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Google AI improves accuracy of reading mammograms, study finds

Google AI improves accuracy of reading mammograms, study finds

Google CFO Ruth Porat has blogged about twice battling breast cancer.

Artificial intelligence was often more accurate than radiologists in detecting breast cancer from mammograms in a study conducted by researchers using Google AI technology.

The study, published in the journal Nature, used mammograms from approximately 90,000 women in which the outcomes were known to train technology from Alphabet Inc’s DeepMind AI unit, now part of Google Health, Yahoo news reported.

The AI system was then used to analyze images from 28,000 other women and often diagnosed early cancers more accurately than the radiologists who originally interpreted the mammograms.

In another test, AI outperformed six radiologists in reading 500 mammograms. However, while the AI system found cancers the humans missed, it also failed to find cancers flagged by all six radiologists, reports The New York Times.

The researchers said the study “paves the way” for further clinical trials.

Writing in NatureEtta D. Pisano, chief research officer at the American College of Radiology and professor in residence at Harvard Medical School, noted, “The real world is more complicated and potentially more diverse than the type of controlled research environment reported in this study.”

Ruth Porat, senior vice president and chief financial officer Alphabet, Inc., wrote in a company blog titled “Breast cancer and tech…a reason for optimism” in October about twice battling the disease herself, and the importance of her company’s application of AI to healthcare innovations.

She said that focus had already led to the development of a deep learning algorithm to help pathologists assess tissue associated with metastatic breast cancer.

“By pinpointing the location of the cancer more accurately, quickly and at a lower cost, care providers might be able to deliver better treatment for more patients,” she wrote.

Google also has created algorithms that help medical professionals diagnose lung cancer, and eye disease in people with diabetes, per the Times.

Porat acknowledged that Google’s research showed the best results occur when medical professionals and technology work together.

Any insights provided by AI must be “paired with human intelligence and placed in the hands of skilled researchers, surgeons, oncologists, radiologists and others,” she said.

Anne Stych is a staff writer for Bizwomen.
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AI Acquisitions by Big Tech Firms Are Happening at a Blistering Pace: 2019 Recent Data by CBI Insights

Reporter: Stephen J. Williams, Ph.D.

Recent report from CBI Insights shows the rapid pace at which the biggest tech firms (Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, and Amazon) are acquiring artificial intelligence (AI) startups, potentially confounding the AI talent shortage that exists.

The link to the report and free download is given here at https://www.cbinsights.com/research/top-acquirers-ai-startups-ma-timeline/

Part of the report:

TECH GIANTS LEAD IN AI ACQUISITIONS

The usual suspects are leading the race for AI: tech giants like Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft, Google, & Apple (FAMGA) have all been aggressively acquiring AI startups in the last decade.

Among the FAMGA companies, Apple leads the way, making 20 total AI acquisitions since 2010. It is followed by Google (the frontrunner from 2012 to 2016) with 14 acquisitions and Microsoft with 10.

Apple’s AI acquisition spree, which has helped it overtake Google in recent years, was essential to the development of new iPhone features. For example, FaceID, the technology that allows users to unlock their iPhone X just by looking at it, stems from Apple’s M&A moves in chips and computer vision, including the acquisition of AI company RealFace.

In fact, many of FAMGA’s prominent products and services came out of acquisitions of AI companies — such as Apple’s Siri, or Google’s contributions to healthcare through DeepMind.

That said, tech giants are far from the only companies snatching up AI startups.

Since 2010, there have been 635 AI acquisitions, as companies aim to build out their AI capabilities and capture sought-after talent (as of 8/31/2019).

The pace of these acquisitions has also been increasing. AI acquisitions saw a more than 6x uptick from 2013 to 2018, including last year’s record of 166 AI acquisitions — up 38% year-over-year.

In 2019, there have already been 140+ acquisitions (as of August), putting the year on track to beat the 2018 record at the current run rate.

Part of this increase in the pace of AI acquisitions can be attributed to a growing diversity in acquirers. Where once AI was the exclusive territory of major tech companies, today, smaller AI startups are becoming acquisition targets for traditional insurance, retail, and healthcare incumbents.

For example, in February 2018, Roche Holding acquired New York-based cancer startup Flatiron Health for $1.9B — one of the largest M&A deals in artificial intelligence. This year, Nike acquired AI-powered inventory management startup Celect, Uber acquired computer vision company Mighty AI, and McDonald’s acquired personalization platform Dynamic Yield.

Despite the increased number of acquirers, however, tech giants are still leading the charge. Acquisitive tech giants have emerged as powerful global corporations with a competitive advantage in artificial intelligence, and startups have played a pivotal role in helping these companies scale their AI initiatives.

Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Intel, and Amazon are the most active acquirers of AI startups, each acquiring 7+ companies.

To read more on recent Acquisitions in the AI space please see the following articles on this Open Access Online Journal

Diversification and Acquisitions, 2001 – 2015: Trail known as “Google Acquisitions” – Understanding Alphabet’s Acquisitions: A Sector-By-Sector Analysis

Clarivate Analytics expanded IP data leadership by new acquisition of the leading provider of intellectual property case law and analytics Darts-ip

2019 Biotechnology Sector and Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

Forbes Opinion: 13 Industries Soon To Be Revolutionized By Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence and Cardiovascular Disease

Multiple Barriers Identified Which May Hamper Use of Artificial Intelligence in the Clinical Setting

Top 12 Artificial Intelligence Innovations Disrupting Healthcare by 2020

The launch of SCAI – Interview with Gérard Biau, director of the Sorbonne Center for Artificial Intelligence (SCAI).

 

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Retrospect on HistoScanning; an AI routinely used in diagnostic imaging for over a decade

Author and Curator: Dror Nir, PhD

This blog-post is a retrospect on over a decade of doing with HistoScanning; an AI medical-device for imaging-based tissue characterization.

Imaging-based tissue characterization by AI is offering a change in imaging paradigm; enhancing the visual information received when using diagnostic-imaging beyond that which the eye alone can see and at the same time simplifying and increasing the cost-effectiveness of patients clinical pathway.

In the case of HistoScanning, imaging is a combination of 3D-scanning by ultrasound with a real-time application of AI. The HistoScanning AI application comprises fast “patterns recognition” algorithms trained on ultrasound-scans and matched histopathology of cancer patients. It classifies millimetric tissue-volumes by identifying differences in the scattered ultrasound characterizing different mechanical and morphological properties of the different pathologies. A user-friendly interface displays the analysis results on the live ultrasound video image.

Users of AI in diagnostic-imaging of cancer patients expect it to improve their ability to:

  • Detect clinically significant cancer lesions with high sensitivity and specificity
  • Accurately position lesions within an organ
  • Accurately estimate the lesion volume
  • AND; help determine the pre-clinical level of lesion aggressiveness

The last being achieved through real-time guidance of needle biopsy towards the most suspicious locations.

Unlike most technologies that get obsolete as time passes, AI gets better. Availability of more processing power, better storage technologies, and faster memories translate to an ever-growing capacity of machines to learn. Moreover, the human-perception of AI is transforming fast from disbelief at the time HistoScanning was first launched, into total embracement.

During the last decade, 192 systems were put to use at the hands of urologists, radiologists, and gynecologists. Over 200 peer-reviewed, scientific-posters and white-papers were written by HistoScanning users sharing experiences and thoughts. Most of these papers are about HistoScanning for Prostate (PHS) which was launched as a medical-device in 2007. The real-time guided prostate-biopsy application was added to it in late 2013. I have mentioned several  of these papers in blog-posts published in this open-access website, e.g. :

Today’s fundamental challenge in Prostate cancer screening (September 2, 2012)

The unfortunate ending of the Tower of Babel construction project and its effect on modern imaging-based cancer patients’ management (October 22, 2012)

On the road to improve prostate biopsy (February 15, 2013)

Ultrasound-based Screening for Ovarian Cancer (April 28, 2013)

Imaging-Biomarkers; from discovery to validation (September 28, 2014)

For people who are developing AI applications for health-care, retrospect on HistoScanning represents an excellent opportunity to better plan the life cycle of such products and what it would take to bring it to a level of wide adoption by global health systems.

It would require many pages to cover the lessons HistoScanning could teach each and all of us in detail. I will therefore briefly discuss the highlights:

  • Regulations: Clearance for HistoScanning by FDA required a PMA and was not achieved until today. The regulatory process in Europe was similar to that of ultrasound but getting harder in recent years.
  • Safety: During more than a decade and many thousands of procedures, no safety issue was brought up.
  • Learning curve: Many of the reports on HistoScanning conclude that in order to maximize its potential the sonographer must be experienced and well trained with using the system. Amongst else, it became clear that there is a strong correlation between the clinical added value of using HistoScanning and the quality of the ultrasound scan, which is dependant on the sonographer but also, in many cases, on the patient (e.g. his BMI)
  • Patient’s attitude: PMS reviews on HistoScanning shows that patients are generally excited about the opportunity of an AI application being involved in their diagnostic process. It seems to increase their confidence in the validity of the results and there was never a case of refusal to be exposed to the analysis. Also, some of the early adopters of PHS (HistoScanning for prostate) charged their patients privately for the service and patients were happy to accept that although there was no reimbursement of such cost by their health insurance.
  • Adoption by practitioners: To date, PHS did not achieve wide market adoption and users’ feedback on it are mixed, ranging from strong positive recommendation to very negative and dismissive. Close examination of the reasons for such a variety of experiences reveals that most of the reports are relying on small and largely varying samples. The reason for it being the relatively high complexity and cost of clinical trials aiming at measuring its performance. Moreover, without any available standards of assessing AI performance, what is good enough for one user can be totally insufficient for another. Realizing this led to recent efforts by some leading urologists to organize large patients’ registries related to routine-use of PHS.

The most recent peer-reviewed paper on PHS; Evaluation of Prostate HistoScanning as a Method for Targeted Biopsy in Routine Practice. Petr V. Glybochko, Yuriy G. Alyaev, Alexandr V. Amosov, German E. Krupinov, Dror Nir, Mathias Winkler, Timur M. Ganzha, European Urology Focus.

Studies PHS on statistically reasonable number (611) of patients and concluded that “Our study results support supplementing the standard schematic transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy with a few guided cores harvested using the ultrasound-based prostate HistoScanning true targeting approach in cases for which multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is not available.”

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Real Time Coverage @BIOConvention #BIO2019: Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence: Realizing Precision Medicine One Patient at a Time

Reporter: Stephen J Williams, PhD @StephenJWillia2

The impact of Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) during the last decade has been tremendous. With the rise of infobesity, ML/AI is evolving to an essential capability to help mine the sheer volume of patient genomics, omics, sensor/wearables and real-world data, and unravel the knot of healthcare’s most complex questions.

Despite the advancements in technology, organizations struggle to prioritize and implement ML/AI to achieve the anticipated value, whilst managing the disruption that comes with it. In this session, panelists will discuss ML/AI implementation and adoption strategies that work. Panelists will draw upon their experiences as they share their success stories, discuss how to implement digital diagnostics, track disease progression and treatment, and increase commercial value and ROI compared against traditional approaches.

  • most of trials which are done are still in training AI/ML algorithms with training data sets.  The best results however have been about 80% accuracy in training sets.  Needs to improve
  • All data sets can be biased.  For example a professor was looking at heartrate using a IR detector on a wearable but it wound up that different types of skin would generate a different signal to the detector so training sets maybe population biases (you are getting data from one group)
  • clinical grade equipment actually haven’t been trained on a large set like commercial versions of wearables, Commercial grade is tested on a larger study population.  This can affect the AI/ML algorithms.
  • Regulations:  The regulatory bodies responsible is up to debate.  Whether FDA or FTC is responsible for AI/ML in healtcare and healthcare tech and IT is not fully decided yet.  We don’t have the guidances for these new technologies
  • some rules: never use your own encryption always use industry standards especially when getting personal data from wearables.  One hospital corrupted their system because their computer system was not up to date and could not protect against a virus transmitted by a wearable.
  • pharma companies understand they need to increase value of their products so very interested in how AI/ML can be used.

Please follow LIVE on TWITTER using the following @ handles and # hashtags:

@Handles

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

@BIOConvention

# Hashtags

#BIO2019 (official meeting hashtag)

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Real Time Coverage @BIOConvention #BIO2019: Precision Medicine Beyond Oncology June 5 Philadelphia PA

Reporter: Stephen J Williams PhD @StephenJWillia2

Precision Medicine has helped transform cancer care from one-size-fits-all chemotherapy to a new era, where patients’ tumors can be analyzed and therapy selected based on their genetic makeup. Until now, however, precision medicine’s impact has been far less in other therapeutic areas, many of which are ripe for transformation. Efforts are underway to bring the successes of precision medicine to neurology, immunology, ophthalmology, and other areas. This move raises key questions of how the lessons learned in oncology can be used to advance precision medicine in other fields, what types of data and tools will be important to personalizing treatment in these areas, and what sorts of partnerships and payer initiatives will be needed to support these approaches and their ultimate commercialization and use. The panel will also provide an in depth look at precision medicine approaches aimed at better understanding and improving patient care in highly complex disease areas like neurology.
Speaker panel:  The big issue now with precision medicine is there is so much data and hard to put experimental design and controls around randomly collected data.
  • The frontier is how to CURATE randomly collected data to make some sense of it
  • One speaker was at a cancer meeting and the oncologist had no idea what to make of genomic reports they were given.  Then there is a lack of action or worse a misdiagnosis.
  • So for e.g. with Artificial Intelligence algorithms to analyze image data you can see things you can’t see with naked eye but if data quality not good the algorithms are useless – if data not curated properly data is wasted
Data needs to be organized and curated. 
If relying of AI for big data analysis the big question still is: what are the rates of false negative and false positives?  Have to make sure so no misdiagnosis.

Please follow LIVE on TWITTER using the following @ handles and # hashtags:

@Handles

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

@BIOConvention

# Hashtags

#BIO2019 (official meeting hashtag)

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