 2 trial to launch in the future at City of Hope.

 

What makes your recent alliance with Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) different from other efforts in precision medicine around the country and within our Government to identify treatments for cancer?

Dr. Rosen: Precision medicine is the future of cancer care. Since former Vice President’s Joe Biden’s Moonshot Cancer program was launched to achieve 10 years of progress in preventing, diagnosing and treating cancer, within five years, federal cancer funding has been prioritized to address these aims.

City of Hope and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) have formed an alliance to fast-track the future of precision medicine for patients. Our clinical leadership as a comprehensive cancer center combined with TGen’s leadership in molecular cancer research will propel us to the forefront of precision medicine and is further evidence of our momentum in transforming the future of health.

In fact, most recently scientists at TGen have identified a potent compound in the fight for an improved treatment against glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadly type of adult brain cancer. This research could represent a breakthrough for us to find an effective long-term treatment. The compound prevents glioblastoma from spreading, and leaves cancer vulnerable to chemotherapy and radiation.  Aurintricarboxylic Acid (ATA) is a chemical compound that in laboratory tests was shown to block the chemical cascade that otherwise allows glioblastoma cells to invade normal brain tissue and resist both chemo and radiation therapy.

The goal is to accelerate the speed at which we advance research discoveries into the clinic to benefit patients worldwide.

 

As a prestigious Comprehensive Cancer Center, City of Hope was named this year as one of the top 20 cancer centers for the past 10 years. How do you achieve that designation year after year? And what specific collaborations, clinical trials and multidisciplinary research programs are under way that offer benefits to patients?

Dr. Rosen: It’s simple – we achieve this through the compassion, commitment and excellence of the City of Hope family, which includes our world-class physicians, staff, supporters and donors.

We look to find the best and brightest professionals and bring them to City of Hope to work with our amazing staff on research, treatments and cures that not only change people’s lives, but also change the world.

We also have a community of forward-looking, incredibly generous and deeply committed supporters and donors. People who get it. People who share our vision. People who take their capacity for business success and apply it to helping others. They provide the fuel that drives us forward, enabling us to do great things.

City of Hope has a long track record of research breakthroughs and is constantly working to turn novel scientific research into the most advanced medical services.

Right now, we have a number of collaborative programs underway, including: Our alliance with TGen to make precision medicine a reality for patients, The Wanek Family Project to Cure Type 1 Diabetes, and Immunotherapy and CAR-T cell therapy clinical trials, which aim to fight against brain tumors and blood cancers.

More specifically, our research team led by Hua Yu, [Ph.D.] and Andreas Herrmann, [Ph.D.], developed a drug to address the way in which cancer uses the STAT3 protein to “corrupt” the immune system. The drug, CpG-STAT3 siRNA, halts the protein’s ability to “talk” to the immune system. It blocks cancer cell growth while sending a message to surrounding immune cells to destroy a tumor, and it may also enhance the effectiveness of other immunotherapies, such as T-cell therapy.

We could also see a functional cure for HIV in the next 5 to 10 years. Gene therapy pioneer, John A. Zaia, [M.D.], the Aaron D. Miller and Edith Miller Chair in Gene Therapy, the director of the Center for Gene Therapy within City of Hope’s Hematologic Malignancies and Stem Cell Transplantation Institute, as well as principal director of our Alpha Clinic, and researchers are building on knowledge gained from the case of the so-called “Berlin patient” whose HIV infection vanished after receiving a stem cell transplant for treatment of leukemia. The donor’s CCR5 gene, HIV’s typical pathway into the body, had a mutation that blocked the virus. The team launched a clinical trial that used a zinc finger nuclease to “cut out” the CCR5 gene, leaving HIV with no place to go. Their goal: to someday deliver a one-time treatment that produces a lifetime change. Integral to the first-in-human trials are the nurses who understand the study protocols, potential side effects and symptoms.

 

Would you share some of the current science under way on breakthrough cures for cancer?

Dr. Rosen: We are achieving promising results in many innovative approaches – gene therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy and all aspects of precision medicine. We are also forging new partnerships and collaboration agreements around the world.

Let me share with you a few examples of our cutting-edge science.

City of Hope researchers identified a promising new strategy for dealing with PDAC, an aggressive form of pancreatic cancer. The bacterial-based therapy homes to tumors and provokes an extremely effective tumor-killing response.

Teams at City of Hope are working to load nanoparticles with small snippets of DNA molecules that can stimulate the immune system to attack tumor cells in the brain. This innovative approach can overcome the blood-brain barrier, which blocks many drugs from reaching the tumor site.

A pioneer in islet cell transplantation for the treatment of diabetes, City of Hope conducted a clinical trial to refine its transplantation protocol. Because this new protocol includes an ATG (antithymoglobulin) induction, the immune system will not harm the transplant. The immune-suppression strategy used in the trial is considered a significant improvement over the protocol used in previous islet cell transplant trials.

City of Hope physicians and scientists joined a multinational team in reporting the success of a phase II clinical trial of a novel drug against essential thrombocythemia (ET). ET patients make too many platelets (cells essential for blood clotting), which puts them at risk for abnormal clotting and bleeding. All 18 patients treated with the drug, imetelstat, exhibited decreased platelet levels, and 16 showed normalized blood cell counts.

Researchers found that the CMVPepVax vaccine — developed at City of Hope to boost cellular immunity against cytomegalovirus (CMV) — is safe and effective in stem cell transplant recipients. Building on this discovery, City of Hope and Fortress Biotech formed a company to develop two vaccines, PepVax and Triplex, against CMV, a life-threatening illness in people who have weakened or underdeveloped immune systems such as cancer patients and developing fetuses. The vaccines are the subjects of multisite clinical trials. These City of Hope vaccines could open the door to a new way of protecting cancer patients from CMV, a devastating infection that affects hundreds of thousands of people worldwide.

 

In what ways does the initial vision of Samuel H. Golter impact the work you are doing today? What does the tagline – “The Miracle of Science with Soul” – mean?

Dr. Rosen: 100+ years ago, Samuel Golter, one of the founders of City of Hope said: “There is no profit in curing the body if in the process we destroy the soul.” For decades, City of Hope has lived by this credo, providing a comprehensive, compassionate and research-based treatment approach.

“The Miracle of Science with Soul” refers to the lives that we save by uniting science and research with compassionate care.

“Miracle” represents what people with cancer and other deadly diseases say they want most of all.

“Science” speaks to the many innovations we’ve pioneered, which demonstrate that medical miracles happen here.

“Soul” represents our compassionate care. We’re an untraditional health system — and our people, culture and campus reflect this.

 

Can you please describe how City of Hope has evolved throughout its 100-year history from a tuberculosis sanitorium into a world-class research-centered institution? 

Dr. Rosen: City of Hope is a leading comprehensive cancer center and independent biomedical research institution. Over the years, our discoveries have changed the lives of millions of patients around the world.

We pioneered the research leading to the first synthetic insulin and the technology behind numerous cancer-fighting drugs, including Herceptin (trastuzumab), Avasatin (bevacizumab), Erbitux (cetuximab), and Rituxin (rituximab).

As previously mentioned, we hold 300+ patents, have numerous potential therapies in the pipeline at any given time, and treat 1,000+ patients a year in therapeutic clinical trials.

These numbers reflect our commitment to innovation and rapid translation of science into therapies to benefit patients.

We are home to Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, the first of only five Beckman Research Institutes established by funding from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. It is responsible for fundamentally expanding the world’s understanding of how biology affects diseases such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes.

Recognizing our team’s accomplishments in cancer research, treatment, patient care, education and prevention, the National Cancer Institute has designated City of Hope as a comprehensive cancer center. This is an honor reserved for only 47 institutions nationwide. Our five Cancer Center Research Programs run the gamut from basic and translational studies, to Phase I and II clinical protocols and follow-up studies in survivorship and symptom management.

City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute offers a broad diabetes and endocrinology program combining groundbreaking research, unique treatments and comprehensive education to help people with diabetes and other endocrine diseases live longer, better lives.

Our dedicated, multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals at the Hematologic Malignancies & Stem Cell Institute combine innovative research discoveries with superior clinical treatments to improve outcomes for patients with hematologic cancers.

Working closely with the City of Hope comprehensive cancer center’s Developmental Cancer Therapeutics Program and other cancer centers, the Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research multidisciplinary program includes basic, translational and clinical research and fosters collaborations among scientists and clinicians.

City of Hope’s Radiation Oncology Department is on the forefront of improving patient care, and our staff is constantly studying new research technologies, clinical trials and treatment methods that can lead to better outcomes and quality of life for our patients.

What attracted you to City of Hope? And how do you define success in your present role as provost and CSO?

Dr. Rosen: Helping cancer patients and their families gives me a sense of purpose. I encourage everyone to find a passion and find an organization that fits their passion. City of Hope is a special place. What we do is bigger than ourselves.

I define success as finding cures and helping patients live stronger, better lives. I am focused on leading a diverse team of scientists, clinicians and administrative leaders committed to discovering breakthroughs and specialized therapies.

COH2 Dr__Steve_Rosen_

Image SOURCE: Photograph of Provost and Chief Scientific Officer Steven T. Rosen, M.D., courtesy of City of Hope, Duarte, California.

 

Steven T. Rosen, M.D.
Provost and Chief Scientific Officer

City of Hope
Duarte, California

Steven T. Rosen, M.D., is provost and chief scientific officer for City of Hope and a member of City of Hope’s Executive Team. He also is director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center and holds the Irell & Manella Cancer Center Director’s Distinguished Chair, and he is director of Beckman Research Institute (BRI) and the Irell & Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences.

Dr. Rosen sets the scientific direction of City of Hope, shaping the research and educational vision for the biomedical research, treatment and education institution. Working closely and collaboratively with City of Hope’s scientists, clinicians and administrative leaders, he develops strategies that contribute to the organization’s mission.

As director of BRI, he works with faculty across the institution to help shape and direct the scientific vision for BRI while leading the vital basic and translational research that is fundamental to our strategic plan and mission. He focuses on opportunities for expanding and integrating our research initiatives; recruiting and leading talented scientists; helping our talented researchers achieve national and international recognition; and promoting our national standing as a premier scientific organization.

Prior to joining City of Hope, Dr. Rosen was the Genevieve Teuton Professor of Medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago. He served for 24 years as director of Northwestern’s Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. Under his leadership, the center received continuous National Cancer Institute (NCI) funding beginning in 1993 and built nationally recognized programs in laboratory sciences, clinical investigations, translational research and cancer prevention and control. The center attained comprehensive status in 1997.

Dr. Rosen has published more than 400 original reports, editorials, books and book chapters. His research has been funded by the National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of America and Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation.

Dr. Rosen also has served as an adviser for several of these organizations and on the external advisory boards of more than a dozen NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers. He is the current editor-in-chief of the textbook series “Cancer Treatment & Research.”

Recognized as one of the Best Doctors in America, Dr. Rosen is a recipient of the Martin Luther King Humanitarian Award from Northwestern Memorial Hospital and the Man of Distinction Award from the Israel Cancer Research Fund. He earned his bachelor’s degree and medical degree with distinction from Northwestern University from which he also earned the Alumni Merit Award, and is a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society.

Editor’s Note: 

We would like to thank Mary-Fran Faraji, David Caouette, and Chantal Roshetar of the Communications and Public Affairs department at the City of Hope, for the gracious help and invaluable support they provided during this interview.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

The City of Hope (https://www.cityofhope.org/homepage), Duarte, California.

Other related articles

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/people/rosen-steven

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/research/beckman-research-institute

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/research/comprehensive-cancer-center

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/research/research-overview/diabetes-metabolism-research-institute

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/patients/departments-and-services/hematologic-malignancies-and-stem-cell-transplantation-institute

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/patients/departments-and-services/medical-oncology-and-therapeutics-research/medical-oncology-research

Retrieved from https://www.cityofhope.org/patients/cancers-and-treatments/departments-and-services/radiation-oncology/radiation-oncology-research

                        

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2017

Expedite Use of Agents in Clinical Trials: New Drug Formulary Created – The NCI Formulary is a public-private partnership between NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/01/12/expedite-use-of-agents-in-clinical-trials-new-drug-formulary-created-the-nci-formulary-is-a-public-private-partnership-between-nci-part-of-the-national-institutes-of-health-and-pharmaceutical-and/

The top 15 best-selling cancer drugs in 2022 & Projected Sales in 2020 of World’s Top Ten Oncology Drugs

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/01/03/projected-sales-in-2020-of-worlds-top-ten-oncology-drugs/

2016

Funding Opportunities for Cancer Research

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/08/funding-opportunities-for-cancer-research/

Recent Breakthroughs in Cancer Research at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology- 2015

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/03/recent-breakthroughs-in-cancer-research-at-the-technion-israel-institute-of-technology-2015/

New York Times Articles on Cancer Immunotherapy and Cancer Treatment Options

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/09/new-york-times-articles-on-immunotherapy-and-cancer-treatment-options/

  • Cancer Biology & Genomics for Disease Diagnosis, on Amazon since 8/11/2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-c-e-books-on-cancer-oncology/volume-2-immunotherapy-in-oncology/

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World’s Top Ten Cancer Drugs by 2020  (million USD)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

Image Source: Statista (www.statista.com)

Opdivo Setback May Yield Lessons for Pharma – Advancing Immunotherapies With PD-L1 Testing

Sep 12, 2016 | Turna Ray

The anti-PD-1/PD-L1 drug market is estimated to be worth around $30 billion by 2020. The negative Phase III results for Opdivo in first-line NSCLC shocked market analysts, and pharmaceutical companies developing drugs in this space “are taking stock of the situation” and surely assessing whether they have the right test methods in place in their drug studies, said Peter Keeling, CEO of consulting firm Diaceutics.

Most drugmakers developing anti-PD-1/PD-L1 drugs are evaluating whether their therapies work especially well in patients whose tumor cells express PD-L1, a protein that cancer cells use to hide from an immune system attack. But studies have demonstrated that PD-L1 expression status doesn’t neatly bucket responders and non-responders in the same way that testing for EGFR mutations or ALK rearrangements can, making it difficult for pharmaceutical companies to integrate PD-L1 testing for patient stratification in clinical trials.

In the absence of a universal diagnostic, Cancer Genetics is one lab that does offer all the FDA-approved companion and complementary PD-L1 tests, but also spends a lot of time educating doctors and pathologists on the differences between these tests and which to order for a particular immunotherapy. “There’s a big need for our pharma cousins to really push more knowledge about the associated diagnostics and tests and how to use them,” Sharma said. “That’s the only way they’re going to get uptake in the community setting.”

Despite the muddled messages around PD-L1 testing, healthcare providers and researchers nonetheless seem interested in PD-L1 testing as part of the tumor profiling workup for patients. Diaceutics’ surveys show a sharp uptick in the number of labs offering PD-L1 testing over the past year-and-a-half and 52 labs in the US offer at least one PD-L1 test. The company also reviewed biomarkers being studied in 95 Phase II/III NSCLC, and found that approximately half are incorporating patients’ PD-L1 status either alone or in combination with other markers, such as EGFR and ALK mutations.

At Cancer Genetics over the past year, there has also been a notable ramp up in orders for PD-L1 testing for lung cancer patients, but also for melanoma and head and neck cancer patients. “One our biggest volume increased tests this year has been PD-L1 testing,” Sharma said. “We think there is a lot of opportunity for significant additional growth.”

https://www.genomeweb.com/molecular-diagnostics/opdivo-setback-may-yield-lessons-pharma-advancing-immunotherapies-pd-l1

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16th Annual Cancer Research Symposium, Koch Institute, Friday, June 16, 9AM – 5PM, Kresge Auditorium, MIT

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Summer Symposium 2017

https://ki.mit.edu/news/symposium/2017

A leader in Convergence, MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research will, on June 16, present its 16th annual Summer Symposium: the Convergence of Science and Engineering in Cancer Research. Convergence—the merging of historically distinct disciplines such as engineering, physics, computer science, chemistry, mathematics, and the life sciences—has created extraordinary opportunities in cancer research and care. Leaders in this emerging field will discuss innovative new approaches and technologies to better detect, monitor, treat, and prevent cancer. The symposium will also feature a panel of experts to discuss the impact of Convergence on the future of medical care.


INTRODUCTORY REMARKS

Tyler Jacks Tyler Jacks, PhD
Director, Koch Institute, MIT
David H. Koch Professor of Biology, MIT

 

Phillip A. Sharp  

Phillip A. Sharp, PhD
Institute Professor, MIT
Koch Institute, MIT

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Eric Lander

30 Years of Convergence

Eric Lander, PhD
President and Founding Director, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT
Professor of Biology, Department of Biology, MIT
Koch Institute, MIT
Professor of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School

 

SPEAKERS

James Collins

Synthetic biology and next-generation diagnostics

James Collins, PhD
Termeer Professor of Medical Engineering and Science and Professor of Biological Engineering, MIT
Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT
Wyss Institute

 

Gad Getz

Cancer Genome and the Cloud

Gad Getz, PhD
Director, Cancer Genome Computational Analysis Group, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT

 

Paula Hammond

Targeting Aggressive Cancers Nanolayers at a Time: A Platform Approach to Engineered Nanomedicine

Paula T. Hammond, PhD
David H. Koch Professor in Engineering, MIT
Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering, MIT
Koch Institute, MIT

 

Robert Langer

New chemical engineering approaches to convergence

Robert S. Langer, ScD
David H. Koch Institute Professor, MIT
Koch Institute, MIT

 

Daniel Larson

Understanding transcription and splicing heterogeneity in cancer progression

Daniel Larson, PhD
NIH Stadtman Investigator, Center for Cancer Research
Head, Systems Biology of Gene Expression, National Cancer Institute

 

Franziska Michor

Computational Models of Cancer

Franziska Michor, PhD
Professor of Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

 

Chad A. Mirkin

Spherical Nucleic Acids as a Powerful New Platform for Cancer Therapy

Chad A. Mirkin, PhD
Director, International Institute for Nanotechnology
George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University

 

Aviv Regev

Dissecting the tumor ecosystem with single cell genomics

Aviv Regev, PhD
Core Institute Member, Chair of the Faculty, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT
Co-director of the Cell Circuits Program, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT
Koch Institute, MIT

 

Xiaowei Zhuang

Illuminating biology at the nanoscale and systems scale using single-molecule and super-resolution imaging

Xiaowei Zhuang, PhD
David B. Arnold Professor of Science, Harvard University
Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator

 

EXPERT PANEL: CONVERGENCE IN HEALTH

Cori Bargmann  

Cori Bargmann, PhD
President of Science, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

 

Marc N. Casper  

Marc N. Casper, MBA
President and CEO, Thermo Fisher Scientific

 

Victor Dzau  

Victor Dzau, MD
President, National Academy of Medicine

 

Tyler Jacks  

Tyler Jacks, PhD
Director, Koch Institute, MIT
David H. Koch Professor of Biology, MIT

 

Nancy Simonian  

Nancy Simonian, MD
CEO, Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

 

Elias Zerhouni  

Elias Zerhouni, MD
President for Global Research and Development, Sanofi
Former Director, NIH

 

Susan Hockfield

Moderated by:

Susan Hockfield, PhD
President Emerita, MIT
Professor of Neuroscience, MIT
Koch Institute, MIT

 

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Standard of care for localization of impalpable breast lesions, aka Magseed, @ UCSF as First Adopter

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

PRESS RELEASE

23rd January 2017

  

UCSF first to adopt Magseed as standard of care for localization of impalpable breast lesions

Magseed technology guides surgeons during a breast lumpectomy to simplify treatment and improve patient experience

 

Cambridge, UK & San Francisco, CA, 23rd January 2017: Endomag, the cancer healthcare company, announced today that the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has become the first US site to adopt Magseed™ as its standard of care for localization of impalpable breast lesions. Magseed™ is a simpler, more effective alternative to traditional wire localization methods.

 

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women, with 1.7 million new cases of breast cancer globally every year, and is expected to double by 2030. Due to a rise in national screening programmes and an increase in public awareness, breast cancer is being caught at an earlier stage meaning that the tumors are smaller, less defined and harder to feel, with as many as 50% of all breast tumors impalpable at the time of diagnosis. In these cases, a technique called wire localization is typically used by surgeons to locate the tumor.

 

Although widely used, wire localization commonly causes complications. On average 1 in every 4 breast wire localizations result in cancerous tissue being left behind and requiring additional surgery because the wire has become dislodged between when it was implanted and when it was removed during surgery. Additionally, there is a risk of infection due to the wire protruding from the skin, so the placement of the wire must be done on the same day as surgery. These issues result in unnecessary anxiety for patients, delays to the surgical lists and fewer patients being treated as a consequence.

 

Dr. Eric Mayes, CEO of Endomag noted “The wire localization technique has remained largely the same since it was introduced over 30 years ago and it causes a lot of anxiety for patients. We wanted to create a technique that could simplify the localization process and improve the patient experience.”

 

Magseed™ is smaller than a grain of rice and can be placed into the tumor for up to 30 days, allowing the patient to return home ahead of surgery. Once implanted, the seed is not easily dislodged and patients are not restricted in movement or activity. During surgery the seed is detected with the Sentimag® probe to guide accurate removal of the tumor and maximising the amount of healthy tissue left behind. Unlike radioactive alternatives that involve strict regulatory oversight and complex logistics, the Magseed™ technique can be widely adopted by any hospital, regardless of size.

 

Dr. Laura Esserman (Breast Surgeon, UCSF) “We are excited to have a set of safe, easy to use tools that will improve the efficiency of identifying breast lesions and dramatically improve the experience of patients and clinicians, as well as the workflow in the operating room.”

 

 

Dr. Michael Alvarado (Breast Surgeon, UCSF) “We have been looking for a better alternative to wire localization for some time, as the wire procedure adds additional stress for the patients on the day of surgery and often causes delays to our operating schedule. Very early in our evaluation of the magnetic seed technique we found that we could avoid a same-day placement, and the surgeries could be completed in less time, without compromising accuracy. This offers a tangible benefit to both our clinical team and, most importantly, our patients.”

 

ENDS

 

Photo: X-ray showing a complete surgical specimen with negative margins and Magseed™ in the centre, next to the cancer.

For a high res image please contact lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com

 

For further information please contact:

Zyme Communications

Lorna Cuddon

Tel: +44 (0)7811 996 942

Email: lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com

 

About Endomag http://www.endomag.com 

Endomag is a pioneer in the use of magnetism for minimally-invasive surgical guidance.  By addressing unmet needs in availability, affordability and workflow efficiency for surgical oncology, we support our mission to improve the global standard of cancer care for everyone, everywhere.

 

Founded as a spin-out from the University of Houston and the University College London (UCL) in 2007, we continue to develop our unique clinical platform that uses magnetic fields to power diagnostic and therapeutic devices.  The company has sales in over 30 countries worldwide and is headquartered in Cambridge, United Kingdom.

 

UC Disclaimer

The information stated above was prepared by Endomag, and reflects solely the opinion of the corporation. Nothing in this statement shall be construed to imply any support or endorsement of Endomag, or any of its products, by The Regents of the University of California, its officers, agents and employees.

SOURCE

From: Lorna Cuddon <lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com>

Reply-To: <lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com>

Date: Monday, January 23, 2017 at 9:16 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: UCSF first to adopt Magseed as standard of care for localization of impalpable breast lesions

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One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers: R&D at WPI

Curator: Marzan Khan, B.Sc

 

A team of mechanical engineers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) have developed a fascinating technology – a liquid biopsy chip that captures and detects metastatic cancer cells, just from a small blood sample of cancer patients(1). This device is a recent development in the scientific field and holds tremendous potential that will allow doctors to spot signs of metastasis for a variety of cancers at an early stage and initiate an appropriate course of treatment(1).

Metastasis occurs when cancer cells break away from their site of origin and spread to other parts of the body via the lymph or the bloodstream, where they give rise to secondary tumors(2). By this time, the cancer is at an advanced stage and it becomes increasingly difficult to fight the disease. The cells that are shed by primary and metastatic cancers are called circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their numbers lie in the range of 1–77,200/m(3). The basis of the liquid biopsy chip test is to capture these circulating tumor cells in the patient’s blood and identify the cell type through specific interaction with antibodies(4).

The chip is comprised of individual test units or small elements, about 3 millimeters wide(4). Each small element contains a network of carbon nanotube sensors in a well which are functionalized with antibodies(4). These antibodies will bind cell-surface antigens or protein markers unique for each type of cancer cell. Specific interaction between a cell surface protein and its corresponding antibody is a thermodynamic event that causes a change in free energy which is transduced into electricity(3). This electrical signature is picked up by the semi-conducting carbon nanotubes and can be seen as electrical spikes(4). Specific interactions create an increase in electrical signal, whereas non-specific interactions cause a decrease in signal or no change at all(4). Capture efficiency of cancer cells with the chip has been reported to range between 62-100%(4).

The liquid biopsy chip is also more advanced than microfluidics for several reasons. Firstly, the nanotube-chip arrays can capture as well as detect cancer cells, while microfluidics can only capture(4). Samples do not need to be processed for labeling or fixation, so the cell structures are preserved(4). Unlike microfluidics, these nanotubes will also capture tiny structures called exosomes spanning the nanometer range that are produced from cancer cells and carry the same biomarkers(4).

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-associated deaths in the United states, with a survival window of 5 years in only 6% of the cases with treatment(5). In most patients, the disease has already metastasized at the time of diagnosis due to the lack of early-diagnostic markers, affecting some of the major organs such as liver, lungs and the peritoneum(5,6). Despite surgical resection of the primary tumor, the recurrence of local and metastatic tumors is rampant(5). Metastasis is the major cause of mortality in cancers(5). The liquid biopsy chip, that identifies CTCs can thus become an effective diagnostic tool in early detection of cancer as well as provide information into the efficacy of treatment(3). At present, ongoing experiments with this device involve testing for breast cancers but Dr. Balaji Panchapakesan and his team of engineers at WPI are optimistic about incorporating pancreatic and lung cancers into their research.

REFERENCES

1.Nanophenotype. Researchers build liquid biopsy chip that detects metastatic cancer cells in blood: One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers. 27 Dec 2016. Genesis Nanotechnology,Inc

https://genesisnanotech.wordpress.com/2016/12/27/researchers-build-liquid-biopsy-chip-that-detects-metastatic-cancer-cells-in-blood-one-blood-sample-can-be-tested-for-a-comprehensive-array-of-cancer-cell-markers/

2.Martin TA, Ye L, Sanders AJ, et al. Cancer Invasion and Metastasis: Molecular and Cellular Perspective. In: Madame Curie Bioscience Database [Internet]. Austin (TX): Landes Bioscience; 2000-2013.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK164700/

3.F Khosravi, B King, S Rai, G Kloecker, E Wickstrom, B Panchapakesan. Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells. 23 Dec 2013. IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine 7 (4), 20-26

Nanotube devices for digital profiling of cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells

4.Farhad Khosravi, Patrick J Trainor, Christopher Lambert, Goetz Kloecker, Eric Wickstrom, Shesh N Rai and Balaji Panchapakesan. Static micro-array isolation, dynamic time series classification, capture and enumeration of spiked breast cancer cells in blood: the nanotube–CTC chip. 29 Sept 2016. Nanotechnology. Vol 27, No.44. IOP Publishing Ltd

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0957-4484/27/44/44LT03/meta

5.Seyfried, T. N., & Huysentruyt, L. C. (2013). On the Origin of Cancer Metastasis. Critical Reviews in Oncogenesis18(1-2), 43–73.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3597235/

6.Deeb, A., Haque, S.-U., & Olowoure, O. (2015). Pulmonary metastases in pancreatic cancer, is there a survival influence? Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology6(3), E48–E51. http://doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2078-6891.2014.114

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4397254/

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Liquid Biopsy Chip detects an array of metastatic cancer cell markers in blood – R&D @Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Reporters: Tilda Barliya, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/28/liquid-biopsy-chip-detects-an-array-of-metastatic-cancer-cell-markers-in-blood-rd-worcester-polytechnic-institute-micro-and-nanotechnology-lab/

 

Trovagene’s ctDNA Liquid Biopsy urine and blood tests to be used in Monitoring and Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer

Reporters: David Orchard-Webb, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/06/trovagenes-ctdna-liquide-biopsy-urine-and-blood-tests-to-be-used-in-monitoring-and-early-detection-of-pancreatic-cancer/

 

Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/06/liquid-biopsy-assay-may-predict-drug-resistance/


New insights in cancer, cancer immunogenesis and circulating cancer cells

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/15/new-insights-in-cancer-cancer-immunogenesis-and-circulating-cancer-cells/

 

Prognostic biomarker for NSCLC and Cancer Metastasis

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curato

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/24/prognostic-biomarker-for-nsclc-and-cancer-metastasis/

 

Monitoring AML with “cell specific” blood test

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/23/monitoring-aml-with-cell-specific-blood-test/

 

Diagnostic Revelations

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/02/diagnostic-revelations/

 

Circulating Biomarkers World Congress, March 23-24, 2015, Boston: Exosomes, Microvesicles, Circulating DNA, Circulating RNA, Circulating Tumor Cells, Sample Preparation

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/03/03/circulating-biomarkers-world-congress-march-23-24-2015-boston-exosomes-microvesicles-circulating-dna-circulating-rna-circulating-tumor-cells-sample-preparation/

 

 

 

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Projected Sales in 2020 of World’s Top Ten Oncology Drugs

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

UPDATED on 1/17/2017

The top 15 best-selling cancer drugs in 2022

All told, by 2022, the top 15 cancer drugs are expected to collectively make almost $90 billion in sales. To put that in perspective, that represents about one-fourth of the entire U.S. pharma market in 2014, according to QuintilesIMS data. It’s also bigger than pharma’s haul in Japan or China that year.

It will likely be no revelation that three drugs among the top six on our list—provided courtesy of EvaluatePharma and Chempetitive—come from the highly touted PD-1/PD-L1 or checkpoint inhibitor class.

The top 15 best-selling cancer drugs in 2022

SOURCE

http://www.fiercepharma.com/special-report/special-report-top-15-best-selling-cancer-drugs-2022?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal&mrkid=993697&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWW1aa1kyRmpaV1poTlRZMiIsInQiOiJkSEU3WFdzNHd4cnhmc2NQN0tSUjNVbEY4NDQyUUdHZ29NY2cwWEM1OHRxRmdWWHowVDY5eDMxWkdhZ1ZucHAxTjk5ZmJRWERKT2V4UExCUFd3U25vTkdQWk9ZQWVPQkszUVlVeUFjTjVqcXJJVDB1a1ZDWmNJZ0U4UHhEQUhHdiJ9

Projected Sales in 2020 of World’s Top Ten Oncology Drugs

 

Top Oncology Medicines

Projected Sales in 2020

Revlimid (Celgene)

Generic Name: Lenalidomide

$10,110 Million

 

Imbruvica (AbbVie/J&J)

Generic Name: Ibrutinib

$8,213 Million

 

Avastin (Roche)

Generic Name: Bevacizumab

$ 6,733 Million

 

Opdivo (BMS)

Generic Name: Nivolumab

$ 6,201 Million

 

Xtandi (Medivation & Astellas)

Generic Name: Enzalutamide

$5,700 Million

 

Rituxan (Roche)

Generic Name: Rituximab

$5,407 Million

 

Ibrance (Pfizer)

Generic Name: Palbociclib

$4,722 Million

 

Perjeta (Roche)

Generic Name: Pertuzumab

$4,669 Million

 

Herceptin (Roche)

Generic Name: Trastuzumab

$4,573 Million

 

Keytruda (Merck)

Generic Name: Pembrolizumab

$3,560 Million


SOURCE

https://igeahub.com/2016/04/01/worlds-top-ten-cancer-drugs-by-2020/

World’s Top Ten Cancer Drugs by 2020

Igea gives professionals, patients and investors interested in pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, healthcare technology, diagnostics and medical devices the most relevant, actionable news, information and analysis available anywhere. Our goal is to provide expert insights, analysis and information from industry leaders with a deep understanding of life sciences, medicine and healthcare. Created and curated by Luca Dezzani, MD, Global Medical Director at Novartis Oncology*, Igea offers an insider’s view on the most important developments in life sciences, healthcare technology, digital health and more.


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Prostate Cancer Patient: Consider Monitoring vs Surgery or Radiation, only if Life Expectancy is less than a Decade

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Boldface by ALA

 

Rethinking Prostate Cancer, in THE MOST NOTABLE MEDICAL FINDINGS OF 2016

For many years, American physicians have screened their older male patients for prostate cancer by looking at the level of a particular protein in the blood. The protein, called prostate-specific antigen (P.S.A.), can indicate the presence of a tumor long before any symptoms materialize. Recently, though, there has been a movement within the medical community against P.S.A. testing; since prostate cancers typically grow very slowly and rarely cause discomfort, the thinking goes, early screening may not be all that useful. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, based on data from two large clinical trials, currently recommends against routine screening, but other expert groups (using the same evidence) have countered that men should be allowed to choose for themselves.

Now the dispute has become even more fraught. In October, The New England Journal of Medicine published a study by a group of British researchers that examined three classes of prostate-cancer patients: those who had received surgery, those who had received radiation therapy, and those whose disease had been carefully monitored without intervention. After ten years, there was no difference in survival rates among the three groups. Active treatment does not change the over-all risk of death, and this was the headline in most news reports. But largely overlooked in the press was that metastases, meaning spread of the cancer beyond the prostate gland to tissues in the pelvis and to bone, occurred three times more frequently in those being monitored than in those who received surgery or radiation. Not surprisingly, the cancer also progressed more quickly in these men.

In an editorial that accompanied the study, Anthony D’Amico, a radiation oncologist at Boston’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, argued that men should be informed of the risk of metastasis and of its consequences, particularly pelvic tumors and bone pain and fracture. D’Amico advises that men who wish to avoid metastases should consider monitoring, rather than surgery or radiation, only if their life expectancy is less than a decade. Having cared for many men with prostate cancer that metastasized—an incurable situation often marked by severe suffering—I strongly concur.

SOURCE

http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/the-most-notable-medical-findings-of-2016?mbid=nl_TNY%20Template%20-%20With%20Photo%20(122)&CNDID=22119822&spMailingID=10139434&spUserID=MTMzMTc5ODE3NDQwS0&spJobID=1062494562&spReportId=MTA2MjQ5NDU2MgS2

 

REFERENCES

10-Year Outcomes after Monitoring, Surgery, or Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

Freddie C. Hamdy, F.R.C.S.(Urol.), F.Med.Sci., Jenny L. Donovan, Ph.D., F.Med.Sci., J. Athene Lane, Ph.D., Malcolm Mason, M.D., F.R.C.R., Chris Metcalfe, Ph.D., Peter Holding, R.G.N., M.Sc., Michael Davis, M.Sc., Tim J. Peters, Ph.D., F.Med.Sci., Emma L. Turner, Ph.D., Richard M. Martin, Ph.D., Jon Oxley, M.D., F.R.C.Path., Mary Robinson, M.B., B.S., F.R.C.Path., John Staffurth, M.B., B.S., M.D., Eleanor Walsh, M.Sc., Prasad Bollina, M.B., B.S., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), James Catto, Ph.D., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), Andrew Doble, M.S., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), Alan Doherty, F.R.C.S.(Urol.), David Gillatt, M.S., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), Roger Kockelbergh, D.M., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), Howard Kynaston, M.D., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), Alan Paul, M.D., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), Philip Powell, M.D., F.R.C.S., Stephen Prescott, M.D., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), Derek J. Rosario, M.D., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), Edward Rowe, M.D., F.R.C.S.(Urol.), and David E. Neal, F.R.C.S., F.Med.Sci., for the ProtecT Study Group*

N Engl J Med 2016; 375:1415-1424 October 13, 2016 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1606220

 

Treatment or Monitoring for Early Prostate Cancer

Anthony V. D’Amico, M.D., Ph.D.

N Engl J Med 2016; 375:1482-1483 October 13, 2016 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMe1610395

CITING ARTICLES

  1. Matthew R. Cooperberg. . (2016) Re: 10-Year Outcomes After Monitoring, Surgery, or Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer. European Urology.
    CrossRef

  2. Jean-Jacques Mazeron. . (2016) Cancer de la prostate : to treat or not to treat ?. Bulletin du Cancer.
    CrossRef

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