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Archive for the ‘Medical Imaging Technology, Image Processing/Computing, MRI, CT, Nuclear Medicine, Ultra Sound’ Category


Diagnostic and Prognostic value of structural MRI: preliminary evidence of common and specific gray matter changes in Depression and Anxiety patients

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Cortical thickening in the insular cortex, a brain region vital to perception and self-awareness in Patients with

  • Social anxiety disorder (SAD)
  • Major depressive disorder (MDD)

greater cortical thickness may reflect a

  • compensatory mechanism that is related to inflammation or other aspects of the pathophysiology,” she said.
  • greater anterior cingulate cortical thickness could be the result of both the continuous coping efforts and emotion regulation attempts of MDD and SAD patients.”

Image Source: There are significant cortical thickness differences among the three groups. All regions survived clusterwise-correction (p<0.001).(Credit: Radiological Society of North America)

SOURCE

MRI Uncovers Brain Abnormalities in People with Depression and Anxiety

https://www.mdtmag.com/news/2017/11/mri-uncovers-brain-abnormalities-people-depression-and-anxiety?et_cid=6181014&et_rid=461755519&location=top&et_cid=6181014&et_rid=461755519&linkid=https%3a%2f%2fwww.mdtmag.com%2fnews%2f2017%2f11%2fmri-uncovers-brain-abnormalities-people-depression-and-anxiety%3fet_cid%3d6181014%26et_rid%3d%%subscriberid%%%26location%3dtop

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cancerandoncologyseriesccover

Series C: e-Books on Cancer & Oncology

Series C Content Consultant: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP

 

VOLUME ONE 

Cancer Biology and Genomics

for

Disease Diagnosis

2015

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B013RVYR2K

Stephen J. Williams, PhD, Senior Editor

sjwilliamspa@comcast.net

Tilda Barliya, PhD, Editor

tildabarliya@gmail.com

Ritu Saxena, PhD, Editor

ritu.uab@gmail.com

Leaders in Pharmaceutical Business Intelligence 

Part I

Historical Perspective of Cancer Demographics, Etiology, and Progress in Research

Chapter 1:  The Occurrence of Cancer in World Populations

1.1   Understanding Cancer

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

1.2  Cancer Metastasis

Tilda Barliya, PhD

1.3      2013 Perspective on “War on Cancer” on December 23, 1971

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1.4   Global Burden of Cancer Treatment & Women Health: Market Access & Cost Concerns

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1.5    The Importance of Cancer Prevention Programs: New Perspectives for Fighting Cancer

Ziv Raviv, PhD

1.6      The “Cancer establishments” examined by James Watson, co-discoverer of DNA w/Crick, 4/1953,  

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

1.7      New Ecosystem of Cancer Research: Cross Institutional Team Science

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1.8       Cancer Innovations from across the Web

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

1.9         Exploring the role of vitamin C in Cancer therapy

Ritu Saxena PhD

1.10        Relation of Diet and Cancer

Sudipta Saha, PhD

1.11      Association between Non-melanoma Skin Cancer and subsequent Primary Cancers in White Population 

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

1.12       Men With Prostate Cancer More Likely to Die from Other Causes

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

1.13      Battle of Steve Jobs and Ralph Steinman with Pancreatic Cancer: How we Lost

Ritu Saxena, PhD

Chapter 2.  Rapid Scientific Advances Changes Our View on How Cancer Forms

2.1     All Cancer Cells Are Not Created Equal: Some Cell Types Control Continued Tumor Growth, Others Prepare the Way for Metastasis 

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

2.2      Hold on. Mutations in Cancer do Good

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

2.3       Is the Warburg Effect the Cause or the Effect of Cancer: A 21st Century View?

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.4          Naked Mole Rats Cancer-Free

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.5           Zebrafish—Susceptible to Cancer

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.6         Demythologizing Sharks, Cancer, and Shark Fins,

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

2.7       Tumor Cells’ Inner Workings Predict Cancer Progression

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

2.8      In Focus: Identity of Cancer Stem Cells

Ritu Saxena, PhD

2.9      In Focus: Circulating Tumor Cells

Ritu Saxena, PhD

2.10     Rewriting the Mathematics of Tumor Growth; Teams Use Math Models to Sort Drivers from Passengers 

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

2.11     Role of Primary Cilia in Ovarian Cancer

Aashir Awan, PhD

Chapter 3:  A Genetic Basis and Genetic Complexity of Cancer Emerges

3.1       The Binding of Oligonucleotides in DNA and 3-D Lattice Structures

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

3.2      How Mobile Elements in “Junk” DNA Promote Cancer. Part 1: Transposon-mediated Tumorigenesis. 

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

3.3      DNA: One Man’s Trash is another Man’s Treasure, but there is no JUNK after all

Demet Sag, PhD

3.4 Issues of Tumor Heterogeneity

3.4.1    Issues in Personalized Medicine in Cancer: Intratumor Heterogeneity and Branched Evolution Revealed by Multiregion Sequencing

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

3.4.2       Issues in Personalized Medicine: Discussions of Intratumor Heterogeneity from the Oncology Pharma forum on LinkedIn

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

3.5        arrayMap: Genomic Feature Mining of Cancer Entities of Copy Number Abnormalities (CNAs) Data

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

3.6        HBV and HCV-associated Liver Cancer: Important Insights from the Genome

Ritu Saxena, PhD

3.7      Salivary Gland Cancer – Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: Mutation Patterns: Exome- and Genome-Sequencing @ Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

3.8         Gastric Cancer: Whole-genome Reconstruction and Mutational Signatures

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

3.9        Missing Gene may Drive more than a quarter of Breast Cancers

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

3.10     Critical Gene in Calcium Reabsorption: Variants in the KCNJ and SLC12A1 genes – Calcium Intake and Cancer Protection

Aviva Lev-Ari,PhD, RN

Chapter 4: How Epigenetic and Metabolic Factors Affect Tumor Growth

4.1    Epigenetics

4.1.1     The Magic of the Pandora’s Box : Epigenetics and Stemness with Long non-coding RNAs (lincRNA)

Demet Sag, PhD, CRA, GCP

4.1.2     Stomach Cancer Subtypes Methylation-based identified by Singapore-Led Team

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

4.1.3     The Underappreciated EpiGenome

Demet Sag, Ph.D., CRA, GCP

4.1.4     Differentiation Therapy – Epigenetics Tackles Solid Tumors

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

4.1.5      “The SILENCE of the Lambs” Introducing The Power of Uncoded RNA

Demet Sag, Ph.D., CRA, GCP

4.1.6      DNA Methyltransferases – Implications to Epigenetic Regulation and Cancer Therapy Targeting: James Shen, PhD

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

4.2   Metabolism

4.2.1      Mitochondria and Cancer: An overview of mechanisms

Ritu Saxena, PhD

4.2.2     Bioenergetic Mechanism: The Inverse Association of Cancer and Alzheimer’s

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

4.2.3      Crucial role of Nitric Oxide in Cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

4.2.4      Nitric Oxide Mitigates Sensitivity of Melanoma Cells to Cisplatin

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

4.2.5      Increased risks of obesity and cancer, Decreased risk of type 2 diabetes: The role of Tumor-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN)

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

4.2.6      Lipid Profile, Saturated Fats, Raman Spectrosopy, Cancer Cytology

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

4.3     Other Factors Affecting Tumor Growth

4.3.1      Squeezing Ovarian Cancer Cells to Predict Metastatic Potential: Cell Stiffness as Possible Biomarker

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

4.3.2      Prostate Cancer: Androgen-driven “Pathomechanism” in Early-onset Forms of the Disease

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Chapter 5: Advances in Breast and Gastrointestinal Cancer Research Supports Hope for Cure

5.1 Breast Cancer

5.1.1      Cell Movement Provides Clues to Aggressive Breast Cancer

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

5.1.2    Identifying Aggressive Breast Cancers by Interpreting the Mathematical Patterns in the Cancer Genome

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

5.1.3  Mechanism involved in Breast Cancer Cell Growth: Function in Early Detection & Treatment

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

5.1.4       BRCA1 a tumour suppressor in breast and ovarian cancer – functions in transcription, ubiquitination and DNA repair

Sudipta Saha, PhD

5.1.5      Breast Cancer and Mitochondrial Mutations

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

5.1.6      MIT Scientists Identified Gene that Controls Aggressiveness in Breast Cancer Cells

Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN

5.1.7       “The Molecular pathology of Breast Cancer Progression”

Tilda Barliya, PhD

5.1.8       In focus: Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

5.1.9       Automated Breast Ultrasound System (‘ABUS’) for full breast scanning: The beginning of structuring a solution for an acute need!

Dror Nir, PhD

5.1.10       State of the art in oncologic imaging of breast.

Dror Nir, PhD

 

5.2 Gastrointestinal Cancer

5.2.1         Colon Cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

5.2.2      PIK3CA mutation in Colorectal Cancer may serve as a Predictive Molecular Biomarker for adjuvant Aspirin therapy

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

5.2.3     State of the art in oncologic imaging of colorectal cancers.

Dror Nir, PhD

5.2.4     Pancreatic Cancer: Genetics, Genomics and Immunotherapy

Tilda Barliya, PhD

5.2.5     Pancreatic cancer genomes: Axon guidance pathway genes – aberrations revealed

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Part II

Advent of Translational Medicine, “omics”, and Personalized Medicine Ushers in New Paradigms in Cancer Treatment and Advances in Drug Development

Chapter 6:  Treatment Strategies

6.1 Marketed and Novel Drugs

Breast Cancer                                   

6.1.1     Treatment for Metastatic HER2 Breast Cancer

Larry H Bernstein MD, FCAP

6.1.2          Aspirin a Day Tied to Lower Cancer Mortality

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

6.1.3       New Anti-Cancer Drug Developed

Prabodh Kandala, Ph.D.

6.1.4         Pfizer’s Kidney Cancer Drug Sutent Effectively caused REMISSION to Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Aviva Lev-Ari ,PhD, RN

6.1.5     “To Die or Not To Die” – Time and Order of Combination drugs for Triple Negative Breast Cancer cells: A Systems Level Analysis

Anamika Sarkar, PhD. and Ritu Saxena, PhD

Melanoma

6.1.6    “Thymosin alpha1 and melanoma”

Tilda Barliya, PhD

Leukemia

6.1.7    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Bone Marrow Transplantation

Tilda Barliya PhD

6.2 Natural agents

Prostate Cancer                 

6.2.1      Scientists use natural agents for prostate cancer bone metastasis treatment

Ritu Saxena, PhD

Breast Cancer

6.2.2        Marijuana Compound Shows Promise In Fighting Breast Cancer

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Ovarian Cancer                  

6.2.3        Dimming ovarian cancer growth

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

6.3 Potential Therapeutic Agents

Gastric Cancer                 

6.3.1       β Integrin emerges as an important player in mitochondrial dysfunction associated Gastric Cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

6.3.2      Arthritis, Cancer: New Screening Technique Yields Elusive Compounds to Block Immune-Regulating Enzyme

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Pancreatic Cancer                                   

6.3.3    Usp9x: Promising therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

Breast Cancer                 

6.3.4       Breast Cancer, drug resistance, and biopharmaceutical targets

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Prostate Cancer

6.3.5        Prostate Cancer Cells: Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Induce Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

Glioblastoma

6.3.6      Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA) as a Therapeutic tool in the Management of Glioblastoma

Raphael Nir, PhD, MSM, MSc

6.3.7   Akt inhibition for cancer treatment, where do we stand today?

Ziv Raviv, PhD

Chapter 7:  Personalized Medicine and Targeted Therapy

7.1.1        Harnessing Personalized Medicine for Cancer Management, Prospects of Prevention and Cure: Opinions of Cancer Scientific Leaders

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.1.2      Personalized medicine-based cure for cancer might not be far away

Ritu Saxena, PhD

7.1.3      Personalized medicine gearing up to tackle cancer

Ritu Saxena, PhD

7.1.4       Cancer Screening at Sourasky Medical Center Cancer Prevention Center in Tel-Aviv

Ziv Raviv, PhD

7.1.5       Inspiration From Dr. Maureen Cronin’s Achievements in Applying Genomic Sequencing to Cancer Diagnostics

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.1.6       Personalized Medicine: Cancer Cell Biology and Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS)

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2 Personalized Medicine and Genomics

7.2.1       Cancer Genomics – Leading the Way by Cancer Genomics Program at UC Santa Cruz

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2.2       Whole exome somatic mutations analysis of malignant melanoma contributes to the development of personalized cancer therapy for this disease

Ziv Raviv, PhD

7.2.3       Genotype-based Analysis for Cancer Therapy using Large-scale Data Modeling: Nayoung Kim, PhD(c)

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2.4         Cancer Genomic Precision Therapy: Digitized Tumor’s Genome (WGSA) Compared with Genome-native Germ Line: Flash-frozen specimen and Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded Specimen Needed

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2.5         LEADERS in Genome Sequencing of Genetic Mutations for Therapeutic Drug Selection in Cancer Personalized Treatment: Part 2

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.2.6       Ethical Concerns in Personalized Medicine: BRCA1/2 Testing in Minors and Communication of Breast Cancer Risk

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

7.3  Personalized Medicine and Targeted Therapy

7.3.1     The Development of siRNA-Based Therapies for Cancer

Ziv Raviv, PhD

7.3.2       mRNA interference with cancer expression

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

7.3.3       CD47: Target Therapy for Cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

7.3.4      Targeting Mitochondrial-bound Hexokinase for Cancer Therapy

Ziv Raviv, PhD

7.3.5       GSK for Personalized Medicine using Cancer Drugs needs Alacris systems biology model to determine the in silico effect of the inhibitor in its “virtual clinical trial”

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.3.6         Personalized Pancreatic Cancer Treatment Option

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.3.7        New scheme to routinely test patients for inherited cancer genes

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

7.3.8        Targeting Untargetable Proto-Oncogenes

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.3.9        The Future of Translational Medicine with Smart Diagnostics and Therapies: PharmacoGenomics 

Demet Sag, PhD

7.4 Personalized Medicine in Specific Cancers

7.4.1      Personalized medicine and Colon cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

7.4.2      Comprehensive Genomic Characterization of Squamous Cell Lung Cancers

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

7.4.3        Targeted Tumor-Penetrating siRNA Nanocomplexes for Credentialing the Ovarian Cancer Oncogene ID4

Sudipta Saha, PhD

7.4.4        Cancer and Bone: low magnitude vibrations help mitigate bone loss

Ritu Saxena, PhD

7.4.5         New Prostate Cancer Screening Guidelines Face a Tough Sell, Study Suggests

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Part III

Translational Medicine, Genomics, and New Technologies Converge to Improve Early Detection

Diagnosis, Detection And Biomarkers

Chapter 8:  Diagnosis Diagnosis: Prostate Cancer

8.1        Prostate Cancer Molecular Diagnostic Market – the Players are: SRI Int’l, Genomic Health w/Cleveland Clinic, Myriad Genetics w/UCSF, GenomeDx and BioTheranostics

Aviva Lev-Ari PhD RN

8.2         Today’s fundamental challenge in Prostate cancer screening

Dror Nir, PhD

Diagnosis & Guidance: Prostate Cancer

8.3      Prostate Cancers Plunged After USPSTF Guidance, Will It Happen Again?

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Diagnosis, Guidance and Market Aspects: Prostate Cancer

8.4       New Prostate Cancer Screening Guidelines Face a Tough Sell, Study Suggests

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Diagnossis: Lung Cancer

8.5      Diagnosing lung cancer in exhaled breath using gold nanoparticles

Tilda Barliya PhD

Chapter 9:  Detection

Detection: Prostate Cancer

9.1     Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: American Urological Association (AUA) Guideline

Dror Nir, PhD

Detection: Breast & Ovarian Cancer

9.2       Testing for Multiple Genetic Mutations via NGS for Patients: Very Strong Family History of Breast & Ovarian Cancer, Diagnosed at Young Ages, & Negative on BRCA Test

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Detection: Aggressive Prostate Cancer

9.3     A Blood Test to Identify Aggressive Prostate Cancer: a Discovery @ SRI International, Menlo Park, CA

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Diagnostic Markers & Screening as Diagnosis Method

9.4      Combining Nanotube Technology and Genetically Engineered Antibodies to Detect Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

Stephen J. Williams, PhD

Detection: Ovarian Cancer

9.5      Warning signs may lead to better early detection of ovarian cancer

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

9.6       Knowing the tumor’s size and location, could we target treatment to THE ROI by applying imaging-guided intervention?

Dror Nir, PhD

Chapter 10:  Biomarkers

                                                Biomarkers: Pancreatic Cancer

10.1        Mesothelin: An early detection biomarker for cancer (By Jack Andraka)

Tilda Barliya, PhD

Biomarkers: All Types of Cancer, Genomics and Histology

10.2                  Stanniocalcin: A Cancer Biomarker

Aashir Awan, PhD

10.3         Breast Cancer: Genomic Profiling to Predict Survival: Combination of Histopathology and Gene Expression Analysis

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Biomarkers: Pancreatic Cancer

10.4         Biomarker tool development for Early Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer: Van Andel Institute and Emory University

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

10.5     Early Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer Identified

Prabodh Kandala, PhD

Biomarkers: Head and Neck Cancer

10.6        Head and Neck Cancer Studies Suggest Alternative Markers More Prognostically Useful than HPV DNA Testing

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

10.7      Opens Exome Service for Rare Diseases & Advanced Cancer @Mayo Clinic’s OncoSpire

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

Diagnostic Markers and Screening as Diagnosis Methods

10.8         In Search of Clarity on Prostate Cancer Screening, Post-Surgical Followup, and Prediction of Long Term Remission

Larry H Bernstein, MD, FCAP

Chapter 11  Imaging In Cancer

11.1  Introduction by Dror Nir, PhD

11.2  Ultrasound

11.2.1        2013 – YEAR OF THE ULTRASOUND

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.2      Imaging: seeing or imagining? (Part 1)

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.3        Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: American Urological Association (AUA) Guideline

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.4        Today’s fundamental challenge in Prostate cancer screening

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.5       State of the art in oncologic imaging of Prostate

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.6        From AUA 2013: “HistoScanning”- aided template biopsies for patients with previous negative TRUS biopsies

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.7     On the road to improve prostate biopsy

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.8       Ultrasound imaging as an instrument for measuring tissue elasticity: “Shear-wave Elastography” VS. “Strain-Imaging”

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.9       What could transform an underdog into a winner?

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.10        Ultrasound-based Screening for Ovarian Cancer

Dror Nir, PhD

11.2.11        Imaging Guided Cancer-Therapy – a Discipline in Need of Guidance

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3   MRI & PET/MRI

11.3.1     Introducing smart-imaging into radiologists’ daily practice

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.2     Imaging: seeing or imagining? (Part 2)

[Part 1 is included in the ultrasound section above]

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.3    Imaging-guided biopsies: Is there a preferred strategy to choose?

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.4     New clinical results support Imaging-guidance for targeted prostate biopsy

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.5      Whole-body imaging as cancer screening tool; answering an unmet clinical need?

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.6        State of the art in oncologic imaging of Lymphoma

Dror Nir, PhD

11.3.7      A corner in the medical imaging’s ECO system

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4  CT, Mammography & PET/CT 

11.4.1      Causes and imaging features of false positives and false negatives on 18F-PET/CT in oncologic imaging

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.2     Minimally invasive image-guided therapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.3        Improving Mammography-based imaging for better treatment planning

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.4       Closing the Mammography gap

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.5       State of the art in oncologic imaging of lungs

Dror Nir, PhD

11.4.6       Ovarian Cancer and fluorescence-guided surgery: A report

Tilda Barliya, PhD

11.5  Optical Coherent Tomography (OCT)

11.5.1       Optical Coherent Tomography – emerging technology in cancer patient management

Dror Nir, PhD

11.5.2     New Imaging device bears a promise for better quality control of breast-cancer lumpectomies – considering the cost impact

Dror Nir, PhD

11.5.3        Virtual Biopsy – is it possible?

Dror Nir, PhD

11.5.4      New development in measuring mechanical properties of tissue

Dror Nir, PhD

Chapter 12. Nanotechnology Imparts New Advances in Cancer Treatment,  Detection, and Imaging  

12.1     DNA Nanotechnology

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.2     Nanotechnology, personalized medicine and DNA sequencing

Tilda Barliya, PhD       

12.3     Nanotech Therapy for Breast Cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.4     Prostate Cancer and Nanotecnology

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.5     Nanotechnology: Detecting and Treating metastatic cancer in the lymph node

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.6     Nanotechnology Tackles Brain Cancer

Tilda Barliya, PhD

12.7     Lung Cancer (NSCLC), drug administration and nanotechnology

Tilda Barliya, PhD

Volume Epilogue by Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FACP

Epilogue: Envisioning New Insights in Cancer Translational Biology

Larry H. Berstein, MD, FACP

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MGH & BWH Researchers: Brains of cognitively normal older individuals carrying the APOE4 gene variant – association between lower weight and more extensive deposits of the Alzheimer’s-associated protein beta-amyloid

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

While the concept of a preclinical version of Alzheimer’s disease is theoretical and not yet being used to guide clinical diagnosis or treatment, the current hypothesis involves three stages. Individuals at stage 1 are cognitively normal but have elevated amyloid deposits; stage 2 adds evidence of neurodegeneration, such as elevated tau deposits or characteristic loss of certain brain tissues, with no cognitive symptoms; and stage 3 adds cognitive changes that, while still in a normal range, indicate a decline for that individual. The current study is part of the MGH-based Harvard Aging Brain Study (HABS), designed to identify markers that predict who is likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and how soon symptoms are likely to develop.

This investigation explored the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and beta amyloid levels in the brains of the first 280 participants to enroll in HABS, who were ages 62 to 90, cognitively normal and in good general health. Participants’ initial enrollment data included medical histories; physical exams; testing for the presence of APOE4, the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s; and PET imaging with Pittsburgh compound B (PiB), which can visualize amyloid plaques in the brain.

After adjusting for factors including age, sex, education and APOE4 status, researchers found that having a lower BMI was associated with greater retention of PiB, indicating more extensive amyloid deposits in the brain. The association was most pronounced in normal-weight participants, who were the group with the lowest BMI in the study. Analysis focused on APOE status revealed that the association between lower BMI and greater PiB retention was particularly significant for individuals with the APOE4 gene variant, which is associated with increased Alzheimer’s disease risk.

SOURCE

MGH News Release

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Lower weight in late life may increase risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

http://www.massgeneral.org/News/pressrelease.aspx?id=1970

 

Other related articles published in this Open Access Online Scientific Journal include the following:

 

Alzheimer’s Disease: Novel Therapeutical Approaches — Articles of Note @PharmaceuticalIntelligence.com

Curators: Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP and Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

https://pharmaceuticalintelligence.com/2016/04/05/alzheimers-disease-novel-therapeutical-approaches-articles-of-note-pharmaceuticalintelligence-com/

Read Full Post »


Breast Cancer Screening Imaging Technology:  2D Mammography vs Combination of 3D and 2D Mammography vs Combination of 3D and Synthetic 2D – Smaller, invasive cancers detection achieved

 

Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN

 

Mean tumor size for the 46 invasive cancers detected with both 2D mammography alone and a combination of 2D and 3D mammography was 12.7 mm, while the mean tumor size for the 28 invasive cancers detected only by a combination of 2D and 3D mammography was 11.6 mm

 

Smaller, invasive cancers

The study included 9,672 asymptomatic women screened during the time frame. The exams were interpreted in two parallel double readings that were performed consecutively, starting with 2D exams followed by combination exams (Lancet, June 23, 2016).

In these women, 90 cancers were identified, 74 of which were invasive. The cancer detection rate for the combination of 3D and 2D mammography was 8.5 cancers per 1,000 screens, while the rate for the combination of 3D and synthetic 2D was 8.8 cancers per 1,000 screens — both significantly higher than 2D mammography alone, with a rate of 6.3 per 1,000 screens.

The combination of 3D and 2D mammography also found invasive cancers that were smaller, Bernardi’s group wrote: Mean tumor size for the 46 invasive cancers detected with both 2D mammography alone and a combination of 2D and 3D mammography was 12.7 mm, while the mean tumor size for the 28 invasive cancers detected only by a combination of 2D and 3D mammography was 11.6 mm.

Dr. Nehmat Houssami, PhD

Dr. Nehmat Houssami, PhD.

That synthetic 2D mammography images proved comparable to those acquired in addition to the 3D images is good news for women in terms of minimizing their radiation exposure, as creating synthetic 2D exams from the 3D data means that a separate 2D exam doesn’t have to be performed, according to corresponding author Dr. Nehmat Houssami, PhD, of the University of Sydney.

“Future evaluation of 3D in screening practice should consider using 3D mammography only with reconstructed 2D images to avoid double acquisitions,” she toldAuntMinnie.com via email.

Still, the study results need to be taken with a grain of salt, Houssami emphasized.

“Clearly, screening with 3D plus 2D finds more cancer cases than 2D alone, but we still do not know to what extent that will improve the longer-term outcomes for women,” she noted. “Some of the additional cancers found only on 3D may confer screening benefit by reducing risk of breast cancer death, but some may be overdiagnosed cases that bring no additional benefit and possibly harm.”

Sequential structure

To best compare standard 2D mammography with the combinations of 2D plus 3D and synthetic 2D plus 3D, the study included sequential reads and duplicate double reads. But this technique also increased both breast cancer detection and false-positive recalls across all exam readings, according to the researchers.

“The sequential screen readings might have affected the estimated false-positive recall proportions,” they wrote.

So how might this study limitation be addressed? Directly integrating screening 2D/3D mammography (with synthetic 2D images or not) and using arbitration techniques for discordant readings could reduce the false-positive rate, Bernardi’s team wrote. And more practice reading synthetic 2D images wouldn’t hurt, either.

“We also expect that increasing experience with 2D synthetic/3Dmammography could further reduce false-positive recall,” the researchers concluded.

SOURCE

http://www.auntminnie.com/index.aspx?sec=sup&sub=wom&pag=dis&ItemID=114687

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Imaging  Living Cells and Devices, Presentation by Danut Dragoi, PhD, LPBI group

Imaging living cells is for a good number of years a hot place in Biology, Physics, Chemistry as well as Engineering and Technology for producing specific devices to visualize living cells. In this presentation is shown my opinion on this topic regarding actual status of applied technology for visualizing living cells as well as small small areas of interest.

Slide #1

Slide1

Slide #2

Slide2

As an overview, slide #2 describes: higher resolution imaging of living cells based on advanced CT and MicroCT scanners, and their actual technological trend,  advanced optical microscopy, optical magnetic imaging of living cells, and conclusion.

Slide #3

Slide3

Slide #3 describes a schematic of a computing tomography applied to a single cell, see the inside URL address. The work is in progress as a SBIR application of a group of researchers from Arizona State.The partial section of the cell is supposed to  reveal the contents of the cell, which is very important in Biology and Medicine.

Slide #4

Slide4

Slide #4 describes the principle of computed tomography for relative small objects that are expose by a soft x-ray source on the left, an x-ray detector screen that takes the x-ray projection radiography for the sample on the right. The sample is rotated discretely a small number of degrees and pictures recorded. Depending on the absorption of the sample, the reconstructed 3D object is possible. The resolution of the reconstructed object is a function of the number of pixels as well as the pitch distance d (in the slide 0.127 microns). Because the sample is rotated, the precision of the axis of rotation is very important and becomes a challenging task for small objects.

Slide #5

Slide5

Slide #5 shows a sample taken from the URL address given below the picture. It represents an insect and the future CT development is expected to produce similar images for mono living cells.

Slide #6

Slide6

For many Bio-labs the reverse optical microscope is the working horse. The slide above shows a such microscope with a culture cell inside a transparent box. The picture can be found at the address shown inside the slide.

Slide #7

Slide7

Slide #7 describes an innovative digital microscope from Keyence in which we can observe any object entirely in focus, a 20x greater depth-of-field than an optical microscope, we can view objects from any angle, and measure lengths directly on screen.

Slide #8

Slide8

Slide #8 shows an actual innovative digital microscope from Keyence, see the website address at the bottom of the slide.

Slide #9

Slide9

As we know, the samples visualized by a common optical microscope have to be flat on the surface to be visualized because there is no clear image above and below the focal plane, which is the surface of the sample. For a con-focal microscope the situation is changed. Objects can be visualized at different depths and image files recorded can reconstruct as 3D image object.

Slide #10

Slide10

Slide #10 describes the principle of a con-focal microscope, in which a green laser on left side excites molecules of the specimen at a given depth of focusing, the molecules emit on red light (less energetic than green light) that go all way to the photo-multiplier, which has a small pinhole aperture in front of it that limits the entrance of red rays (parasitic light) from out of range area. More details can be found at the URL address given at the bottom of the slide.

Slide #11

Confocal microscopy Leica

Slide #11 shows a sample of a living specimen taken with a Leica micro-system, see the website address inside the slide.

Slide #12

Slide12

Slide #12 shows the principle of fluorescent microscope and how it works. A light source is filtered to allow blue light (energetic photons for excitation of the molecules of the specimen), the green light emitted is going through objective and ocular lenses and further to the photo-multiplier or digital camera.

Slide #13

Slide13

For their discovery of fluorescent microscopy, Eric Betzig, William Moerner and Stefan Hell won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on 2014,  for “the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy,” which brings optical microscopy into the nano-dimension.

Slide #14

Slide14

Slide #14 introduces the improvement on micro CT scanners for imaging living cells which now is on R & D under heavy development.  The goal is to visualize the interior of living cells. Challenging tasks are: miniaturization, respond to customer needs, low cost, and versatility.

Slide #15

Slide15

Slide #15 shows the schematic for an optical magnetic imaging microscope for visualizing living cells with one dimension less than 500 nm. The website address gven describes in details the working principle.

Slide #16

Slide16

Slide #16 shows the picture of a hand held microscope that is useful on finding spot cancer in moments, ses the website.

Slide #17

Slide17

Slide #17 shows a hand held MRI that connects to an iPhone. It is useful device for detecting cancer cells.

Slide #18

Slide18

Slide #18 shows in comparison a portable NMR device, left side, and a Lab NMR instrument whose height is greater than 5 Ft. The spectrum in the left side is that of Toluene and a capillary sample holder is shown also next to the magnetic device.

Slide #19

Slide19

Slide #19 shows that the hand held MRI can recognize complex molecules,  can diagnose cancer faster, can be connected to a smartphone, and be accurate on precise measurements.

Slide #20

Slide20

An optical dental camera is shown in slide #20. It is less then $100 and a USB cable can connect to a computer. It is very useful for every family in checking the status of the teeth and gums.

Slide #21

Slide21

For detecting dental cavities the x-ray source packaged as a camera and the sensor that connects to a computer are very useful tools in a dental office.

Slide #22

Slide22

Slide #22 shows the conclusions of the presentation, in which we summarize: the automated con-focal microscope partially satisfies the actual needs for imaging of living cells, the optical magnetic imaging microscope for living cells is a promising technique,
a higher resolution is needed on all actual microscopes,  the advanced CT and Micro CT scanners provide a new avenue on the investigation of living cells, more research needed
on hand-held MRI, which is a new solution for complex molecules recognition including cancer

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Medical Applications of Nano Magnetite

Author: Danut Dragoi, PhD

Nano magnetite refers to small crystals of Fe3O4 in nano-metric range that preserves some specific magnetic properties of the magnetite bulk crystal such as the magnetism at saturation, Curie temperature, coercive magnetic force, hysteresis loop, etc. A discussion of medical applications of nano-magnetic particles is shown in here.

Opportunities for magnetite nanoparticles to be effectively incorporated into environmental contaminant removal and cell separation ([1] Honda et al., 1998;[2] Ebner et al.,1999; [3] Rikers et al., 1998; [4] Navratil, 2003), magnetically guided-drug delivery (Roger et al., 1999), magnetocytolysis ([5] Roger et al., 1999), sealing agents (liquid O-rings) ([6] Enzel et al., 1999), dampening and cooling mechanisms in loudspeakers ([6] Enzel et al., 1999), and contrasting agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ([7] Schütt, 2004). Advancement of synthesis and stabilization procedures towards production of uniformly sized, dispersed (potentially embedded) magnetite nanoparticles has clearly inspired creative imagination and application in various fields. The following subsections address two topics, magnetic guided drug delivery and magnetic resonance tomography which  helps us  better understanding the capabilities offered by magnetite nanoparticles.

Magnetically Guided Drug Delivery

Ferrofluids containing encapsulated (with biologically compatible surface chemistries) magnetite nanoparticles, as described above, can be employed for drug delivery to specific locations. Exploitation of superparamagnetic magnetization of magnetite nanoparticles allows for “magnetic dragging” of internal (present in bloodstream or elsewhere) magnetite nanoparticles carrying DNA, enzymes, drugs to target-areas. Similarly, biological effectors, which are proteins (containing DNA specific to target cells) incorporated into encapsulated nanoparticle surface functionality, allow for target cell specificity. Once biological effector carrying magnetic nanoparticles bind to target-cells, the applied magnetic field is fluctuated (approximately 1 MHz) causing magnetocytolysis, or cell destruction, which eliminates target-cells. Similarly, after being dragged to target areas, magnetocytolysis of encapsulated nanoparticles can release drugs. Research towards these ends is currently being heavily investigated as potential for novel drug/cancer treatment abounds. ([5] Roger et al., 1999). Picture below shows schematically drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles targeting for tumor therapy in which the magnetic nanoparticles are noninvasively moved toward the target.

Drug loaded NanoParicles

Image SOURCE:https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=oX32CwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA425&ots=1EDRtu7mDx&sig=fYjckTZEyXCkOBb4sjRAuWSR_U4#v=onepage&q&f=false

Magnetic Resonance Tomography

Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) permits noninvasive visualization of cross-sectional images of the human body, tissues, and organs ([7] Schütt, 2004). The MRT technique provides better tissue resolution than traditional radiation based technologies; with addition of contrasting agents, this resolution can be further enhanced ([8] Shao et al., 2005). Magnetite nanoparticles (in ferrofluid form) are powerful contrasting agents due to their paramagnetic magnetization. Ferrofluid physico-morphosis under magnetic field Blaney 65 Human bloodstreams readily reject the nanoparticle colloidal solution, which quickly passes into the liver ([8] Shao et al., 2005). Consequently, ferrofluids have thus far only been useful in distinguishing between healthy and malignant liver cells. This limitation can be overcome through functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles with various ligands that allows for organ-specific transport; therefore, MRT imaging of various bodily organs can be possible. Furthermore, polymeric (i.e., polyethylene oxide – PEO) coating of functionalized magnetite particles permits ferrofluids longer bloodstream retention. ([7] Schütt, 2004) PEO coatings are applied through magnetite interaction with copolymer PEO-polypeptide; polypeptides interact with the positively charged magnetite surface and provide nanoparticle masking to allow longer bloodstream residence. These coated magnetite nanoparticles could also be employed as extremely efficient capsules for drug delivery systems, which are discussed by ([7] Schütt, 2004).

References

[1] Honda H, Kawabe A, Shinkai M, and Kobayashi T (1998). Development of chitosan-conjugated magnetite for magnetic cell separation. Journal of Fermentation and Bioengineering 86, 191-196

[2] Ebner AD, Ritter JA, Ploehn HJ, Kochen RL, and Navratil JD (1999). New magnetic field-enhanced process for the treatment of aqueous wastes. Separation Science and Technology 34, 1277-1300

[3] Rikers RA, Voncken JHL, and Dalmijn WL (1998). Cr-polluted soil studied by high gradient magnetic separation and electron probe. Journal of Environmental Engineering 124, 1159-1164

[4] Navratil JD (2003). Adsorption and nanoscale magnetic separation of heavy metals from water. U.S. EPA workshop on managing arsenic risks to the environment: characterization of waste, chemistry, and treatment and disposal. Denver, CO

[5] Roger J, Pons JN, Massart R, Halbreich A, and Bacri JC (1999). Some biomedical applications of ferro fluids. Eur. Phys. J. AP 5, 321-325

[6] Enzel P, Adelman N, Beckman KJ, Campbell DJ, Ellis AB, Lisensky GC (1999). Preparation of an aqueous-based ferrofluid. J. Chem. Educ. 76, 943-948

[7] Schütt D (2004). Magnetite colloids for drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Institute Angewandte Polymerforschung: thesis Selim MS, Cunningham LP, Srivastava R, Olson JM (1997). Preparation of nano-size magnetic gamma ferric oxide (γ-Fe2O3) and magnetite (Fe3O4) particles for toner and color imaging applications. Recent Progress in Toner Technologies, 108- 111

[8] Shao H, Lee H, Huang Y, Kwak BK, and Kim CO (2005). Synthesis of nano-size magnetite coated with chitosan for MRI contrast agent by sonochemistry. Magnetics Conference, 2005. INTERMAG Asia 2005. Digests of the IEEE International, 461-462

https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=oX32CwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA425&ots=1EDRtu7mDx&sig=fYjckTZEyXCkOBb4sjRAuWSR_U4#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

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Problem of Science Doctorate Programs

Larry H. Bernstein, MD, FCAP, Curator

LPBI

 

 

The Problem in Biomedical Education

Henry Bourne (UCSF)

Dr. Henry Bourne has trained graduate students and postdocs at UCSF for over 40 years. In his iBiology talk, he discusses the imminent need for change in graduate education. With time to degrees getting longer, the biomedical community needs to create experimental graduate programs to find more effective and low cost ways to train future scientists and run successful laboratories. If we don’t start looking for solutions, the future of the biomedical enterprise will grow increasingly unstable.

Watch Henry Bourne’s iBioMagazine: The Problem in Biomedical Education

https://youtu.be/V9peRqNr-L0

Henry Bourne is Professor Emeritus and former chair of the Department of Pharmacology at the University of California – San Francisco. His research focused on trimeric G-proteins, G-protein coupled receptors, and the cellular signals responsible for polarity and direction-finding of human leukocytes. He is the author of several books including a memoir, Ambition and Delight, and has written extensively about graduate training and biomedical workforce issues. Now Dr. Bourne’s research focuses on the organization and founding of US biomedical research in the early 20th century.

Related Talks

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