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Dr. Francis S. Collins to Accept Award, Deliver Comments During 11th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference at Harvard Medical School

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

The 11th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference, November 18-19, 2015,  Joseph B. Martin Conference Center of the Harvard New Research Building at Harvard Medical School,  77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA

Real Time Conference Press Coverage: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

www.personalizedmedicineconference.org

http://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/07/09/the-11th-annual-personalized-medicine-conference-november-18-19-2015-joseph-b-martin-conference-center-of-the-harvard-new-research-building-at-harvard-medical-school/

 

Contact: Chris Wells

Personalized Medicine Coalition

cwells@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org

202-589-1755

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

PMC to Recognize NIH Director With Leadership in Personalized Medicine Award

Dr. Francis S. Collins to Accept Award, Deliver Comments During 11th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference at Harvard Medical School

WASHINGTON (Aug. 27, 2015) — In recognition of a career that has resulted in four of the biggest breakthroughs in the history of personalized medicine, the Personalized Medicine Coalition (PMC) will present National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., with the 11th Annual Leadership in Personalized Medicine Award during the Personalized Medicine Conference at Harvard Medical School on Nov. 19.

In his letter nominating Collins for the award, Harvard Medical School Professor Raju Kucherlapati, Ph.D., noted that Collins “has made sustained and critical contributions for the establishment of personalized medicine.” A physician-geneticist, Collins earned national recognition in 1989, more than a decade before the complete sequencing of the human genome, for his team’s discovery of the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis. He then served as the director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), where he was the overall project manager of the international Human Genome Project, which produced a complete map of the human genome in 2003. He also played a key role in the passage of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) in 2008, which has helped to ensure that the insights from his extraordinary achievements and those of many others are not used for discriminatory purposes.

President Obama nominated him as NIH director in 2009, proclaiming that his work had already “changed the very ways we consider our health and examine disease.” As NIH director, Collins’ relentless advocacy helped shape President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI), which was announced earlier this year as part of the President’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2016.

Collins remains one of the field’s most passionate champions.

“I see a day in the not too distant future when every person will have his or her genome sequenced and other important data collected as a routine part of medical care with individualized strategies developed for diagnosing, treating and preventing their disease,” said Dr. Collins. “I know that the PMC shares this vision and I am truly honored to receive this award from an organization that continues to pursue the vision with such great passion.”

Collins will accept the award and deliver remarks at 10:30 a.m. on the second day of the conference, which will take place from Nov. 18 – 19 at the Harvard School of Medicine. The event kicks off with PMC’s cocktail reception at the Hotel Commonwealth on Nov. 17.

Register for PMC’s cocktail reception on Nov. 17

Register for the Personalized Medicine Conference (Nov. 18 – 19)

###

About the Personalized Medicine Coalition:
The Personalized Medicine Coalition, representing innovators, scientists, patients, providers and payers, promotes the understanding and adoption of personalized medicine concepts, services and products to benefit patients and the health system. For more information, please visit
www.personalizedmedicinecoalition.org.

About the Leadership in Personalized Medicine Award:
The Leadership in Personalized Medicine Award recognizes an individual whose contributions in science, business and/or policy have helped advance the frontiers of personalized medicine. Previous recipients of the award include Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Dr. Elizabeth G. Nabel, former director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Ralph Snyderman, chancellor emeritus of Duke University, former Health and Human Services secretary Michael Leavitt, Brook Byers of Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Dr. William Dalton, president and CEO of the Moffitt Cancer Center, Dr. Leroy Hood, president and co-founder of the Institute for Systems Biology, Dr. Randal W. Scott, founder, Genomic Health Inc. and current chairman and CEO, InVitae Corporation, Kathy Giusti, founder and CEO of the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, and Mark Levin, co-founder and partner at Third Rock Ventures.

SOURCE

From: <cwells@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org>

Date: Thursday, August 27, 2015 at 10:17 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: NIH Director Francis Collins to Accept PMC Award at Harvard on Nov. 19


Fertilization: Protein Architecture of the Sperm’s Acrosomal Matrix, Filaments in Sperm Head Organelle Target the Egg

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Andrology. 2015 Jul;3(4):756-71. doi: 10.1111/andr.12057.

Sperm Lysozyme-Like Protein 1 (SLLP1), an intra-acrosomal oolemmal-binding sperm protein, reveals filamentous organization in protein crystal form.

Zheng H1, Mandal A2, Shumilin IA1, Chordia MD1, Panneerdoss S2, Herr JC2, Minor W1.

Abstract

Sperm lysozyme-like protein 1 (SLLP1) is one of the lysozyme-like proteins predominantly expressed in mammalian testes that lacks bacteriolytic activity, localizes in the sperm acrosome, and exhibits high affinity for an oolemmal receptor, SAS1B. The crystal structure of mouse SLLP1 (mSLLP1) was determined at 2.15 Å resolution. mSLLP1 monomer adopts a structural fold similar to that of chicken/mouse lysozymes retaining all four canonical disulfide bonds. mSLLP1 is distinct from c-lysozyme by substituting two essential catalytic residues (E35T/D52N), exhibiting different surface charge distribution, and by forming helical filaments approximately 75 Å in diameter with a 25 Å central pore comprised of six monomers per helix turn repeating every 33 Å. Cross-species alignment of all reported SLLP1 sequences revealed a set of invariant surface regions comprising a characteristic fingerprint uniquely identifying SLLP1 from other c-lysozyme family members. The fingerprint surface regions reside around the lips of the putative glycan-binding groove including three polar residues (Y33/E46/H113). A flexible salt bridge (E46-R61) was observed covering the glycan-binding groove. The conservation of these regions may be linked to their involvement in oolemmal protein binding. Interaction between SLLP1 monomer and its oolemmal receptor SAS1B was modeled using protein-protein docking algorithms, utilizing the SLLP1 fingerprint regions along with the SAS1B conserved surface regions. This computational model revealed complementarity between the conserved SLLP1/SAS1B interacting surfaces supporting the experimentally observed SLLP1/SAS1B interaction involved in fertilization.

© 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

SOURCE

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=26198801

Fertilization Discovery: Do Sperm Carry Tiny Harpoons?

SLLP1-filament-side

Figure SOURCE
The SLLP1 filament viewed along the side with each neighboring monomer colored alternatively
Andrology. 2015 Jul;3(4):756-71. doi: 10.1111/andr.12057. Sperm Lysozyme-Like Protein 1 (SLLP1), an intra-acrosomal oolemmal-binding sperm protein, reveals filamentous organization in protein crystal form.

AUGUST 26, 2015

Could the sperm harpoon the egg to facilitate fertilization? That’s the intriguing possibility raised by the University of Virginia School of Medicine’s discovery that a protein within the head of the sperm forms spiky filaments, suggesting that these tiny filaments may lash together the sperm and its target.

The finding, 14 years in the making, has earned the cover of the scientific journal Andrology. It represents a significant step forward in the fine dissection of the protein architecture of the sperm’s acrosomal matrix, an organelle in the sperm head, and suggests a new hypothesis concerning what happens during fertilization.

“This finding has really captured our imagination,” said U.Va. reproduction researcher John Herr of the Department of Cell Biology. “One of the major proteins that is abundant in the acrosome [in the anterior region of the sperm head] is crystallizing into filaments, and we now postulate they’re involved in penetrating the egg ­– that’s the new hypothesis emerging from the finding, which leads to a whole new set of questions and new hypotheses about the very fine structure of molecular events during fertilization.”

The discovery is the result of a longstanding collaboration between Herr’s lab and the lab of Wladek Minor of the Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics. Years ago, Herr’s lab discovered the protein that has now been shown to form the filaments, which they dubbed sperm lysozyme-like protein 1, or SLLP1. This protein is a member of a family of proteins now known to reside inside the acrosome.

Herr’s lab, however, had no way to determine the shape and structure of the protein. That’s where Minor’s lab came in. To figure it out, Minor’s team had to capture the protein within a static crystal, cool the crystal to cryogenic temperatures to prevent decay and then blast it with X-rays. By examining how those X-rays were refracted, they could calculate the shape of the protein, somewhat like mapping out a shipwreck with sonar.

It was no easy task, requiring many attempts and much analysis. But in the end, they were able to produce one of the first descriptions of a sperm protein.

“This is an important protein, because it’s the first crystal structure from a protein within the sperm acrosome,” said Heping Zheng, the lead author of the paper outlining the discovery. “It is also the first structure of a mammalian sperm protein with a specific oocyte-side binding partner characterized. To our knowledge, only nine proteins specifically obtained from mammalian sperm have known structures.”

The new understanding of the structure will now act as a map for Herr and other reproductive biologists exploring how fertilization occurs. “At the very fundamental level, understanding that fine molecular architecture leads me, the biologist, to be able to posit new functions for this family of proteins my lab discovered in the acrosome,” Herr explained.

The mutually beneficial collaboration between the labs is vital, Minor noted. “You have to explain the relation between structure and function,” he said. “You can make a beautiful picture of the Himalayas, for example. For some time, when nobody knew the Himalayas, it was enough to show the picture. It was a beautiful picture; nobody had seen that before. Now, you can go close to Mount Everest, you can make a picture, you can send it to the Washington Post or the New York Times. Nobody will print that, because who cares? They have millions of these pictures. But if you have a story about someone who climbed the mountain in winter, skied down and saved the life of another climber, you have a story for the front page of the New York Times. It’s the same here. You must have a story, a novel understanding, to go with the structure on the cover of the journal.”

The structure has been detailed in an article published in Andrology by Heping Zheng, Arabinda Mandal, Igor A. Shumilin, Mahendra D. Chordia, Subbarayalu Panneerdoss, John Herr and Wladek Minor.


Open Innovation Summit  October 28 & 29, Boston, 2015, Hilton Hotel, Back Bay

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

https://theinnovationenterprise.com/summits/open-innovation-summit-boston-2015/registration#sthash.fMuKPMw0.dpuf

OVERVIEW

http://theinnovationenterprise.com/summits/open-innovation-summit-boston-2015#overview

BROCHURE

ie.theinnovationenterprise.com/eb/OpenInno_US15.pdf

AGENDA

http://theinnovationenterprise.com/summits/open-innovation-summit-boston-2015/schedule?mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRokva7Ie%2B%2FhmjTEU5z16u4pX6a2g5141El3fuXBP2XqjvpVQcBmMb3LRw8FHZNpywVWM8TIKdQQt9l1IAzmCmk%3D

 


MD Anderson Cancer Center: Treatment Options for Lung Cancer

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Seeking a Second Opinion for NSCLC –>>>>> Consider MDACC

 

Surgeon David Rice, M.D., is dedicated to providing the most-advanced
personalized lung cancer treatments, including minimally invasive surgeries.

Oncologist George Simon, M.D., FACP, FCCP, examines one of his patients. Dr. Simon specializes in targeted
therapies to improve outcomes for patients with small cell and non-small cell lung cancers.

George Simon, M.D., FACP, FCCP
Section Chief, Translational Research; Professor

If you have been diagnosed with lung cancer, we’re here to help. Call 1-877-632-6789 to make an appointment or request an appointment online.

Lung Cancer Treatment Options

Our Treatment Approach

At MD Anderson, some of the nation’s top lung cancer specialists focus their extraordinary expertise on you. We customize your treatment to deliver the most advanced, least invasive treatments available for lung cancer. And because your peace of mind is important to us, we specialize in techniques and therapies than can help preserve lung function.

MD Anderson offers the most advanced lung cancer treatments, many available at only a few locations in the United States. Your lung cancer therapy may include:

And we’re constantly researching newer, safer, more-effective lung cancer treatments – with fewer side effects. We are proud to be one of the few cancer centers in the nation to house a prestigious federally funded lung cancer SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence) program. This translates to a wide variety of clinical trials for new treatments.

Our Lung Cancer Treatments

If you are diagnosed with lung cancer, your doctor will discuss the best options to treat it. This depends on several factors, including:

  • The stage and type of lung cancer
  • Other lung problems, such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis
  • Possible side effects of treatment
  • Your general health

Your treatment for lung cancer will be customized to your particular needs. It may include one or more of the following therapies to treat the cancer or help relieve symptoms.

If you have been diagnosed with lung cancer, we’re here to help. Call 1-877-632-6789 to make an appointment or request an appointment online.

 

Make Your First Appointment

Why Choose MD Anderson?

  • Latest, most-advancedlung cancer treatmentsincluding delivery of chemotherapy by nanoparticles, minimally invasive surgical techniques, targeted therapies and gene therapies
  • Leading-edge radiotherapy approaches including proton therapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy
  • Focus on saving lung function and reducing damage to healthy tissue
  • Nationally recognized lung cancer research program, range of clinical trials
  • Lung cancer is part of MD Anderson’sMoon Shots Program: an ambitious effort to reduce cancer deaths through the rapid discovery of new treatments

Lung Cancer Knowledge Center

Treatment at MD Anderson

Lung cancer is treated in our:

Find Your MD Anderson Location

Surgery

Surgeon David Rice, M.D., is dedicated to providing the most-advanced
personalized lung cancer treatments, including minimally invasive surgeries.

Like all surgeries, lung cancer surgery is most successful when performed by a specialist with a great deal of experience in the particular procedure.

MD Anderson lung surgeons are among the most skilled and recognized in the world. They perform a large number of surgeries for lung cancer each year, using the least invasive and most effective techniques. For some patients, our advanced Cyberknife® stereotactic radiosurgery system provides an effective minimally invasive approach.

Lung cancer may be treated with surgery alone or combined with other treatments. Chemotherapy or radiation may be given:

  • Before surgery to shrink tumors. This is called induction or neoadjuvant therapy.
  • After surgery to help destroy cancer cells that may remain in the body. This is called adjuvant therapy.

Surgery is used less often for small cell lung cancer because this type of cancer spreads more quickly through the body and is not often found in the early stages when it is confined to the lungs.

The most common types of surgery for lung cancer are:

  • Wedge resection: Removal of the tumor and a pie- or wedge-shaped piece of the lung around the tumor
  • Lobectomy: Removal of the lobe of the lung with cancer
  • Segmentectomy or segmental resection: Removal of a segment, or part, of the lobe where the cancer is located
  • Pneumonectomy: Removal of the entire lung
  • Sleeve resection: Removal of part of the bronchus

In addition, lymph nodes in the chest will be removed and looked at under a microscope to find out if the lung cancer has spread. This will help doctors decide if you need further treatment after surgery.

Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS): MD Anderson surgeons are specially trained and highly skilled at performing this minimally invasive surgery, and they use the latest equipment available.

Other types of surgery

Sometimes surgery is needed to help problems caused by lung cancer or its treatment. This may include:

  • Laser surgery to open a blocked airway
  • Placement of small tubes (stents) to keep airways open
  • Cryosurgery to freeze and destroy cancer tissue
  • Placement of a Pleurx-Denver catheter to drain fluid that may accumulate in the pleural cavity (the layer of tissue that surrounds the lungs)
  • Cyberknife® stereotactic radiosurgery

Chemotherapy

MD Anderson offers the most up-to-date and effective chemotherapy options for lung cancer. Chemotherapy is often the main treatment for small cell lung cancer or if the cancer has spread (metastasized). MD Anderson offers techniques to help make chemotherapy more effective, including delivery by nanoparticles. If surgery is not an option for you, your doctor may suggest chemotherapy and radiation.

Targeted Therapies

MD Anderson is among just a few cancer centers in the nation that are able to offer you targeted therapies for some types of lung cancer. These innovative new drugs stop the growth of cancer cells by interfering with certain proteins and receptors or blood vessels that supply the tumor with what it needs to grow.

Radiation Therapy

New radiation therapy techniques and remarkable skill allow MD Anderson doctors to target lung cancer more precisely, delivering the maximum amount of radiation with the least damage to healthy cells. Radiation therapy may be used with chemotherapy and/or surgery.

The Thoracic Center provides the very latest radiation treatments for lung cancer, including:

  • Brachytherapy: Tiny radioactive seeds are placed in the body close to the tumor
  • 3D-conformal radiation therapy: Several radiation beams are given in the exact shape of the tumor
  • Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT): Treatment is tailored to the specific shape of the tumor

Proton Therapy

The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson is one of the world’s largest and most advanced centers. It’s the only proton therapy facility in the country located within a comprehensive cancer center. This means this cutting-edge therapy is backed by all the expertise and compassionate care for which MD Anderson is famous.

Proton therapy delivers high radiation doses directly into the tumor, sparing nearby healthy tissue and vital organs. For many patients, this results in better cancer control with fewer side effects.

Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

In photodynamic therapy, a light-sensitive chemical is injected into the body, where it remains longer in cancer cells than it does in normal cells. The chemical is activated with a laser that initiates the destruction of cancer cells. PDT often is used on very small tumors or to reduce certain symptoms of lung cancer.

Our Lung Cancer Clinical Trials

Because of its status as one of the world’s premier cancer centers, MD Anderson participates in many clinical trials (research studies) for lung cancer. Sometimes they are your best option for treatment. Other times, they help researchers learn how to treat cancer and improve the future of cancer treatment.

To find out more about clinical trials at MD Anderson for lung cancer, visit our Clinical Trials database or speak to your doctor.

Thoracic/Head & Neck Medical Oncology

While encompassing the overall mission of MD Anderson Cancer Center, the particular goals of the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology are to provide the highest quality of care to our patients and to advance the treatment and prevention of aerodigestive cancers through innovative clinical and laboratory research.

Our investigations involve many of the most promising molecularly-targeted agents and combinations of agents currently known. We emphasize rigorous study conduct and impeccable study design, and many of our studies have been developed through cooperative group mechanisms.

The Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology staff directly responsible for patient care is comprised of 21 physicians, 24 research nurses, two inpatient mid-level providers, and 13 outpatient mid-level providers. Our physician team includes ten physicians who care only for thoracic medical oncology patients in the Thoracic Center and eleven medical oncologists who treat both lung cancer and head/neck cancer patients in those respective outpatient clinic areas.

Why Choose MD Anderson?

  • Latest, most-advancedlung cancer treatmentsincluding delivery of chemotherapy by nanoparticles, minimally invasive surgical techniques, targeted therapies and gene therapies
  • Leading-edge radiotherapy approaches including proton therapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy
  • Focus on saving lung function and reducing damage to healthy tissue
  • Nationally recognized lung cancer research program, range of clinical trials
  • Lung cancer is part of MD Anderson’sMoon Shots Program: an ambitious effort to reduce cancer deaths through the rapid discovery of new treatments

Faculty & Staff

Ethan Dmitrovsky, M.D.
Provost and Executive Vice President; Professor

Waun Ki Hong, M.D.
Head, Division of Cancer Medicine and Vice Provost; Professor

John V. Heymach, M.D., Ph.D.
Chair, Thoracic/ Head & Neck Medical Oncology and Chief, Thoracic Medical Oncology; Professor

Bonnie S. Glisson, M.D., FACP
Associate Chair, Thoracic/ Head & Neck Medical Oncology; Professor

George R. Blumenschein, Jr., M.D.
Associate Professor

Lauren Byers, M.D.
Assistant Professor

Frank V. Fossella, M.D.
Medical Director, Thoracic Multidisciplinary Care Center; Professor

Don Gibbons, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Kathryn Gold, M.D.
Assistant Professor

Faye M. Johnson, M.D., Ph.D.
Co-Chief, Section of Head & Neck Medical Oncology; Associate Professor

Merrill S. Kies, M.D.
Deputy Division Head for Global Oncology; Professor

Jonathan M. Kurie, M.D.
Professor

Charles Lu, M.D., S.M.
Associate Professor; Associate Medical Director, Head and Neck Center

Erminia Massarelli, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Vassiliki A. Papadimitrakopoulou, M.D.
Professor, Deputy Section Chief Thoracic Medical Oncology

Katherine M. Pisters, M.D.
Professor

Hai T. Tran, Pharm.D.
Associate Professor

George Simon, M.D., FACP, FCCP
Section Chief, Translational Research; Professor

Anne Tsao, M.D.
Director, Mesothelioma Program; Associate Professor

William N. William, Jr., M.D.
Chief, Section of Head & Neck Medical Oncology; Assistant Professor

Related Care Centers

Related Diseases

Related Programs

Thoracic Center

Thoracic Center Banner

MD Anderson’s Thoracic Center is dedicated to providing personalized care for every type and stage of lung cancer and other cancers in the chest. Our goal is to give patients exceptional outcomes while focusing on quality of life and optimum lung function. We specialize in treating:

And at MD Anderson you’re surrounded by the strength of one of the nation’s largest and most experienced comprehensive cancer centers, which has all the support and wellness services needed to treat the whole person – not just the disease.

If you have been diagnosed with lung cancer or another thoracic cancer, we’re here to help. Call 1-877-632-6789 to make an appointment or request an appointment online.

Why Choose MD Anderson’s Thoracic Center?

  • Latest treatments, including less-invasive surgery, sterotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy
  • Dedication to optimum lung function and quality of life
  • Accurate diagnosis with most-advanced technology
  • Team approach to customized care
  • Clinical trials, including new chemotherapy agents, targeted therapies, antibodies and gene therapy

Our Diagnostic Approach

Early and precise diagnosis and staging of lung cancer and other thoracic cancers is important for successful treatment. MD Anderson’s Thoracic Center offers you the most advanced diagnostic methods and tools including:

  • PET (positron emission tomography) scans
  • High-resolution CT (computed tomography) scans
  • Endobronchial and esophageal ultrasound
  • Advanced bronchoscopic imaging
  • Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)

Our Treatments

Lung cancer and other thoracic cancers often are complex and challenging cancers that may require multiple types of treatment. Our teams of surgeons, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists specialize in thoracic cancers. They focus a remarkable amount of talent and expertise on you, providing personal, customized care.

We offer the most-advanced treatment options for thoracic cancers including:

  • Less-invasive surgical techniques
  • Proton therapy with the only pencil scanning beam capability in the United States
  • Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)
  • Four-dimensional radiation therapy
  • Image-guided radiation therapy
  • Stereotactic radiation therapy
  • Techniques to help save lung function
  • Targeted therapies

Our Clinical Trials

We are proud to be one of the few cancer centers in the nation with a prestigious federally funded lung cancer SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence) program. We’re studying new ways to prevent and treat lung cancers, and we offer clinical trials (research studies) for almost every type and stage of lung cancer and other types of thoracic cancer.

The Thoracic Center collaborates with Massachusetts General Hospital in the only National Cancer Institute-funded clinical trial to establish standards and guidelines for using proton therapy to treat lung cancer.

To find out more about clinical trials at MD Anderson for thoracic cancers, visit ourClinical Trials database or speak to your doctor.

 

 


LPBI’s M3DP – Matrix Organization

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

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