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Archive for the ‘Human Sensation and Cellular Transduction: Physiology and Therapeutics’ Category


Contributions to Neuronal Systems by University Professors Eve Marder and Irv Epstein at Brandeis University

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Oscillators: Chemicals, Neurons and People: A Celebration of Eve Marder, Irving Epstein and the Volen Center for Complex Systems
Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, 1 – 5:30 p.m.
Location Schwartz
Room Auditorium
Event Sponsor(S) Office of the Provost
Website www.brandeis.edu…

A celebration for new university professors Eve Marder and Irving Epstein, and the 25th anniversary of the Volen Center!

Schedule of Events

  • 1p.m. – Opening remarks: Leslie Griffith, Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Volen National Center for Complex Systems
  • 1:30 p.m. – Panel Discussion: “Oscillators: Chemicals, Neurons and People”
    • Moderator: Gina Turrigiano, Joseph Levitan Professor of Vision Science
    • Panelist: Jorge Golowasch, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology
    • Panelist: Nancy Kopell, Professor of Mathematics, Boston University
    • Panelist: Horacio Rotstein, Professor of Mathematical Biology & Computational Neuroscience, Department of Biological Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology
    • Panelist: Frances Skinner, Senior Scientist, Krembil Research Institute and Professor, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine and Department of Physiology, University of Toront
  • 2:30 p.m. – Coffee
  • 3 p.m. – Irving Epstein: “How I Wandered into an Oscillatory State”
  • 4 p.m. – Eve Marder: “The Challenges Posed by Neuronal Oscillators that are both Stable and Plastic”
  • 5 p.m. – Closing remarks: Leslie Griffith

 

Eve Marder and Irv Epstein recall the collaborations that started it all

The University Professors will lead a public symposium on Nov. 17

headshots of University Professors Eve Marder, left, and Irv EpsteinPhoto/Mike LovettUniversity professors Eve Marder ’69, Left, and Irving R. Epstein

University Professors Eve Marder ’69 and Irv Epstein will help celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Volen National Center for Complex Systems in a public symposium November 17.

Marder, the Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield Professor of Neuroscience, and Epstein, the Henry F. Fischbach Professor of Chemistry, were named University Professors last spring in recognition of their pioneering interdisciplinary achievements. At the symposium, they will each deliver a lecture drawing on their collaborative research on oscillators. In the case of Epstein, these are oscillating chemical reactions. In Marder’s case, it is rhythmically active neurons and/or circuits.   

But some 35 years ago, before they were leaders in their fields, Epstein and Marder saw the benefit of sharing ideas. A mutual colleague noticed that the chemical reactions recorded on the chart recorder Epstein was using looked intriguingly similar to the neuronal signals Marder was recording in her research.

“It’s relatively unusual behavior for chemistry, but it’s sort of the essence of what goes on in neuronal systems,” said Epstein, who soon learned some rudiments of neuroscience from Marder and began mathematically modeling groups of neurons. For her part, Marder “got an appreciation for what interacting with theorists could bring, to help her answer the kind of questions she wanted to answer,” said Epstein.

These days, Marder’s research on small neural circuits found in lobsters and crabs is credited with revolutionizing understanding of the fundamental nature of neuronal circuit operation, including how neuromodulators control behavioral outputs and how the stability of circuits is maintained over time. She has won many top prizes in neuroscience, including the Gruber Award in Neuroscience, the Kavli Prize in Neuroscience, and the National Academy of Sciences Neuroscience Prize. In March, she will receive the Carnegie Prize in Mind and Brain Science from Carnegie Mellon University.

Epstein, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute professor, pioneered the field of chemical oscillators. “When we got into the field of oscillating reactions, there were just three that were known, and they were all discovered accidentally,” said Epstein. “We decided that if we really understood these systems, we should be able to design them.”

Although it took him several years and three unsuccessful grant applications to secure funding for his ideas, Epstein and his lab ultimately won funding, and within a few months succeeded in developing their first novel chemical oscillating reaction.

Writ large, Marder and Epstein collaboratively demonstrate that the kinds of phenomena seen in neurons are also found in chemical and physical systems. “What you learn from modeling chemical reactions can help you understand how neurons work, and vice versa,” said Epstein.

“Volen is a place where you get all kinds of collaborations,” said Marder. “One of Brandeis’ strengths is its interactivity; those early days were quite catalytic.”

 

Categories: ResearchScience and Technology

SOURCE

https://www.brandeis.edu/now/2019/november/eve-irv-volen.html

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Milestones in Physiology & Discoveries in Medicine and Genomics: Request for Book Review Writing on Amazon.com


physiology-cover-seriese-vol-3individualsaddlebrown-page2

Milestones in Physiology

Discoveries in Medicine, Genomics and Therapeutics

Patient-centric Perspective 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B019VH97LU 

2015

 

 

Author, Curator and Editor

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chief Scientific Officer

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence

Larry.bernstein@gmail.com

Preface

Introduction 

Chapter 1: Evolution of the Foundation for Diagnostics and Pharmaceuticals Industries

1.1  Outline of Medical Discoveries between 1880 and 1980

1.2 The History of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology in the late 19th and 20th Century

1.3 The Classification of Microbiota

1.4 Selected Contributions to Chemistry from 1880 to 1980

1.5 The Evolution of Clinical Chemistry in the 20th Century

1.6 Milestones in the Evolution of Diagnostics in the US HealthCare System: 1920s to Pre-Genomics

 

Chapter 2. The search for the evolution of function of proteins, enzymes and metal catalysts in life processes

2.1 The life and work of Allan Wilson
2.2  The  evolution of myoglobin and hemoglobin
2.3  More complexity in proteins evolution
2.4  Life on earth is traced to oxygen binding
2.5  The colors of life function
2.6  The colors of respiration and electron transport
2.7  Highlights of a green evolution

 

Chapter 3. Evolution of New Relationships in Neuroendocrine States
3.1 Pituitary endocrine axis
3.2 Thyroid function
3.3 Sex hormones
3.4 Adrenal Cortex
3.5 Pancreatic Islets
3.6 Parathyroids
3.7 Gastointestinal hormones
3.8 Endocrine action on midbrain
3.9 Neural activity regulating endocrine response

3.10 Genomic Promise for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Dementias, Autism Spectrum, Schizophrenia, and Serious Depression

 

Chapter 4.  Problems of the Circulation, Altitude, and Immunity

4.1 Innervation of Heart and Heart Rate
4.2 Action of hormones on the circulation
4.3 Allogeneic Transfusion Reactions
4.4 Graft-versus Host reaction
4.5 Unique problems of perinatal period
4.6. High altitude sickness
4.7 Deep water adaptation
4.8 Heart-Lung-and Kidney
4.9 Acute Lung Injury

4.10 Reconstruction of Life Processes requires both Genomics and Metabolomics to explain Phenotypes and Phylogenetics

 

Chapter 5. Problems of Diets and Lifestyle Changes

5.1 Anorexia nervosa
5.2 Voluntary and Involuntary S-insufficiency
5.3 Diarrheas – bacterial and nonbacterial
5.4 Gluten-free diets
5.5 Diet and cholesterol
5.6 Diet and Type 2 diabetes mellitus
5.7 Diet and exercise
5.8 Anxiety and quality of Life
5.9 Nutritional Supplements

 

Chapter 6. Advances in Genomics, Therapeutics and Pharmacogenomics

6.1 Natural Products Chemistry

6.2 The Challenge of Antimicrobial Resistance

6.3 Viruses, Vaccines and immunotherapy

6.4 Genomics and Metabolomics Advances in Cancer

6.5 Proteomics – Protein Interaction

6.6 Pharmacogenomics

6.7 Biomarker Guided Therapy

6.8 The Emergence of a Pharmaceutical Industry in the 20th Century: Diagnostics Industry and Drug Development in the Genomics Era: Mid 80s to Present

6.09 The Union of Biomarkers and Drug Development

6.10 Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

6.11 Epigenomics and Companion Diagnostics

 

Chapter  7

Integration of Physiology, Genomics and Pharmacotherapy

7.1 Richard Lifton, MD, PhD of Yale University and Howard Hughes Medical Institute: Recipient of 2014 Breakthrough Prizes Awarded in Life Sciences for the Discovery of Genes and Biochemical Mechanisms that cause Hypertension

7.2 Calcium Cycling (ATPase Pump) in Cardiac Gene Therapy: Inhalable Gene Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Percutaneous Intra-coronary Artery Infusion for Heart Failure: Contributions by Roger J. Hajjar, MD

7.3 Diagnostics and Biomarkers: Novel Genomics Industry Trends vs Present Market Conditions and Historical Scientific Leaders Memoirs

7.4 Synthetic Biology: On Advanced Genome Interpretation for Gene Variants and Pathways: What is the Genetic Base of Atherosclerosis and Loss of Arterial Elasticity with Aging

7.5 Diagnosing Diseases & Gene Therapy: Precision Genome Editing and Cost-effective microRNA Profiling

7.6 Imaging Biomarker for Arterial Stiffness: Pathways in Pharmacotherapy for Hypertension and Hypercholesterolemia Management

7.7 Neuroprotective Therapies: Pharmacogenomics vs Psychotropic drugs and Cholinesterase Inhibitors

7.8 Metabolite Identification Combining Genetic and Metabolic Information: Genetic association links unknown metabolites to functionally related genes

7.9 Preserved vs Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available and Needed Therapies

7.10 Biosimilars: Intellectual Property Creation and Protection by Pioneer and by

7.11 Demonstrate Biosimilarity: New FDA Biosimilar Guidelines

 

Chapter 7.  Biopharma Today

8.1 A Great University engaged in Drug Discovery: University of Pittsburgh

8.2 Introduction – The Evolution of Cancer Therapy and Cancer Research: How We Got Here?

8.3 Predicting Tumor Response, Progression, and Time to Recurrence

8.4 Targeting Untargetable Proto-Oncogenes

8.5 Innovation: Drug Discovery, Medical Devices and Digital Health

8.6 Cardiotoxicity and Cardiomyopathy Related to Drugs Adverse Effects

8.7 Nanotechnology and Ocular Drug Delivery: Part I

8.8 Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) system and nanotechnology: Part II

8.9 The Delicate Connection: IDO (Indolamine 2, 3 dehydrogenase) and Cancer Immunology

8.10 Natural Drug Target Discovery and Translational Medicine in Human Microbiome

8.11 From Genomics of Microorganisms to Translational Medicine

8.12 Confined Indolamine 2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) Controls the Homeostasis of Immune Responses for Good and Bad

 

Chapter 9. BioPharma – Future Trends

9.1 Artificial Intelligence Versus the Scientist: Who Will Win?

9.2 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on KannaLife Sciences and the Discipline and Potential of Pharmacognosy

9.3 The Vibrant Philly Biotech Scene: Focus on Computer-Aided Drug Design and Gfree Bio, LLC

9.4 Heroes in Medical Research: The Postdoctoral Fellow

9.5 NIH Considers Guidelines for CAR-T therapy: Report from Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee

9.6 1st Pitch Life Science- Philadelphia- What VCs Really Think of your Pitch

9.7 Multiple Lung Cancer Genomic Projects Suggest New Targets, Research Directions for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

9.8 Heroes in Medical Research: Green Fluorescent Protein and the Rough Road in Science

9.9 Issues in Personalized Medicine in Cancer: Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

9.10 The SCID Pig II: Researchers Develop Another SCID Pig, And Another Great Model For Cancer Research

Epilogue

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Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology – 2016-2017 Forthcoming Conferences in Life Sciences

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

2016-2017 Forthcoming Conferences in Life Sciences by topic:

DNA Replication and Recombination (Z2)
April 2 – 6, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: John F.X. Diffley, Anja Groth and Scott Keeney

Immunology

Translational Vaccinology for Global Health (S1)
October 25 – 29, 2016 | London, United Kingdom
Scientific Organizers: Christopher L. Karp, Gagandeep Kang and Rino Rappuoli

Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses (S3)
December 4 – 8, 2016 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: William E. Dowling and Thomas W. Geisbert

Cell Plasticity within the Tumor Microenvironment (A1)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Big Sky, Montana, USA
Scientific Organizers: Sergei Grivennikov, Florian R. Greten and Mikala Egeblad

TGF-ß in Immunity, Inflammation and Cancer (A3)
January 9 – 13, 2017 | Taos, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Wanjun Chen, Joanne E. Konkel and Richard A. Flavell

New Developments in Our Basic Understanding of Tuberculosis (A5)
January 14 – 18, 2017 | Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Samuel M. Behar and Valerie Mizrahi

PI3K Pathways in Immunology, Growth Disorders and Cancer (A6)
January 19 – 23, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Leon O. Murphy, Klaus Okkenhaug and Sabina C. Cosulich

Biobetters and Next-Generation Biologics: Innovative Strategies for Optimally Effective Therapies (A7)
January 22 – 26, 2017 | Snowbird, Utah, USA
Scientific Organizers: Cherié L. Butts, Amy S. Rosenberg, Amy D. Klion and Sachdev S. Sidhu

Obesity and Adipose Tissue Biology (J4)
January 22 – 26, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Marc L. Reitman, Ruth E. Gimeno and Jan Nedergaard

Inflammation-Driven Cancer: Mechanisms to Therapy (J7)
February 5 – 9, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Fiona M. Powrie, Michael Karin and Alberto Mantovani

Autophagy Network Integration in Health and Disease (B2)
February 12 – 16, 2017 | Copper Mountain, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Ivan Dikic, Katja Simon and J. Wade Harper

Asthma: From Pathway Biology to Precision Therapeutics (B3)
February 12 – 16, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Clare M. Lloyd, John V. Fahy and Sally Wenzel-Morganroth

Viral Immunity: Mechanisms and Consequences (B4)
February 19 – 23, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Akiko Iwasaki, Daniel B. Stetson and E. John Wherry

Lipidomics and Bioactive Lipids in Metabolism and Disease (B6)
February 26 – March 2, 2017 | Tahoe City, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alfred H. Merrill, Walter Allen Shaw, Sarah Spiegel and Michael J.O.Wakelam

Bile Acid Receptors as Signal Integrators in Liver and Metabolism (C1)
March 3 – 7, 2017 | Monterey, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Luciano Adorini, Kristina Schoonjans and Scott L. Friedman

Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy: Taking a Place in Mainstream Oncology (C7)
March 19 – 23, 2017 | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Robert D. Schreiber, James P. Allison, Philip D. Greenberg and Glenn Dranoff

Pattern Recognition Signaling: From Innate Immunity to Inflammatory Disease (X5)
March 19 – 23, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti, Vishva M. Dixit and Mohamed Lamkanfi

Type I Interferon: Friend and Foe Alike (X6)
March 19 – 23, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Alan Sher, Virginia Pascual, Adolfo García-Sastre and Anne O’Garra

Injury, Inflammation and Fibrosis (C8)
March 26 – 30, 2017 | Snowbird, Utah, USA
Scientific Organizers: Tatiana Kisseleva, Michael Karin and Andrew M. Tager

Immune Regulation in Autoimmunity and Cancer (D1)
March 26 – 30, 2017 | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: David A. Hafler, Vijay K. Kuchroo and Jane L. Grogan

B Cells and T Follicular Helper Cells – Controlling Long-Lived Immunity (D2)
April 23 – 27, 2017 | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Stuart G. Tangye, Ignacio Sanz and Hai Qi

Mononuclear Phagocytes in Health, Immune Defense and Disease (D3)
April 30 – May 4, 2017 | Austin, Texas, USA
Scientific Organizers: Steffen Jung and Miriam Merad

Modeling Viral Infections and Immunity (E1)
May 1 – 4, 2017 | Estes Park, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alan S. Perelson, Rob J. De Boer and Phillip D. Hodgkin

Integrating Metabolism and Immunity (E4)
May 29 – June 2, 2017 | Dublin, Ireland
Scientific Organizers: Hongbo Chi, Erika L. Pearce, Richard A. Flavell and Luke A.J. O’Neill

Neuroinflammation: Concepts, Characteristics, Consequences (E5)
June 19 – 23, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Richard M. Ransohoff, Christopher K. Glass and V. Hugh Perry

Infectious Diseases

Translational Vaccinology for Global Health (S1)
October 25 – 29, 2016 | London, United Kingdom
Scientific Organizers: Christopher L. Karp, Gagandeep Kang and Rino Rappuoli

Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses (S3)
December 4 – 8, 2016 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: William E. Dowling and Thomas W. Geisbert

Cellular Stress Responses and Infectious Agents (S4)
December 4 – 8, 2016 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Margo A. Brinton, Sandra K. Weller and Beth Levine

New Developments in Our Basic Understanding of Tuberculosis (A5)
January 14 – 18, 2017 | Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Samuel M. Behar and Valerie Mizrahi

Autophagy Network Integration in Health and Disease (B2)
February 12 – 16, 2017 | Copper Mountain, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Ivan Dikic, Katja Simon and J. Wade Harper

Viral Immunity: Mechanisms and Consequences (B4)
February 19 – 23, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Akiko Iwasaki, Daniel B. Stetson and E. John Wherry

Malaria: From Innovation to Eradication (B5)
February 19 – 23, 2017 | Kampala, Uganda
Scientific Organizers: Marcel Tanner, Sarah K. Volkman, Marcus V.G. Lacerda and Salim Abdulla

Type I Interferon: Friend and Foe Alike (X6)
March 19 – 23, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Alan Sher, Virginia Pascual, Adolfo García-Sastre and Anne O’Garra

HIV Vaccines (C9)
March 26 – 30, 2017 | Steamboat Springs, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Andrew B. Ward, Penny L. Moore and Robin Shattock

Modeling Viral Infections and Immunity (E1)
May 1 – 4, 2017 | Estes Park, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alan S. Perelson, Rob J. De Boer and Phillip D. Hodgkin

Metabolic Diseases

Mitochondria Communication (A4)
January 14 – 18, 2017 | Taos, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Jared Rutter, Cole M. Haynes and Marcia C. Haigis

Diabetes (J3)
January 22 – 26, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Jiandie Lin, Clay F. Semenkovich and Rohit N. Kulkarni

Obesity and Adipose Tissue Biology (J4)
January 22 – 26, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Marc L. Reitman, Ruth E. Gimeno and Jan Nedergaard

Microbiome in Health and Disease (J8)
February 5 – 9, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Julie A. Segre, Ramnik Xavier and William Michael Dunne

Bile Acid Receptors as Signal Integrators in Liver and Metabolism (C1)
March 3 – 7, 2017 | Monterey, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Luciano Adorini, Kristina Schoonjans and Scott L. Friedman

Sex and Gender Factors Affecting Metabolic Homeostasis, Diabetes and Obesity (C6)
March 19 – 22, 2017 | Tahoe City, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Franck Mauvais-Jarvis, Deborah Clegg and Arthur P. Arnold

Neuronal Control of Appetite, Metabolism and Weight (Z5)
May 9 – 13, 2017 | Copenhagen, Denmark
Scientific Organizers: Lora K. Heisler and Scott M. Sternson

Gastrointestinal Control of Metabolism (Z6)
May 9 – 13, 2017 | Copenhagen, Denmark
Scientific Organizers: Randy J. Seeley, Matthias H. Tschöp and Fiona M. Gribble

Integrating Metabolism and Immunity (E4)
May 29 – June 2, 2017 | Dublin, Ireland
Scientific Organizers: Hongbo Chi, Erika L. Pearce, Richard A. Flavell and Luke A.J. O’Neill

Neurobiology

Transcriptional and Epigenetic Control in Stem Cells (J1)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Olympic Valley, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Konrad Hochedlinger, Kathrin Plath and Marius Wernig

Neurogenesis during Development and in the Adult Brain (J2)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Olympic Valley, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alysson R. Muotri, Kinichi Nakashima and Xinyu Zhao

Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases: Discovery and Models of Precision Therapy (C2)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Scientific Organizers: William A. Gahl and Christoph Klein

mRNA Processing and Human Disease (C3)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Taos, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: James L. Manley, Siddhartha Mukherjee and Gideon Dreyfuss

Synapses and Circuits: Formation, Function, and Dysfunction (X1)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Tony Koleske, Yimin Zou, Kristin Scott and A. Kimberley McAllister

Connectomics (X2)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Olaf Sporns, Danielle Bassett and Jeremy Freeman

Neuronal Control of Appetite, Metabolism and Weight (Z5)
May 9 – 13, 2017 | Copenhagen, Denmark
Scientific Organizers: Lora K. Heisler and Scott M. Sternson

Neuroinflammation: Concepts, Characteristics, Consequences (E5)
June 19 – 23, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Richard M. Ransohoff, Christopher K. Glass and V. Hugh Perry

Plant Biology

Phytobiomes: From Microbes to Plant Ecosystems (S2)
November 8 – 12, 2016 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Jan E. Leach, Kellye A. Eversole, Jonathan A. Eisen and Gwyn Beattie

Structural Biology

Frontiers of NMR in Life Sciences (C5)
March 12 – 16, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Kurt Wüthrich, Michael Sattler and Stephen W. Fesik

Technologies

Cell Plasticity within the Tumor Microenvironment (A1)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Big Sky, Montana, USA
Scientific Organizers: Sergei Grivennikov, Florian R. Greten and Mikala Egeblad

Precision Genome Engineering (A2)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Breckenridge, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: J. Keith Joung, Emmanuelle Charpentier and Olivier Danos

Transcriptional and Epigenetic Control in Stem Cells (J1)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Olympic Valley, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Konrad Hochedlinger, Kathrin Plath and Marius Wernig

Protein-RNA Interactions: Scale, Mechanisms, Structure and Function of Coding and Noncoding RNPs (J6)
February 5 – 9, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Gene W. Yeo, Jernej Ule, Karla Neugebauer and Melissa J. Moore

Lipidomics and Bioactive Lipids in Metabolism and Disease (B6)
February 26 – March 2, 2017 | Tahoe City, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alfred H. Merrill, Walter Allen Shaw, Sarah Spiegel and Michael J.O.Wakelam

Connectomics (X2)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Olaf Sporns, Danielle Bassett and Jeremy Freeman

Engineered Cells and Tissues as Platforms for Discovery and Therapy (K1)
March 9 – 12, 2017 | Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Scientific Organizers: Laura E. Niklason, Milica Radisic and Nenad Bursac

Frontiers of NMR in Life Sciences (C5)
March 12 – 16, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Kurt Wüthrich, Michael Sattler and Stephen W. Fesik

October 2016

Translational Vaccinology for Global Health (S1)
October 25 – 29, 2016 | London, United Kingdom
Scientific Organizers: Christopher L. Karp, Gagandeep Kang and Rino Rappuoli

November 2016

Phytobiomes: From Microbes to Plant Ecosystems (S2)
November 8 – 12, 2016 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Jan E. Leach, Kellye A. Eversole, Jonathan A. Eisen and Gwyn Beattie

December 2016

Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses (S3)
December 4 – 8, 2016 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: William E. Dowling and Thomas W. Geisbert

Cellular Stress Responses and Infectious Agents (S4)
December 4 – 8, 2016 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Margo A. Brinton, Sandra K. Weller and Beth Levine

January 2017

Cell Plasticity within the Tumor Microenvironment (A1)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Big Sky, Montana, USA
Scientific Organizers: Sergei Grivennikov, Florian R. Greten and Mikala Egeblad

Precision Genome Engineering (A2)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Breckenridge, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: J. Keith Joung, Emmanuelle Charpentier and Olivier Danos

Transcriptional and Epigenetic Control in Stem Cells (J1)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Olympic Valley, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Konrad Hochedlinger, Kathrin Plath and Marius Wernig

Neurogenesis during Development and in the Adult Brain (J2)
January 8 – 12, 2017 | Olympic Valley, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alysson R. Muotri, Kinichi Nakashima and Xinyu Zhao

TGF-ß in Immunity, Inflammation and Cancer (A3)
January 9 – 13, 2017 | Taos, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Wanjun Chen, Joanne E. Konkel and Richard A. Flavell

Mitochondria Communication (A4)
January 14 – 18, 2017 | Taos, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Jared Rutter, Cole M. Haynes and Marcia C. Haigis

New Developments in Our Basic Understanding of Tuberculosis (A5)
January 14 – 18, 2017 | Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Samuel M. Behar and Valerie Mizrahi

PI3K Pathways in Immunology, Growth Disorders and Cancer (A6)
January 19 – 23, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Leon O. Murphy, Klaus Okkenhaug and Sabina C. Cosulich

Biobetters and Next-Generation Biologics: Innovative Strategies for Optimally Effective Therapies (A7)
January 22 – 26, 2017 | Snowbird, Utah, USA
Scientific Organizers: Cherié L. Butts, Amy S. Rosenberg, Amy D. Klion and Sachdev S. Sidhu

Diabetes (J3)
January 22 – 26, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Jiandie Lin, Clay F. Semenkovich and Rohit N. Kulkarni

Obesity and Adipose Tissue Biology (J4)
January 22 – 26, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Marc L. Reitman, Ruth E. Gimeno and Jan Nedergaard

Omics Strategies to Study the Proteome (A8)
January 29 – February 2, 2017 | Breckenridge, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alan Saghatelian, Chuan He and Ileana M. Cristea

Epigenetics and Human Disease: Progress from Mechanisms to Therapeutics (A9)
January 29 – February 2, 2017 | Seattle, Washington, USA
Scientific Organizers: Johnathan R. Whetstine, Jessica K. Tyler and Rab K. Prinjha

Hematopoiesis (B1)
January 31 – February 4, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Catriona H.M. Jamieson, Andreas Trumpp and Paul S. Frenette

February 2017

Noncoding RNAs: From Disease to Targeted Therapeutics (J5)
February 5 – 9, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Kevin V. Morris, Archa Fox and Paloma Hoban Giangrande

Protein-RNA Interactions: Scale, Mechanisms, Structure and Function of Coding and Noncoding RNPs (J6)
February 5 – 9, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Gene W. Yeo, Jernej Ule, Karla Neugebauer and Melissa J. Moore

Inflammation-Driven Cancer: Mechanisms to Therapy (J7)
February 5 – 9, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Fiona M. Powrie, Michael Karin and Alberto Mantovani

Microbiome in Health and Disease (J8)
February 5 – 9, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Julie A. Segre, Ramnik Xavier and William Michael Dunne

Autophagy Network Integration in Health and Disease (B2)
February 12 – 16, 2017 | Copper Mountain, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Ivan Dikic, Katja Simon and J. Wade Harper

Asthma: From Pathway Biology to Precision Therapeutics (B3)
February 12 – 16, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Clare M. Lloyd, John V. Fahy and Sally Wenzel-Morganroth

Viral Immunity: Mechanisms and Consequences (B4)
February 19 – 23, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Akiko Iwasaki, Daniel B. Stetson and E. John Wherry

Malaria: From Innovation to Eradication (B5)
February 19 – 23, 2017 | Kampala, Uganda
Scientific Organizers: Marcel Tanner, Sarah K. Volkman, Marcus V.G. Lacerda and Salim Abdulla

Lipidomics and Bioactive Lipids in Metabolism and Disease (B6)
February 26 – March 2, 2017 | Tahoe City, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alfred H. Merrill, Walter Allen Shaw, Sarah Spiegel and Michael J.O.Wakelam

March 2017

Bile Acid Receptors as Signal Integrators in Liver and Metabolism (C1)
March 3 – 7, 2017 | Monterey, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Luciano Adorini, Kristina Schoonjans and Scott L. Friedman

Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases: Discovery and Models of Precision Therapy (C2)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Scientific Organizers: William A. Gahl and Christoph Klein

mRNA Processing and Human Disease (C3)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Taos, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: James L. Manley, Siddhartha Mukherjee and Gideon Dreyfuss

Kinases: Next-Generation Insights and Approaches (C4)
March 5 – 9, 2017 | Breckenridge, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Reid M. Huber, John Kuriyan and Ruth H. Palmer

Synapses and Circuits: Formation, Function, and Dysfunction (X1)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Tony Koleske, Yimin Zou, Kristin Scott and A. Kimberley McAllister

Connectomics (X2)
March 5 – 8, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Olaf Sporns, Danielle Bassett and Jeremy Freeman

Tumor Metabolism: Mechanisms and Targets (X3)
March 5 – 9, 2017 | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Brendan D. Manning, Kathryn E. Wellen and Reuben J. Shaw

Adaptations to Hypoxia in Physiology and Disease (X4)
March 5 – 9, 2017 | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: M. Celeste Simon, Amato J. Giaccia and Randall S. Johnson

Engineered Cells and Tissues as Platforms for Discovery and Therapy (K1)
March 9 – 12, 2017 | Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Scientific Organizers: Laura E. Niklason, Milica Radisic and Nenad Bursac

Frontiers of NMR in Life Sciences (C5)
March 12 – 16, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Kurt Wüthrich, Michael Sattler and Stephen W. Fesik

Sex and Gender Factors Affecting Metabolic Homeostasis, Diabetes and Obesity (C6)
March 19 – 22, 2017 | Tahoe City, California, USA
Scientific Organizers: Franck Mauvais-Jarvis, Deborah Clegg and Arthur P. Arnold

Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy: Taking a Place in Mainstream Oncology (C7)
March 19 – 23, 2017 | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Robert D. Schreiber, James P. Allison, Philip D. Greenberg and Glenn Dranoff

Pattern Recognition Signaling: From Innate Immunity to Inflammatory Disease (X5)
March 19 – 23, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti, Vishva M. Dixit and Mohamed Lamkanfi

Type I Interferon: Friend and Foe Alike (X6)
March 19 – 23, 2017 | Banff, Alberta, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Alan Sher, Virginia Pascual, Adolfo García-Sastre and Anne O’Garra

Injury, Inflammation and Fibrosis (C8)
March 26 – 30, 2017 | Snowbird, Utah, USA
Scientific Organizers: Tatiana Kisseleva, Michael Karin and Andrew M. Tager

HIV Vaccines (C9)
March 26 – 30, 2017 | Steamboat Springs, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Andrew B. Ward, Penny L. Moore and Robin Shattock

Immune Regulation in Autoimmunity and Cancer (D1)
March 26 – 30, 2017 | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: David A. Hafler, Vijay K. Kuchroo and Jane L. Grogan

Molecular Mechanisms of Heart Development (X7)
March 26 – 30, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Benoit G. Bruneau, Brian L. Black and Margaret E. Buckingham

RNA-Based Approaches in Cardiovascular Disease (X8)
March 26 – 30, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Thomas Thum and Roger J. Hajjar

April 2017

Genomic Instability and DNA Repair (Z1)
April 2 – 6, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Julia Promisel Cooper, Marco F. Foiani and Geneviève Almouzni

DNA Replication and Recombination (Z2)
April 2 – 6, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: John F.X. Diffley, Anja Groth and Scott Keeney

B Cells and T Follicular Helper Cells – Controlling Long-Lived Immunity (D2)
April 23 – 27, 2017 | Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
Scientific Organizers: Stuart G. Tangye, Ignacio Sanz and Hai Qi

Mononuclear Phagocytes in Health, Immune Defense and Disease (D3)
April 30 – May 4, 2017 | Austin, Texas, USA
Scientific Organizers: Steffen Jung and Miriam Merad

May 2017

Modeling Viral Infections and Immunity (E1)
May 1 – 4, 2017 | Estes Park, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Alan S. Perelson, Rob J. De Boer and Phillip D. Hodgkin

Angiogenesis and Vascular Disease (Z3)
May 8 – 12, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: M. Luisa Iruela-Arispe, Timothy T. Hla and Courtney Griffin

Mitochondria, Metabolism and Heart (Z4)
May 8 – 12, 2017 | Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Scientific Organizers: Junichi Sadoshima, Toren Finkel and Åsa B. Gustafsson

Neuronal Control of Appetite, Metabolism and Weight (Z5)
May 9 – 13, 2017 | Copenhagen, Denmark
Scientific Organizers: Lora K. Heisler and Scott M. Sternson

Gastrointestinal Control of Metabolism (Z6)
May 9 – 13, 2017 | Copenhagen, Denmark
Scientific Organizers: Randy J. Seeley, Matthias H. Tschöp and Fiona M. Gribble

Aging and Mechanisms of Aging-Related Disease (E2)
May 15 – 19, 2017 | Yokohama, Japan
Scientific Organizers: Kazuo Tsubota, Shin-ichiro Imai, Matt Kaeberlein and Joan Mannick

Single Cell Omics (E3)
May 26 – 30, 2017 | Stockholm, Sweden
Scientific Organizers: Sarah Teichmann, Evan W. Newell and William J. Greenleaf

Integrating Metabolism and Immunity (E4)
May 29 – June 2, 2017 | Dublin, Ireland
Scientific Organizers: Hongbo Chi, Erika L. Pearce, Richard A. Flavell and Luke A.J. O’Neill

Cell Death and Inflammation (K2)
May 29 – June 2, 2017 | Dublin, Ireland
Scientific Organizers: Seamus J. Martin and John Silke

June 2017

Neuroinflammation: Concepts, Characteristics, Consequences (E5)
June 19 – 23, 2017 | Keystone, Colorado, USA
Scientific Organizers: Richard M. Ransohoff, Christopher K. Glass and V. Hugh Perry

SOURCE

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Selye’s Riddle solved

Larry H. Bernstein, mD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

Mathematicians Solve 78-year-old Mystery

Mathematicians developed a solution to Selye's riddle which has puzzled scientists for almost 80 years.
Mathematicians developed a solution to Selye’s riddle which has puzzled scientists for almost 80 years.

In previous research, it was suggested that adaptation of an animal to different factors looks like spending of one resource, and that the animal dies when this resource is exhausted. In 1938, Hans Selye introduced “adaptation energy” and found strong experimental arguments in favor of this hypothesis. However, this term has caused much debate because, as it cannot be measured as a physical quantity, adaptation energy is not strictly energy.

 

Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death

Alexander N. Gorbana, , Tatiana A. Tyukinaa, Elena V. Smirnovab, Lyudmila I. Pokidyshevab,

Highlights

•   We formalize Selye׳s ideas about adaptation energy and dynamics of adaptation.
•   A hierarchy of dynamic models of adaptation is developed.
•   Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the ‘dominant path’ in the model of adaptation.
•   The optimal distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors is studied.
•   The phenomena of ‘oscillating death’ and ‘oscillating remission’ are predicted.       

In previous research, it was suggested that adaptation of an animal to different factors looks like spending of one resource, and that the animal dies when this resource is exhausted.

In 1938, Selye proposed the notion of adaptation energy and published ‘Experimental evidence supporting the conception of adaptation energy.’ Adaptation of an animal to different factors appears as the spending of one resource. Adaptation energy is a hypothetical extensive quantity spent for adaptation. This term causes much debate when one takes it literally, as a physical quantity, i.e. a sort of energy. The controversial points of view impede the systematic use of the notion of adaptation energy despite experimental evidence. Nevertheless, the response to many harmful factors often has general non-specific form and we suggest that the mechanisms of physiological adaptation admit a very general and nonspecific description.

We aim to demonstrate that Selye׳s adaptation energy is the cornerstone of the top-down approach to modelling of non-specific adaptation processes. We analyze Selye׳s axioms of adaptation energy together with Goldstone׳s modifications and propose a series of models for interpretation of these axioms. Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the ‘dominant path’ in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of ‘oscillating death’ and ‘oscillating remission’ are predicted on the base of the dynamical models of adaptation. Natural selection plays a key role in the evolution of mechanisms of physiological adaptation. We use the fitness optimization approach to study of the distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors, during adaptation to a multifactor environment, and analyze the optimal strategies for different systems of factors.

In this work, an international team of researchers, led by Professor Alexander N. Gorban from the University of Leicester, have developed a solution to Selye’s riddle, which has puzzled scientists for almost 80 years.

Alexander N. Gorban, Professor of Applied Mathematics in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Leicester, said: “Nobody can measure adaptation energy directly, indeed, but it can be understood by its place already in simple models. In this work, we develop a hierarchy of top-down models following Selye’s findings and further developments. We trust Selye’s intuition and experiments and use the notion of adaptation energy as a cornerstone in a system of models. We provide a ‘thermodynamic-like’ theory of organism resilience that, just like classical thermodynamics, allows for economics metaphors, such as cost and bankruptcy and, more importantly, is largely independent of a detailed mechanistic explanation of what is ‘going on underneath’.”

Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the “dominant path” in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of “oscillating death” and “oscillating remission,” which have been observed in clinic for a long time, are predicted on the basis of the dynamical models of adaptation. The models, based on Selye’s idea of adaptation energy, demonstrate that the oscillating remission and oscillating death do not need exogenous reasons. The developed theory of adaptation to various factors gives the instrument for the early anticipation of crises.

Professor Alessandro Giuliani from Istituto Superiore di Sanità in Rome commented on the work, saying: “Gorban and his colleagues dare to make science adopting the thermodynamics style: they look for powerful principles endowed with predictive ability in the real world before knowing the microscopic details. This is, in my opinion, the only possible way out from the actual repeatability crisis of mainstream biology, where a fantastic knowledge of the details totally fails to predict anything outside the test tube.1

Citation: Alexander N. Gorban, Tatiana A. Tyukina, Elena V. Smirnova, Lyudmila I. Pokidysheva. Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 2016; DOI:10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.12.017. Voosen P. (2015) Amid a Sea of False Findings NIH tries Reform, The Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Occupational Therapy

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

Definition of Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy is a client-centred health profession concerned with promoting health and well being through occupation. The primary goal of occupational therapy is to enable people to participate in the activities of everyday life. Occupational therapists achieve this outcome by working with people and communities to enhance their ability to engage in the occupations they want to, need to, or are expected to do, or by modifying the occupation or the environment to better support their occupational engagement.(WFOT 2012)

Read the Statement on Occupational Therapy

In occupational therapy, occupations refer to the everyday activities that people do as individuals, in families and with communities to occupy time and bring meaning and purpose to life. Occupations include things people need to, want to and are expected to do.

Definition of Occupational Therapy Practice for the AOTA Model Practice Act

http://www.aota.org/-/media/Corporate/Files/Advocacy/State/Resources/PracticeAct/Model%20Definition%20of%20OT%20Practice%20%20Adopted%2041411.ashx

The practice of occupational therapy means the therapeutic use of occupations, including everyday life activities with individuals, groups, populations, or organizations to support participation, performance, and function in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for habilitation, rehabilitation, and the promotion of health and wellness to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory-perceptual, and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts and environments to support engagement in occupations that affect physical and mental health, well-being, and quality of life. The practice of occupational therapy includes:

A. Evaluation of factors affecting activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

1. Client factors, including body functions (such as neuromusculoskeletal, sensory-perceptual, visual, mental, cognitive, and pain factors) and body structures (such as cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, integumentary, genitourinary systems, and structures related to movement), values, beliefs, and spirituality.

2. Habits, routines, roles, rituals, and behavior patterns.

3. Physical and social environments, cultural, personal, temporal, and virtual contexts and activity demands that affect performance.

4. Performance skills, including motor and praxis, sensory-perceptual, emotional regulation, cognitive, communication and social skills.

B. Methods or approaches selected to direct the process of interventions such as:

1. Establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed, is impaired, or is in decline.

2. Compensation, modification, or adaptation of activity or environment to enhance performance, or to prevent injuries, disorders, or other conditions.

3. Retention and enhancement of skills or abilities without which performance in everyday life activities would decline.

4. Promotion of health and wellness, including the use of self-management strategies, to enable or enhance performance in everyday life activities.

5. Prevention of barriers to performance and participation, including injury and disability prevention.

C. Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

1. Therapeutic use of occupations, exercises, and activities.

2. Training in self-care, self-management, health management and maintenance, home management, community/work reintegration, and school activities and work performance.

3. Development, remediation, or compensation of neuromusculoskeletal, sensory-perceptual, visual, mental, and cognitive functions, pain tolerance and management, and behavioral skills.

4. Therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process.

5. Education and training of individuals, including family members, caregivers, groups, populations, and others.

6. Care coordination, case management, and transition services.

7. Consultative services to groups, programs, organizations, or communities.

8. Modification of environments (home, work, school, or community) and adaptation of processes, including the application of ergonomic principles.

9. Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in seating and positioning, assistive technology, adaptive devices, and orthotic devices, and training in the use of prosthetic devices.

10. Assessment, recommendation, and training in techniques to enhance functional mobility, including management of wheelchairs and other mobility devices.

11. Low vision rehabilitation.

12. Driver rehabilitation and community mobility.

13. Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance.

14. Application of physical agent modalities, and use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures (such as wound care management; interventions to enhance sensory-perceptual, and cognitive processing; and manual therapy) to enhance performance skills.

15. Facilitating the occupational performance of groups, populations, or organizations through the modification of environments and the adaptation of processes.

Adopted by the Representative Assembly 4/14/11 (Agenda A13, Charge 18)

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Pain Management

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

Pain Management Health Center

http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/

 

Pain Management Overview

Pain management is important for ongoing pain control, especially if you suffer with long-term or chronic pain. After getting a pain assessment, your doctor can prescribe pain medicine, other pain treatments, or psychotherapy to help with pain relief.

Nearly any part of your body is vulnerable to pain. Acute pain warns us that something may be wrong. Chronic pain can rob us of our daily life, making it difficult and even unbearable. Many people with chronic pain can be helped by understanding the causes, symptoms, and treatments for pain – and how to cope with the frustrations.

You know your pain better than anyone — and as hard as it’s been to handle it, your experience holds the key to making a plan to treat it.

Each person and their pain are unique. The best way to manage your case could be very different from what works for someone else. Your treatment will depend upon things such as:

  • The cause
  • How intense it is
  • How long it’s lasted
  • What makes it worse or better

It can be a process to find your best plan. You can try a combination of things and then report back to your doctor about how your pain is doing. Together, you can tweak your program based on what’s working and what needs more help.

All Pain Is Not the Same

In order to make your pain management plan, your doctor will first consider whether you have sudden (“acute”) or long-term (“chronic”) pain.

Acute pain starts suddenly and usually feels sharp. Broken bones, burns, or cuts are classic examples. So is pain after surgery or giving birth.

Acute pain may be mild and last just a moment. Or it may be severe and last for weeks or months. In most cases, acute pain does not last longer than 6 months, and it stops when its underlying cause has been treated or has healed.

If the problem that causes short-term pain isn’t treated, it may lead to long-term, or “chronic” pain.

Chronic pain lasts longer than 3 months, often despite the fact that an injury has healed. It could even last for years. Some examples include:

  • Headache
  • Low back pain
  • Cancer pain
  • Arthritis pain
  • Pain caused by nerve damage

It can cause tense muscles, problems with moving, a lack of energy, and changes in appetite. It can also affect your emotions. Some people feel depressed, angry, or anxious about the pain and injury coming back.

Chronic pain doesn’t always have an obvious physical cause.

What Can I Do to Feel Better?

1. Keep moving. You might think it’s best to rest on the sidelines. But being active is a good idea. You’ll get stronger and move better.

The key is knowing what’s OK for you to do to get stronger and challenge your body, without doing too much, too soon.

Your doctor can let you know what changes to make. For instance, if you used to run and your joints can’t take that now because you have a chronic condition like osteoarthritis, you might be able to switch to something like biking or swimming.

2. Physical and occupational therapy. Take your recovery to the next level with these treatments. In PT, you’ll focus on the exact muscles you need to strengthen, stretch, and recover from injury. Your doctor may also recommend “occupational therapy,” which focuses on how to do specific tasks, like walking up and down stairs, opening a jar, or getting in and out of a car, with less pain.

3. Counseling. If pain gets you down, reach out. A counselor can help you get back to feeling like yourself again. You can say anything, set goals, and get support. Even a few sessions are a good idea. Look for a counselor who does “cognitive behavioral therapy,” in which you learn ways that your thinking can support you as you work toward solutions.

4. Massage therapy. It’s not a cure, but it can help you feel better temporarily and ease tension in your muscles. Ask your doctor or physical therapist to recommend a massage therapist. At your first appointment, tell them about the pain you have. And be sure to let them know if the massage feels too intense.

5. Relaxation. Meditation and deep breathing are two techniques to try. You could also picture a peaceful scene, do some gentle stretching, or listen to music you love. Another technique is to scan your body slowly in your mind, and consciously try to relax each part of your body, one by one, from head to toe. Any healthy activity that helps you unwind is good for you and can help you feel better prepared to manage your pain.

6. Consider complementary treatments such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and spinal manipulation. In acupuncture, a trained practitioner briefly inserts very thin needles in certain places on your skin to tap into your “chi,” which is an inner energy noted in traditional Chinese medicine. It doesn’t hurt.

Biofeedback trains you to control how your body responds to pain. In a session of it, you’ll wear electrodes hooked up to a machine that tracks your heart rate, breathing, and skin temperature, so you can see the results.

When you get spinal manipulation, a medical professional uses their hands or a device to adjust your spine so that you can move better and have less pain. Some MDs do this. So do chiropractors, osteopathic doctors (they have “DO” after their name instead of “MD”), and some physical therapists.

Are There Devices That Help?

Although there are no products that take pain away completely, there are some that you and your doctor could consider.

TENS and ultrasound. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, or TENS, uses a device to send an electric current to the skin over the area where you have pain. Ultrasound sends sound waves to the places you have pain. Both may offer relief by blocking the pain messages sent to your brain.

Spinal cord stimulation. An implanted device delivers low-voltage electricity to the spine to block pain.  If your doctor thinks it’s an option, you would use it for a trial period before you get surgery to have it permanently implanted. In most cases, you can go home the same day as the procedure.

What About Medicine?

Your doctor will consider what’s causing your pain, how long you’ve had it, how intense it is, and what medications will help. They may recommend one or more of the following:

These may include over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen. Or you may need stronger medications that require a prescription, such as steroids, morphine, codeine, or anesthesia.

Some are pills or tablets. Others are shots. There are also sprays or lotions that go on your skin.

Other drugs, like muscle relaxers and some antidepressants, are also used for pain. Some people may need anesthetic drugs to block pain.

Will I Need Surgery?

It depends on why you’re in pain. If you’ve had a sudden injury or accident, you might need surgery right away.

But if you have chronic pain, you may or may not need an operation or another procedure, such as a nerve block (done with anesthetics or other types of prescription drugs to halt pain signals) or a spinal injection (such as a shot of cortisone or an anesthetic drug).

Talk with your doctor about what results you can expect and any side effects, so you can weigh the risks and the benefits. Also ask how many times the doctor has done the procedure they recommend and what their patients have said about how much relief they’ve gotten.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD on September 20, 2015

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Advances in acoustics and in learning

Larry H. Brnstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

Controlling acoustic properties with algorithms and computational methods

http://www.kurzweilai.net/controlling-acoustic-properties-with-algorithms-and-computational-methods

October 28, 2015

Computer scientists at Columbia Engineering, Harvard, and MIT have demonstrated that acoustic properties — both sound and vibration — can be controlled by 3D-printing specific shapes.

They designed an optimization algorithm and used computational methods and digital fabrication to alter the shape of 2D and 3D objects, creating what looks to be a simple children’s musical instrument — a xylophone with keys in the shape of zoo animals.

Practical uses

“Our discovery could lead to a wealth of possibilities that go well beyond musical instruments,” says Changxi Zheng, assistant professor of computer science at Columbia Engineering, who led the research team.

“Our algorithm could lead to ways to build less noisy computer fans and bridges that don’t amplify vibrations under stress, and advance the construction of micro-electro-mechanical resonators whose vibration modes are of great importance.”

Zheng, who works in the area of dynamic, physics-based computational sound for immersive environments, wanted to see if he could use computation and digital fabrication to actively control the acoustical property, or vibration, of an object.

Zheng’s team decided to focus on simplifying the slow, complicated, manual process of designing “idiophones” — musical instruments that produce sounds through vibrations in the instrument itself, not through strings or reeds.

The surface vibration and resulting sounds depend on the idiophone’s shape in a complex way, so designing the shapes to obtain desired sound characteristics is not straightforward, and their forms have so far been limited to well-understood designs such as bars that are tuned by careful drilling of dimples on the underside of the instrument.

Optimizing sound properties

To demonstrate their new technique, the team settled on building a “zoolophone,” a metallophone with playful animal shapes (a metallophone is an idiophone made of tuned metal bars that can be struck to make sound, such as a glockenspiel).

 

What happens in the brain when we learn

http://www.kurzweilai.net/what-happens-in-the-brain-when-we-learn

Findings could enhance teaching methods and lead to treatments for cognitive problems
October 28, 2015

A Johns Hopkins University-led research team has proven a working theory that explains what happens in the brain when we learn, as described in the current issue of the journal Neuron.

More than a century ago, Pavlov figured out that dogs fed after hearing a bell eventually began to salivate when they heard the bell ring. The team looked into the question of how Pavlov’s dogs (in “classical conditioning”) managed to associate an action with a delayed reward to create knowledge. For decades, scientists had a working theory of how it happened, but the team is now the first to prove it.

“If you’re trying to train a dog to sit, the initial neural stimuli, the command, is gone almost instantly — it lasts as long as the word sit,” said neuroscientist Alfredo Kirkwood, a professor with the university’s Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute. “Before the reward comes, the dog’s brain has already turned to other things. The mystery was, ‘How does the brain link an action that’s over in a fraction of a second with a reward that doesn’t come until much later?’ ”

Eligibility traces

The working theory — which Kirkwood’s team has now validated experimentally — is that invisible “synaptic eligibility traces” effectively tag the synapses activated by the stimuli so that the learning can be cemented with the arrival of a reward. The reward is a neuromodulator* (neurochemical) that floods the dog’s brain with “good feelings.” Though the brain has long since processed the “sit” command, eligibility traces in the synapse respond to the neuromodulators, prompting a lasting synaptic change, a.k.a. “learning.”

The team was able to prove the eligibility-traces theory by isolating cells in the visual cortex of a mouse. When they stimulated the axon of one cell with an electrical impulse, they sparked a response in another cell. By doing this repeatedly, they mimicked the synaptic response between two cells as they process a stimulus and create an eligibility trace.

When the researchers later flooded the cells with neuromodulators, simulating the arrival of a delayed reward, the response between the cells strengthened (“long-term potentiation”) or weakened (“long-term depression”), showing that the cells had “learned” and were able to do so because of the eligibility trace.

“This is the basis of how we learn things through reward,” Kirkwood said, “a fundamental aspect of learning.”

In addition to a greater understanding of the mechanics of learning, these findings could enhance teaching methods and lead to treatments for cognitive problems, the researchers suggest.

Scientists at the University of Texas at Houston and the University of California, Davis were also involved in the research, which was supported by grants from JHU’s Science of Learning Institute and National Institutes of Health.

* The neuromodulators tested were norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, and acetylcholine, all of which have been implicated in cortical plasticity (ability to grow and form new connections to other neurons).


Abstract of Distinct Eligibility Traces for LTP and LTD in Cortical Synapses

In reward-based learning, synaptic modifications depend on a brief stimulus and a temporally delayed reward, which poses the question of how synaptic activity patterns associate with a delayed reward. A theoretical solution to this so-called distal reward problem has been the notion of activity-generated “synaptic eligibility traces,” silent and transient synaptic tags that can be converted into long-term changes in synaptic strength by reward-linked neuromodulators. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of eligibility traces in cortical synapses. We demonstrate the Hebbian induction of distinct traces for LTP and LTD and their subsequent timing-dependent transformation into lasting changes by specific monoaminergic receptors anchored to postsynaptic proteins. Notably, the temporal properties of these transient traces allow stable learning in a recurrent neural network that accurately predicts the timing of the reward, further validating the induction and transformation of eligibility traces for LTP and LTD as a plausible synaptic substrate for reward-based learning.

 

Holographic sonic tractor beam lifts and moves objects using soundwaves

Another science-fiction idea realized
October 27, 2015

British researchers have built a working Star-Trek-style “tractor beam” — a device that can attract or repel one object to another from a distance. It uses high-amplitude soundwaves to generate an acoustic hologram that can grasp and move small objects.

The technique, published in an open-access paper in Nature Communications October 27, has a wide range of potential applications, the researchers say. A sonic production line could transport delicate objects and assemble them, all without physical contact. Or a miniature version could grip and transport drug capsules or microsurgical instruments through living tissue.

The device was developed at the Universities of Sussex and Bristol in collaboration with Ultrahaptics.

https://youtu.be/wDzhlW-rKvM
University of Sussex | Levitation using sound waves

The researchers used an array of 64 miniature loudspeakers. The whole system consumes just 9 Watts of power, used to create high-pitched (40Khz), high-intensity sound waves to levitate a spherical bead 4mm in diameter made of expanded polystyrene.

The tractor beam works by surrounding the object with high-intensity sound to create a force field that keeps the objects in place. By carefully controlling the output of the loudspeakers, the object can be held in place, moved, or rotated.

Three different shapes of acoustic force fields work as tractor beams: an acoustic force field that resembles a pair of fingers or tweezers; an acoustic vortex, the objects becoming trapped at the core; and a high-intensity “cage” that surrounds the objects and holds them in place from all directions.

Previous attempts surrounded the object with loudspeakers, which limits the extent of movement and restricts many applications. Last year, the University of Dundee presented the concept of a tractor beam, but no objects were held in the ray.

The team is now designing different variations of this system. A bigger version aims at levitating a soccer ball from 10 meters away and a smaller version aims at manipulating particles inside the human body.

https://youtu.be/g_EM1y4MKSc
Asier Marzo, Matt Sutton, Bruce Drinkwater and Sriram Subramanian | Acoustic holograms are projected from a flat surface and contrary to traditional holograms, they exert considerable forces on the objects contained within. The acoustic holograms can be updated in real time to translate, rotate and combine levitated particles enabling unprecedented contactless manipulators such as tractor beams.


Abstract of Holographic acoustic elements for manipulation of levitated objects

Sound can levitate objects of different sizes and materials through air, water and tissue. This allows us to manipulate cells, liquids, compounds or living things without touching or contaminating them. However, acoustic levitation has required the targets to be enclosed with acoustic elements or had limited maneuverability. Here we optimize the phases used to drive an ultrasonic phased array and show that acoustic levitation can be employed to translate, rotate and manipulate particles using even a single-sided emitter. Furthermore, we introduce the holographic acoustic elements framework that permits the rapid generation of traps and provides a bridge between optical and acoustical trapping. Acoustic structures shaped as tweezers, twisters or bottles emerge as the optimum mechanisms for tractor beams or containerless transportation. Single-beam levitation could manipulate particles inside our body for applications in targeted drug delivery or acoustically controlled micro-machines that do not interfere with magnetic resonance imaging.

 

A drug-delivery technique to bypass the blood-brain barrier

http://www.kurzweilai.net/a-drug-delivery-technique-to-bypass-the-blood-brain-barrier

Could benefit a large population of patients with neurodegenerative disorders
October 26, 2015

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Boston University have developed a new technique to deliver drugs across the blood-brain barrier and have successfully tested it in a Parkinson’s mouse model (a line of mice that has been genetically modified to express the symptoms and pathological features of Parkinson’s to various extents).

Their findings, published in the journal Neurosurgery, lend hope to patients with neurological conditions that are difficult to treat due to a barrier mechanism that prevents approximately 98 percent of drugs from reaching the brain and central nervous system.

“Although we are currently looking at neurodegenerative disease, there is potential for the technology to be expanded to psychiatric diseases, chronic pain, seizure disorders, and many other conditions affecting the brain and nervous system down the road,” said senior author Benjamin S. Bleier, M.D., of the department of otolaryngology at Mass. Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School.

The nasal mucosal grafting solution

Researchers delivered glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a therapeutic protein in testing for treating Parkinson’s disease, to the brains of mice. They showed that their delivery method was equivalent to direct injection of GDNF, which has been shown to delay and even reverse disease progression of Parkinson’s disease in pre-clinical models.

Once they have finished the treatment, they use adjacent nasal lining to rebuild the hole in a permanent and safe way. Nasal mucosal grafting is a technique regularly used in the ENT (ear, nose, and throat) field to reconstruct the barrier around the brain after surgery to the skull base. ENT surgeons commonly use endoscopic approaches to remove brain tumors through the nose by making a window through the blood-brain barrier to access the brain.

The safety and efficacy of these methods have been well established through long-term clinical outcomes studies in the field, with the nasal lining protecting the brain from infection just as the blood brain barrier has done.

By functionally replacing a section of the blood-brain barrier with nasal mucosa, which is more than 1,000 times more permeable than the native barrier, surgeons could create a “screen door” to allow for drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system.

The technique has the potential to benefit a large population of patients with neurodegenerative disorders, where there is still a specific unmet need for blood-brain-penetrating therapeutic delivery strategies.

The study was funded by The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF).


Abstract of Heterotopic Mucosal Grafting Enables the Delivery of Therapeutic Neuropeptides Across the Blood Brain Barrier

BACKGROUND: The blood-brain barrier represents a fundamental limitation in treating neurological disease because it prevents all neuropeptides from reaching the central nervous system (CNS). Currently, there is no efficient method to permanently bypass the blood-brain barrier.

OBJECTIVE: To test the feasibility of using nasal mucosal graft reconstruction of arachnoid defects to deliver glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for the treatment of Parkinson disease in a mouse model.

METHODS: The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approved this study in an established murine 6-hydroxydopamine Parkinson disease model. A parietal craniotomy and arachnoid defect was repaired with a heterotopic donor mucosal graft. The therapeutic efficacy of GDNF (2 [mu]g/mL) delivered through the mucosal graft was compared with direct intrastriatal GDNF injection (2 [mu]g/mL) and saline control through the use of 2 behavioral assays (rotarod and apomorphine rotation). An immunohistological analysis was further used to compare the relative preservation of substantia nigra cell bodies between treatment groups.

RESULTS: Transmucosal GDNF was equivalent to direct intrastriatal injection at preserving motor function at week 7 in both the rotarod and apomorphine rotation behavioral assays. Similarly, both transmucosal and intrastriatal GDNF demonstrated an equivalent ratio of preserved substantia nigra cell bodies (0.79 +/- 0.14 and 0.78 +/- 0.09, respectively, P = NS) compared with the contralateral control side, and both were significantly greater than saline control (0.53 +/- 0.21; P = .01 and P = .03, respectively).

CONCLUSION: Transmucosal delivery of GDNF is equivalent to direct intrastriatal injection at ameliorating the behavioral and immunohistological features of Parkinson disease in a murine model. Mucosal grafting of arachnoid defects is a technique commonly used for endoscopic skull base reconstruction and may represent a novel method to permanently bypass the blood-brain barrier.

 

Creating an artificial sense of touch by electrical stimulation of the brain

http://www.kurzweilai.net/creating-an-artificial-sense-of-touch-by-electrical-stimulation-of-the-brain

DARPA-funded study may lead to building prosthetic limbs for humans using a direct brain-electrode interface to recreate the sense of touch
October 26, 2015

Neuroscientists in a project headed by the University of Chicago have determined some of the specific characteristics of electrical stimuli that should be applied to the brain to produce different sensations in an artificial upper limb intended to restore natural motor control and sensation in amputees.

The research is part of Revolutionizing Prosthetics, a multi-year Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

For this study, the researchers used monkeys, whose sensory systems closely resemble those of humans. They implanted electrodes into the primary somatosensory cortex, the area of the brain that processes touch information from the hand. The animals were trained to perform two perceptual tasks: one in which they detected the presence of an electrical stimulus, and a second task in which they indicated which of two successive stimuli was more intense.

The sense of touch is made up of a complex and nuanced set of sensations, from contact and pressure to texture, vibration and movement. The goal of the research is to document the range, composition and specific increments of signals that create sensations that feel different from each other.

To achieve that, the researchers manipulated various features of the electrical pulse train, such as its amplitude, frequency, and duration, and noted how the interaction of each of these factors affected the animals’ ability to detect the signal.

Of specific interest were the “just-noticeable differences” (JND),” — the incremental changes needed to produce a sensation that felt different. For instance, at a certain frequency, the signal may be detectable first at a strength of 20 microamps of electricity. If the signal has to be increased to 50 microamps to notice a difference, the JND in that case is 30 microamps.*

“When you grasp an object, for example, you can hold it with different grades of pressure. To recreate a realistic sense of touch, you need to know how many grades of pressure you can convey through electrical stimulation,” said Sliman Bensmaia, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy at the University of Chicago and senior author of the study, which was published today (Oct. 26) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “Ideally, you can have the same dynamic range for artificial touch as you do for natural touch.”

“This study gets us to the point where we can actually create real algorithms that work. It gives us the parameters as to what we can achieve with artificial touch, and brings us one step closer to having human-ready algorithms.”

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and Johns Hopkins University were also involved in the DARPA-supported study.

* The study also has important scientific implications beyond neuroprosthetics. In natural perception, a principle known as Weber’s Law states that the just-noticeable difference between two stimuli is proportional to the size of the stimulus. For example, with a 100-watt light bulb, you might be able to detect a difference in brightness by increasing its power to 110 watts. The JND in that case is 10 watts. According to Weber’s Law, if you double the power of the light bulb to 200 watts, the JND would also be doubled to 20 watts.

However, Bensmaia’s research shows that with electrical stimulation of the brain, Weber’s Law does not apply — the JND remains nearly constant, no matter the size of the stimulus. This means that the brain responds to electrical stimulation in a much more repeatable, consistent way than through natural stimulation.

“It shows that there is something fundamentally different about the way the brain responds to electrical stimulation than it does to natural stimulation,” Bensmaia said.


Abstract of Behavioral assessment of sensitivity to intracortical microstimulation of primate somatosensory cortex

Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) is a powerful tool to investigate the functional role of neural circuits and may provide a means to restore sensation for patients for whom peripheral stimulation is not an option. In a series of psychophysical experiments with nonhuman primates, we investigate how stimulation parameters affect behavioral sensitivity to ICMS. Specifically, we deliver ICMS to primary somatosensory cortex through chronically implanted electrode arrays across a wide range of stimulation regimes. First, we investigate how the detectability of ICMS depends on stimulation parameters, including pulse width, frequency, amplitude, and pulse train duration. Then, we characterize the degree to which ICMS pulse trains that differ in amplitude lead to discriminable percepts across the range of perceptible and safe amplitudes. We also investigate how discriminability of pulse amplitude is modulated by other stimulation parameters—namely, frequency and duration. Perceptual judgments obtained across these various conditions will inform the design of stimulation regimes for neuroscience and neuroengineering applications.

references:

  • Sungshin Kim, Thierri Callier, Gregg A. Tabot, Robert A. Gaunt, Francesco V. Tenore, and Sliman J. Bensmaia. Behavioral assessment of sensitivity to intracortical microstimulation of primate somatosensory cortex. PNAS 2015; doi:10.1073/pnas.1509265112

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