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Archive for the ‘Systemic Inflammatory Response Related Disorders’ Category


Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Obesity is a global concern that is associated with many chronic complications such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance (IR), cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Growing evidence has implicated the digestive system, including its microbiota, gut-derived incretin hormones, and gut-associated lymphoid tissue in obesity and IR. During high fat diet (HFD) feeding and obesity, a significant shift occurs in the microbial populations within the gut, known as dysbiosis, which interacts with the intestinal immune system. Similar to other metabolic organs, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver, altered immune homeostasis has also been observed in the small and large intestines during obesity.

 

A link between the gut microbiota and the intestinal immune system is the immune-derived molecule immunoglobulin A (IgA). IgA is a B cell antibody primarily produced in dimeric form by plasma cells residing in the gut lamina propria (LP). Given the importance of IgA on intestinal–gut microbe immunoregulation, which is directly influenced by dietary changes, scientists hypothesized that IgA may be a key player in the pathogenesis of obesity and IR. Here, in this study it was demonstrate that IgA levels are reduced during obesity and the loss of IgA in mice worsens IR and increases intestinal permeability, microbiota encroachment, and downstream inflammation in metabolic tissues, including inside the VAT.

 

IgA deficiency alters the obese gut microbiota and its metabolic phenotype can be recapitulated into microbiota-depleted mice upon fecal matter transplantation. In addition, the researchers also demonstrated that commonly used therapies for diabetes such as metformin and bariatric surgery can alter cellular and stool IgA levels, respectively. These findings suggested a critical function for IgA in regulating metabolic disease and support the emerging role for intestinal immunity as an important modulator of systemic glucose metabolism.

 

Overall, the researchers demonstrated a critical role for IgA in regulating intestinal homeostasis, metabolic inflammation, and obesity-related IR. These findings identify intestinal IgA+ immune cells as mucosal mediators of whole-body glucose regulation in diet-induced metabolic disease. This research further emphasized the importance of the intestinal adaptive immune system and its interactions with the gut microbiota and innate immune system within the larger network of organs involved in the manifestation of metabolic disease.

 

Future investigation is required to determine the impact of IgA deficiency during obesity in humans and the role of metabolic disease in human populations with selective IgA deficiency, especially since human IgA deficiency is associated with an altered gut microbiota that cannot be fully compensated with IgM. However, the research identified IgA as a critical immunological molecule in the intestine that impacts systemic glucose homeostasis, and treatments targeting IgA-producing immune populations and SIgA may have therapeutic potential for metabolic disease.

 

References:

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11370-y?elqTrackId=dc86e0c60f574542b033227afd0fdc8e

 

https://www.jci.org/articles/view/88879

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.2353

 

https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/57/6/1470

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413115001047?via%3Dihub

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413115002326?via%3Dihub

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1931312814004636?via%3Dihub

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature15766

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413116000371?via%3Dihub

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.2001

 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1550413118305047?via%3Dihub

 

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  1. Lungs can supply blood stem cells and also produce platelets: Lungs, known primarily for breathing, play a previously unrecognized role in blood production, with more than half of the platelets in a mouse’s circulation produced there. Furthermore, a previously unknown pool of blood stem cells has been identified that is capable of restoring blood production when bone marrow stem cells are depleted.

 

  1. A new drug for multiple sclerosis: A new multiple sclerosis (MS) drug, which grew out of the work of UCSF (University of California, San Francisco) neurologist was approved by the FDA. Ocrelizumab, the first drug to reflect current scientific understanding of MS, was approved to treat both relapsing-remitting MS and primary progressive MS.

 

  1. Marijuana legalized – research needed on therapeutic possibilities and negative effects: Recreational marijuana will be legal in California starting in January, and that has brought a renewed urgency to seek out more information on the drug’s health effects, both positive and negative. UCSF scientists recognize marijuana’s contradictory status: the drug has proven therapeutic uses, but it can also lead to tremendous public health problems.

 

  1. Source of autism discovered: In a finding that could help unlock the fundamental mysteries about how events early in brain development lead to autism, researchers traced how distinct sets of genetic defects in a single neuronal protein can lead to either epilepsy in infancy or to autism spectrum disorders in predictable ways.

 

  1. Protein found in diet responsible for inflammation in brain: Ketogenic diets, characterized by extreme low-carbohydrate, high-fat regimens are known to benefit people with epilepsy and other neurological illnesses by lowering inflammation in the brain. UCSF researchers discovered the previously undiscovered mechanism by which a low-carbohydrate diet reduces inflammation in the brain. Importantly, the team identified a pivotal protein that links the diet to inflammatory genes, which, if blocked, could mirror the anti-inflammatory effects of ketogenic diets.

 

  1. Learning and memory failure due to brain injury is now restorable by drug: In a finding that holds promise for treating people with traumatic brain injury, an experimental drug, ISRIB (integrated stress response inhibitor), completely reversed severe learning and memory impairments caused by traumatic brain injury in mice. The groundbreaking finding revealed that the drug fully restored the ability to learn and remember in the brain-injured mice even when the animals were initially treated as long as a month after injury.

 

  1. Regulatory T cells induce stem cells for promoting hair growth: In a finding that could impact baldness, researchers found that regulatory T cells, a type of immune cell generally associated with controlling inflammation, directly trigger stem cells in the skin to promote healthy hair growth. An experiment with mice revealed that without these immune cells as partners, stem cells cannot regenerate hair follicles, leading to baldness.

 

  1. More intake of good fat is also bad: Liberal consumption of good fat (monounsaturated fat) – found in olive oil and avocados – may lead to fatty liver disease, a risk factor for metabolic disorders like type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Eating the fat in combination with high starch content was found to cause the most severe fatty liver disease in mice.

 

  1. Chemical toxicity in almost every daily use products: Unregulated chemicals are increasingly prevalent in products people use every day, and that rise matches a concurrent rise in health conditions like cancers and childhood diseases, Thus, researcher in UCSF is working to understand the environment’s role – including exposure to chemicals – in health conditions.

 

  1. Cytomegalovirus found as common factor for diabetes and heart disease in young women: Cytomegalovirus is associated with risk factors for type 2 diabetes and heart disease in women younger than 50. Women of normal weight who were infected with the typically asymptomatic cytomegalovirus, or CMV, were more likely to have metabolic syndrome. Surprisingly, the reverse was found in those with extreme obesity.

 

References:

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/12/409241/most-popular-science-stories-2017

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/03/406111/surprising-new-role-lungs-making-blood

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/03/406296/new-multiple-sclerosis-drug-ocrelizumab-could-halt-disease

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/06/407351/dazed-and-confused-marijuana-legalization-raises-need-more-research

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/01/405631/autism-researchers-discover-genetic-rosetta-stone

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/09/408366/how-ketogenic-diets-curb-inflammation-brain

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/07/407656/drug-reverses-memory-failure-caused-traumatic-brain-injury

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/05/407121/new-hair-growth-mechanism-discovered

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/06/407536/go-easy-avocado-toast-good-fat-can-still-be-bad-you-research-shows

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/06/407416/toxic-exposure-chemicals-are-our-water-food-air-and-furniture

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/02/405871/common-virus-tied-diabetes-heart-disease-women-under-50

 

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Image Source:Koch Institute

 

LIVE – OCTOBER 16 – DAY 1- Koch Institute Immune Engineering Symposium 2017, MIT, Kresge Auditorium

Koch Institute Immune Engineering Symposium 2017

http://kochinstituteevents.cvent.com/events/koch-institute-immune-engineering-symposium-2017/agenda-64e5d3f55b964ff2a0643bd320b8e60d.aspx

 

#IESYMPOSIUM

 

Image Source: Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence (LPBI) Group

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN will be in attendance covering the event in REAL TIME

@pharma_BI

@AVIVA1950

#IESYMPOSIUM

@KOCHINSTITUTE

  • The Immune System, Stress Signaling, Infectious Diseases and Therapeutic Implications: VOLUME 2: Infectious Diseases and Therapeutics and VOLUME 3: The Immune System and Therapeutics (Series D: BioMedicine & Immunology) Kindle Edition – on Amazon.com since September 4, 2017

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075CXHY1B

SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

OCTOBER 16 – DAY 1

7:00 – 8:15 Registration

8:15 – 8:30Introductory Remarks
Darrell Irvine | MIT, Koch Institute; HHMI

  • Stimulating the Immune system not only sustaining it for therapies

K. Dane Wittrup | MIT, Koch Institute

8:30 – 9:45Session I
Moderator: Douglas Lauffenburger | MIT, Biological Engineering and Koch Institute

Garry P. Nolan – Stanford University School of Medicine
Pathology from the Molecular Scale on Up

  • Intracellular molecules,
  • how molecules are organized to create tissue
  • Meaning from data Heterogeneity is an illusion: Order in Data ?? Cancer is heterogeneous, Cells in suspension – number of molecules
  • System-wide changes during Immune Response (IR)
  • Untreated, Ineffective therapy, effective therapy
  • Days 3-8 Tumor, Lymph node…
  • Variation is a Feature – not a bug: Effective therapy vs Ineffective – intercellular modules – virtual neighborhoods
  • ordered by connectivity: very high – CD4 T-cells, CD8 T-cels, moderate, not connected
  • Landmark nodes, Increase in responders
  • CODEX: Multiples epitome detection
  • Adaptable to proteins & mRNA
  • Rendering antibody staining via removal to neighborhood mapping
  • Human tonsil – 42 parameters: CD7, CD45, CD86,
  • Automated Annotations of tissues: F, P, V,
  • Normal BALBs
  • Marker expression defined by the niche: B220 vs CD79
  • Marker expression defines the niche
  • Learn neighborhoods and Trees
  • Improving Tissue Classification and staining – Ce3D – Tissue and Immune Cells in 3D
  • Molecular level cancer imaging
  • Proteomic Profiles: multi slice combine
  • Theory is formed to explain 3D nuclear images of cells – Composite Ion Image, DNA replication
  • Replication loci visualization on DNA backbone – nascent transcriptome – bar code of isotopes – 3D  600 slices
  • use CRISPR Cas9 for Epigenetics

Susan Napier Thomas – Georgia Institute of Technology
Transport Barriers in the Tumor Microenvironment: Drug Carrier Design for Therapeutic Delivery to Sentinel Lymph Nodes

  • Lymph Nodes important therapeutics target tissue
  • Lymphatic flow support passive and active antigen transport to lymph nodes
  • clearance of biomolecules and drug formulations: Interstitial transport barriers influence clearance: Arteriole to Venule –
  • Molecular tracers to analyze in vivo clearance mechanisms and vascular transport function
  • quantifying molecular clearance and biodistribution
  • Lymphatic transport increases tracer concentrations within dLN by orders of magnitude
  • Melanoma growth results in remodeled tumor vasculature
  • passive transport via lymphatic to dLN sustained in advanced tumors despite abrogated cell trafficking
  • Engineered biomaterial drug carriers to enhance sentinel lymph node-drug delivery: facilitated by exploiting lymphatic transport
  • TLR9 ligand therapeutic tumor in situ vaccination – Lymphatic-draining CpG-NP enhanced
  • Sturcutral and Cellular barriers: transport of particles is restriced by
  • Current drug delivery technology: lymph-node are undrugable
  • Multistage delivery platform to overcome barriers to lymphatic uptake and LN targeting
  • nano particles – OND – Oxanorbornade OND Time sensitive Linker synthesized large cargo – NP improve payload
  • OND release rate from nanoparticles changes retention in lymph nodes – Axilliary-Brachial delivery
  • Two-stage OND-NP delivery and release system dramatically – OND acumulate in lymphocyte
  •  delivers payload to previously undraggable lymphe tissue
  • improved drug bioactivity  – OND-NP eliminate LN LYMPHOMAS
  • Engineered Biomaterials

Douglas Lauffenburger – MIT, Biological Engineering and Koch Institute
Integrative Multi-Omic Analysis of Tissue Microenvironment in Inflammatory Pathophysiology

  • How to intervene, in predictive manner, in immunesystem-associated complex diseases
  • Understand cell communication beteen immune cells and other cells, i.e., tumor cells
  • Multi-Variate in Vivo – System Approach: Integrative Experiment & COmputational Analysis
  • Cell COmmunication & Signaling in CHronic inflammation – T-cell transfer model for colitis
  • COmparison of diffrential Regulation (Tcell transfer-elicited vs control) anong data types – relying solely on mRNA can be misleading
  • Diparities in differential responses to T cell transfer across data types yield insights concerning broader multi-organ interactions
  • T cell transfer can be ascertained and validated by successful experimental test
  • Cell COmmunication in Tumor MIcro-Environment — integration of single-cell transcriptomic data and protein interaction
  • Standard Cluster Elucidation – Classification of cell population on Full gene expression Profiles using Training sets: Decision Tree for Cell Classification
  • Wuantification of Pairwise Cell-Cell Receptor/Ligand Interactions: Cell type Pairs vs Receptor/Ligand Interaction
  • Pairwise Cell-Cell Receptor/Ligand Interactions
  • Calculate strength of interaction and its statistical significance
  • How the interaction is related to Phenotypic Behaviors – tumor growth rate, MDSC levels,
  • Correlated the Interactions translated to Phynotypic behavior for Therapeutic interventions (AXL via macrophage and fibroblasts)
  • Mouth model translation to Humans – New machine learning approach
  • Pathways, false negative, tumor negative expression
  • Molecular vs Phynotypical expression
  • Categories of inter-species translation
  • Semi-supervised Learning ALgorithms on Transcriptomic Data can ascertain Key Pathways/Processes in Human IBD from mapping mouse IBD

9:45 – 10:15 Break

10:15 – 11:30Session II
Moderator: Tyler Jacks | MIT, Koch Institute; HHMI

Tyler Jacks – MIT, Koch Institute; HHMI
Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models to Probe Cancer-Immune Interactions

  • Utility of genetically-engineered mouse models of Cancer:
  1. Immune Response (IR),
  2. Tumor0immune microenvironment
  • Lung adenocarcinoma – KRAS mutation: Genetically-engineered model, applications: CRISPR, genetic interactions
  • Minimal Immune response to KP lung tumors: H&E, T cells (CD3), Bcells (B220) for Lenti-x 8 weeks
  • Exosome sequencing : Modeling loss-and gain-of-function mutations in Lung Cancer by CRISPR-Cas9 – germline – tolerance in mice, In vivo CRISPR-induced knockout of Msh2
  • Signatures of MMR deficient
  • Mutation burden and response to Immunotherapy (IT)
  • Programmed neoantigen expression – robust infiltration of T cells (evidence of IR)
  • Immunosuppression – T cell rendered ineffective
  • Lymphoid infiltration: Acute Treg depletion results in T cell infiltration — this depletion causes autoimmune response
  • Lung Treg from KP tumor-bearing mice have a distinct transcriptional heterogeneity through single cell mRNA sequencing
  • KP, FOXP3+, CD4
  • Treg from no existent to existance, Treg cells increase 20 fold =>>>  Treg activation and effectiveness
  • Single cells cluster by tissue and cell type: Treg, CD4+, CD8+, Tetramer-CD4+
  • ILrl1/II-33r unregulated in Treg at late time point
  • Treg-specific deletion of IL-33r results in fewer effector Tregs in Tumor-bearing lungs
  • CD8+ T cell infiltration
  • Tetramer-positive T cells cluster according to time point: All Lung CD8+ T cells
  • IR is not uniform functional differences – Clones show distinct transcriptional profiles
  • Different phynotypes Exhaustive signature
  • CRISPR-mediated modulation of CD8 T cell regulatory genes
  • Genetic dissection of the tumor-immune microenvironment
  • Single cell analysis, CRISPR – CRISPRa,i, – Drug development

Wendell Lim – University of California, San Francisco

Synthetic Immunology: Hacking Immune Cells

  • Precision Cell therapies – engineered by synthetic biology
  • Anti CD19 – drug approved
  • CAR-T cells still face major problems
  1. success limited to B cells cancers = blood vs solid tumors
  2. adverse effects
  3. OFF-TUMOR effects
  • Cell engineering for Cancer Therapy: User remote control (drug) – user control safety
  • Cell Engineering for TX
  1. new sensors – decision making for
  2. tumor recognition – safety,
  3. Cancer is a recognition issue
  • How do we avoid cross-reaction with bystader tissue (OFF TISSUE effect)
  • Tumor recognition: More receptors & integration
  • User Control
  • synthetic NOTCH receptors (different flavors of synNotch) – New Universal platform for cell-to -cell recognition: Target molecule: Extracellular antigen –>> transciptional instruction to cell
  • nextgen T cell: Engineer T cell recognition circuit that integrates multiple inputs: Two receptors – two antigen priming circuit
  • UNARMED: If antigen A THEN receptor A activates CAR
  • “Bystander” cell single antigen vs “tumor” drug antigen
  • Selective clearance of combinatorial tumor – Boulian formulation, canonical response
  • Cell response: Priming –>> Killing: Spatial & Temporal choreographed cell
  • CAR expression while removed from primed cells deminished
  • Solid Tumor: suppress cell microenvironment: Selected response vs non-natural response
  • Immune stimulator IR IL2, IL12, flagellin in the payload — Ourcome: Immune enhancement “vaccination”
  • Immune suppression –  block
  • Envision ideal situation: Unarmed cells
  • FUTURE: identify disease signatures and vulnerabilities – Precision Medicine using Synthetic Biology

Darrell Irvine – MIT, Koch Institute; HHMI
Engineering Enhanced Cancer Vaccines to Drive Combination Immunotherapies

  • Vaccine to drive IT
  • Intervening in the cancer-immunity cycle – Peptide Vaccines
  • poor physiology  of solute transport to tissue
  • endogenous albumin affinity – Lymphe Node dying
  • Designing Albumin-hitchhiking vaccines
  • Amphiphile-vaccine enhance uptake in lymph nodes in small and large animal models
  • soluble vaccine vs Amphiphile-vaccine
  • DIRECTING Vaccines to the Lymph nodes
  • amph-peptide antigen: Prime, booster, tetramer
  • albimin-mediated LN-targeting of both antigen and adjuvant maximizes IR
  • Immuno-supressed microenvironment will not be overcome by vaccines
  • Replacing adoptive T cell transfer with potent vaccine
  • exploiting albumin biology for mucosal vaccine delivery by amph-vaccines
  • Amph-peptides and -adjuvants show enhanced uptake/retention in lung tissue
  •  Enhancing adoptive T cell therapy: loss of T cell functionality, expand in vivo
  • boost in vivo enhanced adoptive T cell therapy
  • CAR-T cells: Enable T cells to target any cell surface protein
  • “Adaptor”-targeting CAR-T cells to deal with tumor cell heterogeneity
  • Lymph node-targeting Amph as CAR T booster vaccine: prining, production of cytokines
  • Boosting CAR T with amph-caccines: anti FITC CAR-T by DSPE=PEG-FITC coated
  • Targeting FITC to lymph node antigen presenting cells
  • Modulatory Macrophages
  • Amph-FITC expands FITC-CAR T cells in vivo – Adjuvant is needed
  • Hijacking albumin’s natural trafficking pathway

11:30 – 1:00  Lunch Break

1:00 – 2:15Session III
Moderator: Darrell Irvine | MIT, Koch Institute; HHMI

Nicholas P. Restifo – National Cancer Institute
Extracellular Potassium Regulates Epigenetics and Efficacy of Anti-Tumor T Cells

Why T cell do not kill Cancer cells?

  • co-inhibition
  • hostile tumor microenvironment

CAR T – does not treat solid tumors

Somatic mutation

  1. resistence of T cell based IT due to loss of function mutations
  2. Can other genes be lost?

CRISPR Cas9 – used to identify agents – GeCKOv2 Human library

Two cell-type (2CT) CRISPR assay system for genome-wide mutagenesis

  • work flow for genome-scale SRISPR mutagenesis profiling of genes essential for T cell mediate cytosis
  • sgRNA enrichment at the individual gene level by multiple methods:
  1. subunits of the MHC Class I complex
  2. CRISPR mutagenesis cut germline
  • Measutring the generalizability of resistance mechanism and mice in vivo validation
  • Validation of top gene candidates using libraries: MART-1
  • Checkpoint blockade: cells LOF causes tumor growth and immune escape
  • Weird genesL Large Ribisomal Subunit Proteins are nor all essential for cell survival
  • Bias in enrichment of 60S vs 40S
  • Novel elements of MHC class I antigen processing and presentation
  • Association of top CRISPR hits with response rates to IT – antiCTLA-4
  • CRISPR help identify novel regulators of T cells
  • Analyzed sgRNA – second rarest sgRNA for gene BIRC2 – encoded the Baculoviral Inhibitor
  • Drugs that inhibit BIRC2
  • How T cells can kill tumor cells more efficiently
  • p38kiaseas target for adoptive immunotherapy
  • FACS-based – Mapk14
  • Potent targets p38 – Blockade PD-1 or p38 ??
  • p38 signaling: Inhibition augments expansion and memory-marked human PBMC and TIL cells, N. P. Restifo
  • Tumor killing capacity of human CD19-specific, gene engineered T cells

Jennifer Elisseeff – Johns Hopkins University
The Adaptive Immune Response to Biomaterials and Tissue Repair

  • design scafolds, tissue-specific microenvironment
  • clinical translation of biosynthetic implants for soft tissue reconstruction
  • Local environment affects biomaterials: Epidermis, dermis
  • CD4+ T cells
  • Immune system – first reponders to materials: Natural or Synthetic
  • Biological (ECM) scaffolds to repair muscle injury
  • Which immune cells enter the WOUND?
  • ECM alters Macrophages: CD86, CD206
  • Adaptive system impact on Macrophages: CD86
  • mTOR signaling pathway M2 depend on Th2 Cells in regeneration of cell healing of surgical wounds
  • Systemic Immunological changes
  • Is the response antigen specific? – IL-4 expression in ILN,
  • Tissue reconstruction Clinical Trial: FDA ask to look at what cells infiltrate the scaffold
  • Trauma/biomaterial response – Injury induction of Senescence, anti apoptosis
  • Injury to skin or muscle
  • Is pro-regenerative environment (Th2/M2) pro-tumorigenic?
  • SYNTHETIC Materials for scafolds
  • Biomaterials and Immunology
  1. Immune response to bioscafolds
  2. environment modulate the immune system
  • Regenerative Immunetherapy

Marcela Maus – Massachusetts General Hospital

Engineering Better T Cells

  • Comparing CD19 CARs for Leukemia – anti-CD19- directed CAR T cells with r/r B-cell ALL – age 3-25 – FDA approved Novartis tisagenlecleucel – for pediatric r/r/ ALL
  • Phase II in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Using T cells – increases prospects for cure
  • Vector retroviral – 30 day expression
  • measuring cytokines release syndrome: Common toxicity with CAR 19
  • neurological toxicity, B-cell aplagia
  • CART issues with heme malignancies
  1. decrease cytokine release
  2. avoid neurological toxicity – homing
  3. new targets address antigene escape variants – Resistance, CD19 is shaded, another target needed
  4. B Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) Target
  5. Bluebird Bio: Response duratio up to 54 weeks – Active dose cohort
  6. natural ligand CAR based on April
  7. activated in response to TACI+ target cells – APRIL-based CARs but not BCMA-CAR is able to kill TACI+ target cells
  • Hurdles for Solid Tumors
  1. Specific antigen targets
  2. tumor heterogeneity
  3. inhibitory microenvironment
  • CART in Glioblastoma
  1. rationale for EGFRvIII as therapeutic target
  2. Preclinical Studies & Phase 1: CAR t engraft, not as highly as CD19
  3. Upregulation of immunosuppression and Treg infiltrate in CART EGFRvIII as therapeutic target, Marcela Maus
  • What to do differently?

 

2:15 – 2:45 Break

2:45 – 4:00 Session IV
Moderator: Arup K. Chakraborty | MIT, IMES

Laura Walker – Adimab, LLC
Molecular Dissection of the Human Antibody Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus

  • prophylactic antibody is available
  • Barriers for development of Vaccine
  • Prefusion and Postfusion RSV structures
  • Six major antigenic sites on RSV F
  • Blood samples Infants less 6 month of age and over 6 month: High abundance RSV F -specific memory B Cells are group  less 6 month

Arup K. Chakraborty – MIT, Institute for Medical Engineering & Science
How to Hit HIV Where it Hurts

  • antibody  – Model IN SILICO
  • Check affinity of each Ab for the Seaman panel of strain
  • Breadth of coverage
  • immmunize with cocktail of variant antigens
  • Mutations on Affinity Maturation: Molecular dynamics
  • bnAb eveolution: Hypothesis – mutations evolution make the antigen binding region more flexible,
  • Tested hypothesisi: carrying out affinity maturation – LOW GERMLINE AFFINITY TO CONSERVE RESIDUES IN 10,000 trials, acquire the mutation (generation 300)

William Schief – The Scripps Research Institute
HIV Vaccine Design Targeting the Human Naive B Cell Repertoire

  • HIV Envelope Trimer Glycan): the Target of neutralizing Antibodies (bnAbs)
  • Proof of principle for germline-targeting: VRC)!-class bnAbs
  • design of a nanoparticle
  • can germline -targeting innumogens prime low frequency precursors?
  • Day 14 day 42 vaccinate
  • Precursor frequency and affinity are limiting for germline center (GC) entry at day 8
  • Germline-targeting immunogens can elicit robust, high quality SHM under physiological conditions of precursor frequency and affinity at day 8, 16, 36
  • Germline-targeting immunogens can lead to production of memory B cells

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Systemic Inflammatory Diseases as Crohn’s disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Longer Psoriasis Duration May Mean Higher CVD Risk

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Longer Psoriasis Duration May Mean Higher CVD Risk

Effect size ‘similar to that of smoking’

Several studies have shown that methotrexate, which has anti-inflammatory effects, reduces CV risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting that good anti-inflammatory control may be expected to reduce CV risk in patients with psoriasis.

Menter has worked closely with the senior author of the current study, Nehal Mehta, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, to identify cardiovascular issues in the psoriasis population. In one recent study, investigators found that the prevalence of moderate-to-severe coronary calcification was similar between patients with psoriasis and those with type 2 diabetes, and approximately five times greater than healthy controls.

Investigators found that moderate-to-severe psoriasis was a significantly stronger predictor of coronary calcification than type 2 diabetes, and the effect was independent of known CV and cardiometabolic risk factors.

 

SOURCE

https://www.medpagetoday.com/Dermatology/Psoriasis/68429?xid=nl_mpt_cardiodaily_2017-10-09&eun=g99985d0r

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Nutrition: Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

 

Nutrition and Wellbeing

 

Introduction 

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

The chapters that follow are divided into three parts, but they are also a summary of 25 years of work with nutritional support research and involvement with nutritional support teams in Connecticut and New York, attendance and presentations at the American Association for Clinical Chemistry and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, and long term collaborations with the surgeons Walter Pleban and Prof. Stanley Dudrick, and Prof. Yves Ingenbleek at the Laboratory of Nutrition, Department of Pharmacy, University Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, Fr.   They are presented in the order: malnutrition in childhood; cancer, inflammation, and nutrition; and vegetarian diet and nutrition role in alternative medicines. These are not unrelated as they embrace the role of nutrition throughout the lifespan, the environmental impact of geo-ecological conditions on nutritional wellbeing and human development, and the impact of metabolism and metabolomics on the outcomes of human disease in relationship to severe inflammatory disorders, chronic disease, and cancer. Finally, the discussion emphasizes the negative impact of a vegan diet on long term health, and it reviews the importance of protein sources during phases of the life cycle.

Malnutrition in Childhood

 

Protein Energy Malnutrition and Early Child Development

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

The Significant Burden of Childhood Malnutrition and Stunting

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Is Malnutrition the Cost of Civilization?

Curation: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Malnutrition in India, High Newborn Death Rate and Stunting of Children Age Under Five Years

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Under Nutrition Early in Life may lead to Obesity

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Protein Malnutrition

Reporter and Curator: Dr. Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Cancer, Inflammation and Nutrition

 

A Second Look at the Transthyretin Nutrition Inflammatory Conundrum

Author and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FACP

 

Cancer and Nutrition

Writer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

The history and creators of total parenteral nutrition

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Nutrition Plan

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Nutrition and Aging

Curator: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Vegetarian Diet and Nutrition Role in Alternative Medicines

 

Plant-based Nutrition, Neutraceuticals and Alternative Medicine: Article Compilation the Journal PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

Metabolomics, Metabonomics and Functional Nutrition: the next step in nutritional metabolism and biotherapeutics

Reviewer and Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

2014 Epidemiology and Prevention, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism Conference: San Francisco, Ca. Conference Dates: San Francisco, CA 3/18-21, 2014

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Metabolomics: its Applications in Food and Nutrition Research

Reporter and Curator: Sudipta Saha, Ph.D.

 

Summary

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP 

The interest in human malnutrition became a major healthcare issue in the 1980’s with the publication of several seminal papers on hospital malnutrition. However, the basis for protein-energy malnutrition that focused on the distinction between kwashiorkor and marasmus was first identified in seminal papers by Ingenbleek and others:

Ingenbleek Y. La malnutrition protein-calorique chez l’enfant en bas age. Repercussions sur la function thyroidienne et les protein vectrices du serum. PhD Thesis. Acco Press. 1997. Univ Louvain.

Ingenbleek Y, Carpentier YA. A prognostic inflammatory and nutrition index scoring critically ill patients. Internat J Vit Nutr Res 1985; 55:91-101.

Ingenbleek Y, Young VR. Transthyretin (prealbumin) in health and disease. Nutritional implications. Ann Rev Nutr 1994; 14:495-533.

Ingenbleek Y, Hardillier E, Jung L. Subclinical protein malnutrition is a determinant of hyperhomocysteinemia. Nutrition 2002; 18:40-46.

It was these early papers that transfixed my attention, and drove me to establish early the transthyretin test by immunodiffusion and later by automated immunoassay at Bridgeport Hospital.

Among the important studies often referred to with respect to hospital malnutrition are:

  1. Hill GL, Blackett RL, Pickford I, Burkinshaw L, Young GA, Warren JV. Malnutrition in surgical patients: An unrecognised problem. Lancet.1977; 310:689–692. [PubMed]
  2. Bistrian BR, Blackburn GL, Vitale J, Cochrane D, Naylor J. Prevalence of malnutrition in general medical patients. JAMA. 1976; 235:1567–1570. [PubMed]
  3. Butterworth CE. The skeleton in the hospital closet. Nutrition Today.1974; 9:4–8.
  4. Buzby GP, Mullen JL, Matthews DC, Hobbs CL, Rosato EF. Prognostic nutritional index in gastrointestinal surgery. Am. J. Surg. 1980; 139:160–167.[PubMed]
  5. Dempsey DT, Mullen JL, Buzby GP. The link between nutritional status and clinical outcomes: can nutritional intervention modify it? Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1988; 47:352–356. [PubMed]
  6. Detsky AS, Mclaughlin JR, Baker JP, Johnston N, Whittaker S, Mendleson RA, Jeejeebhoy KN. What is subjective global assessment of nutritional status? JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1987; 11:8–13. [PubMed]
  7. Scrimshaw NS, DanGiovanni JP. Synergism of nutrition, infection and immunity, an overview. J. Nutr. 1997; 133:S316–S321.
  8. Chandra RK. Nutrition and the immune system: an introduction. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1997; 66:460S–463S. [PubMed]
  9. Hill GL. Body composition reserach: Implications for the practice of clinical nutrition. JPEN J. Parenter. Enteral Nutr. 1992; 16:197. [PubMed]
  10. Smith PE, Smith AE. High-quality nutritional interventions reduce costs.Healthc. Financ. Manage. 1997; 5:66–69. [PubMed]
  11. Gallagher-Allred CR, Voss AC, Finn SC, McCamish MA. Malnutrition and clinical outcomes. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. 1996; 96:361–366. [PubMed]
  12. Ferguson M. Uncovering the skeleton in the hoapital closet. What next? Aust. J. Nutr. Diet. 2001; 58:83–84.
  13. Waitzberg DL, Caiaffa WT, Correia MITD. Hospital malnutrition: The Brazilian national survey (IBRANUTRI): a study of 4000 patients. Nutrition.2001; 17:573–580. [PubMed]

The work on hospital (and nursing home) treatment of malnutrition described in this series led to established standards. It first requires identifying a patient at malnutrition risk to be identified via either screening or assessment. This needs to be done on admission, and it has been made mandatory by health care accrediting bodies. In order to achieve this, dietitians need to have the confidence and knowledge to detect malnutrition, which is ideally done using a validated assessment for patient outcomes and financial benefits to be realized.

There is a worldwide relationship between ecological conditions, religious practices, soil conditions, availability of animal food sources, and altitude and river flows has not received the attention that evidence requires. We have seen that the emphasis on the Hindu tradition of not eating beef or having dairy is possibly problematic in the Ganges River basin. There may be other meat sources, but it is questionable that sufficient animal protein is available for the large population. The additional problem of water pollution is an aggravating situation. However, it is this region that is one of the most affected by stunting of children. We have a situation here and in other poor societies where veganism is present, and there is also voluntary veganism in western societies. This is not a practice that leads to any beneficial effect, and it has been shown to lead to a hyperhomocystenemia with the associated risk of arterial vascular disease. For those who voluntarily choose veganism, this is an unexpected result.

Met is implicated in a large spectrum of metabolic and enzyme activities and participates in the conformation of a large number of molecules of survival importance. Due to the fact that plant products are relatively Met-deficient, vegan subjects are more exposed than omnivorous to develop hyperhomocysteinemia – related disorders. Dietary protein restriction may promote supranormal Hcy concentrations which appears as the dark side of adaptive attempts developed by the malnourished and/or stressed body to preserve Met homeostasis.  Summing up, we assume that the low TTR concentrations reported in the blood and CSF of AD or MID patients result in impairment of their normal scavenging capacity and in the excessive accumulation of Hcy in body fluids, hence causing direct harmful damage to the brain and cardiac vasculature.

The content of these discussions has also included nutrition and cancer. This is perhaps least well understood. Reasons for such an association may well include chronic exposure to radiation damage, or persistent focal chronic inflammatory conditions. These would result in a cirumferential and repeated cycle of injury and repair combined with an underlying hypoxia. I have already established a fundamental relationship between inflammation, the cytokine storm, the decreased hepatic synthesis of essential plasma proteins, such as, albumin, transferrin, retinol-binding protein, and transthyretin, and the surge of steroid hormones. This results in an imbalance in the protein and free protein equilibrium of essential vitamins, the retinoids, and other circulating ligands transported. This is discussed in the ‘nutrition-inflammatory conundrum”. As stated, whatever the nutritional status and the disease condition, the actual transthyretin (TTR) plasma level is determined by opposing influences between anabolic and catabolic alterations. Rising TTR values indicate that synthetic processes prevail over tissue breakdown with a nitrogen balance (NB) turning positive as a result of efficient nutritional support and / or anti-inflammatory therapy. Declining TTR values are associated with an effect of maladjusted dietetic management and / or further worsening of the morbid condition.

Inflammatory disorders of any cause are initiated by activated leukocytes releasing a shower of cytokines working as autocrine, paracrine and endocrine molecules. Cytokines regulate the overproduction of acute-phase proteins (APPs), notably that of CRP, 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), fibrinogen, haptoglobin, 1-antitrypsin and antichymotrypsin. APPs contribute in several ways to defense and repair mechanisms, being characterized by proper kinetic and functional properties. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is regarded as a key mediator governing both the acute and chronic inflammatory processes, as documented by data recorded on burn, sepsis and AIDS patients. IL-6-NF possesses a high degree of homology with C/EBP-NF1 and competes for the same DNA response element of the IL-6 gene. IL-6-NF is not expressed under normal circumstances, explaining why APP concentrations are kept at baseline levels. In stressful conditions, IL-6-NF causes a dramatic surge in APP values with a concomitant suppressed synthesis of TTR.

Inadequate nutritional management, multiple injuries, occurrence of severe sepsis and metabolic complications result in persistent proteolysis and subnormal TTR concentrations. The evolutionary patterns of urinary N output and of TTR thus appear as mirror images of each other, which supports the view that TTR might well reflect the depletion of TBN in both acute and chronic disease processes. Even in the most complex stressful conditions, the synthesis of visceral proteins is submitted to opposing anabolic or catabolic influences yielding ultimately TTR as an end-product reflecting the prevailing tendency. Whatever the nutritional and/or inflammatory causal factors, the actual TTR plasma level and its course in process of time indicates the exhaustion or restoration of the body N resources, hence its likely (in)ability to assume defense and repair mechanisms.

In westernized societies, elderly persons constitute a growing population group. A substantial proportion of them may develop a syndrome of frailty characterized by weight loss, clumsy gait, impaired memory and sensorial aptitudes, poor physical, mental and social activities, depressive trends. Hallmarks of frailty combine progressive depletion of both structural and metabolic N compartments. Sarcopenia and limitation of muscle strength are naturally involutive events of normal ageing which may nevertheless be accelerated by cytokine-induced underlying inflammatory disorders. Depletion of visceral resources is substantiated by the shrinking of FFM and its partial replacement by FM, mainly in abdominal organs, and by the down-regulation of indices of growth and protein status. Due to reduced tissue reserves and diminished efficiency of immune and repair mechanisms, any stressful condition affecting old age may trigger more severe clinical impact whereas healing processes require longer duration with erratical setbacks. As a result, protein malnutrition is a common finding in most elderly patients with significantly increased morbidity and mortality rates.

TTR has proved to be a useful marker of nutritional alterations with prognostic implications in large bowel cancer, bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumor, ovarian carcinoma and squamous carcinoma of bladder. Many oncologists have observed a rapid TTR fall 2 or 3 months prior to the patient’s death. In cancer patients submitted to surgical intervention, most postoperative complications occurred in subjects with preoperative TTR  180 mg/L. Two independent studies came to the same conclusion that a TTR threshold of 100 mg/L is indicative of extremely weak survival likelihood and that these terminally ill patients better deserve palliative care rather than aggressive therapeutic strategies.

Thyroid hormones and retinoids indeed function in concert through the mediation of common heterodimeric motifs bound to DNA response elements. The data also imply that the provision of thyroid molecules within the CSF works as a relatively stable secretory process, poorly sensitive to extracerebral influences as opposed to the delivery of retinoid molecules whose plasma concentrations are highly dependent on nutritional and/or inflammatory alterations. This last statement is documented by mice experiments and clinical investigations showing that the level of TTR production by the liver operates as a limiting factor for retinol transport. Defective TTR synthesis determines the occurrence of secondary hyporetinolemia which nevertheless results from entirely different kinetic mechanisms in the two quoted studies.

Points to consider:

Protein energy malnutrition has an unlikely causal relationship to carcinogenesis. Perhaps the opposite is true. However, cancer has a relationship to protein energy malnutrition without any doubt. PEM is the consequence of cachexia, whether caused by dietary insufficiency, inflammatory or cancer.

Protein energy malnutrition leads to hyperhomocysteinemia, and by that means, the relationship of dietary insufficiency of methionine has a relationship to heart disease. This is the significant link between veganism and cardiovascular disease, whether voluntary or by unavailability of adequate source.

The last portion of these chapters deals with metabolomics and functional nutrition. This is an emerging and important area of academic interest. There is a significant relationship between these emerging studies and pathways to understanding natural products medicinal chemistry.

 

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Selye’s Riddle solved

Larry H. Bernstein, mD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

Mathematicians Solve 78-year-old Mystery

Mathematicians developed a solution to Selye's riddle which has puzzled scientists for almost 80 years.
Mathematicians developed a solution to Selye’s riddle which has puzzled scientists for almost 80 years.

In previous research, it was suggested that adaptation of an animal to different factors looks like spending of one resource, and that the animal dies when this resource is exhausted. In 1938, Hans Selye introduced “adaptation energy” and found strong experimental arguments in favor of this hypothesis. However, this term has caused much debate because, as it cannot be measured as a physical quantity, adaptation energy is not strictly energy.

 

Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death

Alexander N. Gorbana, , Tatiana A. Tyukinaa, Elena V. Smirnovab, Lyudmila I. Pokidyshevab,

Highlights

•   We formalize Selye׳s ideas about adaptation energy and dynamics of adaptation.
•   A hierarchy of dynamic models of adaptation is developed.
•   Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the ‘dominant path’ in the model of adaptation.
•   The optimal distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors is studied.
•   The phenomena of ‘oscillating death’ and ‘oscillating remission’ are predicted.       

In previous research, it was suggested that adaptation of an animal to different factors looks like spending of one resource, and that the animal dies when this resource is exhausted.

In 1938, Selye proposed the notion of adaptation energy and published ‘Experimental evidence supporting the conception of adaptation energy.’ Adaptation of an animal to different factors appears as the spending of one resource. Adaptation energy is a hypothetical extensive quantity spent for adaptation. This term causes much debate when one takes it literally, as a physical quantity, i.e. a sort of energy. The controversial points of view impede the systematic use of the notion of adaptation energy despite experimental evidence. Nevertheless, the response to many harmful factors often has general non-specific form and we suggest that the mechanisms of physiological adaptation admit a very general and nonspecific description.

We aim to demonstrate that Selye׳s adaptation energy is the cornerstone of the top-down approach to modelling of non-specific adaptation processes. We analyze Selye׳s axioms of adaptation energy together with Goldstone׳s modifications and propose a series of models for interpretation of these axioms. Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the ‘dominant path’ in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of ‘oscillating death’ and ‘oscillating remission’ are predicted on the base of the dynamical models of adaptation. Natural selection plays a key role in the evolution of mechanisms of physiological adaptation. We use the fitness optimization approach to study of the distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors, during adaptation to a multifactor environment, and analyze the optimal strategies for different systems of factors.

In this work, an international team of researchers, led by Professor Alexander N. Gorban from the University of Leicester, have developed a solution to Selye’s riddle, which has puzzled scientists for almost 80 years.

Alexander N. Gorban, Professor of Applied Mathematics in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Leicester, said: “Nobody can measure adaptation energy directly, indeed, but it can be understood by its place already in simple models. In this work, we develop a hierarchy of top-down models following Selye’s findings and further developments. We trust Selye’s intuition and experiments and use the notion of adaptation energy as a cornerstone in a system of models. We provide a ‘thermodynamic-like’ theory of organism resilience that, just like classical thermodynamics, allows for economics metaphors, such as cost and bankruptcy and, more importantly, is largely independent of a detailed mechanistic explanation of what is ‘going on underneath’.”

Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the “dominant path” in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of “oscillating death” and “oscillating remission,” which have been observed in clinic for a long time, are predicted on the basis of the dynamical models of adaptation. The models, based on Selye’s idea of adaptation energy, demonstrate that the oscillating remission and oscillating death do not need exogenous reasons. The developed theory of adaptation to various factors gives the instrument for the early anticipation of crises.

Professor Alessandro Giuliani from Istituto Superiore di Sanità in Rome commented on the work, saying: “Gorban and his colleagues dare to make science adopting the thermodynamics style: they look for powerful principles endowed with predictive ability in the real world before knowing the microscopic details. This is, in my opinion, the only possible way out from the actual repeatability crisis of mainstream biology, where a fantastic knowledge of the details totally fails to predict anything outside the test tube.1

Citation: Alexander N. Gorban, Tatiana A. Tyukina, Elena V. Smirnova, Lyudmila I. Pokidysheva. Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 2016; DOI:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.12.017. Voosen P. (2015) Amid a Sea of False Findings NIH tries Reform, The Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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High blood pressure can damage the retina’s blood vessels and limit the retina’s function. It can also put pressure on the optic nerve.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.healthline.com

See on Scoop.itCardiovascular Disease: PHARMACO-THERAPY

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