Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘An executive’s guide to AI’ Category


e-Proceedings 2020 World Medical Innovation Forum – COVID-19, AI and the Future of Medicine, Featuring Harvard and Industry Leader Insights – MGH & BWH, Virtual Event: Monday, May 11, 8:15 a.m. – 5:15 p.m. ET

 

Featuring Clinical, Scientific, Tech, AI and Venture Experts

https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/

7:50NOW PLAYING

2020 WMIF | Welcome

34 views1 hour ago

5:31NOW PLAYING

2020 WMIF | Disruptive Dozen #1

122 views1 day ago

3:27NOW PLAYING

3:56NOW PLAYING

2020 WMIF | Disruptive Dozen #4

57 views2 days ago

SOURCE

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCauKpbsS_hUqQaPp8EVGYOg

 

THIS IS THE EVENT I COVERED on 5/11/2020  BY INVITATION AS MEDIA for Mass General Brigham

 

From: “Coburn, Christopher Mark” <CMCOBURN@PARTNERS.ORG>

Date: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 at 6:48 AM

To: “Coburn, Christopher Mark” <CMCOBURN@PARTNERS.ORG>

Subject: REGISTRANT RECAP | World Medical Innovation Forum  

 

Dear World Forum Attendee, 

On behalf of Mass General Brigham CEO Anne Klibanski MD and Forum co-Chairs Gregg Meyer MD and Ravi Thadhani MD, many thanks for being among the nearly 11,000 registrants representing 93 countries, 46 states and 3200 organizations yesterday. A community was established around many pressing topics that  will continue long into the future. We hope you have a chance to examine the attached survey results. There are several revealing items that should be the basis for ongoing discussion. We expect to be in touch regularly during the year. Among the plans is a “First Look” video series highlighting top Mass General Brigham Harvard faculty as well as emerging Harvard investigators.  As promised, we  wanted to also share visual Forum session summaries.  You will be able to access the recordings on the Forum’s YouTube page . The first set will go up this morning

We hope you will join us for the 2021 Forum!  

Thanks again, Chris

 

Mass General Brigham (formerly Partners Healthcare) is pleased to invite media to attend the World Medical Innovation Forum (WMIF) virtual event on Monday, May 11. Our day-long interactive web event features expert discussions of COVID-related infectious disease innovation and the pandemic’s impact on transforming medicine, plus insights on how care may be radically transformed post-COVID. The agenda features nearly 70 executive speakers from the healthcare industry, venture, start-ups, consumer health and the front lines of COVID care, including many of our Harvard Medical School-affiliated researchers and clinicians. The event replaces our annual in-person conference, which we plan to resume in 2021.

 

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor-in Chief, Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston will cover the event in Real Time as MEDIA for our Coronavirus Portal

CORONAVIRUS, SARS-CoV-2 PORTAL @LPBI

http://lnkd.in/ePwTDxm

Launched on 3/14/2020

8:15 – 8:25 AM
Opening Remarks

Dr. Klibanski will welcome participants to the 2020 World Medical Innovation Forum, a global — and this year, virtual — gathering of more than 5,000 senior health care leaders. This annual event was established to respond to the intensifying transformation of health care and its impact on innovation. The Forum is rooted in the belief that no matter the magnitude of that change, the center of health care needs to be a shared, fundamental commitment to collaborative innovation – industry and academia working together to improve patient lives. No collaborative endeavor is more pressing than responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Introduction:
Scott Sperling, Co-President, Thomas H. Lee Partners; Chairman of the Board of Directors, Mass General Brigham

  • Introducing Anne Klibanski – Leadership at its best for breakthroughs in the entire system when return to normalcy

Anne Klibanski, MD, President & CEO, Mass General Brigham

  • Collaborative innovation between Industry and Hospitals and Government
  • Expediting innovations: Prophylactic, Diagnostics, research and care delivery
  • COVID caregivers contribution to this battle, patient experience and outcome

Add Panel to Calendar

8:25 – 8:50 AM
Care in the Next 18 Months – Routine, Elective, Remote

Hospital chief executives reflect on how health care will evolve over the next 18 months in the face of COVID-19. What will routine health care look like? What about elective surgeries and other interventions? And will care-at-a-distance continue to be an essential component? Simply put, how will we provide manage, and pay for health care in a world forever changed by COVID-19?

Moderator:
Gregg Meyer, MD, Chief Clinical Officer, Mass General Brigham; Interim President, NWH; Professor of Medicine, HMS

John Fernandez,  President, Mass Eye and Ear and Mass General Brigham Ambulatory Care

  • Out patients decrease in volume now social distancing enabled by using parking lot as waiting rooms
  • Pre visit and post visit websites will become places of touch – patients accessing via website

Elizabeth Nabel, MD, President, Brigham Health; Professor of Medicine, HMS

  • Support to frontline care
  • Old normal will not be the new normal
  • Telehealth and digital health, work force, healthcare experience, improve access
  • lower medical expense
  • Patients were afraid
  • deferred cancer operation and treatment
  • Cath Lab less 50% occupied
  • Hospitals are safe and patients must come back for procedures
  • COVID-19 only 20% of all patients
  • ICU and OR Scheduling rethink procedure digital care delivers procedures
  • deploy workforce work across repurposed units hybrids, talent acquisition new strategy
  • COVID-19 will have distinct areas
  • BWH – Patient-Nurse-Doctor relations in healing Healthcare team became the Family of the Patients

Peter Slavin, MD, President, MGH; Professor, Health Care Policy, HMS

  • Reemerging more complicated
  • In patients and Out patient realigned with care for COVID-19
  • Telemedicine 85% of outpatients visits at MGH
  • virtual care will dominate the future of care
  • disadvantaged populations suffered more in the pandemic Communities in Chelsea and Revere household received kits social determinants of illness

Add Panel to Calendar

8:50 – 9:15 AM
COVID-19: Technology Solutions Now and in the Future

Experts leading large teams at the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak discuss how technology is shaping the pandemic response today and in the coming years. What technology categories are most important? What tools are healthcare organizations, biopharmaceutical companies, and other organizations leveraging to battle this crisis? How will those tools evolve? And, importantly, how can technology inform the medical response to future pandemics? What were the biggest technology surprises in the current response?

Moderator:
Alice Park, Senior Writer, Time

Stephane Bancel, CEO, Moderna

  • mRNA synthetic RNA of Spike protein injected to stir immune response
  • Phase II working with FDA starting Phase III early Summer
  • 15 mcg dose available in 2020
  • using own capital to invest to scale up manufacturing no help from Gov’t Grant for clinical trial not for manufacturing

Paul Biddinger, MD, Medical Director for Emergency Preparedness, MGH; Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS

  • Sharing information across the system aggregate data technologies
  • ML as Guidance in resource coordination

David Kaufman, MD, PhD, Head of Translational Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Medical Research Institute

  • drug development, clinical operations remote monitoring
  • repurpose compounds usinf libraries
  • scalability and Global vaccine cheap and available globally
  • complexity is in coordinations – toolset  biology tool RNA mapping viral screening primaru cells and organoids
  • Outcomes: Aging and co-morbidities
  • Discovery effort using tools infrastructure maintained between pandemics

Rochelle Walensky, MDChief, Infectious Disease, Steve and Deborah Gorlin MGH Research Scholar, MGH; Professor of Medicine, HMS

  • shared photos important for Public health, using iPhone distribution Demedicalize Testic – not only at clinics but at many placed contact tracing and diagnosis in 24 hours – iPhone is invaluable GPS capability – privacy issues
  • detect patients with high risk and existing infection monitoring
  • Public Health – Thermometer given to Patients – data collected centrally any spike and pulse oximeter given to home – remote
  • Anxiety in opening the economy requires a bit of giving up on privacy
  • TeleHealth and monitoring remotely
  • Pharmacy and workplace as points to start Testing vs Order and a nurse call

Add Panel to Calendar

9:15 – 9:40 AM
Digital Health Becomes a Pillar: Tools, Payment, Data

Deployed in the crucible of the coronavirus pandemic, digital health has now become an essential pillar in the delivery of care. Why is that significant? How and why did it happen? What are the essential tools and components? How is the electronic health record and other health data contributing to this digital movement?

Are there novel use cases for telehealth that arose during the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic? How can digital technologies help enable a full return to work. Thinking ahead to the fall and a possible second wave, are there things we should be doing today to ensure this technology to better detect and profile a resurgence and enhance the patient benefit.

Moderator:
David Louis, MD, Pathologist-in-Chief, MGH; Benjamin Castleman Professor of Pathology, HMS

  • DIgitsl technologies – boostong and innovating
  • upscale activity
  • risk of upscaling on Providers
  • Adaptations of innovation

Alistair Erskine, MD, Chief Digital Health Officer, Mass General Brigham

Adam Landman, MD, VP, Chief Information and Digital Innovation Officer, BH; Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS

  • COVID-19 call center across Partners, Chat bots automated screening tools, Microsoft assisted 60,000 users of chat bots triaging by screening calls of the Hotline
  • TeleHealth transformation may be lost due to reimbursement which may not be reimburse after the emergency is over Insurers to incentivize use of of TeleHealth
  • In person care: Redesign and how to provide In care for the staff and for the Patients

Brooke LeVasseur, CEO, AristaMD

  • Access problem due to care shortage of specialty care
  • technology better allocate resources
  • Industry and Hospital Institutions populations they serve
  • innovations needs a sustainable economic model for reimbursement
  • Inequity issues How Telehealth can benefit all of Society, potential for future solutions

Lee Schwamm, MD, Director, Center for TeleHealth and Exec Vice Chair, Neurology, MGH; Vice President, Virtual Care/Digital Health, Mass General Brigham; Professor, Neurology, HMS

  • Surge capabilities
  • generate insight
  • Research and Innovation needs embedding in the enterprise
  • technical gap in maintenance
  • supply chain disrupted

Add Panel to Calendar

9:40 – 9:45 AM
BREAK
9:45 – 10:05 AM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Bayer Pharma Reflections on Innovation: Creating, Collaborating, and Accelerating Discovery During and After a Pandemic

Dr. Moeller will reflect on how Bayer is weathering the organizational challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. How does a global pharmaceutical company continue to drive drug development when its labs are shut down? What are the critical elements needed to keep the engines of innovation firing even in the face of a global public health crisis? How does a global r&d enterprise plan for an uncertain fall 2020 given a potential return of the virus.

Introduction:
John Fish, CEO, Suffolk; Chairman of Board Trustees, Brigham Health

  • COPD

Moderator:
Janet Wu, Bloomberg

Joerg Moeller, MD, PhD, Head of Research & Development, Pharmaceuticals Division, Bayer AG

  • led team of 9 products
  • Unprecedented is COVID-19: effect on work, travel, life
  • Anti-Malaria vs COVID-19: In China testing early chloroquine approved for RA and anti Malaria Government in China experimental and Bayer supports Clinical Trials by Bill & Melinda Foundation
  • In 8 weeks most Scientist work from home – amazed what was accomplished by 80% of Bayer working from home
  • production is kept ongoing anti-infective for Pneumonia
  • focus on most critical and keep experiment critical and push out studies run Globally – No pre-maturely study was interrupted completely
  • Great collaboration Flexibility with regulatory agencies in Europe and with FDA – levels not seen before
  • R&D in Pharma – when out different point than when we started: Opportunities- Compound libraries OPEN after the COVID Pandemic, speed of decision making, team spirit outstanding – levels not seen before
  • Partnerships: Bayer testing machines and ventilators shared, accelerate mechanisms for new drug development
  • evidence for repurposing drugs: Chloroquine
  • Solidarity – everyone are in it TOGETHER, keep that after the Pandemic is over – levels not seen before

Add Panel to Calendar

10:05 – 10:30 AM
The Patient Experience During the Pandemic

The coronavirus outbreak is not only testing health care staff and resources, it is also having an overwhelming impact on patients. This panel will focus on the approach and technologies providers are using to address the patient experience along the continuum of care.

Moderator:
Thomas Sequist, MD, Chief Patient Experience and Equity Officer, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Health Care Policy, HMS

Anjali Kataria, CEO, Mytonomy

  • Video overcome illiteracy and provide personal engagement without the negative
  • Home health will be the shift – a human component will not go away – sensor technology in car, bathroom
  • COVID-19 accelerated user adoption of Telehealth
  • Digital technologies as an equailizer Hispanic patients consumed for information with the new technologies

Daniel Kuritzkes, MD, Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, BH; Harriet Ryan Albee Professor of Medicine, HMS

  • conserve PPE impacted Physicians ability to see Patients, Nurses meet patients vs Physicians that delivered care remotely – laying on hands was missing in the care
  • Masks will not come off but in a while, can’t allow the infection to surge and curtail hospitals from functioning, use mask for the foreseable future

 

Peter Lee, PhD, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research and Incubation

  • Interactive Chat bots 1 out of 500 hospitals around the Globe adopted the Chat Bot for Patient Intake
  • Scaling telemetry with feedback loop
  • iPad at bedside, platform orchestration, new workflows for COVID-19 patients in the backend guiding Patients in the Process was new infrastructure was in the front line
  • preparing for a game change in Medicine: Patients demanding new experience
  • Historical context for physicians contribution to care and bridge the digital divide

Jag Singh, MD, PhD, Cardiologist & Founding Director, Resynchronization and Advanced Cardiac Therapeutics Program, MGH; Professor of Medicine, HMS

  • Isolation is unbearable
  • Predictive analytics
  • no going back to before Pandemic
  • COVID-19 only severe go to hospital
  • Human contact enhanced interaction with families and Docs

Add Panel to Calendar

10:30 – 10:55 AM
The Role of AI and Big Data in Fighting COVID-19 and the Next Global Crisis – Successes and Aspirations

AI is a key weapon used to fight COVID-19. What are the biggest successes so far? Which applications show the most promise for the future? Can it help a return to work? Can AI help predict and even prevent the next global health care crisis?

Moderator:
Alice Park, Senior Writer, Time

Mike Devoy, MD, EVP, Medical Affairs & Pharmacovigilance and CMO, Bayer AG

  • AI allows speeding up Genome of Spike Proteins sequencing
  • Partnership with Academia help focus effort
  • openness and willingness to collaborate and take risk in Therapeutics

Karen DeSalvo, MD,  Chief Health Officer, Google Health

  • Partnership with Apple on Contact Tracing System – BLE – only for Health applications
  • Public Health as driver as consumer Privacy preserving
  • Individual level data collection for AI applications, privacy giving up for public good
  • Trust component – in sharing data

Keith Dreyer, DO, PhD, Chief Data Science Officer, Mass General Brigham; Vice Chairman, Radiology, MGH; Associate Professor, Radiology, HMS

  • COVID allowed data on contact tracing
  • AI in image capturing for Public health – target Imaging use data to be equivalent to Human Testing at Home va in ER 1 in 10, 000 vs all populations
  • Data to AI application SW providers are stewards Open source , no conflict of interest and no discussion on profits
  • Each country will have own lessens

Add Panel to Calendar

10:55 – 11:20 AM
Designing for Infection Prevention: Innovation and Investment in Personal Protective Equipment and Facility Design

As with many pathogens, prevention is the best defense against SARS-CoV2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Panelists will discuss the insights, design strategies, technologies, and practices that are emerging to guard against infection and how those innovations are being applied to protect health care providers and their patients.
Based on what was learned during the spring of 2020, are there specific changes that will lessen morbidity and mortality in a potential a second wave?

Moderator:
Erica Shenoy, MD, PhD, Associate Chief, Infection Control Unit, MGH; Assistant Professor, HMS

Shelly AndersonSVP, Strategic Initiatives and Partnerships, & Chief Strategy Officer, BH

  • How to establish the New normal
  • Surveillence for new sources of infection
  • Operations under uncertainty
  • learned to be effective with data monitoring, training, facility adaptation to new roles
  • Investments in new materials to stabilize the supply chain: Additional suppliers,
  • Extend internal supply work with R&D on alternative materials

Michele Holcomb, PhD, EVP, Strategy and Corporate Development, Cardinal Health

  • Optimize toward lower cost vs availability of supply
  • Diverting supply chain to manufacturing not in PPE business

 

Guillermo Tearney, MD, PhD, Remondi Family Endowed MGH Research Institute Chair, Mike and Sue Hazard MGH Research Scholar, MGH; Professor, Pathology, HMS

  • 3D Printing innovations for filtration capacity of particles, respirators decontaminated, prevention of patient transmission
  • Negative pressure applied on materials as second line of protection beyond PPE
  • CPAP to be used
  • weaning from Ventilators to CPAP
  • Environment to be protected from air born pathogens

Teresa Wilson, Director/Architect, Colliers Project Leaders

  • Physical Design of the facility and rooms – use design to minimize Hospital infections principals of location of clean vs dirty functions
  • room kept cleaned, how long it takes to clean, where is the sink, hands free, modular construction plug & play design of rooms functions

Add Panel to Calendar

11:20 – 11:25 AM
BREAK
11:25 – 11:45 AM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Preparing for Fall 2020 and Beyond: Production, Innovation, Optimization

How does a global medical technology and life sciences company respond to the health challenges posed by COVID-19? Mr. Murphy will reflect on how his organization is working to meet the unprecedented demand for life-saving medical equipment for diagnosing, treating, and managing coronavirus patients. How does a large manufacturer make adjustments to FDA regulated products and supply chains in time to help lessen the impact of a second wave of COVID-19 infections.

Introduction:
Jonathan Kraft, President, The Kraft Group; Chair, Mass General Hospital Board of Trustees

  • 90 countries around the Globe – collaborative innovations partnership with GE Health – all assets around the World
  • Academic with GE Health AI, Diagnostics, data set for ML for Health care

Moderator:
Timothy Ferris, MD, CEO, MGPO; Professor, HMS

Kieran Murphy, CEO, GE Healthcare

  • Partnership GE Health & MGH
  • COVID-19 Innovations and Customers needs: Ventilators and
  • ICU Cloud application with Microsoft to save PPE and Labor, monitor several ICU rooms at once by technology
  • Quadruple the production and enter new contracts, crisis exposed weaknesses in supply chain of many products
  • Shortage of PPE was not expected, flexibility and trusted relations with GE Health Suppliers
  • CT in a BOX – 42 Slices in a container – no exposure to radiation in prefabricated rooms in field hospital requiring no contact with clinicians and rapid response
  • Command control center with John Hopkins University
  • Manufacturing facilities in China communicate the situation of the business and the customers needs buyers in the Health care industry
  • Future for Biotech industry: Modular systems deploy rapidly, test vaccine, SPEED is everything productivity & Speed
  • Productivity will increase collaboration and speed like partnership with FORD and MIcrosoft

Add Panel to Calendar

11:45 AM – 12:10 PM
Big Tech and Digital Health

Tech giants are dedicating their vast resources to aid in the global response to the coronavirus. This panel will highlight how the big data and computational power of major tech companies is being deployed to help contain the current pandemic through new technologies and services, enable return to work, and how it could help prevent future ones.

Moderator:
Natasha Singer, Reporter, New York Times

Amanda Goltz, Principal, Business Development, Alexa Health & Wellness, Amazon

Michael Mina, MD, PhD, Associate Medical Director, Molecular Virology, BH; Assistant Professor, Epidemiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard Chan School

  • Limitations on Viral Testing
  • Shortage of Swabs for testing
  • Tech giant: Amazon, Walmart – global reach in supply chain
  • new collaborations formed on super charge
  • Antigen test for home administration consumerization of the Testing
  • Walmart can be positioned for blood tests
  • Not only Physicians can order tests
  • Microsoft and Amazon can help in interpretation of the Test using Alexa

Marcus Osborne, VP, Walmart Health, Walmart

Jim Weinstein, MD, SVP, Microsoft

Add Panel to Calendar

12:10 – 12:35 PM
LUNCH BREAK
12:35 – 12:55PM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Insights on Pandemics and Health Care from the National Security Community

General Alexander, a renowned expert on national security as well as pandemics and health care, will reflect on how AI can help identify and predict future global disease outbreaks and enable fully reopening commerce. He will also discuss what health care systems can learn from the response to COVID-19 to ensure preparedness for the next infectious disease challenge.

Moderator:
Gregg Meyer, MD, Chief Clinical Officer, Mass General Brigham; Interim President, NWH; Professor of Medicine, HMS

General (Ret) Keith Alexander, Co-CEO, IronNet Cybersecurity

Add Panel to Calendar

12:55 – 1:20 PM
Calibrating Innovation Opportunity and Urgency: Medical and Social

The social and medical needs of patients are deeply intertwined, yet there are significant gaps in the tools and technologies being developed to help address those needs. These are especially apparent in the non-uniform impact of COVID-19. Harnessing opportunities, particularly for patients whose needs fall into the low medical complexity/high social complexity category — a group often overlooked by health care innovators.

Moderator:
Natasha Singer, Reporter, New York Times

Giles Boland, MD, Chair, Department of Radiology, BH; Philip H. Cook Professor of Radiology, HMS

  • Boston Hope: 1400 patients were treated at Boston Convention Center, 700 COVID -19 patients and 700 post acute after release from ICUs
  • Policy makers to address social determinants of Health

Amit Phadnis, Chief Digital Officer and GE Company Officer, GE Healthcare

  • Crisis will go away the innovations will stay and develop
  • Population Health to benefit from iPhone in Africa and in India mapping hotspots in populations
  • Multi channels TV, Phones and other devices – social disparities – no app to address social inequality

Krishna Yeshwant, MD, General Partner, GV; Instructor in Medicine, BH

  • communities most affected by social determinants of Health like in Chelsea in MA, a hotspot for COVID-19
  • Google Ventures – social issues are most complex invest in underprivileged

Add Panel to Calendar

1:20 – 1:45 PM
FDA Role in Managing Crisis and Anticipating the Next

The FDA and other regulatory bodies have played a key role in managing the coronavirus pandemic. How will the agency’s priorities shift in the coming months as community transmission (ideally) slows? What is the FDA’s role in return to work? What is the FDA doing to anticipate future health crises? How will these drive new tools and effect that rate of innovation?

Moderator:
Ravi Thadhani, MD, CAO, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Faculty Dean for Academic Programs, HMS

Amy Abernethy, MD, PhD, Principal Deputy Commissioner & Acting CIO, FDA

  • Future – common tools, more efficient studies study protocols and study design evaluation
  • Learned what need to be put in place to move fast learn what is not in place
  • post pandemic regulatories lessons for being ready for the next one

Lindsey Baden, MD, Director, Clinical Research, Division of Infectious Diseases, BH; Associate Professor, HMS

  • Identify diagnostics for clinical definition of a virus unknown
  • treatment to be developed
  • Sick patients in need for treatment, researchers and clinicians need the best available FDA and the hospitals are flexible in responding
  • Spread globally like a respiratory virus
  • IRB – fast than ever before FDA and Pharma, DSMB – speed

Add Panel to Calendar

1:45– 2:05 PM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Keeping Priority on the Biggest Diseases

Biogen CEO Michel Vounatsos will discuss how Biogen is tackling some of society’s most devastating neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, and share his perspective on the impact the global COVID-19 pandemic is having on the biopharmaceutical industry.

Moderator:
Jean-François Formela, MD, Partner, Atlas Venture

  • Testing programs – lack of government cooordination

Michel Vounatsos, CEO, Biogen

  • Venture community supportive
  • to be on the safe side
  • employees tested every evenings to prevent rebound of the pandemic
  • Pandemic is acceleration progress that was only dreamt about
  • Opportunities in technologies new drugs,
  • Biogen will lead the new model
  • ALS – rare genetic expression Phase I encouraging
  • Neuro-immunology – MS phase III Parkinson drug
  • Lessons from COVID-19: Delay in clinical trials because Patients are fearing Hospital admission – Stroke patient did not go to Hospital
  • Biogen is joining the fight against COVID
  • Neuroimmunology is the strength – remain focus

 

Add Panel to Calendar

2:05 – 2:30 PM
Building the Plane While Flying: The Experience of Real-Time Innovation from the Front Line

The COVID-19 crisis has required continuous, real time innovation, impacting the way care is delivered on the front lines and across care continuum. This panel will present the perspective, innovations and experiences of care givers interacting directly with patients across the continuum of care – acute, post-acute, rehab and home care.

Moderator:
Ann Prestipino, SVP; Incident Commander, MGH; Teaching Associate, HMS

  • coming out of crisis
  • the New normal will be diferent

Theresa Gallivan, RN, Associate Chief Nurse, MGH

  • Ambulatory procedures
  • 700 nurses were deployed
  • 164 ICU beds increase of 90%
  • Health care demand will change in the future
  • focussed problem alarms from ventilators were not coordinated till biomed engineers arrives to device a solution

 

Karen Reilly, DNP, RN, Associate Chief Nursing Officer, Critical Care, Cardiovascular and Surgical Services, BH

  • Collaborate and move forward
  • Interdisciplinary team: Physical therapy help quickly
  • tech to communicate with families
  • Ready – I wish I had information to stay ahead of the curve
  • New normal ability to expand and contract

Ross Zafonte, DO, SVP, Research Education and Medical Affairs, SRN; Earle P. and Ida S. Charlton Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, HMS

  • Rehabilitation in Cambridge Spaulding Brighton
  • Off loading to rehab from other units
  • Flexibility MGH Brigham – learn to be a new organization
  • Hotspots optimal mapping
  • Right person at right challenge
  • Stay ready for catastrophies
  • Telecare and Tele rehabilitation – greater benefit on TeleHealth or not who will not benefit from Rehab

Add Panel to Calendar

2:30 – 2:55 PM
CEO Roundtable: Will the Innovation Model Remain as It Was

As we envision a post-COVID-19 world, how will the model for biomedical innovation change? What lessons have been learned? Was this pandemic a once-in-a-lifetime event or should organizations begin to weave pandemic planning into their business and operations strategies? Panelists will discuss these and other related questions.

Moderator:
Janet Wu, Bloomberg

Mike Mahoney, CEO, Boston Scientific

  • China 6% of Sales
  • Employees – 148 Counties
  • support hospitals – 57% of volume
  • Resilience for liquidity Variable cost needed be removes partially
  • How will the company come out stronger
  • Innovations by business model innovations – Remote physicians in Japan by European experts in OR
  • Next week 10% of Product management and Quality are priority to come back
  • working remotely works very well except for R&S who needs Labs

Bernd Montag, PhD, CEO, Siemens Healthineers

  • Keep present business and the emerging needs for technologies
  • Serology Test
  • Antibody Test genomic testing
  • Company is Global but Health care is local

Add Panel to Calendar

2:55 – 3:05 PM
BREAK
3:05 – 3:30 PM
Emergency and Urgent Care: How COVID-19 Vulnerabilities and Solutions Will Change the Model

How are the roles of emergency medicine and urgent care changing in light of the COVID-19 pandemic? Panelists will discuss this topic as well as how current and anticipated new technologies can aid in the delivery of community, urgent, and emergency care now and in the future.

Given a false negative at the point of care has consequences well beyond the patient being treated, does this change what can be offered in the various patient care settings?

Moderator:
Ron Walls, MD, EVP and Chief Operating Officer, BH; Neskey Family Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS

Troyen Brennan, MD, EVP and CMO, CVS Health

  • Labs – Quest Diagnostics
  • Point of care – Tests will move to Home will replace Labs
  • Pandemic heated hard people of color and comorbidities

David Brown, MD, Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, MGH; MGH Trustees Professor of Emergency Medicine, HMS

  • Tele Urgent care
  • EMS Providers using TeleHealth
  • Scaled up capability needed administered by Governmental agency
  • new surges of some disease after Re-opening
  • Sensitivity of test for ill patient
  • Demand for Urgent Care will decline higher acuity will increase

Julie Lankiewicz, Head, Clinical Affairs & Health Economics Outcomes Research, Bose Health

  • Management of care with VRE other microbial agents
  • Vulnerable populations EKG between patients no more
  • mitigation of care – Brand new prescriptions for Anxiety and burnout
  • Digital solution to replace medications – audio content to avoid pharmacology by other methods of relaxation
  • Herd immunity  – Digital transformation

Michael VanRooyen, MD, Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine, BH; Director, Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University; Professor, HMS

  •  Separate Patients from Providers
  • Infection threat – Intubation – Tent for airsolize – trap air in the hood
  • manage Emergence Health OUT side of EM at Hospital
  • Rapid testing will continue to be central in Emergency Care

Add Panel to Calendar

3:30 – 3:55 PM
Accelerating Diagnostics – Maintaining the Priority: Lab, Home and Digital

COVID-19 diagnostics, a linchpin in controlling viral spread — what caused testing in the U.S. to fall so far behind and how can those missteps be prevented in the future? How do the diagnostics industry, and academic medicine, develop the tests that enable group activities including businesses sports, and community? What is the profile of diagnostic tests coming online in the coming months and into next year? What lessons can be learned to guide the global health community in future disease outbreaks? Given the biological complexity, required performance standards, and immense volume is a simple DTC assays possible on a greatly accelerated timeline.

Moderator:
Jeffrey Golden, MD, Chair, Department of Pathology, BH; Ramzi S. Cotran Professor of Pathology, HMS

James Brink, MD, Chief, Department of Radiology, MGH; Juan M. Taveras Professor of Radiology, HMS

  • social determinant of care – communities not able to social distance, multiple languages
  • Radiology: Rapid evolution of pandemic
  • MGB – Standardizations

John Iafrate, MD, PhD, Vice Chair, Academic Affairs, MGH; Professor, Pathology, HMS

  • Ability for Rapid testing was not in existence in the US
  • CDC Test deployed
  • BD and Roche diagnostics will
  • recipients and donors of antibodies

Celine Roger-Dalbert, VP Diagnostic Assays R&D – Integrated Diagnostic Solutions, BD Life Sciences

  • Telemedicine collection of samples outside the hospital
  • Testing if a patient had – serology – antibody – past exposure after day 14
  • Testing if a patient has – PCR after 10 days the virus is not infectious but it is present
  • antigen detection testing
  • molecular test

Matt Sause, President and CEO, Roche Diagnostics Corporation

  • Serology – more people become infected
  • active infection
  • Partnership between FDA and the manufactures
  • In the US scaling – infrastructure in place is a must

 

Add Panel to Calendar

3:55 – 4:15 PM
FIRESIDE CHAT
Return to Work: Understanding the Technologies and Strategies

Diagnostic testing is a linchpin of the worldwide response to the coronavirus. How does a global leader pivot to develop molecular diagnostics for a novel global pathogen? How does it scale, including managing international supply chains, to provide unprecedented levels of products and services. What are the expectations for return to work and a possible disease spike in fall 2020 or beyond. How will the diagnostics industry be permanently changed.

Moderator:
Peter Markell, EVP, Finance and Administration, CFO & Treasurer, Mass General Brigham

Marc Casper, Chairman, President and CEO, Thermo Fisher Scientific

  • Re-opening the economy requires Testing for certification of health
  • Testing bringing confidence
  • PCR – have or have not viral proteins: 5Millions a week, June 10 million tests
  • antibody testing will also become available in massive scale
  • Supply chain, more preparedness, robustness of the supply chain
  • Buying supply in China vs US based
  • stockpiling by governments not only at the Hospital level vs JIT shocks to the system
  • Work from home – productivity is good, work from home not ideal environment
  • Transportation and elevators – social distancing – impossible
  • Global change enormous Telemedicine ramp up Academic center Telemedicine will prevail
  • more resilient Health care system dialogue and communications across countries technology will play a role it will improve Health care every where

Add Panel to Calendar

4:15 – 4:40 PM
Digital Therapeutics: Current and Future Opportunities

Digital therapeutics (DTx) represents an emerging class of therapies that is poised for significant growth. Yet already, these software-driven, evidence-based tools for the prevention, management, and/or treatment of disease are already changing patients’ lives. This panel will address how existing DTx are having an early impact — in the COVID-19 pandemic and — and where current development efforts are headed in the coming years especially if there is a aggressive return of the virus in the fall 2020 or later.

Moderator:
Hadine Joffe, MD, Vice Chair for Research, Department of Psychiatry, Executive Director, Mary Horrigan Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, BH; Paula A. Johnson Professor, Women’s Health, HMS

Priya Abani, CEO, AliveCor

  • Medical grade EKG devices
  • Telemedicine on the rise

Julia Hu, CEO, Lark Health

  • AI 24×7 counseling data streaming in data
  • TeleHealth
  • VirtualHealth Provider – working hard to scale
  • Patients @Home work at their schedule 9PM – midnight text messaging
  • 70% in employment reported stress experienced by employees

Dawn Sugarman, PhD, Assistant Psychologist, Division of Alcohol, Drugs, and Addiction, McLean; Assistant Professor, Psychiatry, HMS

  • Opioid & substance abuse
  • Treatment gap for women – gender specific Programs online gender specific  treatment

Add Panel to Calendar

4:40 – 5:05 PM
Investing During and After the Coronavirus Crisis

The investment environment in life sciences and health care overall was at record levels for most of the last decade. What will this environment look like in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic – especially over the near to mid-term? Will investor priorities and enthusiasm shift? What is the investor role in developing new coronavisurs tests, vaccines, and therapeutics?

Moderator:
Roger Kitterman, VP, Venture and Managing Partner, Partners Innovation Fund, Mass General Brigham

Jan Garfinkle, Founder & Manager Partner, Arboretum Ventures

  • Can you close a deal with out meeting management team
  • Known funds will prevail vs new funds Parma adjacencies vs medical devices
  • Telehealth is of interest GI, Cardiovascular
  • Mental health with TeleHealth

Phillip Gross, Managing Director, Adage Capital Management

  • Clinical Trial issues
  • Inflating value of Biotech because therapeutic related to COVID gives a boost
  • 90 programs in clinical trials on Vaccine

Christopher Viehbacher, Managing Partner, Gurnet Point Capital

  • Health care was great investment because prople will get sick.
  • deal making switch to zoom meeting, no site visit, banking is adapting
  • relationship with people you do not know will be very hard
  • early stage if the cloud exist
  • Medical profession: Healthcare system is hurting revenue loss new technologies
  • clinical trials will be changing like for COVID
  • Sharing data will accelerate science

Add Panel to Calendar

5:05 – 5:10 PM
Closing Remarks
Gregg Meyer, MDChief Clinical Officer, Mass General Brigham; Interim President, NWH; Professor of Medicine, HMS
Ravi Thadhani, MD, CAO, Mass General Brigham; Professor of Medicine and Faculty Dean for Academic Programs, HMS

Mass General Brigham (formerly Partners Healthcare) is pleased to invite media to attend the World Medical Innovation Forum (WMIF) virtual event on Monday, May 11. Our day-long interactive web event features expert discussions of COVID-related infectious disease innovation and the pandemic’s impact on transforming medicine, plus insights on how care may be radically transformed post-COVID. The agenda features nearly 70 executive speakers from the healthcare industry, venture, start-ups, consumer health and the front lines of COVID care, including many of our Harvard Medical School-affiliated researchers and clinicians. The event replaces our annual in-person conference, which we plan to resume in 2021.

Read Full Post »


Artificial Intelligence in Medicine – Part 3: in Latest in Genomics Methodologies for Therapeutics: Gene Editing, NGS & BioInformatics, Simulations and the Genome Ontology

 

Updated on 2/10/2020

Eric Topol
@EricTopol

There have only been 5 randomized clinical trials of #AI in medicine to date. Here’s the summary: 4 in gastroenterology (2 @LancetGastroHep, 2 @Gut_BMJ) 1 in ophthalmology (@EClinicalMed) All were conducted in China (None in radiology, pathology, dermatology or other specialties)

Eric Topol
@EricTopol
Following
physician-scientist, author, editor. My new book is #DeepMedicine drerictopol.com

The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology
@LancetGastroHep
Follow
The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology publishes high-quality peer-reviewed research and reviews, comment, and news #gastroenterology #hepatology. IF=12.856

Gut Journal
@Gut_BMJ
Follow
Leading international journal in gastroenterology with an established reputation for publishing 1st class research. Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/Gut.BMJ

EClinicalMedicine – Published by The Lancet
@EClinicalMed
Follow
A new open access clinical journal, published by 

, influencing clinical practice and strengthening health systems

Image

Eric Topol
@EricTopol
While there are now hundreds of in silico, retrospective dataset reports, the number of prospective (non-randomized) trials in a real clinical environment testing #AI performance is limited. I only know of 11. Let me know if I’m missing any.

Image

 

Curators: Stephen J. Williams, PhD, Dror Nir, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

 

Series Content Consultant:

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Emeritus CSO, LPBI Group

 

Volume Content Consultant:

Prof. Marcus W. Feldman

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aT-Jb0lKVT8

BURNET C. AND MILDRED FINLEY WOHLFORD PROFESSOR IN THE SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SCIENCES

Stanford University, Co-Director, Center for Computational, Evolutionary and Human Genetics (2012 – Present)

Latest in Genomics Methodologies for Therapeutics:

Gene Editing, NGS & BioInformatics,

Simulations and the Genome Ontology

2019

Volume Two

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08385KF87

Product details

  • File Size:3138 KB
  • Print Length:217 pages
  • Publisher:Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group, Boston; 1 edition (December 28, 2019)
  • Publication Date:December 28, 2019
  • Sold by:Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language:English
  • ASIN:B08385KF87
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled 
  • X-Ray:

Not Enabled 

  • Word Wise:Not Enabled
  • Lending:Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting:Enabled 

Prof. Marcus W. Feldman, PhD, Editor

Prof. Stephen J. Williams, PhD, Editor

and

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, Editor

Introduction to Part 3: AI in Medicine – Voice of Aviva Lev-Ari & Professor Williams  

 

There is a current consensus that of all specialties in Medicine, Artificial Intelligence technologies will benefit the most the specialty of Radiology.

What AI can do

Of course, there is still a lot AI can do for radiologists. Soonmee Cha, MD, neuroradiologist, has served as a program director at the University of California San Francisco since 2012 and currently oversees 100 radiology trainees, said at RSNA 2019 in Chicago

“we can see a future where AI is improving image quality, decreasing acquisition times, eliminating artifacts, improving patient communication and even decreasing radiation dose.

“If AI can detect when machines are being set up incorrectly and alert us, it’s a win for us and for patients,” she said.

https://www.aiin.healthcare/topics/medical-imaging/rsna-ai-imaging-healthcare-costs-radiology-trainees?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=ai_news

Radiology societies team up for new statement on ethics of AI

Numerous imaging societies, including the American College of Radiology (ACR) and RSNA, have published a new statement on the ethical use of AI in radiology.

The European Society of Radiology, Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine, European Society of Medical Imaging Informatics (EuSoMII), Canadian Association of Radiologists and American Association of Physicists in Medicine all also co-authored the statement which is focused on three key areas of AI development: data, algorithms and practice. A condensed summary was shared in the Journal of the American College of RadiologyRadiologyInsights into Imaging and the Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal.

“Radiologists remain ultimately responsible for patient care and will need to acquire new skills to do their best for patients in the new AI ecosystem,” J. Raymond Geis, MD, ACR Data Science Institute senior scientist and one of the document’s leading contributors, said in a prepared statement. “The radiology community needs an ethical framework to help steer technological development, influence how different stakeholders respond to and use AI, and implement these tools to make the best decisions for—and increasingly with—patients.”

“The application of AI tools in radiological practice lies in the hand of the radiologists, which also means that they have to be well-informed not only about the advantages they can offer to improve their services to patients, but also about the potential risks and pitfalls that might occur when implementing them,” Erik R. Ranschaert, MD, PhD, president of EuSoMII. “This paper is therefore an excellent basis to improve their awareness about the potential issues that might arise, and should stimulate them in thinking proactively on how to answer the existing questions.”

Back in September, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) published its own guidelines on the ethical application of AI in healthcare. The document, “Ethical Principles for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine,” is available on the RANZCR website.

https://www.radiologybusiness.com/topics/artificial-intelligence/radiology-societies-ethics-ai

Selective examples of applications of AI in the specialty of Radiology include the following:

  • RSNA 2019, the world’s largest radiology conference, kicks off at Chicago’s McCormick Place on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2019, and promises to include more AI content than ever before. There will be an expanded AI Showcase this year, giving attendees access to more than 100 vendors in one location.
  1. “Artificial Intelligence and Precision Education: How AI Can Revolutionize Training in Radiology” | Monday, Dec. 2 | 8:30 – 10 a.m. | Room: E450A
  2. “Learning AI from the Experts: Becoming an AI Leader in Global Radiology (Without Needing a Computer Science Degree)” | Tuesday, Dec. 3 | 4:30-6 p.m. | Room: S406B
  3. “Deep Learning in Radiology: How Do We Do It?” | Wednesday, Dec. 4 | 8:30-10 a.m. | Room: S406B

https://www.aiin.healthcare/topics/medical-imaging/rsna-2019-preview-3-ai-sessions-radiology-imaging?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=ai_news

 

  • Interview with George Shih, MD, a radiologist at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian and the co-founder of the healthcare startup MD.ai

An academic gold rush, where people are working to apply the latest AI techniques to both existing problems and brand new problems, and it’s all been really great for the field of radiology.

We’re also holding another machine learning competition this year hosted on Kaggle. In previous years, we’ve annotated existing public data that was used for our competition, but this year, we were actually able to acquire high-quality data—more than 25,000 CT examinations that nobody has used or seen before—from four different institutions. The top 10 winning algorithms will also be made public to anyone in the world, which is an amazing way to advance the use of AI in radiology. I think that’s one of the biggest contributions RSNA is making to the academic community this year.

The other exciting part is that our new and improved AI Showcase will include more vendors—more than 100—than any previous year, which shows just how much the market continues to focus on these technologies.

https://www.aiin.healthcare/topics/medical-imaging/radiologist-rsna-2019-ai-radiology-imaging?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=ai_news

 

  • AI model could help radiologists diagnose lung cancer

Michael Walter | November 27, 2019 | Medical Imaging

https://www.aiin.healthcare/topics/medical-imaging/ai-model-radiologists-diagnose-lung-cancer-imaging

 

  • AI a hot topic for radiology researchers in 2019

Michael Walter | November 26, 2019 | Medical Imaging

https://www.aiin.healthcare/topics/medical-imaging/ai-radiology-researchers-rsna-citations-downloads?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=ai_news

 

  • GE Healthcare launches new program to simplify AI development, implementation

Michael Walter | November 26, 2019 | Business Intelligence

https://www.aiin.healthcare/topics/business-intelligence/ge-healthcare-new-program-simplify-ai-development?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=ai_news

 

  • How teleradiologists are helping underserved regions all over the world

Michael Walter | Medical Imaging Review

Sponsored by vRad, a MEDNAX Company

https://www.radiologybusiness.com/sponsored/1065/topics/medical-imaging-review/qa-how-teleradiologists-are-helping-underserved?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=ai_news

AI in Healthcare 2020 Leadership Survey Report: 7 Key Findings

Artificial and augmented intelligence are already helping healthcare improve clinically, operationally and financially—and there is extraordinary room for growth. Success starts with leadership, vision and investment and leaders tell us they have all of the above. Here are the top 7 survey findings.

01 C-level healthcare leaders are leading the charge to AI. AI has earned the attention of the C-suite, with 40% of survey respondents saying their strategy is coming from the top down. Chief information officers are most often managing AI across the healthcare enterprise (27%).

02 AI has moved into the mainstream. The future is now. It’s here. Health systems are hiring data scientists and spending on AI and infrastructure. Some 40% of respondents are using AI, with 50% using between one and 10 apps.

03 Health systems are committed to investing in AI. 93% of respondents agree AI is absolutely essential, very important or important to their strategy. There is great willingness to take advantage of intelligent technology and leverage machine intelligence to enhance human intelligence. Administration holds financial responsibility for AI at 43% of facilities, with IT paying the bill at 26% of sites.

04 Fortifying infrastructure is top of mind. 93% of respondents agree AI is absolutely essential, very important or important to their strategy. There is great willingness to take advantage of intelligent technology and leverage machine
intelligence to enhance human intelligence. Administration holds financial responsibility for AI at 43% of facilities, with IT paying the bill at 26% of sites.

05 Improving care is AI’s greatest benefit. Improving accuracy, efficiency and workflow are the top benefits leaders see coming from AI. AI helps to highlight key findings from the depths of the EMR, identify declines in patient conditions earlier and improve chronic disease management. Cancer, heart disease and stroke are the disease states survey respondents see AI holding the greatest promise—the 2nd, 1st and 5th leading killer of Americans.

06 Health systems are both buying and developing AI apps. Some 50% of respondents tell us they are both buying and developing AI apps. About 38% are exclusively opting to purchase commercially developed apps while 13% are developing everything in-house.

07 Radiology is blazing the AI trail. AI apps for imaging outnumber all other categories of FDA-approved apps to date. It’s no surprise then that respondents tell us that rad apps top the list of tools they’re using to enhance breast, chest and cardiovascular imaging.

SOURCE

https://www.aiin.healthcare/sponsored/9667/topics/ai-healthcare-2020-leadership-survey-report/ai-healthcare-2020-leadership-1

 

WATCH VIDEO

https://www.dropbox.com/s/xayeu7ss7f7cahp/AI%20Launch%20v2.mp4?dl=0

 

Like in the past, Dr. Eric Topol is a Tour de Force, again

Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again 1st Edition

by Eric Topol  (Author)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1541644638/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wwwsamharris03-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=1541644638&linkId=e8e2d5410e9b5921f1e21883a9c84cff

Dr Mike Warner

5.0 out of 5 starsCrystal Ball for the Next Era of Healthcare

March 13, 2019

Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase

Dr. Topol’s new book, Deep Medicine – How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again, is an encyclopedia of the emerging Fourth Industrial Age; a crystal ball in what is about happen in the next era of healthcare. I’m impressed by the detailed references and touching personal and family stories.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) policy modifications in the past 10 months reveal sweeping changes that fortify Dr. Topol’s vision: May 2018 medical students can document for attending physicians in the health record (MLN MM10412), 2019 ancillary staff members and patients can document the History/medical interview into the health record, 2021 medical providers can document based only on Medical Decision Making or Time (Federal Register Nov, 23, 2018).

Part of making healthcare human is also making it fun. The joy of practicing medicine is about to return to the healthcare delivery as computers will be used to empower humanistic traits, not overburden medical professionals with clerical tasks. For patients, you will be heard, understood and personally treated. Deep Medicine is not a vision of what will happen in 50 years as much will start to reveal within the next 5!

Bravo Dr. Topol!
Michael Warner, DO, CPC, CPCO, CPMA, AAPC Fellow

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1541644638/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wwwsamharris03-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=1541644638&linkId=e8e2d5410e9b5921f1e21883a9c84cff#customerReviews

 

AUDIT PODCASTS

  • The perspective of what it truly means to be an AI company and AI platform.

  • How MaxQ AI is reinventing the diagnostic process with AI in time sensitive, life threatening environments.

  • How EnvoyAI is working towards a zero-click approach for physicians to feel confident in their findings.

  • Recognizing the right questions to ask when training algorithms for more accurate results.

  • The value of having a powerful world-class image processing algorithm running on an extensible interoperable platform.

Join Jeff, Gene, and Kevin next time as they continue the conversation on the future of artificial intelligence in healthcare.

https://www.terarecon.com/blog/beyond-the-screen-episode-6-next-generation-ai-companies-providing-physicians-a-starting-point-in-ai?utm_campaign=AuntMinnie%20June%202019&utm_medium=email&utm_source=hs_email

Academic Gallup Poll: The Artificial Intelligence Age, June 2019.

New Northeastern-Gallup poll: People in the US, UK, and Canada want to keep up in the artificial intelligence age. They say employers, educators, and governments are letting them down. – News @ Northeastern

https://news.northeastern.edu/2019/06/27/new-northeastern-gallup-poll-people-in-the-us-uk-and-canada-want-to-keep-up-in-the-artificial-intelligence-age-they-say-employers-educators-and-governments-are-letting-them-down/

 

Dense Map of Artificial Intelligence Start ups in Israel

 

Image Sourcehttps://www.startuphub.ai/multinational-corporations-with-artificial-intelligence-research-and-development-centers-in-israel/

(See here for an interactive version of the infographic above).

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gilpress/2018/09/24/the-thriving-ai-landscape-in-israel-and-what-it-means-for-global-ai-competition/#577a107330c5

https://hackernoon.com/israels-artificial-intelligence-landscape-2018-83cdd4f04281

3.1 The Science

VIEW VIDEO

Max Tegmark lecture on Life 3.0 – Being Human in the age of Artificial Intelligence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MqukDzhlqA

 

3.1.1   World Medical Innovation Forum, Partners Innovations, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE | APRIL 8–10, 2019 | Westin, BOSTON

https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/agenda/

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/02/14/world-medical-innovation-forum-partners-innovations-artificial-intelligence-april-8-10-2019-westin-boston/

 

 

3.1.2   LIVE Day Three – World Medical Innovation Forum ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, Boston, MA USA, Monday, April 10, 2019

Real Time Coverage: Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/10/live-day-three-world-medical-innovation-forum-artificial-intelligence-boston-ma-usa-monday-april-10-2019/

 

 

3.1.3   LIVE Day Two – World Medical Innovation Forum ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, Boston, MA USA, Monday, April 9, 2019

Real Time Coverage: Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/09/live-day-two-world-medical-innovation-forum-artificial-intelligence-boston-ma-usa-monday-april-9-2019/

 

 

3.1.4   LIVE Day One – World Medical Innovation Forum ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, Boston, MA USA, Monday, April 8, 2019

Real Time Coverage: Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/08/live-day-one-world-medical-innovation-forum-artificial-intelligence-westin-copley-place-boston-ma-usa-monday-april-8-2019/

 

 

3.1.5   2018 Annual World Medical Innovation Forum Artificial Intelligence April 23–25, 2018 Boston, Massachusetts  | Westin Copley Place https://worldmedicalinnovation.org/

Real Time Coverage: Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/01/18/2018-annual-world-medical-innovation-forum-artificial-intelligence-april-23-25-2018-boston-massachusetts-westin-copley-place/

 

 

3.1.6   Synopsis Days 1,2,3: 2018 Annual World Medical Innovation Forum Artificial Intelligence April 23–25, 2018 Boston, Massachusetts  | Westin Copley Place

Real Time Coverage: Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/04/26/synopsis-days-123-2018-annual-world-medical-innovation-forum-artificial-intelligence-april-23-25-2018-boston-massachusetts-westin-copley-place/

 

 

3.1.7   Interview with Systems Immunology Expert Prof. Shai Shen-Orr

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://tmrwedition.com/2018/07/19/interview-with-systems-immunology-expert-prof-shai-shen-orr/

 

 

3.1.8   Unique immune-focused AI model creates largest library of inter-cellular communications at CytoReason. Used  to predict 335 novel cell-cytokine interactions, new clues for drug development.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

  • CYTOREASON. CytoReason features in hashtag #DeepKnowledgeVentures‘s detailed Report on AI in hashtag #drugdevelopment report https://lnkd.in/dKV2BB6

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/c-uia061818.php

3.2 Technologies and Methodologies

 

3.2.1   R&D for Artificial Intelligence Tools & Applications: Google’s Research Efforts in 2018

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/01/16/rd-for-artificial-intelligence-tools-applications-googles-research-efforts-in-2018/

 

3.2.2   Can Blockchain Technology and Artificial Intelligence Cure What Ails Biomedical Research and Healthcare

Curator: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/12/10/can-blockchain-technology-and-artificial-intelligence-cure-what-ails-biomedical-research-and-healthcare/

 

 

3.2.3   N3xt generation carbon nanotubes

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/12/14/n3xt-generation-carbon-nanotubes/

 

3.2.4   Mindful Discoveries

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/28/mindful-discoveries/

 

 

3.2.5   Novel Discoveries in Molecular Biology and Biomedical Science

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/05/30/novel-discoveries-in-molecular-biology-and-biomedical-science/

 

3.2.6   Imaging of Cancer Cells

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/20/imaging-of-cancer-cells/

 

 

3.2.7   Retrospect on HistoScanning: an AI routinely used in diagnostic imaging for over a decade

Author and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/06/22/retrospect-on-histoscanning-an-ai-routinely-used-in-diagnostic-imaging-for-over-a-decade/

 

 

3.2.8    Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk by Machine Learning (ML) Algorithm: Best performing algorithm by predictive capacity had area under the ROC curve (AUC) scores: 1st, quadratic discriminant analysis; 2nd, NaiveBayes and 3rd, neural networks, far exceeding the conventional risk-scaling methods in Clinical Use

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/04/prediction-of-cardiovascular-risk-by-machine-learning-ml-algorithm-best-performing-algorithm-by-predictive-capacity-had-area-under-the-roc-curve-auc-scores-1st-quadratic-discriminant-analysis/

 

3.2.9   An Intelligent DNA Nanorobot to Fight Cancer by Targeting HER2 Expression

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/24/an-intelligent-dna-nanorobot-to-fight-cancer-by-targeting-her2-expression/

3.3   Clinical Aspects

 

Is AI ready for Medical Applications? – The Debate in August 2019 in Nature

 

Eric Topol (@EricTopol)

8/18/19, 2:17 PM

Why I’ve been writing #AI for medicine is long on promise, short of proof

nature.com/articles/s4159… @NatureMedicine

status update in this schematic, among many mismatches pic.twitter.com/mpifYFwlp8

 

The “inconvenient truth” about AI in healthcare

 

However, “the inconvenient truth” is that at present the algorithms that feature prominently in research literature are in fact not, for the most part, executable at the frontlines of clinical practice. This is for two reasons: first, these AI innovations by themselves do not re-engineer the incentives that support existing ways of working.2 A complex web of ingrained political and economic factors as well as the proximal influence of medical practice norms and commercial interests determine the way healthcare is delivered. Simply adding AI applications to a fragmented system will not create sustainable change. Second, most healthcare organizations lack the data infrastructure required to collect the data needed to optimally train algorithms to (a) “fit” the local population and/or the local practice patterns, a requirement prior to deployment that is rarely highlighted by current AI publications, and (b) interrogate them for bias to guarantee that the algorithms perform consistently across patient cohorts, especially those who may not have been adequately represented in the training cohort.9 For example, an algorithm trained on mostly Caucasian patients is not expected to have the same accuracy when applied to minorities.10 In addition, such rigorous evaluation and re-calibration must continue after implementation to track and capture those patient demographics and practice patterns which inevitably change over time.11 Some of these issues can be addressed through external validation, the importance of which is not unique to AI, and it is timely that existing standards for prediction model reporting are being updated specifically to incorporate standards applicable to this end.12 In the United States, there are islands of aggregated healthcare data in the ICU,13 and in the Veterans Administration.14 These aggregated data sets have predictably catalyzed an acceleration in AI development; but without broader development of data infrastructure outside these islands it will not be possible to generalize these innovations.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41746-019-0155-4

3.3.1   9 AI-based initiatives catalyzing immunotherapy in 2018

By Tanima Bose

https://www.prescouter.com/2018/07/9-ai-based-initiatives-catalyzing-immunotherapy-in-2018/

 

 

3.3.2   mRNA Data Survival Analysis

Curators: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/06/18/mrna-data-survival-analysis/

 

 

3.3.3   Medcity Converge 2018 Philadelphia: Live Coverage @pharma_BI

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/07/11/medcity-converge-2018-philadelphia-live-coverage-pharma_bi/

 

 

3.3.4   Live Coverage: MedCity Converge 2018 Philadelphia: AI in Cancer and Keynote Address

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/07/11/live-coverage-medcity-converge-2018-philadelphia-ai-in-cancer-and-keynote-address/

 

 

3.3.5   VIDEOS: Artificial Intelligence Applications for Cardiology

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/03/11/videos-artificial-intelligence-applications-for-cardiology/

 

 

3.3.6   Artificial Intelligence in Health Care and in Medicine: Diagnosis & Therapeutics

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/01/21/artificial-intelligence-in-health-care-and-in-medicine-diagnosis-therapeutics/

 

 

3.3.7   Digital Therapeutics: A Threat or Opportunity to Pharmaceuticals

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/03/18/digital-therapeutics-a-threat-or-opportunity-to-pharmaceuticals/

 

 

3.3.8   The 3rd STATONC Annual Symposium, April 25-27, 2019, Hilton Hartford, CT, 315 Trumbull St., Hartford, CT 06103

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/02/26/the-3rd-stat4onc-annual-symposium-april-25-27-2019-hilton-hartford-connecticut/

 

 

3.3.9   2019 Biotechnology Sector and Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/05/10/2019-biotechnology-sector-and-artificial-intelligence-in-healthcare/

 

 

3.3.10   Artificial intelligence can be a useful tool to predict Alzheimer

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/01/26/artificial-intelligence-can-be-a-useful-tool-to-predict-alzheimer/

 

 

3.3.11   Unlocking the Microbiome

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/07/unlocking-the-microbiome/

 

 

3.3.12   Biomarker Development

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/16/biomarker-development/

 

 

3.3.13   AI System Used to Detect Lung Cancer

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/06/28/ai-system-used-to-detect-lung-cancer/

 

 

3.3.14   AI App for People with Digestive Disorders

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/06/24/ai-app-for-people-with-digestive-disorders/

 

 

3.3.15   Sepsis Detection using an Algorithm More Efficient than Standard Methods

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/06/25/sepsis-detection-using-an-algorithm-more-efficient-than-standard-methods/

 

 

3.3.16   How Might Sleep Apnea Lead to Serious Health Concerns like Cardiac and Cancer?

Author: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/20/how-might-sleep-apnea-lead-to-serious-health-concerns-like-cardiac-and-cancers/

 

 

3.3.17   An Intelligent DNA Nanorobot to Fight Cancer by Targeting HER2 Expression

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/24/an-intelligent-dna-nanorobot-to-fight-cancer-by-targeting-her2-expression/

 

3.3.18   Artificial Intelligence and Cardiovascular Disease

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/26/artificial-intelligence-and-cardiovascular-disease/

 

3.3.19   Using A.I. to Detect Lung Cancer gets an A!

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/08/04/using-a-i-to-detect-lung-cancer-gets-an-a/

 

 

3.3.20   Complex rearrangements and oncogene amplification revealed by long-read DNA and RNA sequencing of a breast cancer cell line

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/08/14/complex-rearrangements-and-oncogene-amplification-revealed-by-long-read-dna-and-rna-sequencing-of-a-breast-cancer-cell-line/

 

3.3.21   Multiple Barriers Identified Which May Hamper Use of Artificial Intelligence in the Clinical Setting

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, PhD.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/21/multiple-barriers-identified-which-may-hamper-use-of-artificial-intelligence-in-the-clinical-setting/

 

3.3.22   Deep Learning–Assisted Diagnosis of Cerebral Aneurysms

Author and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/06/09/deep-learning-assisted-diagnosis-of-cerebral-aneurysms/

 

3.3.23   Artificial Intelligence Innovations in Cardiac Imaging

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/12/17/artificial-intelligence-innovations-in-cardiac-imaging/

 

3.4 Business and Legal

Image Source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/resources-artificial-intelligence-health-care-note-lev-ari-phd-rn/

 

3.4.1   McKinsey Top Ten Articles on Artificial Intelligence: 2018’s most popular articles – An executive’s guide to AI

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/01/21/mckinsey-top-ten-articles-on-artificial-intelligence-2018s-most-popular-articles-an-executives-guide-to-ai/

 

3.4.2   HOTTEST Artificial Intelligence Hub: Israel’s High Tech Industry – Why?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/09/30/hottest-artificial-intelligence-hub-israels-high-tech-industry-why/

 

 

3.4.3   The Regulatory challenge in adopting AI

Author and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/07/the-regulatory-challenge-in-adopting-ai/

 

 

3.4.4   HealthCare focused AI Startups from the 100 Companies Leading the Way in A.I. Globally

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/01/18/healthcare-focused-ai-startups-from-the-100-companies-leading-the-way-in-a-i-globally/

 

 

3.4.5   IBM’s Watson Health division – How will the Future look like?

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/24/ibms-watson-health-division-how-will-the-future-look-like/

 

 

3.4.6   HUBweek 2018, October 8-14, 2018, Greater Boston – “We The Future” – coming together, of breaking down barriers, of convening across disciplinary lines to shape our future

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/10/08/hubweek-2018-october-8-14-2018-greater-boston-we-the-future-coming-together-of-breaking-down-barriers-of-convening-across-disciplinary-lines-to-shape-our-future/

 

 

3.4.7   Role of Informatics in Precision Medicine: Notes from Boston Healthcare Webinar: Can It Drive the Next Cost Efficiencies in Oncology Care?

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/01/03/role-of-informatics-in-precision-medicine-can-it-drive-the-next-cost-efficiencies-in-oncology-care/

 

 

3.4.8   Healthcare conglomeration to access Big Data and lower costs

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/01/13/healthcare-conglomeration-to-access-big-data-and-lower-costs/

 

3.4.9   Linguamatics announces the official launch of its AI self-service text-mining solution for researchers.

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2018/05/10/linguamatics-announces-the-official-launch-of-its-ai-self-service-text-mining-solution-for-researchers/

 

3.4.10   Future of Big Data for Societal Transformation

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/12/14/future-of-big-data-for-societal-transformation/

 

 

3.4.11   Deloitte Analysis 2019 Global Life Sciences Outlook

https://www2.deloitte.com/global/en/pages/life-sciences-and-healthcare/articles/global-life-sciences-sector-outlook.html

https://www.cioapplications.com/news/making-a-breakthrough-in-drug-discovery-with-ai-nid-3114.html

https://healthcare.cioapplications.com/cioviewpoint/leveraging-technologies-to-better-position-the-business-nid-1060.html

 

 

3.4.12   OpenAI: $1 Billion to Create Artificial Intelligence Without Profit Motive by Who is Who in the Silicon Valley

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/12/26/openai-1-billion-to-create-artificial-intelligence-without-profit-motive-by-who-is-who-in-the-silicon-valley/

 

 

3.4.13   The Health Care Benefits of Combining Wearables and AI

Reporter: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/02/the-health-care-benefits-of-combining-wearables-and-ai/

 

 

3.4.14   These twelve artificial intelligence innovations are expected to start impacting clinical care by the end of the decade.

Reporter: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/02/top-12-artificial-intelligence-innovations-disrupting-healthcare-by-2020/

 

 

3.4.15   Forbes Opinion: 13 Industries Soon To Be Revolutionized By Artificial Intelligence

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/07/31/forbes-opinion-13-industries-soon-to-be-revolutionized-by-artificial-intelligence/

 

3.4.16   AI Acquisitions by Big Tech Firms Are Happening at a Blistering Pace: 2019 Recent Data by CBI Insights

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/12/11/ai-acquisitions-by-big-tech-firms-are-happening-at-a-blistering-pace-2019-recent-data-by-cbiinsights/

 

3.5 Machine Learning (ML) Algorithms harnessed for Medical Diagnosis: Pattern Recognition & Prediction of Disease Onset

Introduction by Dr. Dror Nir

 

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to Establish World Class Center for Artificial Intelligence – Hamilton and Amabel James Center for Artificial Intelligence and Human Health

First center in New York to seamlessly integrate artificial intelligence, data science and genomic screening to advance clinical practice and patient outcomes.

Integrative Omics and Multi-Scale Disease Modeling— Artificial intelligence and machine learning approaches developed at the Icahn Institute have been extensively used for identification of novel pathways, drug targets, and therapies for complex human diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, obesity, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and cardiovascular disease. Researchers will combine insights in genomics—including state-of-the-art single-cell genomic data—with ‘omics,’ such as epigenomics, pharmacogenomics, and exposomics, and integrate this information with patient health records and data originating from wearable devices in order to model the molecular, cellular, and circuit networks that facilitate disease progression. “Novel data-driven predictions will be tightly integrated with high-throughput experiments to validate the therapeutic potential of each prediction,” said Adam Margolin, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences and Senior Associate Dean of Precision Medicine at Mount Sinai. “Clinical experts in key disease areas will work side-by-side with data scientists to translate the most promising therapies to benefit patients. We have the potential to transform the way care givers deliver cost-effective, high quality health care to their patients, far beyond providing simple diagnoses. Mount Sinai wants to be on the frontlines of discovery.”

Precision Imaging—Researchers will use artificial intelligence to enhance the diagnostic power of imaging technologies—X-ray, MRI, CT, and PET—and molecular imaging, and accelerate the development of therapies. “We see a huge potential in using algorithms to automate the image interpretation and to acquire images much more quickly at high resolution – so that we can better detect disease and make it less burdensome for the patient,” said Zahi Fayad, PhD, Director of the Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, and Vice Chair for Research for the Department of Radiology, at Mount Sinai. Dr. Fayad plans to broaden the scope of the Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute by recruiting more engineers and scientists who will create new methods to aid in the diagnosis and early detection of disease, treatment protocol development, drug development, and personalized medicine. Dr. Fayad added, “In addition to AI, we envision advance capabilities in two important areas: computer vision and augmented reality, and next generation medical technology enabling development of new medical devices, sensors and robotics.”

https://www.mountsinai.org/about/newsroom/2019/icahn-school-of-medicine-at-mount-sinai-to-establish-world-class-center-for-artificial-intelligence-hamilton-and-amabel-james-center-for-artificial-intelligence-and-human-health

 

A comprehensive overview of ML algorithms applied in health care is presented in the following article:

Survey of Machine Learning Algorithms for Disease Diagnostic

https://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=73781

 

3.5.1 Cases in Pathology 

 

3.5.1.1   Deep Learning extracts Histopathological Patterns and accurately discriminates 28 Cancer and 14 Normal Tissue Types: Pan-cancer Computational Histopathology Analysis

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/10/28/deep-learning-extracts-histopathological-patterns-and-accurately-discriminates-28-cancer-and-14-normal-tissue-types-pan-cancer-computational-histopathology-analysis/

 

3.5.2 Cases in Radiology

 

3.5.2.1   Cardiac MRI Imaging Breakthrough: The First AI-assisted Cardiac MRI Scan Solution, HeartVista Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance for One Click™ Cardiac MRI Package

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/10/29/cardiac-mri-imaging-breakthrough-the-first-ai-assisted-cardiac-mri-scan-solution-heartvista-receives-fda-510k-clearance-for-one-click-cardiac-mri-package/

 

3.5.2.2   Disentangling molecular alterations from water-content changes in the aging human brain using quantitative MRI

Reporter: Dror Nir, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/08/01/disentangling-molecular-alterations-from-water-content-changes-in-the-aging-human-brain-using-quantitative-mri/

 

3.5.2.3   Showcase: How Deep Learning could help radiologists spend their time more efficiently

Reporter and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/08/22/showcase-how-deep-learning-could-help-radiologists-spend-their-time-more-efficiently/

 

3.5.2.4   CancerBase.org – The Global HUB for Diagnoses, Genomes, Pathology Images: A Real-time Diagnosis and Therapy Mapping Service for Cancer Patients – Anonymized Medical Records accessible to anyone on Earth

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/07/28/cancerbase-org-the-global-hub-for-diagnoses-genomes-pathology-images-a-real-time-diagnosis-and-therapy-mapping-service-for-cancer-patients-anonymized-medical-records-accessible-to/

 

3.5.2.5   Applying AI to Improve Interpretation of Medical Imaging

Author and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/05/28/applying-ai-to-improve-interpretation-of-medical-imaging/

 

 

3.5.2.6   Imaging: seeing or imagining? (Part 2)

Author and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2019/04/07/imaging-seeing-or-imagining-part-2-2/

 

 

3.5.3 Cases in Prediction Cancer Onset

 

3.5.3.1  A Deep Learning Mammography-based Model for Improved Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

 

3.5.3.2   Comparison of a Deep Learning Risk Score and Standard Mammographic Density Score for Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

Karin Dembrower Yue LiuHossein AzizpourMartin EklundKevin SmithPeter LindholmFredrik Strand

Published Online: Dec 17 2019 https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2019190872

See editorial by Manisha Bahl

 

Results

A total of 2283 women, 278 of whom were later diagnosed with breast cancer, were evaluated. The age at mammography (mean, 55.7 years vs 54.6 years; P < .001), the dense area (mean, 38.2 cm2 vs 34.2 cm2P < .001), and the percentage density (mean, 25.6% vs 24.0%; P < .001) were higher among women diagnosed with breast cancer than in those without a breast cancer diagnosis. The odds ratios and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were higher for age-adjusted DL risk score than for dense area and percentage density: 1.56 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.48, 1.64; AUC, 0.65), 1.31 (95% CI: 1.24, 1.38; AUC, 0.60), and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.25; AUC, 0.57), respectively (P < .001 for AUC). The false-negative rate was lower: 31% (95% CI: 29%, 34%), 36% (95% CI: 33%, 39%; P = .006), and 39% (95% CI: 37%, 42%; P < .001); this difference was most pronounced for more aggressive cancers.

Conclusion

Compared with density-based models, a deep neural network can more accurately predict which women are at risk for future breast cancer, with a lower false-negative rate for more aggressive cancers.

Related articles

Radiology2019

Volume: 0Issue: 0

Radiology2019

Volume: 293Issue: 2pp. 246-259

Radiology2019

Volume: 291Issue: 3pp. 582-590

 

Summary of ML in Medicine by Dr. Dror Nir

See Introduction to 3.5, above

 

Part 3: Summary – AI in Medicine – Voice of Aviva Lev-Ari & Professor Williams  

AI applications in healthcare

The potential of AI to improve the healthcare delivery system is limitless. It offers a unique opportunity to make sense out of clinical data to enable fully integrated healthcare that is more predictive and precise. Getting all aspects of AI-enabled solutions right requires extensive collaboration between clinicians, data scientists, interaction designers, and other experts. Here are four applications of artificial intelligence to transform healthcare delivery:

1. Improve operational efficiency and performance

On a departmental and enterprise level, the ability of AI to sift through large amounts of data can help hospital administrators to optimize performance, drive productivity, and improve the use of existing resources, generating time and cost savings. For example, in a radiology department, AI could make a difference in the management of referrals, patient scheduling, and exam preparations. Improvements here can help to enhance patient experience and will allow a more effective and efficient use of the facilities at examination sites.

2. Aiding clinical decision support

AI-enabled solutions can help to combine large amounts of clinical data to generate a more holistic view of patients. This supports healthcare providers in their decision making, leading to better patient outcomes and improved population health. “The need for insights and for those insights to lead to clinical operations support is tremendous,” says Dr. Smythe. “Whether that is the accuracy of interventions or the effective use of manpower – these are things that physicians struggle with. That is the imperative.”

3. Enabling population health management

Combining clinical decision support systems with patient self-management, population health management can also benefit from AI. Using predictive analytics with patient populations, healthcare providers will be able to take preventative action, reduce health risk, and save unnecessary costs.

As the population ages, so does a desire to age in place when possible, and to maximize not only disease management, but quality of life as we do so. The possibility of aggregating, analyzing and activating health data from millions of consumers will enable hospitals to see how socio-economic, behavioral, genetic and clinical factors correlate and can offer more targeted, preventative healthcare outside the four walls of the hospital.

4. Empowering consumers, improving patient care

As recently as 2015 patients reported physically carrying x-rays, test results, and other critical health data from one healthcare provider’s office to another3. The burden of multiple referrals, explaining symptoms to new physicians and finding out that their medical history has gaps in it were all too real. Patients now are demanding more personalized, sophisticated and convenient healthcare services.

The great motivation behind AI in healthcare is that increasingly, as patients become more engaged with their own healthcare and better understand their own needs, healthcare will have to take steps towards them and meet them where they are, providing them with health services when they need them, not just when they are ill.

SOURCE

https://www.usa.philips.com/healthcare/nobounds/four-applications-of-ai-in-healthcare?origin=1_us_en_auntminnie_aicommunity

 

Our Summary for AI in Medicine presents to the eReader the results of the 2020 Survey on that topic, all the live links will take the eReader to the report itself. We provided the reference, below

  • AI in Healthcare 2020 Leadership Survey Report: About the Survey

The AI in Healthcare team embarked on this survey to gain a deeper understanding of the current state of artificial and augmented intelligence in use and being planned across healthcare in the next few years. We polled readers of AI in Healthcare, AIin.Healthcare and sister brand HealthExec.com over 2 months. All data is presented in this report in aggregate, with individual responses remaining anonymous.

The content in this report reflects the input of 1,238 physicians, executives, IT and administrative leaders in healthcare, medical devices and IT and software development from across the globe, with 75 percent based in the United States. The report focuses on the responses of providers and professionals at the helm of healthcare systems, integrated delivery networks, academic medical centers, hospitals, imaging centers and physician groups across the U.S. For a deeper dive into survey demographics, click here.

Some respondents chose to share more specific demographics that help us better get to know our survey base. Those 165 healthcare leaders work for 38 unique health systems, hospitals, physician groups and imaging or surgery centers, across 39 states and the District of Columbia. They are large, small and mid-sized, for profit, not for profit, academic and government owned. Respondents, too, herald from all levels of leadership. Here are some of the interesting titles who chimed in—and we are thankful they did: CEO, CFO, CMO, CIO, chief innovation officer, chief data officer, chief administrative officer, medical director of quality, senior VP of quality and innovation officer, system director of transformation, VP of service line development, and plenty of physicians, directors of ICU, imaging, cath lab and surgery, nurses and technologists.

In this report we unpack current trends in AI and machine learning, drill into data from various perspectives such as the C-suite and the physician leader, and learn how healthcare systems are using and planning to use AI. Turn the page and see where we are and where we’re going.

.

Author: Mary C. Tierney, MS, Chief Content Officer, AI in Healthcare magazine and AIin.Healthcare

SOURCE

https://www.aiin.healthcare/sponsored/9667/topics/ai-healthcare-2020-leadership-survey-report/ai-healthcare-2020-leadership-3

Read Full Post »


AI Acquisitions by Big Tech Firms Are Happening at a Blistering Pace: 2019 Recent Data by CBI Insights

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

Recent report from CBI Insights shows the rapid pace at which the biggest tech firms (Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, and Amazon) are acquiring artificial intelligence (AI) startups, potentially confounding the AI talent shortage that exists.

The link to the report and free download is given here at https://www.cbinsights.com/research/top-acquirers-ai-startups-ma-timeline/

Part of the report:

TECH GIANTS LEAD IN AI ACQUISITIONS

The usual suspects are leading the race for AI: tech giants like Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft, Google, & Apple (FAMGA) have all been aggressively acquiring AI startups in the last decade.

Among the FAMGA companies, Apple leads the way, making 20 total AI acquisitions since 2010. It is followed by Google (the frontrunner from 2012 to 2016) with 14 acquisitions and Microsoft with 10.

Apple’s AI acquisition spree, which has helped it overtake Google in recent years, was essential to the development of new iPhone features. For example, FaceID, the technology that allows users to unlock their iPhone X just by looking at it, stems from Apple’s M&A moves in chips and computer vision, including the acquisition of AI company RealFace.

In fact, many of FAMGA’s prominent products and services came out of acquisitions of AI companies — such as Apple’s Siri, or Google’s contributions to healthcare through DeepMind.

That said, tech giants are far from the only companies snatching up AI startups.

Since 2010, there have been 635 AI acquisitions, as companies aim to build out their AI capabilities and capture sought-after talent (as of 8/31/2019).

The pace of these acquisitions has also been increasing. AI acquisitions saw a more than 6x uptick from 2013 to 2018, including last year’s record of 166 AI acquisitions — up 38% year-over-year.

In 2019, there have already been 140+ acquisitions (as of August), putting the year on track to beat the 2018 record at the current run rate.

Part of this increase in the pace of AI acquisitions can be attributed to a growing diversity in acquirers. Where once AI was the exclusive territory of major tech companies, today, smaller AI startups are becoming acquisition targets for traditional insurance, retail, and healthcare incumbents.

For example, in February 2018, Roche Holding acquired New York-based cancer startup Flatiron Health for $1.9B — one of the largest M&A deals in artificial intelligence. This year, Nike acquired AI-powered inventory management startup Celect, Uber acquired computer vision company Mighty AI, and McDonald’s acquired personalization platform Dynamic Yield.

Despite the increased number of acquirers, however, tech giants are still leading the charge. Acquisitive tech giants have emerged as powerful global corporations with a competitive advantage in artificial intelligence, and startups have played a pivotal role in helping these companies scale their AI initiatives.

Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Intel, and Amazon are the most active acquirers of AI startups, each acquiring 7+ companies.

To read more on recent Acquisitions in the AI space please see the following articles on this Open Access Online Journal

Diversification and Acquisitions, 2001 – 2015: Trail known as “Google Acquisitions” – Understanding Alphabet’s Acquisitions: A Sector-By-Sector Analysis

Clarivate Analytics expanded IP data leadership by new acquisition of the leading provider of intellectual property case law and analytics Darts-ip

2019 Biotechnology Sector and Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

Forbes Opinion: 13 Industries Soon To Be Revolutionized By Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence and Cardiovascular Disease

Multiple Barriers Identified Which May Hamper Use of Artificial Intelligence in the Clinical Setting

Top 12 Artificial Intelligence Innovations Disrupting Healthcare by 2020

The launch of SCAI – Interview with Gérard Biau, director of the Sorbonne Center for Artificial Intelligence (SCAI).

 

Read Full Post »


50 CONTEMPORARY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LEADING EXPERTS AND RESEARCHERS

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

SOURCE

http://ipfconline.fr/blog/2018/03/29/50-contemporary-artificial-intelligence-leading-experts-and-researchers/

For those who like, love or are just interested or want to discover what is Artificial Intelligence, I have built this fine List of 50 Top Contemporary Artificial Intelligence Experts and Researchers. No ranking there, of course!

I’ve done too a “classification” among the AI Topics, but evidently all these leading figures are all, globally, specialists in Machine Learning.

Finally, this list is of course non exhaustive (many others could be there 😉)

MACHINE LEARNING
Hugo Larochelle
Ilya Sutskever
Matthew Zeiler
Michael I Jordan
Richard Socher
Ruslan Salakhutdinov
Ryan Adams
DEEP LEARNING
Adam Coates
Andrej Karpathy
Andrew Ng
Oriol Vinyals
Quoc V Le
Soumith Chintala
Timothy Lillicrap
Yann LeCun
Yoshua Bengio
NEURAL NETWORKS
Alex Graves
Alex Krizhevsky
Geoffrey E Hinton
RECURRENT NEURAL NETWORKS (RNN)
Jurgen Schmidhuber
REINFORCEMENT LEARNING
David Silver
Marcus Hutter   
Richard Sutton
GENERATIVE ADVERSARIAL NETWORKS (GAN)
Ian Goodfellow
COMPUTER VISION
Fei-Fei Li
Gary Bradski
Kaiming He
NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING (NLP)
Dag Kittlaus
HEALTH TECH – BIOINFORMATICS
Daphne Koller
Sepp Hochreiter
ROBOTICS
Pieter Abbeel
Raia Hadsell
Raja Chatila
Tessa Lau
Wojciech Zaremba
DATA SCIENCE – BIG DATA – ALGORITHMS
Dez Blanchfield
Kirk Borne
Mike Tamir
Nando de Freitas
Pedro Domingos
Ronald van Loon
Randal S Olson
Toby Walsh
Zoubin Ghahramani
AI GAME DEVELOPMENT
Alex J. Champandard
Demis Hassabis
AI ETHICS
Joanna Bryson
Stuart Russell
SINGULARITY
Raymond “Ray” Kurzweil
MACHINE LEARNING FOR ARTISTS
Gene Kogan

Read Full Post »


The Regulatory challenge in adopting AI

Author and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

In the last couple of years we are witnessing a surge of AI applications in healthcare. It is clear now, that AI and its wide range of health-applications are about to revolutionize diseases’ pathways and the way the variety of stakeholders in this market interact.

Not surprisingly, the developing surge has waken the regulatory watchdogs who are now debating ways to manage the introduction of such applications to healthcare. Attributing measures to known regulatory checkboxes like safety, and efficacy is proving to be a complex exercise. How to align claims made by manufacturers, use cases, users’ expectations and public expectations is unclear. A recent demonstration of that is the so called “failure” of AI in social-network applications like FaceBook and Twitter in handling harmful materials.

‘Advancing AI in the NHS’ – is a report covering the challenges and opportunities of AI in the NHS. It is a modest contribution to the debate in such a timely and fast-moving field!  I bring here the report’s preface and executive summary hoping that whoever is interested in reading the whole 50 pages of it will follow this link: f53ce9_e4e9c4de7f3c446fb1a089615492ba8c

Screenshot 2019-04-07 at 17.18.18

 

Acknowledgements

We and Polygeia as a whole are grateful to Dr Dror Nir, Director, RadBee, whose insights

were valuable throughout the research, conceptualisation, and writing phases of this work; and to Dr Giorgio Quer, Senior Research Scientist, Scripps Research Institute; Dr Matt Willis, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford; Professor Eric T. Meyer, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford; Alexander Hitchcock, Senior Researcher, Reform; Windi Hari, Vice President Clinical, Quality & Regulatory, HeartFlow; Jon Holmes, co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, Vivosight; and Claudia Hartman, School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford for their advice and support.

Author affiliations

Lev Tankelevitch, University of Oxford

Alice Ahn, University of Oxford

Rachel Paterson, University of Oxford

Matthew Reid, University of Oxford

Emily Hilbourne, University of Oxford

Bryan Adriaanse, University of Oxford

Giorgio Quer, Scripps Research Institute

Dror Nir, RadBee

Parth Patel, University of Cambridge

All affiliations are at the time of writing.

Polygeia

Polygeia is an independent, non-party, and non-profit think-tank focusing on health and its intersection with technology, politics, and economics. Our aim is to produce high-quality research on global health issues and policies. With branches in Oxford, Cambridge, London and New York, our work has led to policy reports, peer-reviewed publications, and presentations at the House of Commons and the European Parliament. http://www.polygeia.com @Polygeia © Polygeia 2018. All rights reserved.

Foreword

Almost every day, as MP for Cambridge, I am told of new innovations and developments that show that we are on the cusp of a technological revolution across the sectors. This technology is capable of revolutionising the way we work; incredible innovations which could increase our accuracy, productivity and efficiency and improve our capacity for creativity and innovation.

But huge change, particularly through adoption of new technology, can be difficult to  communicate to the public, and if we do not make sure that we explain carefully the real benefits of such technologies we easily risk a backlash. Despite good intentions, the care.data programme failed to win public trust, with widespread worries that the appropriate safeguards weren’t in place, and a failure to properly explain potential benefits to patients. It is vital that the checks and balances we put in place are robust enough to sooth public anxiety, and prevent problems which could lead to steps back, rather than forwards.

Previous attempts to introduce digital innovation into the NHS also teach us that cross-disciplinary and cross-sector collaboration is essential. Realising this technological revolution in healthcare will require industry, academia and the NHS to work together and share their expertise to ensure that technical innovations are developed and adopted in ways that prioritise patient health, rather than innovation for its own sake. Alongside this, we must make sure that the NHS workforce whose practice will be altered by AI are on side. Consultation and education are key, and this report details well the skills that will be vital to NHS adoption of AI. Technology is only as good as those who use it, and for this, we must listen to the medical and healthcare professionals who will rightly know best the concerns both of patients and their colleagues. The new Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation, the ICO and the National Data Guardian will be key in working alongside the NHS to create both a regulatory framework and the communications which win society’s trust. With this, and with real leadership from the sector and from politicians, focused on the rights and concerns of individuals, AI can be advanced in the NHS to help keep us all healthy.

Daniel Zeichner

MP for Cambridge

Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Group on Data Analytics

 

Executive summary

Artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to transform how the NHS delivers care. From enabling patients to self-care and manage long-term conditions, to advancing triage, diagnostics, treatment, research, and resource management, AI can improve patient outcomes and increase efficiency. Achieving this potential, however, requires addressing a number of ethical, social, legal, and technical challenges. This report describes these challenges within the context of healthcare and offers directions forward.

Data governance

AI-assisted healthcare will demand better collection and sharing of health data between NHS, industry and academic stakeholders. This requires a data governance system that ensures ethical management of health data and enables its use for the improvement of healthcare delivery. Data sharing must be supported by patients. The recently launched NHS data opt-out programme is an important starting point, and will require monitoring to ensure that it has the transparency and clarity to avoid exploiting the public’s lack of awareness and understanding. Data sharing must also be streamlined and mutually beneficial. Current NHS data sharing practices are disjointed and difficult to negotiate from both industry and NHS perspectives. This issue is complicated by the increasing integration of ’traditional’ health data with that from commercial apps and wearables. Finding approaches to valuate data, and considering how patients, the NHS and its partners can benefit from data sharing is key to developing a data sharing framework. Finally, data sharing should be underpinned by digital infrastructure that enables cybersecurity and accountability.

Digital infrastructure

Developing and deploying AI-assisted healthcare requires high quantity and quality digital data. This demands effective digitisation of the NHS, especially within secondary care, involving not only the transformation of paper-based records into digital data, but also improvement of quality assurance practices and increased data linkage. Beyond data digitisation, broader IT infrastructure also needs upgrading, including the use of innovations such as wearable technology and interoperability between NHS sectors and institutions. This would not only increase data availability for AI development, but also provide patients with seamless healthcare delivery, putting the NHS at the vanguard of healthcare innovation.

Standards

The recent advances in AI and the surrounding hype has meant that the development of AI-assisted healthcare remains haphazard across the industry, with quality being difficult to determine or varying widely. Without adequate product validation, including in

real-world settings, there is a risk of unexpected or unintended performance, such as sociodemographic biases or errors arising from inappropriate human-AI interaction. There is a need to develop standardised ways to probe training data, to agree upon clinically-relevant performance benchmarks, and to design approaches to enable and evaluate algorithm interpretability for productive human-AI interaction. In all of these areas, standardised does not necessarily mean one-size-fits-all. These issues require addressing the specifics of AI within a healthcare context, with consideration of users’ expertise, their environment, and products’ intended use. This calls for a fundamentally interdisciplinary approach, including experts in AI, medicine, ethics, cognitive science, usability design, and ethnography.

Regulations

Despite the recognition of AI-assisted healthcare products as medical devices, current regulatory efforts by the UK Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency and the European Commission have yet to be accompanied by detailed guidelines which address questions concerning AI product classification, validation, and monitoring. This is compounded by the uncertainty surrounding Brexit and the UK’s future relationship with the European Medicines Agency. The absence of regulatory clarity risks compromising patient safety and stalling the development of AI-assisted healthcare. Close working partnerships involving regulators, industry members, healthcare institutions, and independent AI-related bodies (for example, as part of regulatory sandboxes) will be needed to enable innovation while ensuring patient safety.

The workforce

AI will be a tool for the healthcare workforce. Harnessing its utility to improve care requires an expanded workforce with the digital skills necessary for both developing AI capability and for working productively with the technology as it becomes commonplace.

Developing capability for AI will involve finding ways to increase the number of clinician-informaticians who can lead the development, procurement and adoption of AI technology while ensuring that innovation remains tied to the human aspect of healthcare delivery. More broadly, healthcare professionals will need to complement their socio-emotional and cognitive skills with training to appropriately interpret information provided by AI products and communicate it effectively to co-workers and patients.

Although much effort has gone into predicting how many jobs will be affected by AI-driven automation, understanding the impact on the healthcare workforce will require examining how jobs will change, not simply how many will change.

Legal liability

AI-assisted healthcare has implications for the legal liability framework: who should be held responsible in the case of a medical error involving AI? Addressing the question of liability will involve understanding how healthcare professionals’ duty of care will be impacted by use of the technology. This is tied to the lack of training standards for healthcare professionals to safely and effectively work with AI, and to the challenges of algorithm interpretability, with ”black-box” systems forcing healthcare professionals to blindly trust or distrust their output. More broadly, it will be important to examine the legal liability of healthcare professionals, NHS trusts and industry partners, raising questions

Recommendations

  1. The NHS, the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation, and industry and academic partners should conduct a review to understand the obstacles that the NHS and external organisations face around data sharing. They should also develop health data valuation protocols which consider the perspectives of patients, the NHS, commercial organisations, and academia. This work should inform the development of a data sharing framework.
  2. The National Data Guardian and the Department of Health should monitor the NHS data opt-out programme and its approach to transparency and communication, evaluating how the public understands commercial and non-commercial data use and the handling of data at different levels of anonymisation.
  3. The NHS, patient advocacy groups, and commercial organisations should expand public engagement strategies around data governance, including discussions about the value of health data for improving healthcare; public and private sector interactions in the development of AI-assisted healthcare; and the NHS’s strategies around data anonymisation, accountability, and commercial partnerships. Findings from this work should inform the development of a data sharing framework.
  4. The NHS Digital Security Operations Centre should ensure that all NHS organisations comply with cybersecurity standards, including having up-to-date technology.
  5. NHS Digital, the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation, and the Alan Turing Institute should develop technological approaches to data privacy, auditing, and accountability that could be implemented in the NHS. This should include learning from Global Digital Exemplar trusts in the UK and from international examples such as Estonia.
  6. The NHS should continue to increase the quantity, quality, and diversity of digital health data across trusts. It should consider targeted projects, in partnership with professional medical bodies, that quality-assure and curate datasets for more deployment-ready AI technology. It should also continue to develop its broader IT infrastructure, focusing on interoperability between sectors, institutions, and technologies, and including the end users as central stakeholders.
  7. The Alan Turing Institute, the Ada Lovelace Institute, and academic and industry partners in medicine and AI should develop ethical frameworks and technological approaches for the validation of training data in the healthcare sector, including methods to minimise performance biases and validate continuously-learning algorithms.
  8. The Alan Turing Institute, the Ada Lovelace Institute, and academic and industry partners in medicine and AI should develop standardised approaches for evaluating product performance in the healthcare sector, with consideration for existing human performance standards and products’ intended use.
  9. The Alan Turing Institute, the Ada Lovelace Institute, and academic and industry partners in medicine and AI should develop methods of enabling and evaluating algorithm interpretability in the healthcare sector. This work should involve experts in AI, medicine, ethics, usability design, cognitive science, and ethnography, among others.
  10. Developers of AI products and NHS Commissioners should ensure that usability design remains a top priority in their respective development and procurement of AI-assisted healthcare products.
  11. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency should establish a digital health unit with expertise in AI and digital products that will work together with manufacturers, healthcare bodies, notified bodies, AI-related organisations, and international forums to advance clear regulatory approaches and guidelines around AI product classification, validation, and monitoring. This should address issues including training data and biases, performance evaluation, algorithm interpretability, and usability.
  12. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation, and industry partners should evaluate regulatory approaches, such as regulatory sandboxing, that can foster innovation in AI-assisted healthcare, ensure patient safety, and inform on-going regulatory development.
  13. The NHS should expand innovation acceleration programmes that bridge healthcare and industry partners, with a focus on increasing validation of AI products in real-world contexts and informing the development of a regulatory framework.
  14. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency and other Government bodies should arrange a post-Brexit agreement ensuring that UK regulations of medical devices, including AI-assisted healthcare, are aligned as closely as possible to the European framework and that the UK can continue to help shape Europe-wide regulations around this technology.
  15. The General Medical Council, the Medical Royal Colleges, Health Education England, and AI-related bodies should partner with industry and academia on comprehensive examinations of the healthcare sector to assess which, when, and how jobs will be impacted by AI, including analyses of the current strengths, limitations, and workflows of healthcare professionals and broader NHS staff. They should also examine how AI-driven workforce changes will impact patient outcomes.
  16. The Federation of Informatics Professionals and the Faculty of Clinical Informatics should continue to lead and expand standards for health informatics competencies, integrating the relevant aspects of AI into their training, accreditation, and professional development programmes for clinician-informaticians and related professions.
  17. Health Education England should expand training programmes to advance digital and AI-related skills among healthcare professionals. Competency standards for working with AI should be identified for each role and established in accordance with professional registration bodies such as the General Medical Council. Training programmes should ensure that ”un-automatable” socio-emotional and cognitive skills remain an important focus.
  18. The NHS Digital Academy should expand recruitment and training efforts to increase the number of Chief Clinical Information Officers across the NHS, and ensure that the latest AI ethics, standards, and innovations are embedded in their training programme.
  19. Legal experts, ethicists, AI-related bodies, professional medical bodies, and industry should review the implications of AI-assisted healthcare for legal liability. This includes understanding how healthcare professionals’ duty of care will be affected, the role of workforce training and product validation standards, and the potential role of NHS Indemnity and no-fault compensation systems.
  20. AI-related bodies such as the Ada Lovelace Institute, patient advocacy groups and other healthcare stakeholders should lead a public engagement and dialogue strategy to understand the public’s views on liability for AI-assisted healthcare.

Read Full Post »


McKinsey Top Ten Articles on Artificial Intelligence: 2018’s most popular articles – An executive’s guide to AI

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

TOP TEN | ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 2018
The year’s most popular articles on artificial intelligence

An executive’s guide to AI

1. An executive’s guide to AI
Staying ahead in the accelerating artificial-intelligence race requires executives to make nimble, informed decisions about where and how to employ AI in their business. One way to prepare to act quickly: know the AI essentials presented in this guide. More →

Notes from the AI frontier: Applications and value of deep learning

2. Notes from the AI frontier: Applications and value of deep learning
An analysis of more than 400 use cases across 19 industries and nine business functions highlights the broad use and significant economic potential of advanced AI techniques. More →

What AI can and can’t do (yet) for your business

3. What AI can and can’t do (yet) for your business
Artificial intelligence is a moving target. Here’s how to take better aim. More →

4. The economics of artificial intelligence
Rotman School of Management professor Ajay Agrawal explains how AI changes the cost of prediction and what this means for business. More →

5. Notes from the AI frontier: Modeling the impact of AI on the world economy
Artificial intelligence has large potential to contribute to global economic activity. But widening gaps among countries, companies, and workers will need to be managed to maximize the benefits. More →

6. The executive’s AI playbook
It’s time to break out of pilot purgatory and more effectively apply artificial intelligence and advanced analytics throughout your organization. Our interactive playbook can help. More →

7. Artificial intelligence: Why a digital base is critical
Early AI adopters are starting to shift industry profit pools. Companies need strong digital capabilities to compete. More →

8. The promise and challenge of the age of artificial intelligence
AI promises considerable economic benefits, even as it disrupts the world of work. These three priorities will help achieve good outcomes. More →

9. The real-world potential and limitations of artificial intelligence
Artificial intelligence has the potential to create trillions of dollars of value across the economy—if business leaders work to understand what AI can and cannot do. More →

10. How artificial intelligence and data add value to businesses
Artificial intelligence will transform many companies and create completely new types of businesses. The cofounder of Coursera, AI Fund, and Landing.AI shares how businesses can benefit. More →

SOURCE

From: McKinsey Top Ten <publishing@email.mckinsey.com>

Reply-To: support@email.mckinsey.com” <support-HP2v40000016815507486b77a82f4bbc782e8252@email.mckinsey.com>

Date: Thursday, January 3, 2019 at 3:03 PM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Artificial Intelligence: 2018’s most popular articles

Read Full Post »