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Four patents and one patent application on Nanopore Sequencing and methods of trapping a molecule in a nanopore assigned to Genia, is been claimed in a Law Suit by The Regents of the University of California, should be assigned to UCSC

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

The university claims that while at UCSC Roger Chen’s research focused on nanopore sequencing, and that he along with others developed technology that became the basis of patent applications filed by the university. However, when Chen left the university in 2008 and cofounded Genia, he was awarded patents for technology developed while he was at UCSC, but those patents were assigned to Genia and not the university, according to the suit.

In the suit, the university notes four patents and one patent application assigned to Genia that it claims should be assigned to UCSC: US Patent Nos., 8,324,914; 8,461,854; 9,041,420; and 9,377,437; and US Patent Application 15/079,322. The patents and patent applications all relate to nanopore sequencing and specifically to methods of trapping a molecule in a nanopore and characterizing it based on the electrical stimulus required to move the molecule through the pore.

Genia was founded in 2009, and in 2014, Roche acquired the startup for $125 million in cash and up to $225 million in milestone payments. Earlier this year, the company published a proof-of-principle study of its technology in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Roche’s head of sequencing solutions, Neil Gunn, said that Roche would announce a commercialization timeline in 2017.

It’s unclear how the lawsuit will impact that commercialization, but Mick Watson, director of ARK-Genomics at the Roslin Institute in the UK, speculated in a blog post that if the suit is decided in favor of UCSC, it could result in a very large settlement and potentially even the end of Genia.

 

SOURCE

https://www.genomeweb.com/sequencing/university-california-files-suit-against-genia-cofounder

http://www.opiniomics.org/university-of-california-makes-legal-move-against-roger-chen-and-genia/

 

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University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland – A Prominent Center of Pediatric Research and Medicine

Author: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

Co-Editor: The VOICES of Patients, Hospital CEOs, HealthCare Providers, Caregivers and Families: Personal Experience with Critical Care and Invasive Medical Procedures

 

University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich —  http://www.kispi.uzh.ch), in Switzerland, is the largest specialized, child and adolescent hospital in the country and one of the leading research centers for pediatric and youth medicine in Europe. The hospital, which has about 220 beds, numerous outpatient clinics, a day clinic, an interdisciplinary emergency room, and a specialized rehabilitation center, is a non-profit private institution that offers a comprehensive range of more than 40 medical sub-specializations, including heart conditions, bone marrow transplantation and burns. There are approximately 2,200 physicians, nurses, and other allied health care and administrative personnel employed at the hospital.

Just as important, the hospital houses the Children’s Research Center (CRC), the first research center in Switzerland that is solely dedicated to pediatric research, and is on par with the largest children’s clinics in the world. The research center provides a strong link between research and clinical experience to ensure that the latest scientific findings are made available to patients and implemented in life-saving therapies. By developing highly precise early diagnoses, innovative therapeutic approaches and effective new drugs, the researchers aim to provide a breakthrough in prevention, treatment and cure of common and, especially, rare diseases in children.

Several significant milestones have been reached over the past year. One important project under way is approval by the hospital management board and Zurich city council to construct a new building, projected to be completed in 2021. The new Children’s Hospital will constitute two main buildings; one building will house the hospital with around 200 beds, and the other building will house university research and teaching facilities.

In the ongoing quest for growing demands for quality, safety and efficiency that better serve patients and their families, the hospital management established a new role of Chief Operating Officer. This new position is responsible for the daily operation of the hospital, focusing on safety and clinical results, building a service culture and producing strong financial results. Greater emphasis on clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction and partnering with physicians, nurses, and other medical and administrative staff is all part of developing a thriving and lasting hospital culture.

Recently, the hospital’s Neurodermatitis Unit in cooperation with Christine Kuehne – Center for Allergy Research and Education (CK-Care), one of Europe’s largest private initiatives in the field of allergology, has won the “Interprofessionality Award” from the Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences.  This award highlights best practices among doctors, nurses and medical staff in organizations who work together to diagnose and treat the health and well-being of patients, especially children with atopic dermatitis and their families.

At the northern end of Lake Zurich and between the mountain summit of the Uetliberg and Zurichberg, Children’s Hospital is located in the center of the residential district of Hottingen.

 

childrens-hospital4childrens-hospital3childrens-hospital2childrens-hospital1

Image SOURCE: Photograph courtesy of Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland. Interior and exterior photographs of the hospital.

 

Below is my interview with Hospital Director and Chief Executive Officer Markus Malagoli, Ph.D., which occurred in December, 2016.

How do you keep the spirit of innovation alive? 

Dr. Malagoli: Innovation in an organization, such as the University Children’s Hospital, correlates to a large extent on the power to attract the best and most innovative medical team and administrative people. It is our hope that by providing our employees with the time and financial resources to undertake needed research projects, they will be opened to further academic perspectives. At first sight, this may seem to be an expensive opportunity. However, in the long run, we have significant research under way in key areas which benefits children ultimately. It also gives our hospital the competitive edge in providing quality care and helps us recruit the best physicians, nurses, therapists, social workers and administrative staff.

The Children’s Hospital Zurich is nationally and internationally positioned as highly specialized in the following areas:

  • Cardiology and cardiac surgery: pediatric cardiac center,
  • Neonatal and malformation surgery as well as fetal surgery,
  • Neurology and neurosurgery as well as neurorehabilitation,
  • Oncology, hematology and immunology as well as oncology and stem cell transplants,
  • Metabolic disorders and endocrinology as well as newborn screening, and
  • Combustion surgery and plastic reconstructive surgery.

We provide patients with our special medical expertise, as well as an expanded  knowledge and new insights into the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of diseases, accidents or deformities. We have more than 40 medical disciplines that cover the entire spectrum of pediatrics as well as child and youth surgery.

As an example, for many years, we have treated all congenital and acquired heart disease in children. Since 2004, specialized heart surgery and post-operative care in our cardiac intensive care unit have been carried out exclusively in our child-friendly hospital. A separate heart operation area was set up for this purpose. The children’s heart center also has a modern cardiac catheter laboratory for children and adolescents with all diagnostic and catheter-interventional therapeutic options. Heart-specific non-invasive diagnostic possibilities using MRI are available as well as a large cardiology clinic with approximately 4,500 outpatient consultations per year. In April 2013, a special ward only for cardiac patients was opened and our nursing staff is highly specialized in the care of children with heart problems.

In addition to the advanced medical diagnostics and treatment of children, we also believe in the importance of caring and supporting families of sick children with a focus on their psychosocial well-being. For this purpose, a team of specialized nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers are available. Occasionally, the children and their families need rehabilitation and we work with a team of specialists to plan and organize the best in-house or out-patient rehabilitation for the children and their families.

We also provide therapeutic, rehabilitation and social services that encompass nutritional advice, art and expression therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy, psychomotor therapy, a helpline for rare diseases, pastoral care, social counseling, and even hospital clowns. Our hospital teams work together to provide our patients with the best care so they are on the road to recovery in the fastest possible way.

What draws patients to Children’s Hospital?

Dr. Malagoli: Our hospital depends heavily on complex, interdisciplinary cases. For many diagnosis and treatments, our hospital is the last resort for children and adolescents in Switzerland and even across other countries. Our team is fully committed to the welfare of the patients they treat in order to deal with complex medical cases, such as diseases and disorders of the musculo-skeletal system and connective tissue, nervous system, respiratory system, digestive system, and ear, nose and throat, for example.

Most of our patients come from Switzerland and other cantons within the country, yet other patients come from as far away as Russia and the Middle East. Our hospital sees about 80,000 patients each year in the outpatient clinic for conditions, such as allergic pulmonary diseases, endocrinology and diabetology, hepatology, and gastroenterology; about 7,000 patients a year are seen for surgery; and about 37,000 patients a year are treated in the emergency ward.

We believe that parents are not visitors; they belong to the sick child’s healing, growth, and development. This guiding principle is a challenge for us, because we care not only for sick children, but also for their families, who may need personal or financial resources. Many of our services for parents, for example, are not paid by the Swiss health insurance and we depend strongly on funds from private institutions. We want to convey the feeling of security to children and adolescents of all ages and we involve the family in the recovery process.

What are the hospital’s strengths?

Dr. Malagoli: A special strength of our hospital is the interdisciplinary thinking of our teams. In addition to the interdisciplinary emergency and intensive care units, there are several internal institutionalized meetings, such as the uro-nephro-radiological conference on Mondays, the oncological conference and the gastroenterological meeting on Tuesdays,  and the pneumological case discussion on Wednesdays, where complex cases are discussed among our doctors. Foreign doctors are welcome to these meetings, and cases are also discussed at the appropriate external medical conferences.

Can you discuss some of the research projects under way at the Children’s Research Center (CRC)?

Dr. Malagoli: Our Children’s Research Center, the first research center in Switzerland focused on pediatric research, works closely with our hospital team. From basic research to clinical application, the hospital’s tasks in research and teaching is at the core of the Children’s Research Center for many young and established researchers and, ultimately, also for patients.

Our research projects focus on:

  • Behavior of the nervous, metabolic, cardiovascular and immune system in all stages of growth and development of the child’s condition,
  • Etiology (causes of disease) and treatment of genetic diseases,
  • Tissue engineering of the skin and skin care research: from a few cells of a child,  complex two-layered skin is produced in the laboratory for life-saving measures after severe burns and treatment of congenital anomalies of the skin,
  • Potential treatment approaches of the most severe infectious diseases, and
  • Cancer diseases of children and adolescents.

You are making great strides in diagnostic work in the areas of Hematology, Immumology, Infectiology and Oncology. Would you elaborate on this particular work that is taking place at the hospital?

Dr. Malagoli: The Department of Image Diagnostics handles radiological and ultrasonographic examinations, and the numerous specialist labs offer a complete  range of laboratory diagnostics.

The laboratory center makes an important contribution to the clarification and treatment of disorders of immune defense, blood and cancer, as well as infections of all kinds and severity. Our highly specialized laboratories offer a large number of analyzes which are necessary in the assessment of normal and pathological cell functions and take into account the specifics and requirements of growth and development in children and infants.

The lab center also participates in various clinical trials and research projects. This allows on-going validation and finally introducing the latest test methods.

The laboratory has been certified as ISO 9001 by the Swiss Government since 2002 and has met the quality management system requirements on meeting patient expectations and delivering customer satisfaction. The interdisciplinary cooperation and careful communication of the laboratory results are at the center of our activities. Within the scope of our quality assurance measures, we conduct internal quality controls on a regular basis and participate in external tests. Among other things, the work of the laboratory center is supervised by the cantonal medicine committee and Swissmedic organization.

Additionally, the Metabolism Laboratory  offers a wide variety of biochemical and molecular diagnostic analysis, including those for the following areas:

  • Disorders in glycogen and fructose metabolism,
  • Lysosomal disorders,
  • Disorders of biotin and vitamin B12 metabolism,
  • Urea cycle disorders and Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD),
  • Congenital disorders of protein glycosylation, and
  • Hereditary disorders of connective tissue, such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Marfan Syndrome.

Screening for newborn conditions is equally important. The Newborn Screening Laboratory examines all newborn children in Switzerland for congenital metabolic and hormonal diseases. Untreated, the diseases detected in the screening lead in most cases to serious damage to different organs, but especially to the development of the brain. Thanks to the newborn screening, the metabolic and hormonal diseases that are being sought can be investigated by means of modern methods shortly after birth. For this, only a few drops of blood are necessary, which are taken from the heel on the third or fourth day after birth. On a filter paper strip, these blood drops are sent to the laboratory of the Children’s Hospital Zurich, where they are examined for the following diseases:

  • Phenylketonuria (PKU),
  • Hypothyroidism,
  • MCAD deficiency,
  • Adrenogenital Syndrome (AGS),
  • Galactosemia,
  • Biotinide deficiency,
  • Cystic Fibrosis (CF),
  • Glutaraziduria Type 1 (GA-1), and
  • Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD).

Ongoing physician medical education and executive training is important for the overall well-being of the hospital. Would you describe the program and the courses?

Dr. Malagoli:  We place a high priority on medical education and training with a focus on children, youth, and their families. The various departments of the hospital offer regular specialist training courses for interested physicians at regular intervals. Training is available in the following areas:

  • Anesthesiology,
  • Surgery,
  • Developmental Pediatrics,
  • Cardiology,
  • Clinical Chemistry and Biochemistry,
  • Neuropediatrics,
  • Oncology,
  • Pediatrics, and
  • Rehabilitation.

As a training hospital, we have built an extensive network or relationships with physicians in Switzerland as well as other parts of the world, who take part in our ongoing medical education opportunities that focus on specialized pediatrics and  pediatric surgery. Also, newly trained, young physicians who are in private practice or affiliated with other children’s hospitals often take part in our courses.

We also offer our hospital management and leaders from other organizations professional development in the areas of leadership or specialized competence training. We believe that all executives in leadership or management roles contribute significantly to our success and to a positive working climate. That is why we have developed crucial training in specific, work-related courses, including planning and communications skills, professional competence, and entrepreneurial development.

How is Children’s Hospital transforming health care? 

Dr. Malagoli: The close cooperation between doctors, nurses, therapists and social workers is a key success factor in transforming health care. We strive for comprehensive child care that does not only focus on somatic issues but also on psychological support for patients and their families and social re-integration. However, it becomes more and more difficult to finance all the necessary support services.

Many supportive services, for example, for parents and families of sick children are not paid by health insurance in Switzerland and we do not receive financial support from the Swiss Government. Since 2012, we have the Swiss Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG) guidelines, a new tariff system for inpatient hospital services, that regulates costs for treatment in hospitals all over the country and those costs do not consider the amount of extra services we provide for parents and families as a children’s hospital. Those DRG principles mostly are for hospitals who treat adult patients.

Since you stepped into your role as CEO, how have you changed the way that you deliver health care?

Dr. Malagoli: I have definitely not reinvented health care! Giving my staff the space for individual development and the chance to realize their ideas is probably my main contribution to our success. Working with children is for many people motivating and enriching. We benefit from that, too. Moreover, we have managed to build up a culture of confidence and mutual respect – we call it the “Kispi-spirit”. “Kispi” as abbreviation of “Kinderspital.” Please visit our special recruiting site, which is www.kispi-spirit.ch.

I can think of a few examples where our doctors and medical teams have made a difference in the lives of our patients. Two of our physicians – PD (Privatdozent, a private university teacher) Dr. med. Alexander Moller and Dr. med. Florian Singer, Ph.D. – are involved in the development of new pulmonary functions tests which allow us to diagnose chronic lung diseases at an early stage in young children.

  • Often times, newly born babies have a lung disease but do not show any specific symptoms, such as coughing. One of these new tests measures lung function based on inhaling and exhaling pure oxygen, rather than using the standard spirometry test used in children and adults to assess how well an infant’s lungs work by measuring how much air they inhale, how much they exhale and how quickly they exhale. The new test is currently part of a clinical routine in children with cystic fibrosis as well as in clinical trials in Europe. The test is so successful that the European Respiratory Society presented Dr. med. Singer, Ph.D., with the ‘Pediatric Research Award’ in 2015.
  • Another significant research question among the pediatric pulmonary disease community is how asthma can be diagnosed reliably and at an earlier stage. PD Dr. med. Moller, chief physician of Pneumology at the hospital, has high hopes in a new way to measure exhaled air via mass spectrometry. If it succeeds, it will be able to evaluate changes in the lungs of asthmatics or help with more specific diagnoses of pneumonia.

In what ways have you built greater transparency, accountability and quality improvement for the benefit of patients?

Dr. Malagoli: Apart from the quality measures which are prescribed by Swiss law, we have decided not to strive for quality certifications and accreditations. We focus on outcome quality, record our results in quality registers and compare our outcome internationally with the best in class.

Our team of approximately 2,200 specialized physicians largely comes from Switzerland, although we have attracted a number of doctors from countries such as Germany, Portugal, Italy, Austria, and even Serbia, Turkey, Macedonia, Slovakia, and Croatia.

We recently conducted an employee satisfaction survey, which showed about 88 percent of employees were very satisfied or satisfied with their working conditions at the hospital and the job we are doing with patients and their families. This ranking is particularly gratifying for us as a service provider for the children and families we serve.

How does your volunteer program help families better deal with hospitalized children?

Dr. Malagoli: We have an enormous commitment from volunteers to care for hospitalized children and we are grateful to them. We offer our patients and their families child care, dog therapy, and even parenting by the Aladdin Foundation, a volunteer visiting service for hospitalized children to relieve parents and relatives and help young patients stay in hospital to recover quickly. The volunteers visit the child in the absence of the parents and are fully briefed on the child’s condition and care plan. The handling of care request usually takes no more than 24 hours and is free of charge. The assignments range from one-off visits to daily care for several weeks.

malagoli_m_905

Image SOURCE: Photograph of Hospital Director and Chief Executive Officer Markus Malagoli, Ph.D., courtesy of Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), Switzerland.  

Markus Malagoli, Ph.D.
Director and Chief Executive Officer

Markus Malagoli, Ph.D., has been Hospital Director and Chief Executive Officer of the University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich), since 2007.

Prior to his current role, Dr. Malagoli served as Chairman of Hospital Management and Head of Geriatrics of the Schaffhausen-Akutspital, the only public hospital in the Canton of Schaffhausen, from 2003 through 2007, where he was responsible for 10 departments, including surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, rheumatology/rehabilitation, throat and nose, eyes, radiology, anesthesia, hospital pharmacy and administration. The hospital employs approximately 1,000 physicians, nursing staff, other medical personal, as well as administration and operational services employees. On average, around 9,000 individuals are treated in the hospital yearly. Previously, he was Administrative Director at the Hospital from 1996 through 2003.

Dr. Malagoli began his career at Ciba-Geigy in 1985, spending 11 years in the company. He worked in Business Accounting in Basel, and a few years later, became Head of the Production Information System department in Basel. He then was transferred to Ciba-Geigy in South Africa as Controller/Treasurer and returned to Basel as Project Manager for the SAP Migration Project in Accounting.

Dr. Malagoli received his B.A. degree in Finance and Accounting and a Ph.D. in Business Administration at the University of St. Gallen.

He is a member of the Supervisory Board of Schaffhausen-Akutspital and President of the Ungarbühl in Schaffhausen, a dormitory for individuals with developmental impairments.

Editor’s note:

We would like to thank Manuela Frey, communications manager, University Children’s Hospital Zurich, for the help and support she provided during this interview.

 

REFERENCE/SOURCE

University Children’s Hospital Zurich (Universitäts-Kinderspital Zürich —  http://www.kispi.uzh.ch)

Other related articles

Retrieved from http://www.swisshealth.ch/en/patienten/spitaeler/Kispi.php

Retrieved from http://hospitals.webometrics.info/en/europe/switzerland%20

Retrieved from http://www.gruner.ch/en/projects/university-childrens-hospital-zurich

Retrieved from http://www.ebmt-swiss-ng.org/university-childrens-hospital-zurich.html

Other related articles were published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following: 

2016

Healthcare conglomeration to access Big Data and lower costs

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/13/healthcare-conglomeration-to-access-big-data-and-lower-costs/

A New Standard in Health Care – Farrer Park Hospital, Singapore’s First Fully Integrated Healthcare/Hospitality Complex

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/22/a-new-standard-in-health-care-farrer-park-hospital-singapores-first-fully-integrated-healthcarehospitality-complex/

A Rich Tradition of Patient-Focused Care — Richmond University Medical Center, New York’s Leader in Health Care and Medical Education

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/10/17/a-rich-tradition-of-patient-focused-care-richmond-university-medical-center-new-yorks-leader-in-health-care-and-medical-education/

2013

Risk Factor for Health Systems: High Turnover of Hospital CEOs and Visionary’s Role of Hospitals In 10 Years

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/08/08/risk-factor-for-health-systems-high-turnover-of-hospital-ceos-and-visionarys-role-of-hospitals-in-10-years/

Nation’s Biobanks: Academic institutions, Research institutes and Hospitals – vary by Collections Size, Types of Specimens and Applications: Regulations are Needed

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/01/26/nations-biobanks-academic-institutions-research-institutes-and-hospitals-vary-by-collections-size-types-of-specimens-and-applications-regulations-are-needed/

 

 

 

 

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Discover Brigham Agenda, Thursday, November 10, 2016: An event to educate and inspire collaboration around innovative science, technology and medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
NOVEMBER 10TH BOSTON, MA

DISCOVER BRIGHAM

An event to educate and inspire collaboration around innovative science, technology and medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. This event is free and open to the public – all are welcome to attend.

 

Discover Brigham

Join us on Thursday, November 10, 2016 at Brigham and Women’s Hospital for an event that brings together our community with the broader Boston healthcare ecosystem to educate and inspire collaboration around innovative science, technology, and medicine.

Thematic sessions will highlight the work on cutting-edge topics spanning research and clinical disciplines with the potential to change healthcare, including Precision Medicine, Global Health, Pain Management, Lung Research in Interstitial Lung Disease,  Neurosciences, Trauma, Zika in Pregnancy  and Regenerative Medicine.

Other activities include a scientific poster session, awards ceremony and a reception in the new Brigham Building for Transformative Medicine.

This event is free and open to the public – all are welcome to attend!

SOURCE

http://www.discoverbrigham.org/

 

Discover Brigham Agenda

11AM – 12PM

Magnet® Matters: Nursing Research

Bornstein Amphitheatre

12PM – 1PM

Poster Session

Posters are located at to be announced locations across the hospital

Lunch

Served at to be announced locations across the hospital

2PM – 3PM

Trauma

Brigham Building for Transformative Medicine

4PM – 5PM

Awards Ceremony

Bornstein Amphitheatre

5PM – 6PM

Reception

Brigham Building for Transformative Medicine

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Interview with Bill Zurn, Scientist and Inventor in http://www.globalinnovationmagazine.com October 2016″

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

BILL ZURN’S drill bit & cylinder patent was issued on Oct 11, 2016. 

US Patent 9,464,487

http://pdfpiw.uspto.gov/.piw?PageNum=0&docid=09464487&IDKey=9542CA372E67&HomeUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fpatft1.uspto.gov%2Fnetacgi%2Fnph-Parser%3FSect1%3DPTO1%2526Sect2%3DHITOFF%2526d%3DPALL%2526p%3D1%2526u%3D%25252Fnetahtml%25252FPTO%25252Fsrchnum.htm%2526r%3D1%2526f%3DG%2526l%3D50%2526s1%3D9%2C464%2C487.PN.%2526OS%3DPN%2F9%2C464%2C487%2526RS%3DPN%2F9%2C464%2C487

zurn_interview_global_innovation_mag_10-04-2016_page_1

 

zurn_interview_global_innovation_mag_10-04-2016_page_2

Permission to Re-Publish Interview with Bill Zurn

“This interview was first featured in www.globalinnovationmagazine.com October 2016″.

From: clifford.thornton@gmail.com

Date: Fri, 14 Oct 2016 02:21:39 -0400

Subject: Fwd: Request permission to re-publish William Zurn Interview – Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

To: wilzur@msn.com

CC: avivalev-ari@alum.berkeley.edu; jamesoflynn@hotmail.com; clifford.thornton@gmail.com

Bill,

Per James O’Flynn and his forwarded Email below, he is fine with you re-publishing the interview in LPBI.  He has granted you permission for that initiative. 

He has requested, as a condition of that permission, to note in the related LPBI publication/ re-publishing, “This interview was first featured in www.globalinnovationmagazine.com October 2016″.

Regards,

Cliff

———- Forwarded message ———-

From: james oflynn <jamesoflynn@hotmail.com>

Date: Fri, Oct 14, 2016 at 2:01 AM

Subject: Re: Request permission to re-publish William Zurn Interview – Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

To: Clifford Thornton <clifford.thornton@gmail.com>

That’s fine, I would like it noted in their publication though i.e. ‘This interview first featured in www.globalinnovationmagazine.com October 2016′

Best

James 

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From Editor of R&D Magazine: listen in on R&D’s exciting webinar on September 20th, 2016 “Powering Research & Innovation with Patent Data”.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

Dear Subscriber,

I’d like to personally invite you to listen in on R&D’s exciting webinar on September 20th, 2016 “Powering Research & Innovation with Patent Data”.

Join me, along with expert Bob Stembridge of Thomson Reuters, as they explore innovation that can lead to profitability.

You’ll learn how:

  • The use of patent data in technology/white space analysis can provide an understanding of market and technology trends.
  • Emerging trends in patent and scientific literature can help determine R&D and business strategic decisions.

You won’t want to miss this webinar. We will also be taking questions, so please let our expert help you with your specific questions. If you can make the date, sign-up anyway, you can watch it at your leisure on-demand.

Sign up here

Thank you,

Tim Studt

Contributing Editor

R&D Magazine

SOURCE

From: Tim Studt <reply@mail.pddnet.com>

Reply-To: Advantage Business Media <reply-fe8a11757160077a7c-487063_HTML-461755519-1003361-137@mail.advantagebusinessmedia.com>

Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 11:31 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: A Personal Invitation – Sign-up Today

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Licensing Agreements for CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Technology Patent

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

AstraZeneca’s CRISPR research collaborations are with the following institutions:

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, UK

Under the terms of the collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, research will focus on deleting specific genes relevant to cancer, cardiovascular, metabolic, respiratory, autoimmune & inflammatory diseases and regenerative medicine to understand their precise role in these conditions. AstraZeneca will provide cell lines that can be targeted using the Sanger Institute’s collection of genome-wide CRISPR guide-RNA libraries to generate populations of cells in which defined genes are switched off. Genes will subsequently be identified by next-generation sequencing and cell populations tested to validate the effects of a given gene on a wide range of physical and biological traits.

“The Sanger Institute’s guide-RNA library enables researchers to target genes with incredible specificity,” said Dr. Kosuke Yusa, Member of Faculty at the Sanger Institute. “CRISPR has transformed the way we study the behaviour of cells and now the application of this powerful technology to the search for effective drugs has the potential to benefit patients.”

The Innovative Genomics Initiative, California

The Innovative Genomics Initiative (IGI) is a joint venture between the University of California, Berkeley and University of California, San Francisco. The research collaboration will focus on either inhibiting (CRISPRi) or activating (CRISPRa) genes to understand their role in disease pathology. The IGI and AstraZeneca will work closely together to identify and validate gene targets relevant to cancer, cardiovascular, metabolic, respiratory, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and regenerative medicine to understand their precise role in these conditions.

“We are excited to pair the IGI’s premier expertise in CRISPR gene editing and regulation with AstraZeneca’s deep experience in therapeutics,” said Jacob Corn, Scientific Director of the Innovative Genomics Initiative. “I’m confident that, working side-by-side with scientists at AstraZeneca, our collaboration will positively impact drug discovery and development to hasten treatments to patients.”

Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, Massachusetts

Under the terms of the collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, a world-leading reagent and instrument provider, AstraZeneca will receive RNA-guide libraries that target individual known human genes and gene families. AstraZeneca can screen these guides against cell lines to identify new disease targets.

“Through this research collaboration with AstraZeneca, Thermo Fisher is helping to accelerate access to cutting edge genome-editing applications for next generation drug discovery. Enabling more relevant disease models will improve target identification and translation to therapeutics,” said Dr. Jon Chesnut, Director of Synthetic Biology R&D at Thermo Fisher Scientific.

Broad Institute/Whitehead Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts

The collaboration with the Broad Institute and Whitehead Institute will evaluate a genome-wide CRISPR library against a panel of cancer cell lines with a view to identifying new targets for cancer drug discovery.

In addition to the new collaborations, AstraZeneca’s in-house programme is currently adapting CRISPR technology to streamline and accelerate the production of cell lines and translational models that mimic complex genomic and disease-relevant scenarios.

“Application of the CRISPR technology for precise genome editing in recombinant cell lines and in relevant disease models should enable us to identify novel targets, build better test systems for drug discovery and enhance the translatability of our efficacy and safety models,” said Dr. Lorenz Mayr, Vice President, Reagents & Assay Development, AstraZeneca.

The short video above explaining how CRISPR technology works is available in English, Mandarin and Spanish, and a still image illustrating the technology is available.

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About The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is one of the world’s leading genome centres. Through its ability to conduct research at scale, it is able to engage in bold and long-term exploratory projects that are designed to influence and empower medical science globally. Institute research findings, generated through its own research programmes and through its leading role in international consortia, are being used to develop new diagnostics and treatments for human disease.http://www.sanger.ac.uk/

About Innovative Genomics Initiative

The Innovative Genomics Initiative (IGI) was established in early 2014 at the Li Ka Shing Center for Genomic Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and is a joint UC Berkeley/UC San Francisco initiative catalyzing and guiding the global effort in both the academic and commercial research communities to unleash the transformative potential of CRISPR/Cas9 technology for positive human impact.

About the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT

The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT was launched in 2004 to empower this generation of creative scientists to transform medicine. The Broad Institute seeks to describe all the molecular components of life and their connections; discover the molecular basis of major human diseases; develop effective new approaches to diagnostics and therapeutics; and disseminate discoveries, tools, methods and data openly to the entire scientific community.

Founded by MIT, Harvard and its affiliated hospitals, and the visionary Los Angeles philanthropists Eli and Edythe L. Broad, the Broad Institute includes faculty, professional staff and students from throughout the MIT and Harvard biomedical research communities and beyond, with collaborations spanning over a hundred private and public institutions in more than 40 countries worldwide. For further information about the Broad Institute, go to http://www.broadinstitute.org.

About Whitehead Institute

Whitehead Institute is a world-renowned non-profit research institution dedicated to improving human health through basic biomedical research. Wholly independent in its governance, finances, and research programs, Whitehead shares a close affiliation with Massachusetts Institute of Technology through its faculty, who hold joint MIT appointments. http://wi.mit.edu

About Thermo Fisher Scientific

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. is the world leader in serving science, with revenues of $17 billion and 50,000 employees in 50 countries. Our mission is to enable our customers to make the world healthier, cleaner and safer. We help our customers accelerate life sciences research, solve complex analytical challenges, improve patient diagnostics and increase laboratory productivity. Through our four premier brands – Thermo Scientific, Life Technologies, Fisher Scientific and Unity Lab Services – we offer an unmatched combination of innovative technologies, purchasing convenience and comprehensive support. For more information, please visit www.thermofisher.com.

SOURCE

https://www.astrazeneca.com/media-centre/press-releases/2015/astrazeneca-crispr-technology-genome-editing-29012015.html

Novartis

  • Caribou BioSciences – Jennifer Daudna
  • Intellia

Novartis bought in to Intellia–as well as Caribou, which out-licensed some pioneering CRISPR tech created by Jennifer Doudna at UC Berkeley–with a clear interest in tapping the science for its ambitious CAR-T work reengineering T cells into cancer weapons. John Leonard was wooed in from the Big Pharma world, after a stint in charge of R&D at AbbVie ($ABBV). And gene editing–deleting, repairing and inserting genetic information to correct an ailment–has what is widely viewed as a potent future in devising a new generation of potential cures.

“CRISPR/Cas9 technology has potential to transform medicine by addressing previously untreatable genetic targets and serving as the basis for new and better therapies,” said Leonard in a statement. “This novel technology could potentially eliminate many severely disabling and life-threatening diseases for patients.”

But after the Big Vision, detailed insights into the company’s plans can be hard to glean. Asked about the apparent likelihood of an IPO in the offing, CEO Nessan Bermingham declined comment.

SOURCE

SOURCE

http://www.fiercebiotech.com/story/crispr-player-intellia-looks-ipo-ready-after-70m-round/2015-09-01?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal

Bayer LifeScience Center (BLSC)

  • ERS Genomics – Emmanuelle Charpentier
  • CRISPR Therapeutics – Emmanuelle Charpentier and

Bayer Inks CRISPR Patent Licensing Agreement

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Bayer and ERS Genomics announced today that they have signed a patent license agreement, giving the Bayer LifeScience Center (BLSC) access to ERS’s foundational CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology.

Financial and other details of the agreement were not disclosed.

ERS Genomics was formed to commercialize patents held by CRISPR pioneer Emmanuelle Charpentier, now director of the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology. She is a co-inventor on a foundational CRISPR/Cas9 patent application currently at the center of a patent interference trial being conducted by the US Patent and Trademark Office. A team led by the Broad Institute currently holds the key patent for CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

The BLSC has also recently created a joint venture with CRISPR Therapeutics, a firm Charpentier co-founded, to develop new CRISPR-based therapies.

SOURCE

https://www.genomeweb.com/business-news/bayer-inks-crispr-patent-licensing-agreement

Vertex Therapeutics

  • CRISPR Therapeutics – Emmanuelle Charpentier

IDT

  • Caribou BioSciences – Jennifer Daudna

DuPont

  • Caribou BioSciences – Jennifer Daudna

Evotec

  • Broad Institute

Regeneron

  • ERS Genomics – Emmanuelle Charpentier
  • Intellia – Jennifer Daudna

Licensing deal with Regeneron to accelerate CRISPR biotech Intellia (Jennifer Doudna’s Start Up) for an IPO

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/12/licensing-deal-with-regeneron-to-accelerate-crispr-biotech-intellia-jennifer-doudnas-start-up-for-an-ipo/

Albany Molecular Research (AMRI)

  • Broad Institute

https://www.genomeweb.com/gene-silencinggene-editing/broad-institute-licenses-crisprcas9-amri?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily%20News:%20Broad%20Institute%20Licenses%20CRISPR/Cas9%20to%20AMRI%20-%2008/24/2016%2011:15:00%20AM

MERCK

  • Moderna Therapeutics

Cases in Biotech Entrepreneurship: Selective Start Ups in 2016

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/03/06/cases-in-biotech-entrepreneurship-selective-start-ups-in-2016/

Moderna Therapeutics Deal with Merck: Are Personalized Vaccines here?

Curator & Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/08/11/moderna-therapeutics-deal-with-merck-are-personalized-vaccines-here/

at #JPM16 – Moderna Therapeutics turns away an extra $200 million: with AstraZeneca (collaboration) & with Merck ($100 million investment)

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/13/at-jpm16-moderna-therapeutics-turns-away-an-extra-200-million-with-astrazeneca-collaboration-with-merck-100-million-investment/

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Pioneers of Cancer Cell Therapy:  Turbocharging the Immune System to Battle Cancer Cells — Success in Hematological Cancers vs. Solid Tumors

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy: Players in Basic & Translational Research and Biotech/Pharma

The companies are teamed with academic pioneers:

  • Novartis with University of Pennsylvania;
  • Kite Pharma with the National Cancer Institute; 
  • Juno Therapeutics with Sloan Kettering,
  • the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and Seattle Children’s Hospital.

cancer33

IMAGE SOURCE: National Cancer Institute

 

 “CAR-T cell immunotherapy” –  genetically modified T cells that are engineered to target specific tumor antigens and/or genes that are involved in survival, proliferation, and the enhancement of effector functions have been under intense research.

 

CAR technology was originally reported by Zelig Eshhar in 1993.

https://www.weizmann.ac.il/immunology/sci/EshharPage.html

Prof. Zelig Eshhar, Ph.D., served as Chairman of the Department of Immunology at the Weizmann Institute. Prof. Eshhar has been Chair of Scientific Advisory Board at TxCell S.A. since April 2016. Prof. Eshhar has been a Member of Scientific Advisory Board at Kite Pharma, Inc. since August 8, 2013. Prof. Eshhar served as a Member of Scientific Advisory Board at Intellect Neurosciences, Inc. since April 2006.

Prof. Eshhar pioneered the CAR approach (or T-Body as he termed it) to redirect T cells to recognize, engage and kill patient’s tumor cells by engineering them with a construct that combines the anti-target specificity of an antibody with T cell activation domains. Prof. Eshhar serves on several editorial boards, including Cancer Gene Therapy, Human Gene Therapy, Gene Therapy, Expert Opinion on Therapeutics, European Journal of Immunology and the Journal of Gene Medicine. He was a Research Fellow in the Department of Pathology at Harvard Medical School and in the Department of Chemical Immunology at the Weizmann Institute in Israel. His achievements were recognized by several international awards, most recently the CAR Pioneering award by the ATTACK European Consortium. Prof. Eshhar obtained his B.Sc. in Biochemistry and Microbiology and his M.Sc. in Biochemistry from the Hebrew University, and his Ph.D. in the Department of Immunology from the Weizmann Institute of Science.

http://www.bloomberg.com/research/stocks/people/person.asp?personId=32720993&privcapId=32390485

 

Zelig Eshhar and Carl H. June honored for research on T cell engineering for cancer immunotherapy

New Rochelle, NY, November 11, 2014–Zelig Eshhar, PhD, The Weizmann Institute of Science and Sourasky Medical Center, and Carl H. June, MD, PhD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, are co-recipients of the Pioneer Award, recognized for lentiviral gene therapy clinical trials and for their leadership and contributions in engineering T-cells capable of targeting tumors with antibody-like specificity through the development of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, is commemorating its 25th anniversary by bestowing this honor on the leading Pioneers in the field of cell and gene therapy selected by a blue ribbon panel* and publishing a Pioneer Perspective by the award recipients. The Perspectives by Dr. Eshhar and Dr. June are available free on the Human Gene Therapy website at http://www.liebertpub.com/hgt until December 11, 2014.

In his Pioneer Perspective entitled “From the Mouse Cage to Human Therapy: A Personal Perspective of the Emergence of T-bodies/Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells” Professor Eshhar chronicles his team’s groundbreaking contributions to the development of the CAR T-cell immunotherapeutic approach to treating cancer. He describes the method’s conceptual development including initial proof-of-concept, and the years of experimentation in mouse models of cancer. They first tested the CAR T-cells on tumors transplanted into mice then progressed to spontaneously developing cancers in immune-competent mice, which Dr. Eshhar describes as “a more suitable model that faithfully mimics cancer patients.” He recounts successful antitumor effects in mice with CAR modified T-cells injected directly into tumors, with effects seen at the injection site and at sites of metastasis, and even the potential of the CAR T-cells to prevent tumor development.

Dr. Carl H. June has led one of the clinical groups that has taken the CAR therapeutic strategy from the laboratory to the patients’ bedside, pioneering the use of CD19-specific CAR T-cells to treat patients with leukemia. In his Pioneer Perspective, “Toward Synthetic Biology with Engineered T Cells: A Long Journey Just Begun” Dr. June looks back on his long, multi-faceted career and describes how he combined his knowledge and research on immunology, cancer, and HIV to develop successful T-cell based immunotherapies. Among the lessons Dr. June has embraced throughout his career are to follow one’s passions. He also says that “accidents can be good: embrace the unexpected results and follow up on these as they are often times more scientifically interesting than predictable responses from less imaginative experiments.”

“These two extraordinary scientists made seminal contributions at key steps of the journey from bench to bedside for CAR T-cells,” says James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Human Gene Therapy, and Director of the Gene Therapy Program, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

SOURCE

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-11/mali-ze111114.php

The General procedure of CAR-T cell therapy involves the follwoing steps:

1) Separate T cells from patient;

2) Engineer these T cells to express an artificial receptor, which is called “CAR” that usually targets tumor-specific antigen;

3) Expand the CAR T cells to a sufficient amount;

4) Re-introduce the CAR T cells to patient.

There are two major components that are critical to the CAR-T cell immunotherapy:

  • the design of CAR itself and
  • the choice of the targeted tumor specific antigen.

SOURCE

http://www.ochis.org/node/209

 

First publication on Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells is an attractive approach for generating antitumor immune responses

Eradication of B-lineage cells and regression of lymphoma in a patient treated with autologous T cells genetically engineered to recognize CD19

James N. Kochenderfer, Wyndham H. Wilson, John E. Janik, Mark E. Dudley, Maryalice Stetler-Stevenson, Steven A. Feldman, Irina Maric, Mark Raffeld, Debbie-Ann N. Nathan, Brock J. Lanier, Richard A. Morgan, Steven A. Rosenberg

Abstract

Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells is an attractive approach for generating antitumor immune responses. We treated a patient with advanced follicular lymphoma by administering a preparative chemotherapy regimen followed by autologous T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that recognized the B-cell antigen CD19. The patient’s lymphoma underwent a dramatic regression, and B-cell precursors were selectively eliminated from the patient’s bone marrow after infusion of anti–CD19-CAR-transduced T cells. Blood B cells were absent for at least 39 weeks after anti–CD19-CAR-transduced T-cell infusion despite prompt recovery of other blood cell counts. Consistent with eradication of B-lineage cells, serum immunoglobulins decreased to very low levels after treatment. The prolonged and selective elimination of B-lineage cells could not be attributed to the chemotherapy that the patient received and indicated antigen-specific eradication of B-lineage cells. Adoptive transfer of anti–CD19-CAR-expressing T cells is a promising new approach for treating B-cell malignancies. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00924326.

SOURCE

According to Setting the Body’s ‘Serial Killers’ Loose on Cancer

After a long, intense pursuit, researchers are close to bringing to market a daring new treatment: cell therapy that turbocharges the immune system to fight cancer.

By ANDREW POLLACK  AUG. 1, 2016

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/02/health/cancer-cell-therapy-immune-system.html?_r=0

Dr. June’s 2011 publications did not cite Dr. Rosenberg’s paper [Blood, 2010] from the previous year, prompting Dr. Rosenberg to write a letter to The New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. June’s publications also did not acknowledge that the genetic construct he had used was the one he had obtained from Dr. Campana of St. Jude.

From the Lab to the bedside to the Out Patient Clinic

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