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Posts Tagged ‘Patient care’


Expanding 3D Printing in Cardiology

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

3D printing is a fabrication technique used to transform digital objects into physical models, which builds structures of arbitrary geometry by depositing material in successive layers on the basis of specific digital design. Even though, the use of 3D bioprinting in cardiovascular medicine is relatively new development, advancement within this discipline is occurring at such a rapid rate. Most cardiologists believed the costs would be too high for routine use such that the price tag was better for academic applications.

Now as the prices are starting to lower, the idea of using 3D printed models of organs vessels and tissue manufactured based on CT, MRI and echocardiography might be beneficial according to Dr. Fadi Matar, professor at University of South Florida. He and his cardiology colleagues use 3D printed models to allow them to view patient’s complex anatomies before deciding what treatments to pursue. The models allow them to calculate the size and exact placement of devices which has led to shorter procedure time and better outcome.

In a study published in Academic Radiology, David Ballard, professor at University School of Medicine appraised the costs of setting up a 3D printing lab including the commercial printer plus software, lab space, materials and staffing. According to Ballard’s team, the commercial printers start at $12,000 but can be as high as high as $500,000.

According to American Medical Association-approved Category III Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes allows cardiology relief from setting up a new 3D printing lab such as Codes 0559T and 0560T, for individually prepared 3D-printed anatomical models with one or more components (including arteries and veins) and Codes 0561T and 0562T, which are for the production of personalized 3D-printed cutting or drilling tools that use patient imaging data and often are used to guide or facilitate surgery.

These codes have been met with enthusiasm by teams eyeing 3D printing, but there are noteworthy limitations to Category III codes—which are temporary codes describing emerging technologies, services and procedures that are used for tracking effectiveness data. It is important to note that Category III codes are not reimbursed but often are a step toward reimbursement.

New and improved materials also might lead to a sharper focus on 3D printing in cardiology. Dr. Fadi Matar says companies are working on materials that better mimic elements of the heart. Such “mimicry” ought to enhance the value of 3D-printed models since they will give cardiologists more realistic insights into how specific devices will interact with an individual patient’s heart. Even with the complex modalities of using 3D bioprinting, in time there would be less obstacles to being able to set up a 3D bioprinter lab.

SOURCE

https://www.cardiovascularbusiness.com/topics/cardiovascular-imaging/seeing-future-3d-new-cpt-codes-set-stage-expanding-3d-printing

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3D Printing Used as New Tool for Radiologists

Reporter: Irina Robu, PhD

3D printing is a technique that has gained immense popularity for its ability to create 3D structures in art, jewelry, engineering, medicine. In this case, radiologists use 3D printing to transform a 2D scan into 3D visualization of a patient’s anatomy. Radiologists use their unique skills to visualize the anatomy of the organs of interest which give them a large advantage in communicating with patients as well as surgical teams.
The 3D printed anatomical models have proved valuable in providing a better understanding of complex anatomies and being used as a tangible aid for pre-surgical planning. It gives the patient a clear understanding of what is happening and it provides a great value when it comes to patient specific care. However, 3D modelling is essential at the beginning but it can also be a useful tool for surgeons. The list of medical 3D printing benefits is infinite. Just recently, a scientific team at University of Minnesota constructed their own patient specific 3D organ model based on MRI scans and prostate tissue samples of patients. The organs allow surgeons to plan and rehearse surgery.
In addition to researchers at University of Minnesota, Siemens Health engineers also created a platform to make medical apps that can be accessible throughout hospitals. In addition, Siemens Health partnered up with Materialise to make 3D printing software an integral part of the radiology workflow.
Hence, using 3D bioprinting is a desirable path to follow for radiologist. Not only they get to interpret anatomy, but now they can use 3D bioprinting as a state of the art tool that empower them to provide immense value to an audience that stretches from patient to practitioner.

SOURCE

https://www.bioportfolio.com/news/article/4177601/3D-Printing-Used-as-New-Tool-for-Radiologists.html

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