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Archive for the ‘Innovations in Neurophysiology & Neuropsychology’ Category


  • More than 77 percent of patients in the REMfresh® Patient Reported Outcomes DURation (REMDUR) study reported achieving 6 or more hours of sleep after taking REMfresh®, the first continuous release and absorption melatonin (CRA-melatonin)
  • More than 91 percent experienced improvements in sleep onset, sleep maintenance and total sleep quality, after taking REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin)
  • Post-marketing, patient-reported outcomes data reinforces clinical trial evidence demonstrating the potential of non-prescription REMfresh®, as a new, non-prescription, drug-free hypnotic (sleep) product designed to achieve 7-hour sleep
  • New data confirms previously presented SLEEP 2017 study showing the patented Ion Powered Pump (IPP) technology in REMfresh® helps extend melatonin-targeted sleep maintenance levels in the body from 3.7 hours (with marketed immediate-release melatonin) to 6.7 hours, while mimicking the pattern of the body’s natural melatonin blood levels during the nightly sleep cycle

Real Time Coverage at SLEEP 2018 meeting, Baltimore.

Reporters: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN, and Gail S. Thornton, MA

BALTIMORE – (June 6, 2018) – A patient-reported outcomes study presented at SLEEP 2018 provides confirmatory real-world evidence of the previously peer-reviewed and presented data showing the 7-hour action of REMfresh®, a new product for sleep. REMfresh® Ion-Powered Melatoninis the first and only, continuous release and absorption melatonin (CRA-melatonin) to mimic the body’s own 7-hour Mesa Wave, the natural pattern of melatonin blood levels during a normal night’s sleep cycle. This induces sleep onset and provides lasting and restorative sleep for up to 7 hours.

This new data shows a correlative relationship between a 7-hour Mesa Wave pharmacokinetic (PK) profile and real-world evidence of improvements in sleep duration, onset, maintenance and sleep quality after taking REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin).

The post-marketing REMfresh® Patient Reported Outcomes DURation (REMDUR) study was presented at SLEEP 2018, the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS), LLC, a joint partnership of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and the Sleep Research Society (SRS).

 

Brodner and Seiden

Pictured here is David C. Brodner, M.D., and David J. Seiden, M.D., FAASM, after presenting the latest study data which found REMfresh is the first and only continuous release and absorption melatonin™ to mimic the body’s own 7-hour Mesa Wave™.

 

In a sample of 500 patients on REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) responding to an online survey, 77.6 percent achieved 6 or more hours of sleep compared to 23.6 percent who slept that duration prior to taking REMfresh® (p<.0001). A vast majority of respondents also reported a major or moderate improvement in sleep onset (91.6 percent, p<.0001), sleep maintenance (94.8 percent, p<.0001) and total sleep quality (97.2 percent, p<.0001). More than three-quarters (76.6 percent) of patients indicated they take REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) nightly. The proportion of patients reporting nightly CRA-melatonin use was significantly greater than the proportion of patients with less than nightly use (p<.0001). Most importantly, over 98 percent of patients reported they were very likely or likely to continue taking REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) to treat their sleep complaints.

“The real-world evidence reported today in REMDUR provides further confirmation that REMfresh® represents a significant advance in the use of melatonin as a baseline therapy for treating sleep complaints,” said David C. Brodner, M.D., a leading sleep specialist who is Double Board-Certified in Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery and Sleep Medicine, founder and principle Physician at the Center for Sinus, Allergy, and Sleep Wellness, in Palm Beach County, Florida, and Senior Medical Advisor for Physician’s Seal, LLC®.

“REMfresh® Ion-Powered Melatoninhas been shown to be an effective drug-free solution that is now available to the millions of Americans in need of a good night’s sleep, many of whom seek new therapies that will induce sleep and keep them asleep until the morning, without causing residual effects they’ll feel the next day. With its unique delivery system that imitates the body’s own natural sleep pattern, REMfresh® has revolutionized the role of melatonin, when delivered in the CRA form. It is no longer just a treatment for jet lag, but the CRA-melatonin found in REMfresh® has been shown to provide substantial relief to individuals having nightly sleep challenges,” said Dr. Brodner.

The scientifically advanced, patented delivery system in REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin), called Ion Powered Pump (IPP™) technology, replicates the way in which the body naturally releases and absorbs melatonin, unlike conventional melatonin sleep products. Since REMfresh® is not a drug, there is no drug hangover.

Nearly one-third of U.S. adults sleep less than the recommended seven hours daily.[1],[2] Increasing evidence suggests an association between sub-optimal sleep duration and adverse health outcomes including a higher risk of diabetes, hypertension, heart attack, stroke, obesity and depression.[3] A pooled analysis of 16 studies and over one million patients found short sleep duration corresponded with greater risk of morbidity and mortality.[4]

 REMDUR Study Design

The post-marketing REMfresh® Patient Reported Outcomes DURation (REMDUR) study was designed to obtain real-world evidence about patients’ sleep patterns, duration of sleep before and after REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin), daily REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) use, onset of action, sleep maintenance, quality of sleep, and overall satisfaction with REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin).

Patients with sleep disturbances in the general population who received a sample of CRA-melatonin (REMfresh®) from their physicians were invited to complete a 12-question survey. Survey responses were received from 500 patients.

Confirmation of the REMAKT Clinical Study

REMDUR confirmed clinical trial findings from REMAKT (REM Absorption Kinetics Trial), a U.S.-based randomized, crossover pharmacokinetic (PK) evaluation study in healthy, non-smoking adults that compared REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) with a market-leading, immediate-release melatonin (IR-melatonin).[5]

The study results, peer-reviewed and presented last year at SLEEP 2017, showed that melatonin levels with REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) exceeded the targeted sleep maintenance threshold for a median of 6.7 hours, compared with 3.7 hours with the leading IR-melatonin. Conversely, the levels of the market-leading IR-melatonin formulation dramatically increased 23 times greater than the targeted levels of exogenous melatonin for sleep maintenance and had a rapid decline in serum levels that did not allow melatonin levels to be maintained beyond 4 hours.

The REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) studies build upon the body of evidence from prolonged-release melatonin (PR-M), marketed in Europe, which demonstrated in well-conducted, placebo-controlled studies, statistically significant improvement in sleep quality, morning alertness, sleep latency and quality of life in patients aged 55 years and older compared with placebo. REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) was designed to overcome the challenges of absorption in the intestines, thereby extending the continual and gradual release pattern of melatonin through the night (known as the Mesa Wave, a flat-topped hill with steep sides). There was a fast time to Cmax, which is anticipated to result in improved sleep onset, while the extended median plateau time to 6.7 hours and rapid fall-off in plasma levels at the end of the Mesa Wave, may help to improve sleep maintenance and morning alertness.

Conventional melatonin products have had challenges at mimicking the profile of a Mesa Wave™. The scientific work behind REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) sought to overcome these challenges by having the melatonin formulation in a matrix that maintains a patented, solubility-enhancing pH environment to help with the transport to the brush border of the gut and its subsequent absorption.

Designed as a hydrogel matrix tablet, REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) provides rapid release of the melatonin from the surface of the tablet, as the hydrogel release-controlling matrix is setting up in the acidic environment (pH of 1 to 3.5) in the stomach. As the tablet moves into the higher pH (5.5 to 6.5) environment of the small-intestine, which is above the pKa of melatonin (~4.0), the acidic moiety in the tablet is designed to maintain the pH within the tablet below 4.0 for 7+ hours. The hydrogel matrix, after proper hydration, allows continuous release of the active melatonin and acidic moiety into the lumen of the intestines.

Melatonin: The Body’s Natural Sleep Ingredient

Melatonin is produced by the pineal gland in the brain and is the body’s natural sleep ingredient. Melatonin levels normally begin to rise in the mid-to late evening and remain high for the majority of the night. Levels begin to decline towards early morning, as the body’s wake cycle is triggered. As people age, melatonin levels can drop by as much as 70 percent[6] and their bodies may no longer produce enough melatonin to ensure adequate sleep.

Other available products, such as immediate-release melatonin, help initiate the onset of sleep but are usually unable to sustain prolonged sleep maintenance due to an immediate burst of melatonin, which is quickly degraded due to its relatively short half-life (60 minutes). Absorption in the lower digestive tract is limited by melatonin’s limited ability to be absorbed in a low acidity or neutral pH environment.

Importance of Sleep

Sleep is an essential part of every person’s life. The body requires a certain amount of sleep in order to properly rest, repair and renew itself. Sleep is customarily divided in four different stages, with each stage having a different effect. These four stages are:

N1, N2, deep sleep and REM sleep. The body moves among these four stages several times while asleep. If sleep is disrupted for any reason, a person’s body may not have a chance to properly restore itself, especially if it is struggling to get to the later stages, called deep sleep and REM sleep. Studies have shown that sound and sufficient sleep is important for learning, memory and a healthy immune system. A regular pattern of deep sleep and REM sleep will help a person begin the next day feeling refreshed and ready to go.

About Non-Prescription REMfresh®

REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) is the first and only, continuous release and absorption formulation of UltraMel® melatonin (available as 2 mg and 5 mg and with a 0.5 mg anticipated in the second half of 2018). UltraMel® melatonin is a high-quality, 99 percent ultra-pure melatonin sourced from Western Europe exclusively for Physician’s Seal®.

REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) is a dietary supplement and is regulated under the Federal Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, which does not require pre-approval. Melatonin has been in common use for over two decades and has a well-established profile of safe use by millions of people around the world. As with all supplements, individual results may vary.

REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) is non-habit forming and does not contain narcotics, hypnotics, barbiturates, sedatives, antihistamines, alcohol or other harsh or additive chemicals. The usual adult recommended dose is 1-2 tablets 30-60 minutes before bedtime. Follow specific dosing instructions found on the back of the box for proper use of supplements.

REMfresh® (CRA-melatonin) is available at Walmart, Rite Aid and CVS/pharmacy. In 2017 REMfresh® was ranked as  the #1 recommended brand for sleep management by sleep doctors[7].

About Physician’s Seal®

Physician’s Seal® is the innovator of REMfresh®, the first and only continuous release and absorption, 99 percent ultra-pure melatonin (CRA-melatonin) that mimics the way the body naturally releases and maintains melatonin over a 7-hour period. Physician’s Seal®, founded in 2015, is a privately held company based in Boca Raton, Florida. It is committed to bringing cutting-edge life science applications to doctors and their patients. For more information, visit www.remfresh.com and connect with us on Facebook and You Tube.

Its sister subsidiary, IM HealthScience® (IMH) is the innovator of IBgard® and FDgard® for the dietary management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Functional Dyspepsia (FD), respectively. In 2017, IMH added Fiber Choice®, a line of prebiotic fibers, to its product line via an acquisition. IMH® is a privately held company based in Boca Raton, Florida. It was founded in 2010 by a team of highly experienced pharmaceutical research and development and management executives. The company is dedicated to developing products to address overall health and wellness, including conditions with a high unmet medical need, such as digestive health. The IM HealthScience® advantage comes from developing products based on its patented, targeted-delivery technologies called Site Specific Targeting® (SST®). For more information, visit www.imhealthscience.com to learn about the company, or www.IBgard.com,  www.FDgard.com,and www.FiberChoice.com.

This information is for educational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for the advice of a physician or other health care professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing a health problem or disease. The company will strive to keep information current and consistent but may not be able to do so at any specific time. Generally, the most current information can be found on www.remfresh.com. Individual results may vary.

Data Presented at SLEEP 2018 Poster Session on Sleep Maintenance/Sleep Quality

Tuesday, June 5, 2018, 5-7pm

  • (Abstract 0419, Poster Board #104) Improvement in Sleep Maintenance and Sleep Quality with Ion Powered Pump Continuous Release and Absorption Melatonin: Results from a Self-Reported Patient Outcomes Study
    • David J. Seiden, M.D., FAASM, David C. Brodner, M.D., Syed M. Shah, Ph.D.

Visit Physician’s Seal® at booth 220 to learn more about REMfresh®.

The abstract is published in an online supplement of the journal, Sleep, which is available at http://www.sleepmeeting.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/abstractbook2018.pdf?sfvrsn=2

[1] Ford, E.S., Cunningham, T.J., & Croft, J.B. (2015, May 1). Trends in Self-Reported Sleep Duration among US Adults from 1985 to 2012. Sleep, 38(5):829-832. doi: 10.5665/sleep.4684.

[2] Watson, N.F., Badr, M.S., Belenky, G., Bliwise, D.L., Buxton, G.M., Buysse, D.,…Tasali, E. (2015). Joint Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society on the Recommended Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Adult: Methodology and Discussion. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 11(8):931-952. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.158.11.1856.

[3] Colten, H.R., & Altevogt, B.M. (Eds). (2006). Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem.  Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Sleep Medicine and Research. Washington, DC: National Academies Press (US). doi: https://doi.org/10.17226/11617.

[4] Cappuccio, F.P., D’Elia, L., Strazzullo, P.,&  Miller, M.A. (2010). Sleep duration and all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Sleep, 33(5):585-592

[5] For this clinical trial, the head-to-head comparison was with the 5 mg form; a 2 mg form of the comparator was not available.

[6] Zisapel, N. (2010). Melatonin and sleep. The Open Neuroendocrinology Journal, 3: 85-95.

[7] Among primary care physicians with a certification in sleep disorders who recommended a brand of modified-release melatonin. Quintiles IMS ProVoice July-September 2017 survey.

REFERENCE/SOURCE

Physician’s Seal® and REMfresh® (www.remfresh.com)

Dr. David C. Brodner, Center for Sinus, Allergy, and Sleep Wellness (http://www.brodnermd.com/sleep-hygiene.html)

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

2017

Ultra-Pure Melatonin Product Helps Maintain Sleep for Up to 7 Hours

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/06/11/ultra-pure-melatonin-product-helps-maintain-sleep-for-up-to-7-hours/

2016

Sleep Science

Genetic link to sleep and mood disorders

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/02/27/genetic-link-to-sleep-and-mood-disorders/

2015

Sleep quality, amyloid and cognitive decline

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/10/31/sleep-quality-amyloid-and-cognitive-decline/

2013

Day and Night Variation in Melatonin Level affects Plasma Membrane Redox System in Red Blood Cells

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/23/httpwww-ncbi-nlm-nih-govpubmed22561555/

 

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FDA: Rejects NDA filing: “clinical and non-clinical pharmacology sections of the application were not sufficient to complete a review”: Celgene’s Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis Drug – Ozanimod

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Celgene Provides Regulatory Update on Ozanimod for the Treatment of Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

Conference call scheduled for today at 5:30 p.m. ET

SUMMIT, N.J.–(BUSINESS WIRE)– Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ:CELG) today announced that it has received a Refusal to File letter from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding its New Drug Application (NDA) for ozanimod in development for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. Ozanimod is a novel, oral, selective sphingosine 1-phosphate 1 (S1PR1) and 5 (S1PR5) receptor modulator.

Upon its preliminary review, the FDA determined that the nonclinical and clinical pharmacology sections in the NDA were insufficient to permit a complete review. Celgene intends to seek immediate guidance, including requesting a Type A meeting with the FDA, to ascertain what additional information will be required to resubmit the NDA.

“We remain confident in ozanimod’s clinical profile demonstrated in the pivotal program in relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis,” said Jay Backstrom, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Head of Global Regulatory Affairs for Celgene. “We will work with the FDA to expeditiously address all outstanding items and bring this important medicine to patients.”

Conference Call Information

Celgene will hold a conference call to discuss this update today at 5:30 p.m. ET. The conference call may be accessed by dialing 1-866-428-9517 for U.S.callers and 1-224-357-2194 for international callers. The passcode for the call is 9179457. The call can also be accessed via an audio webcast in the Investor Relations section of the company website at www.celgene.com. An audio replay will be available through March 6, 2018 by calling 1-855-859-2056 or 1-404-537-3406 and entering access code 9179457.

About Ozanimod

Ozanimod is a novel, oral, selective, sphingosine 1-phosphate 1 (S1PR1) and 5 (S1PR5) receptor modulator in development for immune-inflammatory indications, including relapsing multiple sclerosis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Selective binding with S1PR1 is believed to inhibit a specific sub set of activated lymphocytes from migrating to sites of inflammation. The result is a reduction of circulating T and B lymphocytes that leads to anti-inflammatory activity. Importantly, immune surveillance is maintained.

Selective binding with S1PR5 is thought to activate specific cells within the central nervous system (CNS). This has the potential to enhance remyelination and prevent synaptic defects. Ultimately, neurological damage may be prevented.

Ozanimod is an investigational compound that is not approved for any use in any country.

About Celgene

Celgene Corporation, headquartered in Summit, New Jersey, is an integrated global pharmaceutical company engaged primarily in the discovery, development and commercialization of innovative therapies for the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases through next‐generation solutions in protein homeostasis, immuno‐oncology, epigenetics, immunology and neuro‐inflammation. For more information, please visit www.celgene.com. Follow Celgene on Social Media: @CelgenePinterestLinkedInFacebook and YouTube.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements, which are generally statements that are not historical facts. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the words “expects,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “intends,” “estimates,” “plans,” “will,” “outlook” and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements are based on management’s current plans, estimates, assumptions and projections, and speak only as of the date they are made. We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement in light of new information or future events, except as otherwise required by law. Forward-looking statements involve inherent risks and uncertainties, most of which are difficult to predict and are generally beyond our control. Actual results or outcomes may differ materially from those implied by the forward-looking statements as a result of the impact of a number of factors, many of which are discussed in more detail in our Annual Report on Form 10-K and our other reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Hyperlinks are provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only. Celgene bears no responsibility for the security or content of external websites.

Celgene
Investors:
Patrick E. Flanigan III, 908-673-9969
Corporate Vice President, Investor Relations
or
Media:
Catherine Cantone, 908-897-4256
Senior Director, Corporate Communications

Source: Celgene Corporation

SOURCE

http://ir.celgene.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=1058943

 

DIVE INTERPRETATION

Celgene’s ozanimod hit with Refusal to File in latest

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Medical Scientific Discoveries for the 21st Century & Interviews with Scientific Leaders at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078313281 – electronic Table of Contents 

Author, Curator and Editor: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Available on Kindle Store @ Amazon.com since 12/9/2017

List of Contributors & Contributors’ Biographies

Volume Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Preface, all Introductions, all Summaries and Epilogue

Part One:

1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3, 2.3, 2.4, 2.4.1, 2.4.2, 2.5, 2.6.1, 2.6.2, 2.6.3, 2.6.4, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3

Part Two:

5.2, 5.3, 5.6, 6.1.2, 6.1.4, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.3.2, 6.3.4, 6.3.5, 6.3.6, 6.3.8, 6.3.10, 6.4.1, 6.4.2, 6.5.1.2, 6.5.1.3, 6.5.2.2, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 8.7, 8.8, 8.9, 8.9.1, 8.9.3, 8.9.4, 8.9.5, 8.9.6, 8.10.1, 8.10.2, 8.10.3, 8.10.4, 9.2, 9.3, 9.5, 9.6, 9.7, 9.8, 9.9, 9.10, 9.11, 9.12, 9.13, 9.14, 9.15, 9.16, 10.2, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7, 10.8, 10.10, 10.11, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 11.5, 11.6, 11.7, 12.1, 12.2, 12.3, 12.4, 12.5, 12.7, 12.8, 12.9, 12.10, 12.11, 12.12, 13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 13.6, 13.12, 13.13, 14.1, 14.2

Guest Authors:

Pnina Abir-Am, PhD Part Two: 6.1.1

Stephen J Williams, PhDPart Two: 6.2.6, 6.5.2.2, 10.4, 10.9, 13.4

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN:

Part One:

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.7, 2.2.1, 2.3

Part Two:

5.1, 5.4, 5.5, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10, 5.11, 6.1.3, 6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.5, 6.3.1, 6.3.3, 6.3.7, 6.3.9, 6.4.3, 6.5.1.1, 6.5.2.1, 6.5.2.2, 6.5.3.1, 6.5.4, 6.5.5, 6,5,6, 8.9.2, 8.10.2, 9.1, 9.4, 10.1, 10.3, 11.4, 12.6, 13.5, 13.7, 13.8, 13.9, 13.10, 13.11

Adam Sonnenberg, BSC, MSc(c)Part Two: 13.9

 

electronic Table of Contents

PART ONE:

Physician as Authors, Writers in Medicine and Educator in Public Health

 

Chapter 1: Physicians as Authors

Introduction

1.1  The Young Surgeon and The Retired Pathologist: On Science, Medicine and HealthCare Policy – Best writers Among the WRITERS

1.2 Atul Gawande: Physician and Writer

1.3 Editorial & Publication of Articles in e-Books by  Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence:  Contributions of Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

1.4 Abraham Verghese, MD, Physician and Notable Author

1.5 Eric Topol, M.D.

1.6 Gregory House, MD

1.7 Peter Mueller, MD  Professor of Radiology @MGH & HMS – 2015 Synergy’s Honorary Award Recipient

Summary

Chapter 2: Professional Recognition

Introduction

2.1 Proceedings

2.1.1 Research Presentations

2.1.2 Proceedings of the NYAS

2.1.3 Cold Spring Harbor Conference Meetings

2.1.4 Young Scientist Seminars

2.2 Meet Great Minds

2.2.1 Meet the Laureates

2.2.2 Richard Feynman, Genius and Laureate

2.2.3 Fractals and Heat Energy

2.3 MacArthur Foundation Awards

2.4 Women’s Contributions went beyond Rosie the Riveter

2.4.1 Secret Maoist Chinese Operation Conquered Malaria

2.4.2 Antiparasite Drug Developers Win Nobel

2.5 Impact Factors and Achievement

2.6   RAPsodisiac Medicine

2.6.1 Outstanding-achievements-in-radiology-or-radiotherapy

2.6.2 Outstanding-achievement-in-anesthesiology

2.6.3 Outstanding-achievement-in-pathology

2.6.4 Topics in Pathology – Special Issues from Medscape Pathology

2.7 How to win the Nobel Prize

2.8 Conversations about Medicine

2.9 Current Advances in Medical Technology

2.10 Atul Butte, MD, PhD

Summary

Chapter 3:  Medical and Allied Health Sciences Education

Introduction

3.1 National Outstanding Medical Student Award Winners

3.2 Outstanding Awards in Medical Education

3.3 Promoting Excellence in Physicians and Nurses

3.4 Excellence in mentoring

Summary

Chapter 4: Science Teaching in Math and Technology (STEM)

Introduction

4.1 Science Teaching in Math and Technology

4.2 Television as a Medium for Science Education

4.2.1 Science Discovery TV

4.3 From Turing to Watson

Summary

PART TWO:

Medical Scientific Discoveries Interviews with Scientific Leaders

Chapter 5: Cardiovascular System

Introduction

5.1 Physiologist, Professor Lichtstein, Chair in Heart Studies at The Hebrew University elected Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

5.2 Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cardiac Disorders

5.3 Notable Contributions to Regenerative Cardiology

5.4 For Accomplishments in Cardiology and Cardiovascular Diseases: The Arrigo Recordati International Prize for Scientific Research

5.5 Becoming a Cardiothoracic Surgeon: An Emerging Profile in the Surgery Theater and through Scientific Publications

5.6 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

5.7 CVD Prevention and Evaluation of Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities: Coronary Calcium Score by CT Scan Screening to justify or not the Use of Statin

5.8 2013 as A Year of Revolutionizing Medicine and Top 11 Cardiology Stories

5.9 Bridging the Gap in Medical Innovations – Elazer Edelman @ TEDMED 2013

5.10 Development of a Pancreatobiliary Chemotherapy Eluting Stent for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma PIs: Jeffrey Clark (MGH), Robert Langer (Koch), Elazer Edelman (Harvard:MIT HST Program)

5.11 Publications on Heart Failure by Prof. William Gregory Stevenson, M.D., BWH

Summary

Chapter 6: Genomics

Introduction
6.1 Genetics before the Human Genome Project

6.1.1 Why did Pauling Lose the “Race” to James Watson and Francis Crick? How Crick Describes his Discovery in a Letter to his Son

6.1.2 John Randall’s MRC Research Unit and Rosalind Franklin’s role at Kings College

6.1.3 Interview with the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA: Watson on The Double Helix and his changing view of Rosalind Franklin

6.1.4 The Initiation and Growth of Molecular Biology and Genomics, Part I

6.2 The Human Genome Project: Articles of Note  @ pharmaceuticalintelligence.com by multiple authors

6.2.1 CRACKING THE CODE OF HUMAN LIFE: The Birth of BioInformatics & Computational Genomics

6.2.2 What comes after finishing the Euchromatic Sequence of the Human Genome?

6.2.3 Human Genome Project – 10th Anniversary: Interview with Kevin Davies, PhD – The $1000 Genome

6.2.4 University of California Santa Cruz’s Genomics Institute will create a Map of Human Genetic Variations

6.2.5 Exceptional Genomes: The Process to find them

6.2.6 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

6.3 The Impact of Genome Sequencing on Biology and Medicine

6.3.1 Genomics in Medicine – Establishing a Patient-Centric View of Genomic Data

6.3.2 Modification of genes by homologous recombination – Mario Capecchi, Martin Evans, Oliver Smithies

6.3.3 AAAS February 14-18, 2013, Boston: Symposia – The Science of Uncertainty in Genomic Medicine

6.3.4 The Metabolic View of Epigenetic Expression

6.3.5  Pharmacogenomics

6.3.6 Neonatal Pathophysiology

6.3.7 Genetics of Conduction Disease: Atrioventricular (AV) Conduction Disease (block): Gene Mutations – Transcription, Excitability, and Energy Homeostasis

6.3.8 3D mapping of genome in combine FISH and RNAi

6.3.9 Human Variome Project: encyclopedic catalog of sequence variants indexed to the human genome sequence

6.3.10 DNA mutagenesis and DNA repair

6.4 Scientific Leadership Recognition for Contributions to Genomics

6.4.1 Interview with Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak (44 minutes)

6.4.2 DNA Repair Pioneers Win Nobel – Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich, and Aziz Sancar 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the mechanisms of DNA repair

6.4.3  Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

6.5 Contemporary Field Leaders in Genomics

6.5.1 ROBERT LANGER

6.5.1.1 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Fundamental Physics and Life Sciences for a Total of $21 Million – MIT’s Robert Langer gets $3 Million

6.5.1.2 National Medal of Science – 2006 Robert S. Langer

6.5.1.3  Confluence of Chemistry, Physics, and Biology

6.5.2 JENNIFER DOUDNA

6.5.2.1 Jennifer Doudna, cosmology teams named 2015 Breakthrough Prize winners

6.5.2.2 UPDATED – Medical Interpretation of the Genomics Frontier – CRISPR – Cas9: Gene Editing Technology for New Therapeutics

6.5.3 ERIC LANDER

6.5.3.1  2012 Harvey Prize in April 30: at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology to Eric S. Lander @MIT & Eli Yablonovitch @UC, Berkeley

6.5.4 2013 Genomics: The Era Beyond the Sequencing of the Human Genome: Francis Collins, Craig Venter, Eric Lander, et al.

6.5.5 Recognitions for Contributions in Genomics by Dan David Prize Awards

6.5.6   65 Nobel Laureates meet 650 young scientists covering the fields of physiology and medicine, physics, and chemistry, 28 June – 3 July, 2015, Lindau & Mainau Island, Germany

Summary

Chapter 7: The RNAs

Introduction

7.1 RNA polymerase – molecular basis for DNA transcription – Roger Kornberg, MD

7.2  One gene, one protein – Charles Yanofsky

7.3 Turning genetic information into working proteins – James E. Darnell Jr.

7.4 Small but mighty RNAs – Victor Ambros, David Baulcombe, and Gary Ruvkun, Phillip A. Sharp

7.5 Stress-response gene networks – Nina V. Fedoroff

Summary

Chapter 8: Proteomics, Protein-folding, and Cell Regulation
Introduction.

8.1 The Life and Work of Allan Wilson

8.2 Proteomics

8.3 More Complexity in Protein Evolution

8.4 Proteins: An evolutionary record of diversity and adaptation

8.5 Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Leroy Hood

8.6 Ubiquitin researchers win Nobel – Ciechanover, Hershko, and Rose awarded for discovery of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis

8.7 Buffering of genetic modules involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism provides homeostatic regulation

8.8 Dynamic Protein Profiling

8.9 Protein folding

8.9.1 Protein misfolding and prions – Susan L. Lindquist, Stanley B. Prusiner

8.9.2 A Curated Census of Autophagy-Modulating Proteins and Small Molecules Candidate Targets for Cancer Therapy

8.9.3 Voluntary and Involuntary S-Insufficiency

8.9.4 Transthyretin and Lean Body Mass in Stable and Stressed State

8.9.5 The matter of stunting in the Ganges Plains

8.9.6 Proteins, Imaging and Therapeutics

8.10 Protein Folding and Vesicle Cargo

8.10.1 Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) and Molecular Chaperones

8.10.2 Collagen-binding Molecular Chaperone HSP47: Role in Intestinal Fibrosis – colonic epithelial cells and sub epithelial myofibroblasts

8.10.3 Biology, Physiology and Pathophysiology of Heat Shock Proteins

8.10.4 The Role of Exosomes in Metabolic Regulation 


Summary

Chapter 9:  Neuroscience

Introduction

9.1 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 for Cell Transport: James E. Rothman of Yale University; Randy W. Schekman of the University of California, Berkeley; and Dr. Thomas C. Südhof of Stanford University

9.2 Proteins that control neurotransmitter release – Richard H. Scheller

9.3 Heroes in Basic Medical Research – Robert J. Lefkowitz

9.4 MIND AND MEMORY: BIOLOGICAL AND DIGITAL – 2014 Dan David Prize Symposium

9.5 A new way of moving – Michael Sheetz, James Spudich, Ronald Vale

9.6 Role the basal ganglia

9.7 The Neurogenetics of Language – Patricia Kuhl – 2015 George A. Miller Award

9.8 The structure of our visual system

9.9 Outstanding Achievement in Schizophrenia Research

9.10 George A. Miller, a Pioneer in Cognitive Psychology, Is Dead at 92

9.11 – To understand what happens in the brain to cause mental illness

9.12 Brain and Cognition

9.13 – To reduce symptoms of mental illness and retrain the brain

9.14 Behavior

9.15 Notable Papers in Neurosciences

9.16 Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) – an unproved supplement

Summary

Chapter 10: Microbiology & Immunology

Introduction

10.1 Reference Genes in the Human Gut Microbiome: The BGI Catalogue

10.2 Malnutrition in India, high newborn death rate and stunting of children age under five years

10.3 In His Own Words: Leonard Herzenberg, The Immunologist Who Revolutionized Research, Dies at 81

10.4 Heroes in Medical Research: Dr. Robert Ting, Ph.D. and Retrovirus in AIDS and Cancer

10.5 Tang Prize for 2014: Immunity and Cancer

10.6 Halstedian model of cancer progression

10.7 The History of Hematology and Related Sciences

10.8 Pathology Emergence in the 21st Century

10.9 Heroes in Medical Research: Barnett Rosenberg and the Discovery of Cisplatin

10.10  T cell-mediated immune responses & signaling pathways activated by TLRs – Bruce A. Beutler, Jules A. Hoffmann, Ralph M. Steinman

10.11 Roeder – the coactivator OCA-B, the first cell-specific coactivator, discovered by Roeder in 1992, is unique to immune system B cells

Summary

Chapter 11: Endocrine Hormones

Introduction

11.1 Obesity – 2010 Douglas L. ColemanJeffrey M. Friedman

11.2 Lonely Receptors: RXR – Jensen, Chambon, and Evans – Nuclear receptors provoke RNA production in response to steroid hormones

11.3 The Fred Conrad Koch Lifetime Achievement Award—the Society’s highest honor—recognizes the lifetime achievements and exceptional contributions of an individual to the field of endocrinology

11.4 Gerald D Aurbach Award for Outstanding Translational Research

11.5 Roy O. Greep Award for Outstanding Research in Endocrinology – Martin M. Matzuk

11.6 American Physiology Society Awards

11.7 Solomon Berson and Rosalyn Yalow

Summary

Chapter 12. Stem Cells

Introduction

12.1 Mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent – John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka

12.2 Observing the spleen colonies in mice and proving the existence of stem cells – Till and McCulloch

12.3 McEwen Award for Innovation: Irving Weissman, M.D., Stanford School of Medicine, and Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D., Hubrecht Institute

12.4 Developmental biology

12.5  CRISPR/Cas-mediated genome engineering – Rudolf Jaenisch

12.6 Ribozymes and RNA Machines –  Work of Jennifer A. Doudna

12.7 Ralph Brinster, ‘Father of Transgenesis’

12.8 Targeted gene modification

12.9 Stem Cells and Cancer

12.10 ALPSP Awards

12.11 Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators

12.12 Breaking news about genomic engineering, T2DM and cancer treatments

Summary
Chapter 13: 3D Printing and Medical Application

Introduction

13.1 3D Printing

13.2 What is 3D printing?

13.3 The Scientist Who Is Making 3D Printing More Human

13.4 Join These Medical 3D Printing Groups on Twitter and LinkedIn for great up to date news

13.5 Neri Oxman and her Mediated Matter group @MIT Media Lab have developed a technique for 3D-printing Molten Glass

13.6 The ‘chemputer’ that could print out any drug

13.7 3-D-Bioprinting in use to Create Cardiac Living Tissue: Print your Heart out

13.8 LPBI’s Perspective on Medical and Life Sciences Applications – 3D Printing: BioInks, BioMaterials-BioPolymer

13.9 Medical MEMS, Sensors and 3D Printing: Frontier in Process Control of BioMaterials

13.10 NIH and FDA on 3D Printing in Medical Applications: Views for On-demand Drug Printing, in-Situ direct Tissue Repair and Printed Organs for Live Implants

13.11 ‘Pop-up’ fabrication technique trumps 3D printing

13.12 Augmentation of the ONTOLOGY of the 3D Printing Research

13.13 Superresolution Microscopy

Summary

Chapter 14: Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

Introduction

14.1 Insights in Biological and Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

14.2 Breakthrough work in cancer

Summary to Part Two

Volume Summary and Conclusions

EPILOGUE

 

 

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Diagnostic and Prognostic value of structural MRI: preliminary evidence of common and specific gray matter changes in Depression and Anxiety patients

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Cortical thickening in the insular cortex, a brain region vital to perception and self-awareness in Patients with

  • Social anxiety disorder (SAD)
  • Major depressive disorder (MDD)

greater cortical thickness may reflect a

  • compensatory mechanism that is related to inflammation or other aspects of the pathophysiology,” she said.
  • greater anterior cingulate cortical thickness could be the result of both the continuous coping efforts and emotion regulation attempts of MDD and SAD patients.”

Image Source: There are significant cortical thickness differences among the three groups. All regions survived clusterwise-correction (p<0.001).(Credit: Radiological Society of North America)

SOURCE

MRI Uncovers Brain Abnormalities in People with Depression and Anxiety

https://www.mdtmag.com/news/2017/11/mri-uncovers-brain-abnormalities-people-depression-and-anxiety?et_cid=6181014&et_rid=461755519&location=top&et_cid=6181014&et_rid=461755519&linkid=https%3a%2f%2fwww.mdtmag.com%2fnews%2f2017%2f11%2fmri-uncovers-brain-abnormalities-people-depression-and-anxiety%3fet_cid%3d6181014%26et_rid%3d%%subscriberid%%%26location%3dtop

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2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Jeffrey C. Hall (ex-Brandeis, University of Maine), Michael Rosbash (Brandeis University) and Michael W. Young (Rockefeller University in New York) for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm

 

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Press Release

2017-10-02

The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has today decided to award

the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

jointly to

Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young

for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm

READ the Summary

https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/2017/press.html

 

Jeffrey C. Hall was born 1945 in New York, USA. He received his doctoral degree in 1971 at the University of Washington in Seattle and was a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena from 1971 to 1973. He joined the faculty at Brandeis University in Waltham in 1974. In 2002, he became associated with University of Maine.

Michael Rosbash was born in 1944 in Kansas City, USA. He received his doctoral degree in 1970 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. During the following three years, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Since 1974, he has been on faculty at Brandeis University in Waltham, USA.

Michael W. Young was born in 1949 in Miami, USA. He received his doctoral degree at the University of Texas in Austin in 1975. Between 1975 and 1977, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University in Palo Alto. From 1978, he has been on faculty at the Rockefeller University in New York.

 

Key publications

Zehring, W.A., Wheeler, D.A., Reddy, P., Konopka, R.J., Kyriacou, C.P., Rosbash, M., and Hall, J.C. (1984). P-element transformation with period locus DNA restores rhythmicity to mutant, arrhythmic Drosophila melanogaster. Cell 39, 369–376.

Bargiello, T.A., Jackson, F.R., and Young, M.W. (1984). Restoration of circadian behavioural rhythms by gene transfer in Drosophila. Nature 312, 752–754.

Siwicki, K.K., Eastman, C., Petersen, G., Rosbash, M., and Hall, J.C. (1988). Antibodies to the period gene product of Drosophila reveal diverse tissue distribution and rhythmic changes in the visual system. Neuron 1, 141–150.

Hardin, P.E., Hall, J.C., and Rosbash, M. (1990). Feedback of the Drosophila period gene product on circadian cycling of its messenger RNA levels. Nature 343, 536–540.

Liu, X., Zwiebel, L.J., Hinton, D., Benzer, S., Hall, J.C., and Rosbash, M. (1992). The period gene encodes a predominantly nuclear protein in adult Drosophila. J Neurosci 12, 2735–2744.

Vosshall, L.B., Price, J.L., Sehgal, A., Saez, L., and Young, M.W. (1994). Block in nuclear localization of period protein by a second clock mutation, timeless. Science 263, 1606–1609.

Price, J.L., Blau, J., Rothenfluh, A., Abodeely, M., Kloss, B., and Young, M.W. (1998). double-time is a novel Drosophila clock gene that regulates PERIOD protein accumulation. Cell 94, 83–95.

Keeping time on our human physiology

The biological clock is involved in many aspects of our complex physiology. We now know that all multicellular organisms, including humans, utilize a similar mechanism to control circadian rhythms. A large proportion of our genes are regulated by the biological clock and, consequently, a carefully calibrated circadian rhythm adapts our physiology to the different phases of the day (Figure 3). Since the seminal discoveries by the three laureates, circadian biology has developed into a vast and highly dynamic research field, with implications for our health and wellbeing.

The circadian clock

Figure 3. The circadian clock anticipates and adapts our physiology to the different phases of the day. Our biological clock helps to regulate sleep patterns, feeding behavior, hormone release, blood pressure, and body temperature.

SOURCE

https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/2017/press.html

 

Medicine Nobel awarded for work on circadian clocks, Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young unpicked molecular workings of cells’ daily rhythms.

Ewen CallawayHeidi Ledford

02 October 2017

https://www.nature.com/news/medicine-nobel-awarded-for-work-on-circadian-clocks-1.22736?WT.ec_id=NEWSDAILY-20171002

Other Related Research 

Charles Weitz, Ph.D., M.D.
Robert Henry Pfeiffer Professor of Neurobiology

Mammalian Circadian Clocks

Circadian clocks are molecular oscillators with ~24-hour periods that drive daily biological rhythms.  Such clocks are found in all of the major branches of life, and they likely represent ancient timekeeping systems important for predicting daily environmental cycles on our rotating planet.  In mammals, circadian clocks are present in most if not all cells. These distributed clocks control a myriad of processes, in aggregate creating coherent 24-hour programs of physiology and behavior.

A picture of how circadian clocks are built has emerged in the last two decades.  The core mechanism is a transcriptional feedback loop, wherein the protein products of several clock genes build the molecular machinery to inhibit the transcription factor responsible for their own production.  The molecular components of circadian clocks are conserved from insects to humans.

The Weitz lab uses molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, and structural biology to investigate the mammalian circadian clock.  The focus of our efforts at present is to understand the circadian clock in terms of the integrated functions of its several multi-protein machines.  This effort is principally based on the purification of endogenous circadian clock protein complexes from mouse tissues and their biochemical analysis and structural study by cryo-electron microscopy.

Fig. 1.  Class-average electron microscopy images of the mouse nuclear PER complex, a core circadian clock machine.  It is a 1.9-MDa assembly of about thirty proteins that appears as a quasi-spherical, beaded particle of 40-nm diameter. Our current work provides an initial low-resolution view of the structural organization of endogenous clock machinery from a eukaryote.  We aim to obtain high-resolution structures.

Selected papers:

Duong HA, Robles MS, Knutti K, Weitz CJ.  A molecular mechanism for circadian clock negative feedback. Science  332, 1436-1439 (2011).

Padmanabhan K, Robles MS, Westerling T, Weitz CJ.  Feedback regulation of transcriptional termination by the mammalian circadian clock PERIOD complex. Science  337, 599-602 (2012).

Kim JY, Kwak PB, Weitz CJ. Specificity in circadian clock feedback from targeted reconstitution of the NuRD co-repressor.  Mol. Cell  56, 738-748 (2014).

Aryal RA, Kwak PB, Tamayo AG, Chiu PL, Walz T, Weitz CJ.  Macromolecular assemblies of the mammalian circadian clock.  Mol. Cell  (2017, in press).

SOURCE

http://neuro.hms.harvard.edu/people/faculty/charles-weitz

Circadian Clock’s Inner Gears

https://hms.harvard.edu/news/circadian-clock%E2%80%99s-inner-gears?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=hms-linkedin-general

Other related articles Published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal included the following: 

Search Keyword “Sleep” – 161 Scientific Articles

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/?s=Sleep

Search Keyword “Circadian” Rhythm

Ultra-Pure Melatonin Product Helps Maintain Sleep for Up to 7 Hours

Curator: Gail S. Thornton, M.A.

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/06/11/ultra-pure-melatonin-product-helps-maintain-sleep-for-up-to-7-hours/

 

Alteration in Reduced Glutathione level in Red Blood Cells: Role of Melatonin

Author: Shilpa Chakrabarti, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/06/11/alteration-in-reduced-glutathione-level-in-red-blood-cells-role-of-melatonin/

 

Melatonin and its effect on acetylcholinesterase activity in erythrocytes

Author: S. Chakravarty, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/03/09/melatonin-and-its-effect-on-acetylcholinesterase-activity-in-erythrocytes/

 

Day and Night Variation in Melatonin Level affects Plasma Membrane Redox System in Red Blood Cells

Author: Shilpa Chakravarty, PhD

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2013/02/23/httpwww-ncbi-nlm-nih-govpubmed22561555/

 

Prolonged Wakefulness: Lack of Sufficient Duration of Sleep as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Diseases – – Indications for Cardiovascular Chrono-therapeutics

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2014/02/02/prolonged-wakefulness-lack-of-sufficient-duration-of-sleep-as-a-risk-factor-for-cardiovascular-diseases-indications-for-cardiovascular-chrono-therapeutics/

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Post-zygotic Mutations, spontaneously arising in an embryonic cell after sperm meets egg, are important players in Autism Spectrum Disorder, a HMS & BCH large study suggests

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Based on their findings, they classified 7.5 percent of ASD subjects’ de novo mutations as PZMs. Of these, 83 percent had not been picked up in the original analysis of their genome sequence.

Some PZMs affected genes already known to be linked to autism or other neurodevelopmental disorders (such as SCN2AHNRNPU and SMARCA4), but sometimes affected these genes in different ways. Many other PZMs were in genes known to be active in brain development (such as KLF16 and MSANTD2) but not previously associated with ASD.

Comparing these with the genomic sequencing data (based mostly on blood DNA samples) allowed the researchers estimate the timing of the PZMs and the brain regions they affected. In the image at right, representing the prenatal brain, the region with the most “hits” was the amygdala (AMY, in red), with minor hits in the striatum (STR) and cerebellar cortex (CBC) that did not reach statistical significance.

Image Credit: Mohammed Uddin

 

SOURCES

Late-breaking mutations may play an important role in autism

https://vector.childrenshospital.org/2017/07/post-zygotic-somatic-mutations-autism/

Late in the Game, Post-conception mutations may play an important role in autism

https://hms.harvard.edu/news/late-game?utm_source=Silverpop&utm_medium=email&utm_term=s3&utm_content=8.7.17.HMS

Rates, distribution and implications of postzygotic mosaic mutations in autism spectrum disorder

Nature Neuroscience (2017) doi:10.1038/nn.4598
Published online: 17 July 2017

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Cause of Alzheimer’s Discovered: protein SIRT6 role in DNA repair process – low levels enable DNA damage accumulation

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

According to lead author Dr. Deborah Toiber of the BGU Department of Life Sciences, “If a decrease in SIRT6 and lack of DNA repair is the beginning of the chain that ends in neurodegenerative diseases in seniors, then we should be focusing our research on how to maintain production of SIRT6 and avoid the DNA damage that leads to these diseases.”

Publications

Neuroprotective functions for the histone deacetylase SIRT6

Shai Kaluski Miguel Portillo, Antoine Besnard, Daniel Stein, Monica Einav, Lei Zhong, Uwe Ueberham, Thomas Arendt, Raul Mostoslavsky, Amar Sahay, Debra Toiber

Cell Reports 2017 Mar 28;18(13):3052-3062

Long noncoding RNA: noncoding and not coded.

Toiber D, Leprivier G, Rotblat B.

Cell Death Discov. 2017 Jan 9;3:16104. doi: 10.1038/cddiscovery.2016.104.

SIRT6 recruits SNF2H to DNA break sites, preventing genomic instability through chromatin remodeling.

Toiber D, Erdel F, Bouazoune K, Silberman DM, Zhong L, Mulligan P, Sebastian C, Cosentino C, Martinez-Pastor B, Giacosa S, D’Urso A, Näär AM, Kingston R, Rippe K, Mostoslavsky R.

Mol Cell. 2013 Aug 22;51(4):454-68. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2013.06.018.

The histone deacetylase SIRT6 is a tumor suppressor that controls cancer metabolism.

Sebastián C, Zwaans BM, Silberman DM, Gymrek M, Goren A, Zhong L, Ram O, Truelove J, Guimaraes AR, Toiber D, Cosentino C, Greenson JK, MacDonald AI, McGlynn L, Maxwell F, Edwards J, Giacosa S, Guccione E, Weissleder R, Bernstein BE, Regev A, Shiels PG, Lombard DB, Mostoslavsky R.

Cell. 2012 Dec 7;151(6):1185-99. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.10.047.

Sirt1 is a regulator of bone mass and a repressor of Sost encoding for sclerostin, a bone formation inhibitor.

Cohen-Kfir E, Artsi H, Levin A, Abramowitz E, Bajayo A, Gurt I, Zhong L, D’Urso A, Toiber D, Mostoslavsky R, Dresner-Pollak R.

Endocrinology. 2011 Dec;152(12):4514-24. doi: 10.1210/en.2011-1128.

Characterization of nuclear sirtuins: molecular mechanisms and physiological relevance.

Toiber D, Sebastian C, Mostoslavsky R.

Handb Exp Pharmacol. 2011; 206:189-224. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-21631-2_9.

A SIRT1-LSD1 corepressor complex regulates Notch target gene expression and development.

Mulligan P, Yang F, Di Stefano L, Ji JY, Ouyang J, Nishikawa JL, Toiber D, Kulkarni M, Wang Q, Najafi-Shoushtari SH, Mostoslavsky R, Gygi SP, Gill G, Dyson NJ, Näär AM.

Mol Cell. 2011 Jun 10;42(5):689-99. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2011.04.020.

Engineering DYRK1A overdosage yields Down syndrome-characteristic cortical splicing aberrations.

Toiber D, Azkona G, Ben-Ari S, Torán N, Soreq H, Dierssen M.

Neurobiol Dis. 2010 Oct;40(1):348-59. doi: 10.1016/j.nbd.2010.06.011.

Acetylcholinesterase variants in Alzheimer’s disease: from neuroprotection to programmed cell death.

Greenberg DS, Toiber D, Berson A, Soreq H.

Neurodegener Dis. 2010;7(1-3):60-3. doi: 10.1159/000285507.

The histone deacetylase Sirt6 regulates glucose homeostasis via Hif1alpha.

Zhong L, D’Urso A, Toiber D, Sebastian C, Henry RE, Vadysirisack DD, Guimaraes A, Marinelli B, Wikstrom JD, Nir T, Clish CB, Vaitheesvaran B, Iliopoulos O, Kurland I, Dor Y, Weissleder R, Shirihai OS, Ellisen LW, Espinosa JM, Mostoslavsky R.

Cell. 2010 Jan 22;140(2):280-93. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2009.12.041.

Pro-apoptotic protein-protein interactions of the extended N-AChE terminus.

Toiber D, Greenberg DS, Soreq H.

J Neural Transm 2009 Nov;116(11):1435-42. doi: 10.1007/s00702-009-0249-2.

N-acetylcholinesterase-induced apoptosis in Alzheimer’s disease.

Toiber D, Berson A, Greenberg D, Melamed-Book N, Diamant S, Soreq H.

PLoS One. 2008 Sep 1;3(9):e3108. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0003108.

A novel isoform of acetylcholinesterase exacerbates photoreceptors death after photic stress.

Kehat R, Zemel E, Cuenca N, Evron T, Toiber D, Loewenstein A, Soreq H, Perlman I.

Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2007 Mar;48(3):1290-7.

Modulated splicing-associated gene expression in P19 cells expressing distinct acetylcholinesterase splice variants.

Ben-Ari S*, Toiber D*, Sas AS, Soreq H, Ben-Shaul Y.

J Neurochem. 2006 Apr;97 Suppl 1:24-34.

  • ​*Equal contribution

Cellular stress reactions as putative cholinergic links in Alzheimer’s disease.

Toiber D, Soreq H.

Neurochem Res. 2005 Jun-Jul;30(6-7):909-19.

Function of alternative splicing.

Stamm S, Ben-Ari S, Rafalska I, Tang Y, Zhang Z, Toiber D, Thanaraj TA, Soreq H.

Gene. 2005 Jan 3;344:1-20.

Combinatorial complexity of 5′ alternative acetylcholinesterase transcripts and protein products.

Meshorer E, Toiber D, Zurel D, Sahly I, Dori A, Cagnano E, Schreiber L, Grisaru D, Tronche F, Soreq H.

J Biol Chem. 2004 Jul 9;279(28):29740-51.

SOURCE

https://toiber.wixsite.com/toiber-lab/publications

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