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Archive for the ‘Genome Biology’ Category


Koch Institute Immune Engineering Symposium on October 16 & 17, 2017, Kresge, MIT

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Koch Institute Immune Engineering Symposium on October 16 & 17, 2017.

 

Summary: Biological, chemical, and materials engineers are engaged at the forefront of immunology research. At their disposal is an analytical toolkit honed to solve problems in the petrochemical and materials industries, which share the presence of complex reaction networks, and convective and diffusive molecular transport. Powerful synthetic capabilities have also been crafted: binding proteins can be engineered with effectively arbitrary specificity and affinity, and multifunctional nanoparticles and gels have been designed to interact in highly specific fashions with cells and tissues. Fearless pursuit of knowledge and solutions across disciplinary boundaries characterizes this nascent discipline of immune engineering, synergizing with immunologists and clinicians to put immunotherapy into practice.

SPEAKERS:

Michael Birnbaum – MIT, Koch Institute

Arup Chakraborty – MIT, Insititute for Medical Engineering & Sciences

Jianzhu Chen – MIT, Koch Institute

Jennifer R. Cochran – Stanford University

Jennifer Elisseeff – Johns Hopkins University

K. Christopher Garcia – Stanford University

George Georgiou – University of Texas at Austin

Darrell Irvine – MIT, Koch Institute

Tyler Jacks – MIT, Koch Institute

Doug Lauffenburger – MIT, Biological Engineering and Koch Institute

Wendell Lim – University of California, San Francisco

Harvey Lodish – Whitehead Institute and Koch Institute

Marcela Maus – Massachusetts General Hospital

Garry P. Nolan – Stanford University

Sai Reddy – ETH Zurich

Nicholas Restifo – National Cancer Institute

William Schief – The Scripps Research Institute

Stefani Spranger – MIT, Koch Institute

Susan Napier Thomas – Georgia Institute of Technology

Laura Walker – Adimab, LLC

Jennifer Wargo – MD Anderson Cancer Center

Dane Wittrup – MIT, Koch Institute

Kai Wucherpfennig – Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Please contact ki-events@mit.edu with any questions.

SOURCE

From: Koch Institute Immune Engineering Symposium <ki-events@mit.edu>

Reply-To: <ki-events@mit.edu>

Date: Friday, September 8, 2017 at 9:06 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Reminder – Register Today

 

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Emerging STAR in Molecular Biology, Synthetic Virology and Genomics: Clodagh C. O’Shea: ChromEMT – Visualizing 3D chromatin structure

 

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

On 8/28/2017, I attend and covered in REAL TIME the CHI’s 5th Immune Oncology Summit – Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy, August 28-29, 2017 Sheraton Boston Hotel | Boston, MA

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/08/28/live-828-chis-5th-immune-oncology-summit-oncolytic-virus-immunotherapy-august-28-29-2017-sheraton-boston-hotel-boston-ma/

 

I covered in REAL TIME this event and Clodagh C. O’Shea talk at the conference.

On that evening, I e-mailed my team that

“I believe that Clodagh C. O’Shea will get the Nobel Prizebefore CRISPR

 

11:00 Synthetic Virology: Modular Assembly of Designer Viruses for Cancer Therapy

Clodagh_OShea

Clodagh O’Shea, Ph.D., Howard Hughes Medical Institute Faculty Scholar; Associate Professor, William Scandling Developmental Chair, Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Design is the ultimate test of understanding. For oncolytic therapies to achieve their potential, we need a deep mechanistic understanding of virus and tumor biology together with the ability to confer new properties.

To achieve this, we have developed

  • combinatorial modular genome assembly (ADsembly) platforms,
  • orthogonal capsid functionalization technologies (RapAd) and
  • replication assays that have enabled the rational design, directed evolution, systematic assembly and screening of powerful new vectors and oncolytic viruses.

 

Clodagh O’Shea’s Talk In Real Time:

  • Future Cancer therapies to be sophisticated as Cancer is
  • Targer suppresor pathways (Rb/p53)
  • OV are safe their efficacy ishas been limited
  • MOA: Specify Oncolytic Viral Replication in Tumor cells Attenuate – lack of potency
  • SOLUTIONS: Assembly: Assmble personalized V Tx fro libraries of functional parts
  • Adenovirus – natural & clinical advantages
  • Strategy: Technology for Assmbling Novel Adenovirus Genomes using Modular Genomic Parts
  • E1 module: Inactives Rb & p53
  • core module:
  • E3 Module Immune Evasion Tissue targeting
  • E4 Module Activates E2F (transcription factor TDP1/2), PI3K
  • Adenovirus promoters for Cellular viral replication — Tumor Selective Replication: Novel Viruses Selective Replicate in RB/p16
  • Engineering Viruses to overcome tumor heterogeneity
  • Target multiple & Specific Tumor Cel Receptors – RapAd Technology allows Re-targeting anti Rapamycin – induced targeting of adenovirus
  • Virus Genome: FKBP-fusion FRB-Fiber
  • Engineer Adenovirus Caspids that prevent Liver uptake and Sequestration – Natural Ad5 Therapies 
  • Solution: AdSyn335 Lead candidat AdSyn335 Viruses targeting multiple cells
  • Engineering Mutations that enhanced potency
  • Novel Vector: Homes and targets
  • Genetically engineered PDX1 – for Pancreatic Cancer Stroma: Early and Late Stage
On Twitter:

Engineer Adenovirus Caspids prevent Liver uptake and Sequestration – Natural Ad5 Therapies C. O’Shea, HHDI

Scientist’s Profile: Clodagh C. O’Shea

http://www.salk.edu/scientist/clodagh-oshea/

EDUCATION

BS, Biochemistry and Microbiology, University College Cork, Ireland
PhD, Imperial College London/Imperial Cancer Research Fund, U.K.
Postdoctoral Fellow, UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, U.S.A

VIDEOS

http://www.salk.edu/scientist/clodagh-oshea/videos/

O’Shea Lab @Salk

http://oshea.salk.edu/

AWARDS & HONORS

  • 2016 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Faculty Scholar
  • 2014 W. M. Keck Medical Research Program Award
  • 2014 Rose Hills Fellow
  • 2011Science/NSF International Science & Visualization Challenge, People’s Choice
  • 2011 Anna Fuller Award for Cancer Research
  • 2010, 2011, 2012 Kavli Frontiers Fellow, National Academy of Sciences
  • 2009 Sontag Distinguished Scientist Award
  • 2009 American Cancer Society Research Scholar Award
  • 2008 ACGT Young Investigator Award for Cancer Gene Therapy
  • 2008 Arnold and Mabel Beckman Young Investigator Award
  • 2008 William Scandling Assistant Professor, Developmental Chair
  • 2007 Emerald Foundation Schola

READ 

Clodagh C. O’Shea: ChromEMT: Visualizing 3D chromatin structure and compaction in interphase and mitotic cells | Science

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/357/6349/eaag0025

and 

https://www.readbyqxmd.com/keyword/93030

Clodagh C. O’Shea

In Press

Jul 27, 2017 – Salk scientists solve longstanding biological mystery of DNA organization

Sep 22, 2016 – Clodagh O’Shea named HHMI Faculty Scholar for groundbreaking work in designing synthetic viruses to destroy cancer

Oct 05, 2015 – Clodagh O’Shea awarded $3 million to unlock the “black box” of the nucleus

Aug 27, 2015 – The DNA damage response goes viral: a way in for new cancer treatments

Apr 12, 2013 – Salk Institute promotes three top scientists

Oct 16, 2012 – Cold viruses point the way to new cancer therapies

Aug 25, 2010 – Use the common cold virus to target and disrupt cancer cells?

Oct 22, 2009 – Salk scientist receives The Sontag Foundation’s Distinguished Scientist Award

May 15, 2008 – Salk scientist wins 2008 Beckman Young Investigator Award

Mar 24, 2008 – Salk scientist wins 2007 Young Investigator’s Award in Gene Therapy for Cancer

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Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Transcriptomic Biomarkers to Discriminate Bacterial from Nonbacterial Infection in Adults Hospitalized with Respiratory Illness

Published online: 26 July 2017

URMC Researchers Developing New Tool to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

Goal is to Distinguish Between Viral and Bacterial Infections, Reduce Unnecessary Use of Antibiotics

Friday, July 28, 2017

“It’s extremely difficult to interpret what’s causing a respiratory tract infection, especially in very ill patients who come to the hospital with a high fever, cough, shortness of breath and other concerning symptoms,” said Ann R. Falsey, M.D., lead study author, professor and interim chief of the Infectious Diseases Division at UR Medicine’s Strong Memorial Hospital.

“My goal is to develop a tool that physicians can use to rule out a bacterial infection with enough certainty that they are comfortable, and their patients are comfortable, foregoing an antibiotic.”

Lead researcher Ann Falsey, M.D.

Ann R. Falsey, M.D.

Falsey’s project caught the attention of the federal government; she’s one of 10 semifinalists in the Antimicrobial Resistance Diagnostic Challenge, a competition sponsored by NIH and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority to help combat the development and spread of drug resistant bacteria. Selected from among 74 submissions, Falsey received $50,000 to continue her research and develop a prototype diagnostic test, such as a blood test, using the genetic markers her team identified.

SOURCE

https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/5108/urmc-researchers-developing-new-tool-to-fight-antibiotic-resistance.aspx

Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI)

We enrolled 94 subjects who were microbiologically classified; 53 as “non-bacterial” and 41 as “bacterial”. RNAseq and qPCR confirmed significant differences in mean expression for 10 genes previously identified as discriminatory for bacterial LRTI. A novel dimension reduction strategy selected three pathways (lymphocyte, α-linoleic acid metabolism, IGF regulation) including eleven genes as optimal markers for discriminating bacterial infection (naïve AUC = 0.94; nested CV-AUC = 0.86). Using these genes, we constructed a classifier for bacterial LRTI with 90% (79% CV) sensitivity and 83% (76% CV) specificity. This novel, pathway-based gene set displays promise as a method to distinguish bacterial from nonbacterial LRTI.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-06738-3#Sec8

IMAGE SOURCE

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-06738-3#Sec8

 

SOURCES

http://sciencemission.com/site/index.php?page=news&type=view&id=microbiology-virology%2Fnew-tool-to-distinguish&filter=8%2C9%2C10%2C11%2C12%2C13%2C14%2C16%2C17%2C18%2C19%2C20%2C27&redirected=1&redirected=1

https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/5108/urmc-researchers-developing-new-tool-to-fight-antibiotic-resistance.aspx

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-06738-3

Bacterial or Viral Infection? A New Study May Help Physicians …

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

Series D, VOLUME 2:

Infectious Diseases and Therapeutics

Author, Curator and Editor: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP and CuratorSudipta Saha, PhD

 

Series D, VOLUME 3:

The Immune System and Therapeutics

Author, Curator and Editor: Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/biomed-e-books/series-d-e-books-on-biomedicine/human-immune-system-in-health-and-in-disease/

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SNP-based Study on high BMI exposure confirms CVD and DM Risks – no associations with Stroke

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Genes Affirm: High BMI Carries Weighty Heart, Diabetes Risk – Mendelian randomization study adds to ‘burgeoning evidence’

by Crystal Phend, Senior Associate Editor, MedPage Today, July 05, 2017

 

The “genetically instrumented” measure of high BMI exposure — calculated based on 93 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with BMI in prior genome-wide association studies — was associated with the following risks (odds ratios given per standard deviation higher BMI):

  • Hypertension (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.48-1.83)
  • Coronary heart disease (CHD; OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.09-1.69)
  • Type 2 diabetes (OR 2.53, 95% CI 2.04-3.13)
  • Systolic blood pressure (β 1.65 mm Hg, 95% CI 0.78-2.52 mm Hg)
  • Diastolic blood pressure (β 1.37 mm Hg, 95% CI 0.88-1.85 mm Hg)

However, there were no associations with stroke, Donald Lyall, PhD, of the University of Glasgow, and colleagues reported online in JAMA Cardiology.

The associations independent of age, sex, Townsend deprivation scores, alcohol intake, and smoking history were found in baseline data from 119,859 participants in the population-based U.K. Biobank who had complete medical, sociodemographic, and genetic data.

“The main advantage of an MR approach is that certain types of study bias can be minimized,” the team noted. “Because DNA is stable and randomly inherited, which helps to mitigate errors from reverse causality and confounding, genetic variation can be used as a proxy for lifetime BMI to overcome limitations such as reverse causality and confounding, a process that hampers observational analyses of obesity and its consequences.”

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

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    Etiologies of Cardiovascular Diseases: Epigenetics, Genetics and Genomics

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Breakthroughs: Insights From the Personalized Medicine & Diagnostics Track at the 2017 BIO International Convention

Guest Author: David Davenport, Office Administrator, Personalized Medicine Coalition

 

“Health care today is reactive and costly … anything but personalized … but we are now entering a new era where health care is becoming proactive, preventive, highly personalized and most importantly predictive,” said J. Craig Venter, Ph.D., Founder, President, CEO, J. Craig Venter Institute, during his opening keynote at the Personalized Medicine and Diagnostics Track at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego from June 21 – 22. The track, co-organized by PMC, brought together thought leaders to discuss breakthroughs in advancing personalized medicine. From those conversations several themes emerged:

Complex genetic data require a “knowledge network” to translate into personalized care.

During the session titled The Next Frontier: Navigating Clinical Adoption of Personalized Medicine, moderated by PMC Vice President for Science Policy Daryl Pritchard, Ph.D., panelists discussed how to accelerate the clinical adoption of innovative personalized therapies. Jennifer Levin Carter, M.D., Founder and Chief Medical Officer of N-of-One, a clinical diagnostic testing interpretation service company, explained that as data grows in complexity, there is a growing need for partnerships to efficiently analyze the data and develop effective targeted treatment plans. India Hook-Barnard, Ph.D., Director of Research Strategy, Associate Director of Precision Medicine, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), agreed and discussed the need to build a “knowledge network” that can harness data and expertise to inform provider-patient decision-making.

Discussing how personalized medicine can be integrated into community health centers lacking large research budgets, Lynn Dressler, Dr.P.H., Director of Personalized Medicine and Pharmacogenomics at Mission Health Systems, a rural community health care delivery system in Asheville, North Carolina, discussed the need to better educate physicians and patients as well as the role that a knowledge network could play in providing easy and cost-effective access to diagnostic testing services.

Delivering personalized medicine requires innovative partnerships involving industry, IT companies, providers, payers and the government.

During It’s a Converging World: Innovative Partnerships and Precision Medicine, a panel moderated by Kristin Pothier, Global Head of Life Sciences Strategy, Ernst & Young, discussed the need for “open data” where improved patient care is the shared goal, and how public-private partnerships that address education, evidence development and access to care can help foster personalized medicine.

During a session titled Nevada as a New Model for Population Health Study, Nevada-based health system Renown Health outlined a study in which it partnered with genetic testing company 23andMe to examine whether free access to genetic testing changes participants’ practices in managing their own health and facilitates the utilization of personalized medicine.

In the era of personalized medicine, measuring and delivering value requires a paradigm shift from population-based to individual-based evidence.

Following a discussion on regulatory and reimbursement challenges moderated by Bruce Quinn, M.D., Ph.D., Principal, Bruce Quinn Associates, during which panelists called for the simplification of payment structures to be more consistent, more efficient and more connected to the patient market, a panel moderated by Jennifer Snow, Director of Health Policy at Xcenda, discussed how value assessment frameworks must adapt to consider the value of personalized medicine. During The Whole Picture: Consideration of Personalized Medicine in Value Assessment Frameworks, panelist Mitch Higashi, Ph.D., Vice President, Health Economics and Outcomes Research, U.S., Bristol-Myers Squibb, called for patient-centered definitions of value and advocated for the inclusion of predictive biomarkers in all value frameworks. Donna Cryer, J.D., President, CEO, Global Liver Institute, added that the “patient must be the ultimate ‘arbiter of value’” and urged “transparency” in how value assessment frameworks are used.

Noting that different assessment frameworks have different goals, Roger Longman, CEO, Real Endpoints, called for more dynamic frameworks that allow different stakeholders to “use the same criteria but weigh them differently.” The panel concluded that to advance personalized medicine, value frameworks must be meaningful, practical and predictive for patients; reflect evolving evidence needs like real-world evidence; and consider breakthrough payment structures like bundled payments.

From Promise to Practice: The Way Forward for Personalized Medicine

During the concluding session, Creating a Universal Biomarker Program, moderated by Ian Wright, Owner, Strategic Innovations LLC, on behalf of Cedars-Sinai Precision Health, panelists discussed how to make patients the point of reference for their own care, as opposed to being compared to the “normal” range of population averages in treatment decisions using biomarkers. The speakers concluded that moving in that direction requires providers to establish baselines for each patient, along with tools and metrics to facilitate the approach.

In the words of Donna Cryer, “personalized medicine is the definition of value for a patient.” With the ability to detect diseases before they even express themselves, the promise of personalized medicine has never been greater.

However, changing the health care system to improve patient access to valuable personalized medicines requires innovation and collaboration. As PMC President Edward Abrahams, Ph.D., said during his opening remarks for the track, that change

“doesn’t come easily,” but “breakthrough” discussions like these continue to move us forward.

The complete track agenda can be downloaded here.

 

SOURCE

From: <pmc@personalizedmedicinecoalition.org>

Date: Monday, July 10, 2017 at 10:51 AM

To: Aviva Lev-Ari <AvivaLev-Ari@alum.berkeley.edu>

Subject: Breakthroughs From the 2017 BIO Convention’s PM & Dx Track

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Genomic Diagnostics: Three Techniques to Perform Single Cell Gene Expression and Genome Sequencing Single Molecule DNA Sequencing

Curator: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

This article presents Three Techniques to Perform Single Cell Gene Expression and Genome Sequencing Single molecule DNA sequencing

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Reporter and Curator: Irina Robu, PhD

Monitoring cancer patients and evaluating their response to treatment can sometimes involve invasive procedures, including surgery.

The liquid biopsies have become something of a Holy Grail in cancer treatment among physicians, researchers and companies gambling big on the technology. Liquid biopsies, unlike traditional biopsies involving invasive surgery — rely on an ordinary blood draw. Developments in sequencing the human genome, permitting researchers to detect genetic mutations of cancers, have made the tests conceivable. Some 38 companies in the US alone are working on liquid biopsies by trying to analyze blood for fragments of DNA shed by dying tumor cells.

Premature research on the liquid biopsy has concentrated profoundly on patients with later-stage cancers who have suffered treatments, including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, immunotherapy or drugs that target molecules involved in the growth, progression and spread of cancer. For cancer patients undergoing treatment, liquid biopsies could spare them some of the painful, expensive and risky tissue tumor biopsies and reduce reliance on CT scans. The tests can rapidly evaluate the efficacy of surgery or other treatment, while old-style biopsies and CT scans can still remain inconclusive as a result of scar tissue near the tumor site.

As recently as a few years ago, the liquid biopsies were hardly used except in research. At the moment, thousands of the tests are being used in clinical practices in the United States and abroad, including at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston; the University of California, San Diego; the University of California, San Francisco; the Duke Cancer Institute and several other cancer centers.

With patients for whom physicians cannot get a tissue biopsy, the liquid biopsy could prove a safe and effective alternative that could help determine whether treatment is helping eradicate the cancer. A startup, Miroculus developed a cheap, open source device that can test blood for several types of cancer at once. The platform, called Miriam finds cancer by extracting RNA from blood and spreading it across plates that look at specific type of mRNA. The technology is then hooked up at a smartphone which sends the information to an online database and compares the microRNA found in the patient’s blood to known patterns indicating different type of cancers in the early stage and can reduce unnecessary cancer screenings.

Nevertheless, experts warn that more studies are essential to regulate the accuracy of the test, exactly which cancers it can detect, at what stages and whether it improves care or survival rates.

SOURCE

https://www.fastcompany.com/3037117/a-new-device-can-detect-multiple-types-of-cancer-with-a-single-blood-test

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4356857/

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Publishing Journal include the following:

Liquid Biopsy Chip detects an array of metastatic cancer cell markers in blood – R&D @Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Micro and Nanotechnology Lab

Reporters: Tilda Barliya, PhD and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/12/28/liquid-biopsy-chip-detects-an-array-of-metastatic-cancer-cell-markers-in-blood-rd-worcester-polytechnic-institute-micro-and-nanotechnology-lab/

Liquid Biopsy Assay May Predict Drug Resistance

Curator: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2015/11/06/liquid-biopsy-assay-may-predict-drug-resistance/

One blood sample can be tested for a comprehensive array of cancer cell biomarkers: R&D at WPI

Curator: Marzan Khan, B.Sc

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2017/01/05/one-blood-sample-can-be-tested-for-a-comprehensive-array-of-cancer-cell-biomarkers-rd-wpi

 

 

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